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Philosophy

Summer 2006




PHIL 100  Introduction to Philosophy (AH)                         3 credits
HYBRID COURSE - An introduction to fundamental philosophical concepts and methods of philosophy through the consideration of issues such as the possibility of knowledge, causality and the nature of reality. We shall also discuss the existence and nature of God, the relationship between mind and body. The course emphasizes the formulation and evaluation of philosophical arguments and may draw upon historical as well as contemporary readings. This is a hybrid course which means at least one half of the class meetings will involve working on materials that will be posted online by the instructor. Important material will be presented by the instructor in face-to-face class time while at least one half of the course will not require class attendance. Anyone who misses the first class meeting will be automatically dropped from the course with no exceptions. For more information see blackboard.umbc.edu/ or contact rwilso4@umbc.edu.
          Grade Method: REG
          GFR/GER:Meets A/H. GDR:Meets H.  WEDNESDAY
          CLASSES WILL MEET ON AUGUST 2 ONLY.
[0349] 7040 Meets 07/10/2006 - 08/04/2006             WILSON, R
            MW.........1:00pm- 4:10pm (MP  008)


PHIL 150  Contemporary Moral Issues (AH)                          3 credits
This course focuses on four different issues resonating in the U.S. popular culture, each represented by a recent book on the topic. First, the issue of health, nutrition and corporate responsibility is tackled through the popular book, Fast Food Nation (2005). The analysis of our eating habits opens up the question of responsibilities to non-human animals, excellently presented in Animal Liberation (2001). The course then turns to consider moral issues arising in the war in Iraq. A first-hand account of the war in One Bullet Away (2005) provides insight to the effects of war on soldiers and of our presence in the Middle East. On the home front we face the struggle of increased surveillance of our own populace to thwart terrorist activities. No Place to Hide (2006) examines the unsteady balance struck by surveillance and the competing desire for liberty in our society. Student work for the course involves presentations on sections of the books and four short papers, one for each book. For more information contact philseng@umbc.edu.
          Grade Method: REG
          GFR/GER:Meets A/H. GDR:Meets H.
[0350] 6040 Meets 05/30/2006 - 06/23/2006             SENG, P
            MWF........1:00pm- 4:10pm (FA  530)


PHIL 210  Philosophy of Religion (AH)                             3 credits
A critical examination of the nature and justification of religious belief. Topics discussed include the existence of God, the nature of religious belief, the problem of evil, the possibility of life after death, and the relation between religion and morality. Note: Also listed as RLST 200. For more information contact rwilso4@umbc.edu.
          Grade Method: REG
          GFR/GER:Meets A/H. GDR:Meets H.
[0351] 6060 Meets 05/30/2006 - 07/07/2006             WILSON, R
            MW.........1:00pm- 4:10pm (SOND108)


PHIL 251  Ethical Issues in Science, Engineering                  3 credits
          and Information Technology (AH)                   
The primary focus of the course will be inquiry into the ethical responsibilities of scientists, engineers and information technologists in today's high-tech, information- oriented society. Students will be introduced to both historical and contemporary issues involving ethical and professional responsibility through an extensive discussion and analysis of case studies. The key feature of the course will involve learning how to conduct an ethical analysis and then learning how to apply this analysis to a case study. Teams will be formed early in the semester so each group can meet and discuss case studies before they are discussed in class and before written assignments are due. Each team also will be required to engage in an extended case study project that will culminate in a team presentation of the case study in a PowerPoint format. For more information contact rwilso4@umbc.edu.
          Grade Method: REG
          GFR/GER:Meets A/H. GDR:Meets H.
[0352] 7040 Meets 07/10/2006 - 08/04/2006             WILSON, R
            MWTh.......6:00pm- 9:10pm (MP  012)


PHIL 334  Asian Philosophy (AH or C)                              3 credits
This course will consist of a critical survey of the major philosophical and spiritual traditions of India, China and Japan. The key concepts and principles of Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, Zen Buddhism and Shintoism will be examined and discussed. Topics will include the difference in emphasis and approach between the philosophical thought of East and West, the conceptual relations between the various Asian traditions and the importance of the concept of enlightenment in Asian thought. Special attention will be given to the role that Asian philosophy has played in shaping Asian culture. Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or permission of instructor.
          Grade Method: REG/P-F
          GFR/GER:Meets A/H or C. GDR:Meets H.
[0353] 6060 Meets 05/30/2006 - 07/07/2006             TEMPLETON, R
            MW.........9:00am-12:10pm (FA  018)


PHIL 346  Deductive Systems                                       3 credits
An introduction to symbolized deductive logic, including the construction of formalized systems for traditional logic, the sentential calculus and first-order predicate calculus. These systems will be constructed semantically (as formalizations of deductive reasoning in natural languages) and syntactically (as uninterpreted systems). The course emphasizes the distinction between mechanical decision procedures and the construction of deductive proofs. Prerequisite: One course in philosophy or permission of instructor. For more information contact rwilso4@umbc.edu.
          Grade Method: REG
[0354] 6060 Meets 05/30/2006 - 07/07/2006             WILSON, R
            MW.........6:00pm- 9:10pm (MP  008)


PHIL 399C Topics in Philosophy Evolution vs.                      3 credits
          Intelligent Design                                
This course explores the long and sullied creation vs. evolution controversy. The debate has taken on new significance in the question of the status of Intelligent Design as an alternative to evolution. Topics include creation vs. evolution in relation to science, education, and public policy. The course will consider the evidence for evolution, the criticisms of evolutionary theory from the standpoint of defenders of intelligent design, and responses to these criticisms. For more information contact jathomas@umbc.edu.
          Grade Method: REG
[0356] 7040 Meets 07/10/2006 - 08/04/2006             THOMAS, J
            MWF........9:00am-12:10pm (MP  102)


PHIL 400  Independent Study in Philosophy                       1-4 credits

(PermReq) Grade   Method:   REG/P-F/AUD   Individual
          Instruction  course: contact department or
          instructor to obtain section number.


PHIL 701  DIRECTED INDEPENDENT RESEARCH                         1-3 credits

(PermReq) Grade  Method: REG  Individual Instruction
          course:  contact department  or instructor
          to obtain section number.


PHIL 790  Applied Ethics Practicum                                2 credits

(PermReq) Grade  Method: P-F  Individual Instruction
          course:  contact department  or instructor
          to obtain section number.


PHIL 799  Master's Thesis Research                              1-6 credits

(PermReq) Grade  Method: P-F  Individual Instruction
          course:  contact department  or instructor
          to obtain section number.


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