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Political Science

Winter 2008


General Education Info: GFR | GEP (for students starting Fall 2007)



POLI 230  Introduction to Constitutional Law (SS)                 3 credits
An examination of United States constitutional law by analyzing the leading decisions of the Supreme Court. Emphasis on the critical constitutional doctrines of separation of powers, federalism, tax and commerce power, and judicial review. A few leading cases on civil rights and civil liberties also will be covered. Note: Not open to students who have taken POLI 330. Prerequisite: POLI 100 or permission of instructor. For more information see http://research.umbc.edu/~davisj/conlaw.html or contact davisj@umbc.edu.
          Grade Method: REG
          GEP:N/A. GFR:Meets SS.
[0070] 9101 Meets 01/02/2008 - 01/25/2008             DAVIS, J
            MTuW.......1:00pm- 4:10pm (PUP 105)


POLI 260  Comparative Politics                                    3 credits
HYBRID COURSE - An examination of the responses of three groups of countries - the advanced industrial states, the former socialist countries and the developing world - to such challenges as globalization, democratization, economic development and ethnic conflict. Emphasis will be placed on the legacies of the past, political institutions and political ideologies in developing an explanation for different responses to similar problems. Prerequisite: Sophomore standing or POLI 100. For more information contact forestie@umbc.edu.
          Grade Method: REG
          GEP:N/A. GFR:Meets SS.
[0071] 9151 Meets 01/02/2008 - 01/25/2008             FORESTIERE, C
            MWF........1:00pm- 4:10pm (PUP 208)


POLI 319  Selected Topics in Political Philosophy                 3 credits
          Tocqueville's America on Film                     
The presentation and discussion of selected films will center around a directed reading of Tocqueville’s Democracy in America with the intention that we can gain a deeper insight into American democracy. Can we test his predictions about the tyranny of the majority or soft despotism against current portraits of and even fears about democracy? Note: May be repeated for credit. Prerequisite: POLI 210 or permission of instructor. For more information contact gvaughan@umbc.edu.
          Grade Method: REG
[0072] 9101 Meets 01/02/2008 - 01/25/2008             VAUGHAN, G
            TuWTh......1:00pm- 4:10pm (ACIV210)


POLI 401  Individual Study in Political Science                 1-3 credits

(PermReq) Grade   Method:   REG/P-F/AUD   Individual
          Instruction  course: contact department or
          instructor to obtain section number.


POLI 409  Selected Topics in Political Science                    3 credits
          Politics of Kurdistan: No Friends but the         
          Mountains                                         
The Kurds are the largest stateless nation in the world—almost 30 million people, spread mostly across Turkey, Iraq, Iran and Syria. Many Kurds want complete independence, some want just the Kurdish part of the country they live in to be independent, while others simply want autonomy and cultural freedom within existing Middle Eastern states. Would an independent, oil-rich 'Kurdistan'—of any size—pose a threat to its Arab, Turkish and Persian neighbors? And what effect would European Union membership for Turkey have on its Kurdish population? This course includes lectures by the leading Kurdish activist in the United States, who will discuss what the Kurds must do to gain their freedom and live in peace. Note: May be repeated for credit. For more information contact mcroatti@umbc.edu.
          Grade Method: REG
[0073] 9101 Meets 01/02/2008 - 01/25/2008             CROATTI, M
            Sa.........8:00am- 6:00pm (PHYS107)


POLI 460  Comparative Institutional Development                   3 credits
Institutions are the rules that guide human interaction. Whenever we come into contact with other humans, institutions are involved. But where did our social, political and economic institutions come from? How did they become so firmly entrenched in our societies? This class attempts to answer these profound and often abstract questions by reading influential books on the subject and by generating our own ideas in class discussions. Prerequisites: POLI 260. For more information contact forestie@umbc.edu.
          Grade Method: REG
[0074] 9101 Meets 01/02/2008 - 01/25/2008             FORESTIERE, C
            MWF........9:00am-12:10pm (PUP 105)


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