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English

Spring 2007


General Education Info: GFR | GEP (for students starting Fall 2007)

          All sections of ENGL 100 are
          technologically enhanced.


ENGL 100  Composition                                             3 credits

          Grade Method: REG
          GEP/GFR:Satisfies Eng Comp Req.
[2441] 0101 MWF........9:00am- 9:50am (FA  001)       BURNS, M
[2442] 0201 MW.........2:30pm- 3:45pm (ITE 237)       BLOOM, R
[2443] 0301 M..........7:10pm- 9:40pm (FA  001)       TERHORST, R
[2444] 0401 MWF.......10:00am-10:50am (FA  001)       MCGURRIN JR, A
[2445] 0501 M..........5:30pm- 6:45pm (FA  001)       PEKARSKE, N
            W..........5:30pm- 6:45pm (ENGR122)
[2446] 0601 M..........4:00pm- 5:15pm (FA  001)       KIDD, K
            W..........4:00pm- 5:15pm (ENGR122)
[2447] 0701 MWF.......11:00am-11:50am (FA  001)       BROFMAN, M
[2449] 0901 MW.........1:00pm- 2:15pm (SOND112)       DUNNIGAN, B
[2450] 1001 TuTh.......8:30am- 9:45am (FA  001)       FINDLAY, J
[2451] 1101 TuTh.......8:30am- 9:45am (SOND113)       WALTERS, A
[2452] 1201 TuTh......10:00am-11:15am (FA  001)       PUTZEL, D
[2453] 1301 TuTh......10:00am-11:15am (ITE 231)       WALTERS, A
[2454] 1401 TuTh.......2:30pm- 3:45pm (FA  001)       ROCKETT, D
[2455] 1501 TuTh......11:30am-12:45pm (ENGR104)       KILLGALLON, D
[2456] 1601 TuTh......11:30am-12:45pm (FA  001)       PUTZEL, D
[2457] 1701 TuTh.......4:00pm- 5:15pm (FA  001)       SCHMIDT, V
[2458] 1801 W..........7:10pm- 9:40pm (FA  001)       WALTERS, A
[2459] 1901 Th.........7:10pm- 9:40pm (FA  001)       MACEK, P
[2460] 2001 Tu.........7:10pm- 9:40pm (FA  001)       WILKINSON, R
[2461] 2101 MW.........2:30pm- 3:45pm (FA  001)       MCGURRIN JR, A


ENGL 100A Composition                                             4 credits

          Grade Method: REG/AUD
          GEP/GFR:Satisfies  Eng Comp Req.  Students
          enrolled  in ENGL100A will  be required to
          sign  up for one  hour/week in the writing
          lab. This is a computer environment.
[2462] 0101 MWF........9:00am- 9:50am (SOND203)       DUNNIGAN, B
            M.........11:00am-11:50am (FA  002) LAB
[2463] 0102 MWF........9:00am- 9:50am (SOND203)       DUNNIGAN, B
            W.........11:00am-11:50am (FA  002) LAB
[2464] 0201 MWF.......10:00am-10:50am (SOND207)       BROFMAN, M
            M..........9:00am- 9:50am (FA  002) LAB
[2465] 0202 MWF.......10:00am-10:50am (SOND207)       BROFMAN, M
            W..........9:00am- 9:50am (FA  002) LAB
[2466] 0301 MW.........1:00pm- 2:15pm (ITE 237)       BLOOM, R
            M.........10:00am-10:50am (FA  002) LAB
[2467] 0302 MW.........1:00pm- 2:15pm (ITE 237)       BLOOM, R
            W.........10:00am-10:50am (FA  002) LAB
[2468] 0401 TuTh.......1:00pm- 2:15pm (SOND105)       SCHMIDT, V
            Tu........12:00pm-12:50pm (FA  002) LAB
[2469] 0402 TuTh.......1:00pm- 2:15pm (SOND105)       SCHMIDT, V
            Th........12:00pm-12:50pm (FA  002) LAB
[2472] 0601 TuTh.......8:30am- 9:45am (ENGR104)       KILLGALLON, D
            Tu........10:00am-10:50am (ENGR104) LAB
[2473] 0602 TuTh.......8:30am- 9:45am (ENGR104)       KILLGALLON, D
            Th........10:00am-10:50am (ENGR104) LAB


ENGL 110  Composition for ESL Students                            3 credits

(PermReq) Grade Method: REG
          GEP/GFR:Satisfies  Eng Comp Req.  Students
          need  permission  from Dr.  Paul Taylor in
          the  English  Language Center  or from the
          instructor.
[2478] 0101 MW.........2:30pm- 3:45pm (FA  530)       COLLINS, E
            M..........1:00pm- 1:50pm (FA  002) LAB
[2479] 0102 MW.........2:30pm- 3:45pm (FA  530)       COLLINS, E
            W..........1:00pm- 1:50pm (FA  002) LAB


ENGL 190  The World of Language I (AH)                            3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
          GEP:N/A.  GFR:Meets AH.   Through December
          3,   this  course  is  open  only  to  MLL
          declared  majors (permission required from
          the  MLL  office).  After December  3, all
          students   may   enroll   without  seeking
          permission.
[2480] 0101 MW.........7:10pm- 8:25pm (LH1 ...)       WESTPHAL, G


ENGL 210A Introduction to Literature (AH)                         3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
          GEP:N/A. GFR:Meets AH.  This course offers
          an  introduction to the three major genres
          of  literature: fiction, poetry and drama.
          Using  a range of  examples from different
          literary  periods, the course explores the
          distinctive characteristics of each genre,
          and  introduces key  critical concepts for
          analyzing works of literature.
[2482] 0101 TuTh......10:00am-11:15am (ACIV013)       FINDLAY, J


ENGL 210B Introduction to Literature (AH)                         3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
          GEP:N/A. GFR:Meets AH.  As an introduction
          to  literature,  ENGL  210  covers  drama,
          prose  fiction, and poetry  in that order.
          We  discuss plays from the classical Greek
          period,  and  Elizabethan period,  and the
          Modern American period.
[2483] 0101 W..........7:10pm- 9:40pm (ACIV015)       SCALIA, B


ENGL 226  Grammar and Usage of Standard English (AH)              3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
          GEP:N/A. GFR:Meets AH.
[2484] 0101 MWF.......10:00am-10:50am (SOND110)       HARRIS, L


ENGL 241  Currents in British Literature (AH)                     3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
          GEP:N/A.  GFR:Meets AH.   This course will
          explore the theme and act of confession in
          British  and  American  poetry,  drama and
          prose   with   a   glance  at  the  recent
          popularity   of  genres  like  memoir  and
          "reality"   TV   that   highlight   public
          exposure  of  private  lives.  Authors may
          include  Sylvia Plath,  Peter Shaffer, and
          Frank McCourt.
[2485] 0101 MW.........4:00pm- 5:15pm (ACIV145)       PEKARSKE, N


ENGL 243  Currents in American Literature (AH)                    3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
          GEP:N/A.  GFR:Meets AH.  Diverse Voices is
          a  class  that examines  the literature of
          ethnic  groups who write about the trials,
          tribulations  and  sometimes  triumphs  of
          becoming  American, what is  lost and what
          is  gained.   We will focus  on novels and
          memoirs  and  also  watch  a  few  movies.
          Authors  may include Maxine Hong Kingston,
          Louise  Erdrich,  T.C.   Boyle,  and James
          Welch.
[2486] 0101 TuTh.......8:30am- 9:45am (ACIV145)       BENSON, L


ENGL 250  Introduction to Shakespeare (AH)                        3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
          GEP:N/A. GFR:Meets AH.
[2487] 0101 TuTh......11:30am-12:45pm (FA  015)       ORGELFINGER, G


ENGL 271  Introduction to Creative Writing - Fiction              3 credits
          (AH)                                              

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
          GEP:N/A. GFR:Meets AH.
[2488] 0101 W..........7:10pm- 9:40pm (ITE 237)       SAWYERS, S


ENGL 273  Introduction to Creative Writing - Poetry               3 credits
          (AH)                                              

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
          GEP:N/A. GFR:Meets AH.
[2489] 0101 MWF........9:00am- 9:50am (FA  440)       MCGURRIN JR, A


ENGL 291  Introduction to Writing Creative Essays                 3 credits
          (AH)                                              

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
          GEP:N/A. GFR:Meets AH.
[2490] 0101 TuTh......11:30am-12:45pm (SOND105)       BENSON, L
[2491] 0201 TuTh.......2:30pm- 3:45pm (SOND208)       SHIVNAN, S
[2492] 0301 MW.........2:30pm- 3:45pm (FA  015)       MABE, M


ENGL 301  Analysis of Literary Language                           3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
[2493] 0101 MW.........1:00pm- 2:15pm (SOND209)       SMITH, O
[2495] 0301 TuTh......11:30am-12:45pm (ACIV210)       FARABAUGH, R


ENGL 303  The Art of the Essay                                    3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
[2496] 0101 TuTh.......2:30pm- 3:45pm (SOND112)       FARABAUGH, R


ENGL 304  British Literature: Medieval and                        3 credits
          Renaissance                                       

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
[2497] 0101 TuTh......10:00am-11:15am (SOND003)       FALCO, R


ENGL 305  British Literature: Restoration to                      3 credits
          Romantic                                          

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD COURSE WILL MEET
          IN FA 215.
[2498] 0101 MW.........2:30pm- 3:45pm (SOND204)       SMITH, O


ENGL 306  British Literature: Victorian and Modern                3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
[2499] 0101 MW.........1:00pm- 2:15pm (SOND205)       FERNANDEZ, J


ENGL 307  American Literature: from New World                     3 credits
          Contact to the Civil War                          

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
[2500] 0101 MW.........4:00pm- 5:15pm (BIOL120)       HOLTON, A


ENGL 308  American Literature: The Civil War to 1945              3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
[2501] 0101 TuTh.......1:00pm- 2:15pm (SOND110)       GWIAZDA, P


ENGL 320  Topics in Communication and Technology                  3 credits
          Topics in Communication and Technology            

(PermReq) Grade  Method:  REG/P-F/AUD  Permission of
          Acting Chair required-corbett@umbc.edu. In
          this  course  we  will examine  the memoir
          through both reading and writing.  We will
          read  a selection of contemporary memoirs,
          discussing them both as artistic creations
          and  purportedly  factual  documents.   As
          part  of the study of  the genre and craft
          of  memoir,  students  will  do  their own
          writing, ranging from in-class free-writes
          to  at home writing  exercises that invite
          experimentation  with various storytelling
          techniques.   The  final  section  of  the
          course  will investigate the issues raised
          by  translating/shaping  a  written memoir
          into  an  aural performance.  Students may
          have  an  opportunity to  participate in a
          storytelling  performance  similar  to the
          Stoop          Storytelling         Series
          (stoopstorytelling.com).
[2502] 0101 M..........6:00pm- 8:30pm (FA  440)       WEXLER, L


ENGL 322  Women and the Media: Myths, Images, and                 3 credits
          Voices (AH)                                       

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
          GEP:N/A.  GFR:Meets  AH.   Also  listed as
          AFST 347, MLL 322 and GWST 322.
[8020] 0101 TuTh......11:30am-12:45pm (PUP 208)       HAGOVSKY, E
[8036] 0301 TuTh.......1:00pm- 2:15pm (PUP 208)       HAGOVSKY, E


ENGL 324  Theories of Communication and Technology                3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
[2505] 0101 TuTh.......1:00pm- 2:15pm (FA  015)       MAHER, J


ENGL 326  The Structure of English                                3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
[2506] 0101 MWF.......11:00am-11:50am (FA  018)       FITZPATRICK, C


ENGL 332  Contemporary American Literature (AH)                   3 credits
          Fables of Identity                                

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
          GEP:N/A.  GFR:Meets AH.  In this course we
          will   examine  several  recent  works  of
          American   literature   and  culture  that
          address   "identity"   -   whether  class,
          gender,  race,  sexual or national  - as a
          rhetorical  construct.   The  reading list
          includes  fiction (Philip Roth's The Human
          Stain,  Chang-Rae  Lee's  Native Speaker),
          poetry  (Adrianne  Rich's An  Atlas of the
          Difficult    World,   Harryette   Mullen's
          Sleeping   with   the   Dictionary),   and
          drama(Tony  Kushner's  Angels  in America,
          Suzan-Lori  Parks's In the Blood). We will
          also   watch  a  couple  of  movies  (John
          Water's     Hairspray,     Spike     Lee's
          Bamboozled).  As we study  these texts, we
          will  consider  why and  how they approach
          identity  as  a problem  of representation
          and  what  they  accomplish  through their
          penetrating, unpredictable critiques.
[2507] 0101 TuTh......10:00am-11:15am (SOND105)       GWIAZDA, P


ENGL 346  Literary Themes Biblical Themes in                      3 credits
          Renaissance Texts                                 

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD This course will
          explore  the  use of  biblical material by
          early  modern  authors.  We  will  analyze
          literary  adaptations of  biblical myth in
          various  genres, charting the itinerary of
          the  myths  through the  maze of political
          contingencies,    humanist    neoclassical
          distortion,  and religious propaganda. The
          course   will  cover  the  16th  and  17th
          centuries. We will read, along others,such
          authors  as  William Tyndale,  John Donne,
          George  Herbert,  Henry Vaughan,  and John
          Milton.  The  aim  of  the  course  is  to
          familiarize      students     with     the
          extraordinary  flexibility of the biblical
          material  and to demonstrate the ingenuity
          with  which early modern  authors used the
          bible  as  a kind of  distorting mirror to
          reflect their own beliefs and ambitions.
[2508] 0101 TuTh.......1:00pm- 2:15pm (MP  010)       FALCO, R


ENGL 351  Studies in Shakespeare                                  3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
[2510] 0101 MW.........2:30pm- 3:45pm (ACIV014)       ORLIN, L


ENGL 369  Race and Ethnicity in U.S. Literature (AH)              3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
          GEP:N/A.  GFR:Meets  AH.   Topic:  Race  &
          Ethnicity  in U.S. Literature. The concept
          of  "race"  is  not  static, but  has been
          defined  differently at  various points in
          U.S.  history.  This  course  examines how
          notions   of   race   and   ethnicity  are
          represented,  contested,  and reconsidered
          in  U.S.   fiction  of  the  mid-nineteeth
          century   through   the  present.  Special
          attention   will   be  paid  to  how  race
          intersects  with  gender,  sexuality,  and
          class.  Course  readings  are  drawn  from
          writers  of a range of ethnic backgrounds.
          Possible  works include  Herman Melville's
          Benito   Cereno,  Charles  Chesnutt's  The
          Marrow   of   Tradition,   Nella  Larsen's
          Quicksand,  John  Okada's No-No  Boy, Piri
          Thomas'  Down  These  Mean  Streets, Danzy
          Senna's  Caucasia,  and  Octavia  Butler's
          Kindred.
[2511] 0101 MW.........5:30pm- 6:45pm (PUP 206)       HOLTON, A


ENGL 371  Creative Writing-Fiction                                3 credits

          Grade  Method:  REG/P-F/AUD  Prerequisite:
          ENGL  271 with a grade of "C" or better or
          permission of instructor.
[2512] 0101 TuTh.......4:00pm- 5:15pm (ITE 229)       SHIVNAN, S


ENGL 380  Introduction to News Writing                            3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
[2514] 0101 W..........6:30pm- 9:00pm (ENGR333)       WEISS, K


ENGL 386  Adult Literacy Tutoring                                 4 credits

(PermReq) Grade   Method:  REG  This  is  a  service
          learning  course  in which  students spend
          half  their time in  the college classroom
          discussing   theories  of  adult  literacy
          learning. The other half is spent tutoring
          adult   learners   in   a  Baltimore  City
          literacy  center.  This  course  is geared
          toward  undergraduates who  are interested
          in  understanding the  educational, social
          and  political  issues  surrounding  adult
          literacy   acquisition,  It  is  also  for
          students  who want to make a difference by
          engaging  in hands-on practice. Permission
          of the SHRIVER CENTER IS REQUIRED.
[2516] 0101 M..........4:30pm- 5:45pm (ACIV010)       MCCARTHY, L


ENGL 387  Web Content Development                                 3 credits

          Grade   Method:   REG/P-F/AUD  Note:  This
          course   focuses   on   the  creation  and
          organization of web content that meets the
          information  needs of end-users and serves
          the  communication purposes  of the site's
          sponsors or creators.  Students will learn
          how    to    analyze    the    information
          architecture,  navigation,  audience,  and
          usability   of   good  and  bad  websites;
          conduct   online   research   about   best
          practices;    talk    with   web   content
          developers  from a variety  of fields; and
          develop  the web content  plan for a site.
          Note:   This   course  is  crosslisted  in
          Information  Systems and English, but will
          NOT  fulfill  the requirement  of ta third
          semester  of programming for the IFSM B.A.
          Also  listed  as  IS  387.  Prerequisites:
          ENGL393   "Technical   Writing,"   ENGL391
          "Advanced Exposition and Argumentation" or
          permission of the instructor.
[8142] 0101 MW.........1:00pm- 2:15pm (ITE 468)       KOMLODI, A


ENGL 391  Advanced Exposition and Argumentation                   3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
[2517] 0101 MWF.......11:00am-11:50am (ITE 237)       BURNS, M
[2518] 0201 MW.........1:00pm- 2:15pm (MP  105)       FITZPATRICK, C
[2520] 0401 TuTh......11:30am-12:45pm (SOND101)       FINDLAY, J


ENGL 392  Tutorial in Writing                                   1-3 credits

(PermReq) Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
[2521] 0101 W..........2:00pm- 3:15pm (FA  438)       BENSON, L
[2522] 0201 W..........4:00pm- 5:15pm (FA  438)       BENSON, L
[2523] 0301 Th.........2:00pm- 3:15pm (FA  438)       BENSON, L
[2524] 0401 Tu........10:00am-11:15am (FA  444)       FALLON, M
[2525] 0501 Th........10:00am-11:15am (FA  444)       FALLON, M
[2526] 0601 Tu........11:30am-12:45pm (FA  444)       FALLON, M
[2527] 0701 Tu........11:30am-12:45pm (FA  448C)      SHIVNAN, S
[2528] 0801 Tu.........5:30pm- 6:45pm (FA  448C)      SHIVNAN, S
[2529] 0901 Th........11:30am-12:45pm (FA  448C)      SHIVNAN, S
[2530] 1001 F..........1:00pm- 2:15pm (FA  439)       FITZPATRICK, C


ENGL 393  Technical Writing                                       3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
[2536] 0101 MW.........2:30pm- 3:45pm (SOND203)       HICKERNELL, M
[2537] 0201 MWF.......11:00am-11:50am (ENGR104)       HARRIS, L
[2538] 0301 MW.........1:00pm- 2:15pm (ENGR104)       HARRIS, L
[2539] 0401 TuTh......10:00am-11:15am (ENGR122)       ROCKETT, D
[2540] 0501 TuTh.......2:30pm- 3:45pm (ENGR104)       HESS, L
[2541] 0601 TuTh......11:30am-12:45pm (ENGR122)       HESS, L
[2542] 0701 TuTh.......1:00pm- 2:15pm (ENGR104)       HESS, L
[2543] 0801 TuTh.......4:00pm- 5:15pm (ENGR104)       ROCKETT, D
[2544] 0901 W..........7:10pm- 9:40pm (ENGR104)       WEAR, M


ENGL 393E Technical Writing for ESL Students                      3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD Open to students
          whose  native  language  is  not  English.
          Completion  of ENGL100 with a grade of "C"
          or better and Junior standing required.
[2549] 0101 M..........7:10pm- 9:40pm (ENGR104)       SLYTHOMPSON, A


ENGL 398  Journalism Internship                                 1-4 credits

(PermReq) Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
[2551] 0101 Time and room to be arranged              CORBETT, C


ENGL 399H Introduction to Honors Project                           1 credit

(PermReq) Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
[2552] 0101 Time and room to be arranged              FALCO, R


ENGL 400  Special Projects in English                           1-4 credits

(PermReq) Grade Method: REG
[2553] 0101 Time and room to be arranged              EDINGER, W


ENGL 401  Methods of Interpretation                               3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
[2554] 0101 MW.........1:00pm- 2:15pm (ITE 239)       HOLTON, A
[2555] 0201 MWF.......11:00am-11:50am (ITE 239)       FERNANDEZ, J


ENGL 407  Language in Society                                     3 credits

(PermReq) Grade  Method:  REG/P-F/AUD  Permission of
          Instructor required.
[2556] 0101 MW.........2:30pm- 3:45pm (SOND205)       MCCARTHY, L
[2557] 0201 TuTh......10:00am-11:15am (FA  440)       SHIPKA, J


ENGL 410A Seminar in Genre Studies Formalist Poetry               3 credits

(PermReq) Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD This is a senior
          seminar  on Yvor Winters and mid-twentieth
          century American formalist poetry. We will
          test   Winters'  theories  in  defense  of
          formal   verse   technique   against   the
          practice   of  a  variety  of  mid-century
          formalist    poets,    including   Winters
          himself,  Allen  Tate, Louise  Bogan, J.V.
          Cunningham, Julia Randall, Richard Wilbur,
          Elizabeth  Bishop, John Berryman and James
          Merrill,  and  also look  at Pound, Eliot,
          and  Williams (to whom the formalists were
          reacting)  as well as at a variety of non-
          or  anti-formalist stylists who reacted in
          turn  against formalist  poetry, including
          the  Lowell  of  Life  Studies,  Ginsberg,
          Ferlinghetti,   Creeley,   James   Wright,
          Levertov, Rich and Ammons.
[7570] 0101 MW.........4:00pm- 5:15pm (FA  440)       EDINGER, W


ENGL 410B Seminar in Genre Studies Socio-Cultural                 3 credits
          Theories of Learning and Human Interaction        

(PermReq) Grade  Method:  REG/P-F/AUD  This  seminar
          explores the social nature of learning and
          how individuals, through their interaction
          with   others,   can   become  and  remain
          successful   participants  in  communities
          formed  out of shared  practices.  With an
          emphasis  on the role of genre (a typified
          response  to  a  recurrent  situation)  in
          mediating  activity,  we will  examine how
          and   why   individuals,   through   their
          tool-use  (e.g.,  genre,  language, music,
          computing, architecture), can learn to act
          purposefully  so  as  to  achieve  desired
          outcomes.  But  rather  than understanding
          these    activities,    motivations,   and
          outcomes  as individual-specific,  we will
          uncover  the  ways  in which  the activity
          systems in which action occurs are part of
          a  larger socio-cultural network that sets
          the   conditions   by  which  success  and
          failure  can  occur. Finally,  we will not
          only   analyze  mediated  activity  within
          specific  communities  of  practice (e.g.,
          classrooms,    workplace    organizations,
          academic   disciplines,   etc.)  but  also
          develop   strategies   by   which  we  can
          critically  examine  our  own  tool-use as
          participants, or would-be participants, of
          certain communities.
[7571] 0101 Tu.........4:30pm- 7:00pm (FA  440)       MAHER, J


ENGL 448  Seminar in Literature and Culture                       3 credits
          Victorian Education                               

(PermReq) Grade   Method:   REG/P-F/AUD  During  the
          Victorian     Age     we    witness    the
          transformation  of England into a literate
          society,  where education  for groups such
          as  women,  the  working  classes  and the
          colonized    becomes    an   anxious   and
          contentious  issue  for nineteenth-century
          intellectuals.    The    Victorians   were
          fascinated    by    education    and   its
          implications  for stability or disorder in
          the   individual,   the   family,  English
          society,   the   nation  and  the  British
          Empire.  In this course  we'll examine how
          Victorian    literature    explores    the
          cultural,   economic,   psychological  and
          social  effects of education, uncovers the
          traumas  and  conflicts it  generates, and
          dramatizes  both  its  coercive  value  as
          ideological   state   apparatus   and  its
          subversive  potential for  the politics of
          gender,  class  and  race.  Possible texts
          include   Charles   Dickens'  Hard  Times,
          Charlotte    Bronte's   Villette,   Thomas
          Hughes'  Tom Brown's School Days, extracts
          from Matthew Arnold's Culture and Anarchy,
          and  John  Henry  Newman's  The Idea  of a
          University,   T.B.  Macaulay's  Minute  on
          Education,  Kipling's Stalky and Co., Mary
          Elizabeth  Braddon's  The  Doctor's  Wife,
          Frances   Compton   Burnett's  The  Little
          Princess,      Florence      Nightingale's
          Cassandra,   Amy   Levy's  Xanthippe,  and
          Margaret Oliphant's The Library.
[2559] 0101 MW.........2:30pm- 3:45pm (FA  440)       FERNANDEZ, J


ENGL 473  Advanced Creative Writing-Poetry                        3 credits

          Grade   Method:  REG/P-F/AUD  This  is  an
          advanced  workshop  in  writing poetry.The
          course  will  focus on the  work of Sylvia
          Plath and Ted Hughes and will actually use
          writing  prompts  and  exercises  that Ted
          Hughes  wrote for himself  and Sylvia as a
          basis  for  many workshop  assignments. We
          will study the work of Plath and Hughes in
          order  to  understand how  their poems are
          constructed  and how they create power and
          meaning as well as how Hughes' and Plath's
          creative  ideas  evolved  from  sources of
          inspiration  into  finished  poems.  We'll
          then  use  Hughes'  and  Plath's  work  as
          inspiration   to   create  poems  for  the
          workshops.   The  course  will  be divided
          between   a   lecture/discussion   and   a
          workshop format. Prerequisite: ENGL 373 or
          permission of the instructor.
[2560] 0101 TuTh.......4:00pm- 5:15pm (ACIV010)       FALLON, M


ENGL 486  Seminar in Teaching Composition: Theory                 3 credits
          and Practice                                      

(PermReq) Grade  Method: REG/P-F/AUD  Since the late
          1960s  a revolution has taken place in the
          teaching   of   composition.  This  course
          examines  our  changing  understanding  of
          what the teaching of composition is (i.e.,
          how  it  should  be approached,  and what,
          specifically,  it requires of students and
          instructors)   by  tracing  key  theories,
          issues, and texts across this 45 year span
          of  time.  Our  investigations  will begin
          with  a  consideration of  the "happening"
          movement  of  the late 60s  and early 70s,
          and  will conclude with a consideration of
          the  current  interest  in  multimodal/new
          media/materialist       approaches      to
          understanding  communicative  practice. As
          students engage with the course materials,
          they  will  be asked to  bring theories of
          teaching  composition  into  dialogue with
          practice,  that is, to  consider how these
          theories may be taken up, altered, tweaked
          and/or combined and instantiated in actual
          classroom situations.
[2561] 0101 TuTh......11:30am-12:45pm (FA  440)       SHIPKA, J


ENGL 493  Seminar in Communication and Technology                 3 credits
          New Media                                         

(PermReq) Grade  Method:  REG/P-F/AUD  What  is  new
          media? Simply put, new media is the use of
          digital  technology  to  produce, consume,
          and  represent  cultural  objects  such as
          software,  hypertext, computer  games, and
          cyber  art.  Consequently, this  course is
          devoted  to  the  development  of  digital
          literacy  so as to  understand the ways in
          which new media is produced, consumed, and
          represented,    a    process    that    is
          increasingly  linked to  the production of
          culture  itself.  To  this  end,  we  will
          analyze  the technologies and artifacts of
          new  media  as  well  as  the  texts  that
          surround  this  dynamic  and,  as  of yet,
          still  emerging  medium.   To  aid  in the
          acquisition   of  digital  literacy,  this
          course  will  also provide  historical and
          theoretical  contexts for  the development
          of  new  media.We will  read, analyze, and
          critique  technologies  and  texts  of new
          media.  In addition, we  will create texts
          using  new media. However,  this course is
          not  intended  to  teach  the technologies
          that  constitute  new  media,  although we
          will  "play" with some of them. Rather, we
          will  examine  the  ways  in  which  these
          technologies  are increasingly responsible
          for  the cultural  landscape that provides
          the  means  by which we  live our everyday
          lives.
[2562] 0101 TuTh.......2:30pm- 3:45pm (FA  440)       MAHER, J


ENGL 495  Internship                                            1-4 credits

(PermReq) Grade  Method: REG  Individual Instruction
          course:  contact department  or instructor
          to obtain section number.


ENGL 499H Senior Honors Project                                   4 credits

(PermReq) Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
[2568] 0101 Time and room to be arranged              FALCO, R


ENGL 686  Teaching Composition: Theory and Practice               3 credits

(PermReq) Grade  Method: REG/P-F/AUD  Since the late
          1960s  a revolution has taken place in the
          teaching  of composition. This course will
          trace   the   profound   changes   in  our
          understanding  of the  teaching of writing
          by   examining   key  theories  and  major
          players   during   this   35-year  period.
          Included  will be expressivist theories of
          Murray  and Elbow, cognitive approaches of
          Emig  and  Flower,  social constructionist
          perspectives  of Bartholomae  and Bizzell,
          as  well  as  the political  approaches of
          Fox,  Rose,  and  Hooks. Our  reading will
          include a number of genres: autobiography,
          writers'  journals, academic  and personal
          essays,   and   social   science  research
          reports.  Students will write three papers
          in  which,  employing course  theories and
          genres,  they  will experiment  with their
          own  writing, possibly  creating their own
          "mixed  genres."  As students  discuss and
          write  about the assigned literature, they
          will   be   asked  to  bring  theories  of
          teaching  composition  into  dialogue with
          practice,  that is, to  consider how these
          theories  may  be  instantiated  in actual
          classroom situations.
[7537] 0101 TuTh......11:30am-12:45pm (FA  440)       SHIPKA, J


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