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Philosophy

Spring 2008


General Education Info: GFR | GEP (for students starting Fall 2007)



PHIL 100  Introduction to Philosophy                              3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
          GEP/GFR:Meets AH.
[4798] 0201 TuTh.......4:00pm- 5:15pm (SOND112)       SENG, P
[4800] 0401 TuTh......10:00am-11:15am (FA  015)       THOMAS, J
[4801] 0601 MW.........2:30pm- 3:45pm (SOND206)       YALOWITZ, S
[7544] 0701 MW.........4:00pm- 5:15pm (MP  102)       YALOWITZ, S
[4803] 0801 TuTh.......2:30pm- 3:45pm (SOND109)       SENG, P
[4804] 0901 TuTh.......1:00pm- 2:15pm (SOND209)       HITZ, Z


PHIL 146  Critical Thinking                                       3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
          GEP/GFR:Meets AH.
[4805] 0101 MWF........9:00am- 9:50am (SOND109)       TEMPLETON, R
[4806] 0201 MWF.......11:00am-11:50am (SOND109)       TEMPLETON, R


PHIL 150  Contemporary Moral Issues                               3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
          GEP/GFR:Meets AH.
[4807] 0101 MW........10:00am-10:50am (ACIV LH4)      EALICK, G
            F.........10:00am-10:50am (ACIV145) DIS
[7662] 0102 MW........10:00am-10:50am (ACIV LH4)      EALICK, G
            F.........10:00am-10:50am (ACIV151) DIS
[7663] 0103 MW........10:00am-10:50am (ACIV LH4)      EALICK, G
            F.........11:00am-11:50am (ACIV145) DIS
[7664] 0104 MW........10:00am-10:50am (ACIV LH4)      EALICK, G
            F.........11:00am-11:50am (ACIV151) DIS


PHIL 152  Introduction to Moral Theory                            3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
          GEP/GFR:Meets AH.
[4808] 0101 TuTh.......4:00pm- 5:15pm (SOND205)       THOMAS, J
[4809] 0301 TuTh......10:00am-11:15am (SOND109)       FERRY, M
[4810] 0501 TuTh.......2:30pm- 3:45pm (ACIV305)       THOMAS, J
[4811] 0601 TuTh......10:00am-11:15am (FA  530)       TITCHENER, J


PHIL 210  Philosophy of Religion                                  3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
          GEP/GFR:Meets AH.
[4812] 0101 MW.........2:30pm- 3:45pm (SOND204)       WILSON, R


PHIL 248  Introduction to Scientific Reasoning                    3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
          GEP/GFR:Meets AH.
[4813] 0101 TuTh.......1:00pm- 2:15pm (ACIV015)       SENG, P


PHIL 251  Ethical Issues in Science, Engineering                  3 credits
          and Information Technology                        

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
          GEP/GFR:Meets AH.
[4814] 0101 MW........10:00am-10:50am (FA  306)       WILSON, R
            F.........10:00am-10:50am (FA  006) DIS
[4815] 0102 MW........10:00am-10:50am (FA  306)       WILSON, R
            F.........11:00am-11:50am (FA  006) DIS


PHIL 322  History of Philosophy: Modern                           3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
          GEP/GFR:Meets AH.
[4816] 0101 TuTh......11:30am-12:45pm (SOND105)       BRAUDE, S


PHIL 322H History of Philosophy: Modern (Honors)                  3 credits
          (AH)                                              

(PermReq) Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
          GEP:N/A.   GFR:Meets  AH.   Honors  ID  or
          permission of instructor required.
[4817] 0101 TuTh......11:30am-12:45pm (SOND105)       BRAUDE, S


PHIL 346  Deductive Systems                                       3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
[4818] 0101 MW.........1:00pm- 2:15pm (SOND103)       WILSON, R


PHIL 350  Ethical Theory                                          3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
          GEP/GFR:Meets AH.
[4819] 0101 TuTh.......1:00pm- 2:15pm (ACIV145)       FERRY, M


PHIL 350H Ethical Theory                                          3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
          GEP/GFR:Meets AH.
[4820] 0101 TuTh.......1:00pm- 2:15pm (ACIV145)       FERRY, M


PHIL 368  Aesthetics                                              3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD PHIL 368-0101 is
          a   historical   survey  of  philosophical
          writings  on art and aesthetic experience,
          ranging  from  Ancient  philosophers  like
          Plato   and   Plotinus,  through  Medieval
          considerations   of   art  and  beauty  in
          Aquinas  and Dante, and Modern conceptions
          of  beauty  and  taste  in Hume  and Kant.
          Selections  from  Hegel,  Heidegger, Dewey
          and  more contemporary  writers will round
          out the course.
[4821] 0101 TuTh.......2:30pm- 3:45pm (FA  215)       TITCHENER, J


PHIL 372  Philosophy of Science                                   3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
[7545] 0101 MW.........4:00pm- 5:15pm (FA  530)       EALICK, G


PHIL 373  Metaphysics                                             3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
[4823] 0101 TuTh......11:30am-12:45pm (ACIV150)       THOMAS, J


PHIL 390  Philosophy of Sport                                     3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
[4824] 0101 MWF.......10:00am-10:50am (SOND109)       TEMPLETON, R


PHIL 400  Independent Study in Philosophy                       1-3 credits

(PermReq) Grade   Method:   REG/P-F/AUD   Individual
          Instruction  course: contact department or
          instructor for permission to enroll.
[4825] 0101 Time and room to be arranged              BRAUDE, S
[7888] 0110 Time and room to be arranged              YALOWITZ, S
[4826] 0111 Time and room to be arranged              WILSON, R
[4827] 0401 Time and room to be arranged              TEMPLETON, R
[4828] 0501 Time and room to be arranged              FERRY, M
[4829] 0601 Time and room to be arranged              EALICK, G
[4830] 0701 Time and room to be arranged              PFEIFER, J
[4831] 0801 Time and room to be arranged              HITZ, Z
[4832] 0901 Time and room to be arranged              THOMAS, J


PHIL 405  Honors Independent Study in Philosophy                  3 credits

(PermReq) Grade   Method:   REG/P-F/AUD   Individual
          Instruction  course: contact department or
          instructor for permission to enroll.
[4833] 0101 Time and room to be arranged              BRAUDE, S
[4834] 0201 Time and room to be arranged              YALOWITZ, S
[4835] 0301 Time and room to be arranged              STAFF
[4836] 0401 Time and room to be arranged              PFEIFER, J
[4837] 0501 Time and room to be arranged              HITZ, Z


PHIL 445  Philosophy of Language                                  3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
[4838] 0101 MW.........2:30pm- 3:45pm (ACIV011)       EALICK, G


PHIL 452  Advanced Topics in Ethics Global Ethics                 3 credits

          Grade  Method: REG/P-F/AUD  Throughout the
          world   there   are   massive  social  and
          resource  inequalities between  and within
          communities. This global inequality raises
          serious  moral questions. While states and
          individuals  do  provide  aid  to overcome
          this  problem, relatively  small increases
          in  international  assistance  could  save
          millions  of  lives. So  do the relatively
          affluent  have a  responsibility to assist
          the  global  poor?  If  so, why?  How much
          assistance  should  be provided,  and what
          kind?   What  aspects  of  global  poverty
          should  we should focus on? In this class,
          we  will  attempt  to  provide  answers to
          these    questions.     We    will    read
          philosophers    from   the   Aristotelian,
          consequentialist,       Kantian,       and
          contractarian      ethical     traditions,
          including Amartya Sen, Peter Singer, Onora
          O'Neill, and John Rawls. These theoretical
          perspectives will be applied to real-world
          moral   problems   stemming   from  global
          poverty  -  problems  such  as low  pay in
          'sweat  shop' factories and pharmaceutical
          research   in   impoverished  communities.
          Prerequisites:  two courses in Philosophy,
          at  least one of which  is at the advanced
          level. Also listed as PHIL 650.
[4839] 0101 TuTh.......4:00pm- 5:15pm (FA  536)       FERRY, M


PHIL 471  Freedom, Determinism and Responsibility                 3 credits

          Grade Method: REG/P-F/AUD
[4840] 0101 MW.........1:00pm- 2:15pm (FA  536)       YALOWITZ, S


PHIL 481  Ancient Philosphy                                       3 credits

          Grade  Method:  REG/P-F/AUD  Knowledge for
          Plato  was the relation humans have to the
          objective  truth, moral  and otherwise. In
          this  seminar, we will read and discuss in
          detail  Plato's Protagoras and Theaetetus,
          along  with other  fragments of Protagoras
          the  sophist. Plato's  Protagoras looks at
          the  notion  of  knowledge in  a moral and
          political  context, and includes a defense
          of  democracy (in the mouth of Protagoras)
          based  on  the wide  distribution of moral
          and    political    knowledge.     Plato's
          Theaetetus  examines knowledge as such and
          seeks  to  answer  the  question  of  what
          exactly  knowledge is. The  search for the
          definition  of knowledge  produces some of
          the   most   exciting  philosophy  in  the
          dialogues, and includes a famous attack on
          the relativism of Protogoras, as expressed
          in  his doctrine that  "man is the measure
          of all things". Prerequisites: two courses
          in Philosophy, at least one of which is at
          the    advanced   level.   PHIL   321   is
          recommended but not required.
[4841] 0101 TuTh......10:00am-11:15am (FA  536)       HITZ, Z


PHIL 650  Moral Theory                                            3 credits

          Grade  Method: REG/P-F/AUD  Throughout the
          world   there   are   massive  social  and
          resource  inequalities between  and within
          communities. This global inequality raises
          serious  moral questions. While states and
          individuals  do  provide  aid  to overcome
          this  problem, relatively  small increases
          in  international  assistance  could  save
          millions  of  lives. So  do the relatively
          affluent  have a  responsibility to assist
          the  global  poor?  If  so, why?  How much
          assistance  should  be provided,  and what
          kind?   What  aspects  of  global  poverty
          should  we should focus on? In this class,
          we  will  attempt  to  provide  answers to
          these    questions.     We    will    read
          philosophers    from   the   Aristotelian,
          consequentialist,       Kantian,       and
          contractarian      ethical     traditions,
          including Amartya Sen, Peter Singer, Onora
          O'Neill, and John Rawls. These theoretical
          perspectives will be applied to real-world
          moral   problems   stemming   from  global
          poverty  -  problems  such  as low  pay in
          'sweat  shop' factories and pharmaceutical
          research   in   impoverished  communities.
          Prerequisites:  two courses in Philosophy,
          at  least one of which  is at the advanced
          level. Also listed as PHIL 452.
[4842] 0101 TuTh.......4:00pm- 5:15pm (FA  536)       FERRY, M


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