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February 22, 2007

Cash-Prize Contests, Lessons from Pros to Mark Entrepreneurship Week at UMBC

Erickson Speech, Business Idea Contests Highlight Events as UMBC Spreads Entrepreneurial Spirit Across Campus

Photo Caption: Read more about UMBC's entrepreneurial community online.

CONTACT: Chip Rose, UMBC
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu

Real world lessons and real cash prizes will highlight Entrepreneurship Week USA activities at UMBC next week as the University builds on momentum from a recent $2 million grant from the Kauffman Foundation to spread entrepreneurship education and training across campus.

Two business idea competitions for a total of $4,000 in cash prizes kick off the week on Monday, Feb. 26. The first contest is a student business plan competition with $1,000 at stake.

Later that day the “Fillmaster Challenge” begins. The contest offers a $3,000 prize for the best idea on an alternative market niche for a precision purified water dispenser system developed by Fillmaster Systems, Inc. The device currently helps pharmacists prepare reconstituted drugs more accurately and safely, but could easily adapt to other uses.

Real-world lessons from experienced entrepreneurial experts fill out the rest of the week as Retirement community and media entrepreneur John Erickson, founder and CEO of Erickson, Inc., will speak to students. Erickson’s latest venture, Retirement Living TV, a network aimed at those ages 55 and older, recently expanded to reach over 26 million households nationally through DirecTV as his retirement communities continue to expand nationwide. Erickson speaks from noon to 1 p.m. on Wed., Feb. 28, in UMBC’s Commons building room 312.

Earlier in the week, Ellen Hemmerly, executive vice president of the UMBC Research Park Corporation, will speak on the successful growth of techcenter@UMBC and bwtech@UMBC, the University’s on-campus, high-tech business incubator and accelerator programs. The incubator and research park have grown from concept to a high-demand location for startup and emerging tech companies in the region.

A recent, independent economic impact study of the techcenter and research park documented 841 direct jobs at the two facilities, which support more than 2,000 total jobs statewide and generate $2.1 million in income and property taxes for counties in the Baltimore region. Hemmerly will speak in The Commons room 331 from 2 to 3 p.m. on Tues., Feb. 27.

"The Kauffman grant allows us to take entrepreneurship programming to the next level," said Vivian Armor, director of the Alex. Brown Center for Entrepreneurship at UMBC. Armor hopes the week’s activities expand awareness that entrepreneurship can be found beyond traditional definitions of business.

“Entrepreneurship can play an important role in all disciplines," Armor said. "Faculty and students pushing the envelope in science and technology, breaking new ground in the creative arts or crafting new solutions to society's problems can all be entrepreneurs. Some people don't even realize what they are doing is entrepreneurial."

For a full schedule of Entrepreneurship Week USA events at UMBC, please visit www.umbc.edu/entrepreneurship.

Posted by crose

February 12, 2007

UMBC Theatre Faculty in the News

UMBC's Department of Theatre faculty and alumni recently received favorable reviews in the Baltimore Sun, Washington Post and the Washington City Paper.

A production directed by Xerxes Mehta, professor of theatre, was reviewed in the Baltimore Sun and Washington Post. The double bill of one-act plays by Harold Pinter--The Collection and The Lover--also included set and costumes by Elena Zlotescu, associate professor of theatre, and Lynn Watson, chair and associate professor of theatre, was dialect consultant.

The Pinter plays were produced by Rep Stage, the professional theatre company in residence at Howard County Community College. The new artistic director of Rep Stage is theatre alumnus Michael Stebbins.

In addition, Assistant Professor of Theatre Colette Searls' direction of Vigils at Woolly Mammoth Theatre in Washington, DC was favorably reviewed in the Washington Post and Washington City Paper.


Posted by elewis

February 07, 2007

Andrew Sears, UMBC Information Systems, Discusses Booming IT Job Market on Maryland Public Television

Andrew Sears, chair and professor of UMBC's Information Systems department, was recently an in-studio guest for Maryland Public Television's "Business Connection."

Sears discussed how the information technology (IT) job market is doing much better than conventionally thought. According to Sears, trends like decreased outsourcing, increased hiring and even signing bonuses for talented IT grads all add up to a booming IT job market for the Class of 2007.

Sears was invited by the show's producers based on UMBC's growing reputation as a statewide and national leader. According to the January 2007 issue of Computing Research News, UMBC ranks # 2 in IT degrees awarded by major US research universities. UMBC also continues to be the largest producer of information technology graduates in Maryland.

To watch the video online, visit the UMBC Informations Systems department's website.

Posted by crose

TV Growing Up Fast at UMBC

Feb. 16 Open House to Celebrate Retirement Living TV’s New $1.3 Million UMBC Studio as Students Get Into the Action

MEDIA ADVISORY:

CONTACT: Chip Rose, UMBC
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu

It’s lights-camera-action at UMBC as Retirement Living Television (RLTV), the fast-growing, first-of-its-kind, cable network devoted exclusively to people age 55 and over, has transformed the university’s on-campus TV studio from dusty to dazzling thanks to over a million dollars in new equipment.

UMBC will celebrate its strengthening partnership with Retirement Living TV on Friday Feb. 16 with an open house event featuring UMBC president Freeman Hrabowski, Erickson founder and CEO John Erickson and RLTV president Brad Knight. UMBC communications faculty and students will be on hand as RLTV production staff demonstrate the revamped studio and discuss the programs produced there.

RLTV began as a media offshoot of Erickson Retirement Communities and has since grown to reach 25 million U.S. households thanks to national broadcast partnerships with DirecTV and Comcast. The network recently began producing two programs -- “The Voice” and a yet-to-be-named advocacy show -- at the UMBC studio.

UMBC communications students will soon get hands-on experience as six interns from different disciplines are set to begin work in the studio. RLTV airs daily in the Baltimore area on CN8 The Comcast Channel and on DirecTV.

WHAT: An Open House of the new, $1.3 million Retirement Living TV Studio at UMBC, featuring interview opportunities with RLTV, UMBC and Erickson executives along with UMBC students and faculty and RLTV production staff. See demonstrations in the Control Room and tour the facilities.

WHEN: Friday, Feb. 16, noon-2 p.m.
WHERE: In the studios on the second and third floors of Academic IV Building, A Wing, UMBC.

The refurbished studio has already increased internship opportunities for UMBC students and will further research collaboration between the University and the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC. RLTV will eventually broadcast its programming from a new $20 million TV production and information technology facility currently under construction at bwtech@UMBC Research and Technology Park.

For more information on Retirement Living Television, visit rl.tv.

Posted by crose

January 22, 2007

UMBC Political Scientist Tom Schaller on “The Colbert Report”

Watch the video online.

CONTACT: Chip Rose, UMBC
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu

Can Tom Schaller, UMBC’s resident expert on national politics and an associate professor of political science, handle the “truthiness?"

Schaller and his latest book Whistling Past Dixie: How Democrats Can Win Without the South, took the national stage Monday night as a guest on Comedy Central’s “The Colbert Report.”

For the record, host Stephen Colbert, a native of Charleston, S.C., didn't put Schaller "on notice" or tell him his advice for Democrats to forget the South and focus on the Midwest and Interior West states was “just plain wrong."

Watch the video online.

Posted by crose

December 30, 2006

UMBC Qualifies for Final Four of College Chess at Pan-Am

UMBC-Hosted Tournament Draws Positive Media Coverage

CONTACT:
Mike Lurie

Office: 410-455-6380
Cellphone: 443-695-0262
mlurie@umbc.edu


WASHINGTON, D.C. – The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) chess team qualified for the "Final Four of College Chess" by placing third in the Pan American Intercollegiate Chess Championships, “The World Series of College Chess," held this weekend in Washington, D.C.

The top four U.S. teams at the Pan Am will advance to the Collegiate Final Four round-robin tournament to be held in Dallas on March 24 and 25, 2007. Other qualifying teams were UT-Dallas, the winner of the 2006 Pan-Am, along with Miami-Dade College and Duke University.

UMBC was the host for a successful 2006 Pan-Am tournament that drew media interest from around the nation and region, including the New York Times, an Op-Ed and feature in the Baltimore Sun and a Washington Post story.

Adithya Balasubramanian, a 10th grade player from Tabb High School in York County, Virginia, was the winner of the scholastic tournament at the Pan-Am. He is the top-rated junior player in Virginia and qualified for a four-year scholarship from UMBC with his victory.

More information online: www.umbc.edu/chess/Pan-Am2006

Posted by crose

December 19, 2006

Kevin Eckert, Dean of The Erickson School, to Appear on WYPR's "Maryland Morning"

Eckert to Discuss Innovative School's New Undergraduate Major in Management of Aging Services

CONTACT:
Mike Lurie

Office: 410-455-6380
Cellphone: 443-695-0262
mlurie@umbc.edu


BALTIMOREKevin Eckert, Dean of The Erickson School at UMBC, will be a featured guest on WYPR-88.1 FM's “Maryland Morning With Sheilah Kast” on Wednesday, Dec. 20.

In a segment scheduled for broadcast at 9:20 a.m., Eckert will discuss The Erickson School's new undergraduate major in the management of aging services, the first of its kind in the country.

Posted by crose

December 15, 2006

‘Cuban Cyclone,’ ‘Polish Magician’ and ‘Kiev Killer’ Descend on the Nation’s Capital

Reigning Champion UMBC is Host for Pan-Am Intercollegiate Team Chess Championship, Dec. 27-30 at Renaissance Hotel, Washington, D.C.

CONTACT:
Mike Lurie

Office: 410-455-6380
Cellphone: 443-695-0262
mlurie@umbc.edu


WASHINGTON, D.C. – The “Cuban Cyclone,” the “Polish Magician” and the “Kiev Killer” bring their take-no-prisoners game plan to Washington on December 27.

They are determined to keep the title they reclaimed last year in Miami, when the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) won its record seventh title at the Pan American Intercollegiate Chess Championships, “The World Series of College Chess.”

Intercollegiate chess won’t land players on the “jacked-up” segment of a football television network near you. It won’t inspire a contract holdout, develop a left fielder with home-run pop or prevent an NFL wide receiver from “talking trash.”

Nonetheless, intercollegiate chess is intense. Its competitors are fierce. Mental acumen and physical stamina are essential. UMBC, a place where pep rallies for the chess team are routine, is serious about continuing its reign as national collegiate champions.

UMBC features such recruits as American freshman Ryan Goldenberg of West Haven, Conn., and colorfully nicknamed grandmasters such as Katrina “the Kiev Killer” Rohonyan of Ukraine, Pawel “The Polish Magician” Blehm and “The Cuban Cyclone” Bruci Lopez.

The competition runs December 27-30 at the Renaissance Hotel, 999 9th Street, N.W., Washington, D.C., near the intersection of K Street and Massachusetts Avenue. Admission is free and spectators are welcome.

The Pan-Am is one of the world’s most celebrated intercollegiate chess tournaments. Since its 1946 inception, five years before Bobby Thomson’s “Shot Heard Round the World,” dozens of universities throughout the Americas have participated.

The 2006 Pan-Am includes teams from Yale, Duke and Dartmouth. Its international flavor is embodied by such schools as the University of Toronto, the Catholic University of Peru and Miami Dade College, a rising chess power thanks to an influx of top Cuban players.

The tournament is open to any college or university team from North, South, or Central America. The tournament also includes the Pan-Am scholastic team individual and team championships for students in grades 1-12. The top individual scholastic winner will be offered a four-year scholarship to UMBC, a $69,416 value.

On Dec. 27 from 1:00 to 3:00 p.m., the weekend kicks off with a fast-paced exhibition match with a top cash prize of $1,000. The match will feature live, play-by-play commentary from chess authorities master Craig Jones and former UMBC player senior master William “The Exterminator” Morrison.

Among the highlights for UMBC at the 2005 Pan Am were a sweep of Harvard and victories over archrival the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD), winner of the previous two Pan-Am titles.

The Retrievers won their first title in 1996 and then embarked on a five-year championship streak from 1998 to 2002. UMBC and UTD are the undisputed top two teams in the nation, and among only a handful of schools nationwide that attract the world's best chess players with full scholarships.

The top four teams from the Pan-Am will go on to face each other in the Final Four of College Chess to be held March 24 and 25, 2007 in Dallas.

More information online: www.umbc.edu/chess/Pan-Am2006

Posted by crose

December 14, 2006

The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation Awards $2 Million to Fund Entrepreneurship at UMBC

Initiative Seeks to Develop Entrepreneurs Outside of Business, Engineering Schools

CONTACT:
Mike Lurie

Office: 410-455-6380
Cellphone: 443-695-0262
mlurie@umbc.edu


The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) has been awarded a $2 million grant to build UMBC entrepreneurship programs across the campus, joining a select group of colleges and universities receiving funding for entrepreneurship endeavors through the Kauffman Campuses Initiative.

The Kauffman Foundation initiated the three-year-old Kauffman Campuses Initiative to catalyze entrepreneurship programs outside of business and engineering schools. The Kauffman Foundation grant complements two substantial commitments already received by UMBC to support its Alex. Brown Center for Entrepreneurship. The first commitment is $1 million from Constellation Energy Group. The second is $1 million from the Herbert Bearman Foundation to establish The Bearman Family Chair in Entrepreneurship at UMBC.

The Kauffman Foundation grant acknowledges the success and potential of the Alex. Brown Center for Entrepreneurship, created six years ago through a gift of $1 million from the Alex. Brown Foundation to develop a leading university entrepreneurship center for the Baltimore region.

UMBC has developed three broad strategies to make entrepreneurship education a common and accessible experience for students in all majors: exposure of students and faculty to entrepreneurs and their expertise, creation of formal education opportunities and development of programs to give students and faculty experience in entrepreneurial settings.

UMBC, recognized for its culture of entrepreneurship education despite the absence of a business school, joins a prestigious group of institutions selected by the Kauffman Foundation for funding. The others are Arizona State University, Brown University, Carnegie Mellon University, Georgetown University, New York University, Purdue University, Syracuse University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison.

UMBC learned of its selection after a campus delegation, led by President Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, presented its proposal before an independent panel of judges at Kauffman Foundation headquarters in Kansas City, Mo., on December 12.

“This partnership gives UMBC the opportunity to take entrepreneurship programming to the next level,” says Vivian Armor, director of the Alex. Brown Center. “It will allow UMBC to expand course offerings for current undergraduates, graduate students and working professionals. It will improve programming that exposes students and faculty to important entrepreneurial concepts. Finally, the partnership will help develop systems to support individuals as they work to launch successful business ventures or address urgent challenges facing our communities through social entrepreneurship.”

The Alex. Brown Center supports the kind of entrepreneurial creativity and action exemplified by the creation of OpenPosting.com, the first online classified community for college students. Students Wan Hsi Yuan and Jason Servary, members of the Center’s student-run CEO Club, created the site. It has 1,500 registered users and receives roughly 4,000 page views per day.

Entrepreneurship at UMBC also thrives via the Alex. Brown Center’s summer entrepreneurship institute. In summer, 2006, UMBC’s first Faculty Summer Institute was held for eight faculty members representing the departments of music, dance, theater and visual arts. The institute was created to broaden faculty exposure to concepts of entrepreneurship and integrate into their curricula career development skills, internships and mentoring relationships with established entrepreneurs.

Participation by faculty was determined based upon proposals that demonstrated interest in learning more about entrepreneurship. Winning proposals from faculty included the exploration of marketing and audience development initiatives, the development of courses to help students understand professional careers in the arts and arts and non-profit organization management.

The Center also serves as one of the University’s partners in the ACTiVATE program, funded by the National Science Foundation to address the unique needs of accomplished women interested in starting technology companies. Eight women in the ACTiVATE program, established two years ago, now lead their own tech companies.

The Alex. Brown Center’s activities are complemented by such other initiatives as techcenter@UMBC and bwtech@UMBC, which offer specialized support geared specifically toward research and technology businesses. Through UMBC’s Shriver Center, a national leader in promoting community-based service and internship programs, businesses are introduced to undergraduate and graduate students interested in internship experience in career-related fields.

“The Alex. Brown Center augments the excellent education UMBC offers by giving students the proper toolset to interface with business leaders in their field of choice,” said Greg Barnhill,” chair of the Alex. Brown Center Board of Visitors and partner and member of the board of Brown Advisory Securities. “We offer students guidance on how to deal with people on a daily basis, compose quality written communication and verbalize opinions effectively.”

The grant is awarded with the expectation that UMBC will raise an additional $8 million toward entrepreneurship programs during the next five years.

The Kauffman Campuses Initiative began in 2003 with $25 million in funding to eight schools that provided entrepreneurship education within liberal arts, engineering and other non-business programs.

Selection of this latest round of Kauffman Campuses schools was based on a series of criteria, including the ability to generate a partnership with other foundations and funders and the potential to create new representative models.

“Our initiative is creating a cultural change and making the entire university system more entrepreneurial,” said Kauffman CEO Carl Schramm. “We want all students, not just those in business schools, to see the value of thinking like entrepreneurs. We want them to be able to recognize and seize opportunity when it presents itself, no matter what field they find themselves in.”


About the Alex. Brown Center

Established in 2000 through a gift of $1 million from the Alex. Brown Foundation, the Alex. Brown Center for Entrepreneurship is the hub of entrepreneurial-based activity at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). It provides an active link between the academic community and the corporate environment. Since its inception, the Center has worked closely with the Baltimore business community to create one of the leading university centers for entrepreneurship in the country housed at a mid-sized university. Information about the Alex. Brown Center is available at http://www.umbc.edu/entrepreneurship.

About the Kauffman Foundation
The Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation of Kansas City is a private, nonpartisan foundation that works with partners to advance entrepreneurship in America and improve the education of children and youth. The Kauffman Foundation was established in the mid-1960s by the late entrepreneur and philanthropist Ewing Marion Kauffman. Information about the Kauffman Foundation is available at www.kauffman.org.

Posted by crose

November 27, 2006

UMBC Astronomer Helps Discover Possible New Black Hole

Previously Unknown Black Hole’s Speed, Power Surprises NASA, European Space Agency Team



Illustration Caption: An artist's impression of a possible new black hole ripping gas and matter from the star it orbits.

Click on the illustration to view a European Space Agency gallery of images and animation related to this story.


CONTACT: Chip Rose, UMBC
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu

An international team of astrophysicists including Volker Beckmann of UMBC/NASA-Goddard has discovered a possible new black hole near the center of the Milky Way galaxy.

The previously unknown black hole surprised scientists by suddenly “switching on,” emitting strong pulses of radiation as it began consuming gas from the star it orbits over 26,000 light years away from our solar system. The discovery, detailed in a letter published in the journal Astronomy & Astrophysics, was made using NASA and European Space Agency (ESA) satellites.

In an ESA press release, Roland Walter, an astronomer at the INTEGRAL Science Data Centre and lead author of the research results, said "The galactic center is one of the most exciting regions for gamma-ray astronomy because there are so many potential gamma-ray sources.”

Beckmann, a research assistant professor at UMBC’s Joint Center for Astrophysics and NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, was part of the team who used NASA's Swift satellite and ESA's INTEGRAL satellite to spot the tell-tale gamma ray outburst. The research team includes scientists from Switzerland, France, Belgium, Poland, the United States and Spain.

According to Beckmann, potential new black holes are scarcer than commonly thought. “We know about 10 stellar systems in which we’re pretty sure that there's a black hole involved, and 10 more are good candidates,” he said. “What really surprised us was the intensity of the radiation it emitted and how quickly it became an obvious black hole candidate.”

The team found that the black hole’s unusually strong gravitational pull ripped off layers of the star it orbits, drawing them into its maelstrom. “We’re not sure why this black hole is letting off occasional bright outbursts of radiation instead of a steady stream,” said Beckmann, “But we suspect these powerful emissions are caused by big chunks of the star’s matter falling into the black hole.”

"This detection was possible because of the capability of NASA's Swift satellite to respond quickly to new objects showing up in the sky,” said Neil Gehrels, chief of NASA/Goddard’s Astroparticle Physics Laboratory and leader of the Swift satellite team.

The possible new black hole has drawn the attention of the international astronomy community, having been viewed by all major X-ray telescopes in space including: NASA's Chandra telescope, the Japanese JAXA and NASA collaboration Suzaku and the ESA's XMM-Newton X-ray satellite.

Posted by crose

November 20, 2006

Erickson Technology, Broadcast Divisions to Build at UMBC Research Park


CONTACT: Chip Rose, UMBC
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu

BALTIMORE – The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) announced today that Erickson Retirement Communities will construct a $20 million building at the university’s on-campus research and technology park bwtech@UMBC. Erickson will move its information technology (IT) department, its adult living national broadcast network Retirement Living TV (RL-TV) and its private charitable foundation to the 110,000 square-foot building, expected to be completed by mid-2008.

The move will increase research collaboration and internship opportunities between the Erickson organization and UMBC students and faculty in The Erickson School and visual arts, communications and information technology programs.

The Erickson School at UMBC grew out of Erickson founder John Erickson’s vision for interdisciplinary research and education to improve life for older adults. Since its start in January 2005, the School has launched an undergraduate major in management of aging services, expanded an executive education program for senior housing and care professionals and is planning a professional master’s program.

Current research partnerships between The Erickson School and the Erickson organization include developing new computer technology applications for seniors’ housing, support for three gerontology doctoral students’ studies of older adult health and well-being and proposals to make selected Erickson communities National Institute on Aging research sites.

"We look forward to expanding our partnership with UMBC in a way that will help us to more effectively shape the future of aging studies in the United States and to enhance the operational components of our company that will help to redefine it," said John Erickson, chairman and CEO of Erickson Retirement Communities.

“UMBC is delighted to strengthen our relationship with Erickson Retirement Communities,” said UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski. “Together we will shape innovative approaches combining healthcare, public policy, information technology and communications to meet the needs and interests of the aging Baby Boom generation.”

RL-TV will house its corporate headquarters and three production studios in the new facility. The network recently signed a national broadcasting agreement with DirectTV to expand its viewing audience to over 24 million homes. Retirement Living TV produces programming focused on health, finance, politics and living for people over the age of 55. RL-TV recently partnered with UMBC’s New Media Studio to produce pilots for two programs and is expected to collaborate further with UMBC’s Imaging Research Center and College of Arts, Humanities and Social Sciences.

Erickson’s IT department will work with UMBC on advanced research in health informatics, real time data applications, information assurance, data security and wearable computing. The department will move 60 professionals and a high bandwidth data center to the new building and is expected to hire 10 to 15 UMBC graduates per year as the company grows.

Founded in 1998, the Erickson Foundation funds research projects aimed at improving best practices in active aging and aging with choices. The Foundation is currently conducting research on walking studies, ergonomics, balance control, nursing, memory and other senior wellness and lifestyle issues.

The Erickson facility will be the fifth bwtech@UMBC building. Ellen Hemmerly, executive director of the UMBC Research Park Corporation, says demand for office and lab space at UMBC remains strong.

"Many outside businesses and emerging tech firms from our incubator continue to express interest in locating on our campus," Hemmerly said. "We continue to welcome companies that seek all the advantages of growing their business at UMBC."

Construction is underway for the park’s third building, a new home for the U.S. Geological Survey’s (USGS) MD/DE/DC Regional Water Science Center. Ground is expected to be broken for the fourth building -- an 110,000 square-foot, $22 million multi-tenant facility-- in the first half of 2007. Both the USGS and multi-tenant buildings are being developed by Corporate Office Properties Trust.

About Erickson:

John Erickson launched Erickson Retirement Communities with the 1983 opening of Catonsville, Maryland’s Charlestown, now the nation’s largest campus-style retirement community. Today, Erickson Retirement Communities operates 16 campuses housing more than 18,000 people in eight states. Two more communities are set to open in the near future. The company is noted for its progressive approach to recruitment, training and development, and has broadened its business lines with the addition of a managed health plan for residents. Mr. Erickson has also shown his commitment to the interests of individuals over the age of 55 with his September 2006 launch of Retirement Living, a television and Internet media company. More information is online at www.EricksonCommunities.com and www.RL.TV.

About bwtech@UMBC:

bwtech@UMBC is a state-of-the-art, 41-acre research and technology community. UMBC began planning for a new research and technology park in the early 1990s, based on the success of other U.S. parks and the vision of the late Michael Hooker, UMBC president from 1986-1992. The first building was completed in 2001. To date, UMBC’s research park and technology incubator have received public and private sector funding from the Maryland Economic Development Corporation (MEDCO), the State of Maryland, the City of Baltimore, Baltimore County, the U.S. Department of Commerce, The Abell Foundation, and the Maryland Technology Development Corporation (TEDCO.) bwtech@UMBC is part of Baltimore County's Southwest Enterprise Zone, making companies moving to the park eligible for credits on real property and income taxes, as well as credits for job creation.

Posted by crose

November 01, 2006

Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture Exhibition on MPT 11/1

The Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture's "Raymond Loewy:Designs for a Consumer Culture" exhibition will be featured on MPT's "ArtWorks This Week" on Wednesday, November 1. Professor David Yager, the Center's executive director, gives a tour of the exhibit and a look into the mind of industrial designer Raymond Loewy. For more information, visit www.mpt.org/artworks/thisweek.

For more information on the exhibition and upcoming arts events at UMBC, visit www.umbc.edu/arts.

Posted by elewis

October 31, 2006

University Teams to Kick Off Voting Technology Competition

Computer Science Students from UMBC, George Washington, Stanford, Others Hope Contest Yields Ideas for More Secure Electronic Voting

CONTACT: Chip Rose, UMBC News
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu


WASHINGTON, D.C. – As worries increase about the reliability and security of electronic voting machines a week away from the General Election, a team of computer science students and professors from UMBC and George Washington University will announce on Thursday at the National Press Club the start of a new national competition aimed at sparking ideas for better electronic voting technology while raising college students’ awareness of the political process.

Organized by UMBC professor of computer science Alan Sherman and funded by the National Science Foundation, the University Voting Systems Competition (www.vocomp.org) will take place throughout the academic year.

The UMBC/GW team will compete against teams from Stanford, Rice, Newcastle (UK), Wroclaw (Poland), and other universities to design and implement innovative voting technologies. Teams must post their voting system designs online in January 2007 for review by peers and a panel of judges including IT experts from Microsoft, the National Institutes of Standards and Technology and MIT.

Teams that advance to the next round of competition will be required to demonstrate their systems in a student government or similar real-world campus election in May. Five finalist teams will be chosen to travel to Portland, Oregon, on July 16-18, for the final competition which will include a judged mock election along with academic presentations, critiques, and invited lectures by national experts on voting.

According to Sherman, an expert on cryptology and the security of voting systems, the judging criteria include reliability, security, privacy, ease of use for voters and election officials, and accessibility to the disabled.

“There is a need for better voting technologies that are more secure, reliable, accountable and easy to use.” Sherman said. “This competition will inspire innovation and involvement, and establish the feasibility of competitions as a way to gauge the security of voting systems.”

PRESS CONFERENCE DETAILS:
Thursday, Nov. 2, 2006
2 - 3pm
National Press Club,
529 14th Street NW
Washington, DC 20045

Posted by crose

October 24, 2006

UMBC's ACTiVATE Program to be Featured on "The Digital Spin" With Mario Armstrong

Women Entrepreneurs Training Program is Focus of WEAA 88.9 FM Show, Wed., October 25, 7-8pm


CONTACT: Chip Rose, UMBC News
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu

UMBC's ACTiVATE program, which trains women from business and science backgrounds in entrepreneurship, will be the focus of the Wednesday, Oct. 25 "Digital Spin With Mario Armstrong" show on WEAA 88.9 FM.

Stephen Auvil, director of UMBC's Office of Technology Development (OTD), and ACTiVATE participants Kris Appel and Eva Mitter will be Armstrong's guest for the show.

ACTiVATE is a year-long, competitive program to train women with significant technical or business experience to be entrepreneurs and to create start-up companies from inventions from Maryland research institutions and federal agencies.

Armstrong covers technology for Baltimore & Washington-area National Public Radio affiliates and television stations. He is also co-founder of the Urban Video Game Academy.

Posted by crose

UMBC Names 12 Business, Science Leaders to College of Natural and Mathematical Sciences Advisory Board

Biotech, Pharma, NASA, and NSA Execs to Advise College, Build Connections

CONTACT: Chip Rose, UMBC News
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu

The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) announced today the appointment of 12 leaders selected from the Mid-Atlantic region’s business and scientific community to serve on the Dean’s Advisory Board for UMBC’s College of Natural and Mathematical Sciences.

The Board will help expand awareness of the College’s programs, research and resources and strengthen partnerships with public and private research laboratories, key industry leaders and policymakers. Board members, who will serve three-year renewable terms, will advise the Dean on critical issues including workforce education and training; academic program and curriculum development; faculty recruitment; collaborative research funding; and opportunities for students and alumni.

“UMBC is fortunate to have the counsel of such a diverse group of outstanding scientists and businesspeople,” said Geoffrey Summers, Dean of the College of Natural and Mathematical Sciences at UMBC. “The Board will strengthen the College’s connections with top researchers in bioscience, medicine, homeland security and environmental and space science — fields vital to economic growth, innovation and opportunity in Maryland and beyond.”

The Board will be chaired by biotech entrepreneur and UMBC alumnus Sheldon Broedel, Ph.D. Broedel is a co-founder and CEO/CSO of AthenaES, a biotechnology products and services firm located at the University’s on-campus business incubator, techcenter@UMBC. Broedel, who received his doctoral and master's degrees in Microbial and Molecular Genetics from UMBC, has 19 years of industrial experience, holds three issued patents and has designed and launched 68 products. He also serves on the Science Advisor Board for Villa Julie College and is an Adjunct Professor at Georgetown University School of Medicine’s department of Microbiology and Immunology.

“It is an honor to serve my alma mater alongside a team of exceptional minds from government and business,” said Broedel. “Like me, they know from experience that UMBC is a place committed to scientific excellence, with talented faculty and students eager to share their skills with industry.”

The other Board members announced today are:

Ron Baker, Manager, Cosmetic Claim Development & Support, Procter & Gamble;

Paul Behrens, Director of Physiology, Martek Biosciences;

April Brys, Manager, Biosciences, Battelle;

Stacey Franklin, Vice President, BioTech Primer;

Peter Hughes, Chief Technologist, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center;

Peter Kiener, Senior Vice President of Research, MedImmune;

Alvin LaVoie, Director, Emerging Technologies, Rohm and Haas;

Jerry Skotnicki, Director, Chemical and Screening Sciences, Wyeth Research;

Terry Turpin, Chief Scientist, Essex Corp;

Nancy Welker, Chief Technical Officer, National Security Agency;

George Young, VP, Business Development, GRACE Davison.

UMBC’S College of Natural and Mathematical Sciences includes the Departments of Biological Sciences, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Mathematics and Statistics, and Physics. The College has more than 100 full time faculty members, and includes approximately 1500 majors in 7 undergraduate programs and 280 graduate students in 13 graduate programs. These four departments administer close to half of the Ph.D. programs at UMBC. Research expenditures currently are nearly $13M per year. More information online at http://www.umbc.edu/CNMS/

Posted by crose

October 17, 2006

Managed Care Boosts Access to Health Services for Children Enrolled in Maryland Medicaid

UMBC Researcher Todd Eberly Wins National Dissertation Award

CONTACT: Anne Roland, UMBC Public Policy Department
410-455-8457
anne@umbc.edu

The Maryland Medicaid managed care program has had a positive impact on the receipt of preventive health services by black, white, and Hispanic children and adolescents, as well as black and Hispanic adults, according to a new study from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County.

Following a nationwide trend, Maryland implemented the HealthChoice managed care program in 1998 as a means to control Medicaid costs. Under managed care, the state contracts with private insurers to provide preventative health care services to Medicaid enrollees, such as well child visits, immunizations, and physicals. However, there had been conflicting research on whether managed care meets the needs of socially vulnerable populations, particularly minorities.

Medicaid currently covers 600,000 Maryland residents, including 30 percent of the state’s children. Studies have shown that a significantly larger percentage of black and Hispanic Americans are covered by Medicaid than white Americans, but these populations make less use of routine health procedures and services. These disparities in the use of health care services are significant because studies have shown that a lack of preventive care puts disadvantaged populations at greater risk of serious health problems later in life.

Todd Eberly, a researcher at the Center for Health Program Development and Management at UMBC, analyzed health care data for Medicaid clients in Maryland before and after the adoption of managed care to determine whether the program has had any impact on the preventive care use.

He found that Maryland’s managed care program has had a positive impact on the receipt of primary preventive care by black, white, and Hispanic children and adolescents, as well as black and Hispanic adults. All children and adolescents experienced increases in the use of preventative health services, but increases for black and Hispanic youths were significantly greater than for their white peers.

“The improvements for minority youth were particularly noteworthy,” said Eberly, “because children are especially vulnerable. Access to preventive care is key to the promotion of good heath and quality of life.”

Eberly, who received his Ph.D. in Public Policy at UMBC in 2006, conducted the research for his dissertation, which has been selected for the 2006 Annual Dissertation Award from the National Association of Schools of Public Affairs and Administration (NASPAA). He will receive his award this week in Minneapolis at the NASPAA Annual Conference.

Posted by crose

Dr. Bill Thomas, Innovative Authority On Aging, Offers Lecture At Erickson School On Nov. 9

Developer Of The “Eden Alternative” And “Green House” Approach To Long-Term Care To Deliver 7 P.M. Lecture



CONTACT:
Mike Lurie

Office: 410-455-6380
Cellphone: 443-695-0262
mlurie@umbc.edu

Dr. Bill Thomas, an international authority on later life and eldercare, will deliver a talk, “What Are Old People For?” at The Erickson School on Nov. 9 at 7 p.m.

Thomas has been long recognized as an innovator in formulating approaches to long-term care. Thomas has brought plants, dogs, cats and birds into nursing home facilities to share with patients. This unique approach, known as the Eden Alternative, shifted attention toward enhancing the emotional well-being of residents.

Thomas is focused now on a new endeavor, the Green House Project. With a five-year, $10 million grant from the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation, he is developing a plan to replace more than 100 nursing homes in the United States with groups of smaller homes. Each will house eight to ten residents in private rooms. The grant will result in the creation of Green House projects in all 50 states.

The lecture will take place on the 7th floor of the Albin O. Kuhn Library. To RSVP and for further details, please contact The Erickson School toll-free at 1-877-853-0439 or e-mail Kristanna Jones at krista@umbc.edu.

Recently, U.S.News & World Report described Thomas as a “revolutionary” thinker whose “startling common-sense ideas and his ability to persuade others to take a risk” bring critically needed approaches to the science of aging.

“Bill Thomas is a pioneering thinker who inspires legions of people who have committed their study and careers to the business and science of aging,” said Dr. J. Kevin Eckert, dean of The Erickson School. “We know that his lecture will be another inspiring evening and are delighted to present it at The Erickson School.”

Thomas graduated from Harvard Medical School in 1986, and he was selected by the Mead Johnson Foundation as one of the top Family Medicine residents in the country during his three-year residency at the University of Rochester. He earned board certification in Family Medicine in 1992 and added a certificate in Geriatrics in 1994. Thomas also maintains a part-time appointment as Assistant Clinical Professor in Family Medicine for Upstate Medical Center.

Thomas is the recipient of a three-year fellowship from the global nonprofit organization Ashoka, which searches the world for individuals with unprecedented ideas for community change. He won the America's Award, established by Norman Vincent Peale and sometimes called "The Nobel Prize for Goodness" in 1997.

Thomas has published six books, including "What Are Old People For? How Elders Will Save the World." Named 2005 “Book of the Year” by the American Medical Writers Association, it explores the virtues concealed within the necessity of aging. Thomas also recently authored "In the Arms of Elders: A Parable of Wise Leadership and Community Building."

His books "Learning from Hannah" and "LifeWorth Living" explore the concept of the Eden Alternative and its impact on long-term care. Thomas is currently working on a book about the relationship between aging, health and healing.

About The Erickson School:

The Erickson School was established at UMBC in April 2004 with a $5 million commitment from John Erickson, CEO and founder of Erickson. The school focuses on credit and non-credit professional education, research, and policy in aging services and care.

UMBC, an Honors University in Maryland, is a four-year, public research university that is home to leading experts on aging who are active in research, education, and service in the field of gerontology. It is one of a handful of universities in the nation to offer a Ph.D. in Gerontology.


More information online at:
http://www.umbc.edu/erickson

Posted by crose

October 12, 2006

CommUniversity Fest to Give Whole Family Free Samples of UMBC

Fun, Free Events to Expand Minds, Move Bodies Oct. 21



CONTACT: Chip Rose, UMBC News
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu

Note to Media: High-resolution photos are available for download at the bottom of this advisory.

UMBC is throwing the biggest party in its 40-year history on Saturday, Oct. 21, and the public is invited to enjoy CommUniversity Fest, a day of free activities for all ages reflecting UMBC's diverse mix of arts, culture, athletics and intellect.

Feed Your Head with thought-provoking lectures and discussions by UMBC faculty on topics ranging from politics and infinity to parenting and rock n’ roll. Or put the fun back in “fundamental laws of physics” with a hands-on engineering lesson using balls, hot-air balloons and biplanes.

Soak Your Senses in free arts exhibits, audio tours and gallery crawls, plus live music and dance performances by alumni and student groups.

Cruise Down Memory Lane with a classic car show or savor the spirit of the Orioles 1966 World Series victory with Baltimore Sun sports columnist Peter Schmuck.


Playtime for Kids of All Ages features face painting, carnival games, rock climbing wall, moon bounce, a soccer clinic by Baltimore Blast players, a parade of 40 Chesapeake Bay Retrievers and a giant-size chess challenge against members of UMBC’s world championship team.

Event Details:

UMBC CommUniversity Fest
Saturday, Oct. 21
11 a.m. – 5 p.m.


Erickson Field
(in front of Albin O. Kuhn Library & across from Erickson Hall)
UMBC
1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250

All events are free and open to the public. Free parking on campus. Rain or Shine.

For more information and a full schedule of events, please visit http://www.umbc.edu/communiversity/ or call 410-455-8000.

Note to Media:
High resolution photos & captions related to this advisory are below. Click on the smaller photo to access a high-resolution copy. Contact Chip Rose, UMBC News, at 410-455-5793 or crose@umbc.edu if any questions about downloading.

Caption for photo above:
UMBC's mascot dog will lead 40 other Chesapeake Bay Retrievers and volunteer owners and breeders from across the region in the "March of the Retrievers." The parade of 40 dogs starts at the "True Grit" status outside UMBC's Retriever Activities Center on Saturday, Oct. 21 at 12:15 p.m., continuing to the Commons and ending at the Soccer Field.

Caption for photo above:
UMBC professors Anne Spence (left) and Taryn Bayles put the fun back in "fundmental laws of physics" as they present "Balls, Balloons, and Bi-Planes: Hands-on Engineering for the Whole Family," from 1-2:30 p.m. Saturday on UMBC's Erickson Field.


Caption for Photo Above:
UMBC student dance performances are among the many arts and culture events open to the public at CommUniversity Fest.

Caption for photo above:
At 1 p.m., UMBC Men's Soccer takes on Hartford University, followed by a soccer clinic led by UMBC Alumni, now pro players for the Baltimore Blast.

Posted by crose

October 03, 2006

UMBC Public Policy Professor Don Norris to Appear on WBAL-TV 11, Discuss African-American Vote in State Elections

CONTACT:
Mike Lurie

Office: 410-455-6380
Cellphone: 443-695-0262
mlurie@umbc.edu

BALTIMORE – Dr. Donald Norris, professor of public policy and director of the Maryland Institute for Policy Analysis and Research (MIPAR) at UMBC, will appear from 11:30 a.m. to Noon on Sunday, Oct. 8 on the WBAL-TV (Ch. 11) program 11 TV Hill.

Norris will discuss the importance of the African-American vote in various Maryland political races as the Nov. 7 general election approaches.

MIPAR serves as UMBC’s premier center for applied scholarly research on significant issues of public policy and links the analytical resources of the University with public policy makers in the state and region.

Norris has been the director of MIPAR since 1989. He holds a master’s degree and Ph.D. in Government from the University of Virginia. He is a specialist in public management, urban affairs and the application, management and impacts of information technology in public organizations.

Posted by mlurie

September 28, 2006

Barak, Woodward, Gore Headline 'The Maryland Forum' Speaker Series at UMBC

Sept. 28, 2006

CONTACT:
Mike Lurie

Office: 410-455-6380
Cellphone: 443-695-0262
mlurie@umbc.edu

BALTIMORE – The Maryland Forum, a prestigious speaker series at UMBC in partnership with the Annapolis & Anne Arundel County Chamber of Commerce (AAACCC), will debut this fall with an appearance by former Israeli Prime Minister Ehud Barak at 7 p.m., Tuesday, Oct. 24.

The Maryland Forum, held at the UMBC Retriever Activities Center, continues with three other notable speakers:

• Pulitzer-Prize winning journalist Bob Woodward (7 p.m., Wednesday, Nov. 8)
• Former Baltimore Orioles great Cal Ripken, Jr. (April, 2007, TBD)
• Former U.S. Vice President Al Gore (7 p.m., Tuesday, May 8, 2007)

“Our campus is delighted to be the host site for The Maryland Forum. Our mission as a public research university includes stimulating the intellectual and cultural life of the region. Therefore, we are also pleased that our partnership with The Maryland Forum will continue to build UMBC as a destination for cultural programming,” said UMBC President Freeman A. Hrabowski.

Tickets for UMBC faculty, students and staff for each speaker are $5 (cash and campus ID account only) and can be obtained at the information desk in The Commons, beginning Oct. 9. When presenting their ticket, UMBC faculty, students and staff must show their UMBC identification card.

For the general public, tickets can be purchased by calling 1-866-49-FORUM, online at www.themarylandforum.com and by mail at AAACCC, P.O. Box 346, Annapolis, MD 21404. Prices are $100 for the series and $35 for a single lecture. UMBC alumni are offered the opportunity to buy up to two tickets at a discounted price of $85 (series) or $25 (single lecture).

The Maryland Forum offers an opportunity for the general public to interact with world leaders, Pulitzer Prize winners, former national and international statesmen and authors in an informal setting with a central, convenient location.

“Growing and nurturing the mind knows no jurisdictional boundaries,” said AAACCC President Bob Burdon. “We are grateful to UMBC and President Hrabowski for forming this partnership with us.”

Proceeds from the speaker series will benefit the AAACCC educational foundation, which supports education programs and scholarships throughout the Baltimore/Washington metropolitan region.


Posted by mlurie

September 27, 2006

UMBC, U. Maryland & USRA Join Forces with NASA Goddard to Create New Center for Space Science and Technology

Partnership Builds on Astrophysics, Other NASA Research at UMBC


CONTACT: Chip Rose, UMBC News
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu



Picture Caption: Jane Turner (left) and Ian George of UMBC's Joint Center for Astrophysics in the UMBC Physics Building telescope dome.

The team of UMBC, the University of Maryland, College Park and the Universities Space Research Association has been selected by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center to establish and operate the Center for Research and Exploration in Space Science and Technology (CRESST).

CRESST will bring together NASA Goddard researchers and scientists from the Maryland campuses and USRA to build upon the many capabilities and strengths in space science of the participating organizations. CRESST research will initially focus on the study of neutron stars, black holes, and extremely hot gas throughout the universe. The Center also will work to increase the involvement of minority and women scientists in space science research and to facilitate university student participation in such research.

The Center will be supported through a five-year cooperative agreement from NASA with funding anticipated to be $7.5 million per year. A five-year extension is possible. The university partnership group will operate and provide funding for a management/scientist support office.

"This is a great day for Maryland,” said Maryland Senator Barbara A. Mikulski. “The creation of CRESST is the kind of collaboration between our universities and government laboratories that fosters discovery, innovation, creates new technologies, new ideas and helps Maryland remain a world class center for space science and exploration. As the Senator that funds NASA and our other great federal science agencies, I applaud the creation of this institute and hope to expand cooperation among our universities and government laboratories to keep Maryland competitive."

"This is a fitting reward for UMBC's investment in astrophysics, and a great opportunity to expand the research and educational activities performed here,” said Ian George, director of the Joint Center for Astrophysics and associate professor of physics at UMBC. “This award further bolsters UMBC's position in only its 40th year as one of the leading research universities in the mid-Atlantic region,” George said.

In support of NASA strategic science mission objectives, CRESST will carry out observational, experimental, and theoretical research in three general areas:

-- The Sun and Solar System, stars, galaxies, and the universe at large;

-- The informational and computational sciences related to the unique needs of data systems required to interpret space science data;

-- The development of technology required to achieve these scientific challenges.

CRESST is the latest addition to UMBC’s relationship with NASA. UMBC is ranked 13th nationally among all universities in research funding received from NASA. UMBC is already home to several other multimillion-dollar NASA research centers in collaboration with the Goddard Space Flight Center, including the Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology (GEST) Center, the Joint Center for Earth Systems and Technology (JCET), the Center for the Advanced Study of Photonics Research (CASPR) and the JCA.

According to George, NASA partnerships like CRESST will help bring more internationally-recognized space scientists to UMBC. “UMBC scientists are making major contributions to currently flying NASA high-energy astrophysics missions like the International Gamma-Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGRAL), and the forthcoming Gamma-ray Large Area Space Telescope (GLAST) mission, scheduled to launch in August 2007,” George said.

George noted that UMBC scientists were also involved in the NASA Swift and Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA) missions. “What’s really exciting is the impact CRESST will have on students, “said George. “UMBC has recently started both undergraduate and graduate-level astrophysics courses, so CRESST will help us to expand astrophysics education and research.”

About Space Science at the University of Maryland, College Park:

Through its highly regarded departments of astronomy and physics, the University of Maryland, College Park brings to this collaboration internationally recognized expertise in many areas of space science, including high-energy astrophysics, galaxy structure and dynamics, star formation, planetary science, space physics, gravitational theory and particle astrophysics. Maryland also has a long history of collaboration with the Goddard Space Flight Center in research and educational programs.

About USRA:

The Universities Space Research Association is a national consortium of 100 universities established in 1969 by the National Academy of Sciences. USRA operates programs and facilities in space-related science, technology, and related education. USRA has been an important participant in space science at NASA Goddard for many years, working alongside NASA researchers in conducting space science research, leading-edge instrumentation and technology development, and effectively communicating space science news and information to the educational community and the general public. For more information, go to www.usra.edu.

Posted by crose

September 19, 2006

Brad Simpson on WYPR's Marc Steiner Show, September 20, Noon

CONTACT:
Mike Lurie

Office: 410-455-6380
Cellphone: 443-695-0262
mlurie@umbc.edu

Assistant Professor of History Brad Simpson is scheduled to be a guest on WYPR's (88.1 FM) Marc Steiner Show on Wednesday, September 20 at noon. Simpson, who teaches the history of U.S. foreign relations and international history at UMBC, will discuss President Bush's speech to the United Nations and the war in Iraq.

For more information on the show, please click here. Audio archives of past stories are posted after their original air date.


Posted by elewis

September 13, 2006

TWO EXECUTIVE EDUCATION COURSES OFFERED AT ERICKSON SCHOOL OF AGING STUDIES: OCT. 24-27, NOV. 1-4

“FINANCE, UNDERWRITING AND INVESTMENT ANALYSIS” AND “DEVELOPMENT” TO ANCHOR FALL SCHEDULE

CONTACT:
Mike Lurie

Office: 410-455-6380
Cellphone: 443-695-0262
mlurie@umbc.edu

BALTIMORE – The Erickson School of Aging Studies at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) teams once again with the National Investment Center for the Seniors Housing & Care Industry (NIC) to offer a set of Executive Education courses. The series continues at UMBC with two sessions, “Finance, Underwriting and Investment Analysis” on Oct. 24-27 and “Development” on Nov. 1-4.

"‘Finance, Underwriting and Investment Analysis’ and ‘Development’ combine several of the most important ingredients of successful seniors housing and care,” said Kevin Heffner, CAE, CFRE, who recently joined the Erickson School of Aging Studies as its new Director of Executive Education.

“Finance, Underwriting and Investment Analysis” is led by Ray Braun, President, Chief Operating Officer & Financial Officer of Health Care REIT, Inc.

The course, scheduled for Oct. 24-27, is designed for lenders and equity investors as well as financial professionals within management and development companies. The course will compare seniors housing and care facilities to other real estate asset classes. It will also explore the issues of business-versus-real estate components and how to measure each.

“Development” is led by Phil Golden, Chief Operating Officer of Brightview Senior Living. The course, scheduled for Nov. 1-4, is designed to examine the entire development process of the professionally managed company.

The course includes a thorough overview of complex aspects of the seven segments of the development process. It also examines the critical roles of strategy, market and consumer research, financial feasibility and site selection.

Assessment of the difference between project-financing viability and market viability will be a central component of the sessions.

“Ray Braun of Health Care REIT and Phil Golden of Brightview Senior Living are two of the most respected leaders in their fields,” Heffner said. “The two programs promise to provide attendees with knowledge, real-world experience, and networking opportunities that they simply cannot get anywhere else.

“We're very fortunate,” Heffner added, “to have Ray and Phil leading the teaching teams. ‘Finance’ and ‘Development’ are two of the signature courses of The Erickson School's Executive Education program.”

About The Erickson School of Aging Studies:

The Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC was established in April 2004 with a $5 million commitment from John Erickson, CEO and founder of Erickson. The school focuses on credit and non-credit professional education, research, and policy in aging services and care.

The Executive Development Program at the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC is presented in partnership with NIC, a nonprofit organization that has been the leading source of business and financial information for the senior living industry since 1991. For the last six years, NIC has conducted executive development courses in operations, management, sales, marketing, development, finance, and service quality for emerging industry leaders.

UMBC, an Honors University in Maryland, is a four-year, public research university that is home to leading experts on aging who are active in research, education, and service in the field of gerontology. It is one of a handful of universities in the nation to offer a Ph.D. in Gerontology.

For further details, please call the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC at 443-543-5622.

More information online at:
http://www.umbc.edu/erickson

# # #


Remaining 2006 NIC Executive Education Courses
At the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC

Sales and Marketing
Led by David Smith, President, One on One, Service to Seniors
September 18-21, 2006

Finance, Underwriting and Investment Analysis
Led by Ray Braun, President, Chief Operating Officer & Chief Financial Officer, Health Care REIT, Inc.
October 24-27, 2006

Development
Led by Phil Golden, President and COO, Brightview Senior Living
November 1-4, 2006

Organizational Excellence and Continuous Quality Improvement
Led by Tony Ingelido, Vice President, Asbury Services, Inc.
TBA

Risk Management TBA

Posted by mlurie

September 08, 2006

UMBC LAUNCHES SHERMAN “STEM” TEACHER TRAINING PROGRAM

$5 MILLION GIFT FROM GEORGE AND BETSY SHERMAN
FUELS INITIATIVE TO TRAIN SCIENCE AND MATH TEACHERS FOR URBAN SCHOOLS;
KICKS OFF $100 MILLION CAPITAL CAMPAIGN, LARGEST IN UMBC HISTORY


CONTACT:
Mike Lurie

Office: 410-455-6380
Cellphone: 443-695-0262
mlurie@umbc.edu

BALTIMORE – A leadership gift of $5 million from George and Betsy Sherman will fund the Sherman STEM Teacher Training Program at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), a program that will dramatically increase the number of UMBC graduates who move immediately into science, technology, engineering and math (STEM) teaching careers in at-risk and challenged schools in Baltimore City and throughout Maryland. The gift is a cornerstone of UMBC’s new $100 million capital campaign, the largest in the University’s history.

Through the Sherman STEM Teacher Training Program, UMBC seeks to become one of the nation’s leading institutions for training STEM teachers to work in at-risk schools. The program will provide scholarships for undergraduate and transfer students and fellowships for recent college graduates or mid-career professionals pursuing UMBC’s Master of Arts in Teaching.

“There is no more important education issue right now to the U.S. and to Maryland than getting more students interested in science and math,” said Dr. Geoffrey Summers, dean of the UMBC College of Natural & Mathematical Sciences. “In fact, if we add four physics teachers per year in Maryland public schools, we will double the rate of physics teachers that Maryland currently produces.”

The Sherman gift anchors a $100 million capital campaign ― chaired by John Erickson, CEO of Erickson ― which will seek endowment gifts, annual gifts, grants and gifts-in-kind to support academic initiatives strategically important to the development of UMBC, the region and the nation. The campaign will launch publicly in September with $63 million already raised.


A report from the National Academies designed to assess America’s ability to compete in the 21st century, “Rising Above the Gathering Storm,” calls for the recruitment of 10,000 new science and math teachers each year through competitive scholarships in math, science and engineering that lead to a bachelor’s degree accompanied by a teaching certificate.

George Sherman, retired president and CEO of Danaher Corporation and his wife, Betsy, a former teacher, chose UMBC as a partner to improve K-12 STEM education in urban schools. The $5 million gift began with $1 million to support the existing Sherman Family Teacher Scholars Program in the UMBC Department of Education.

A university widely recognized for its excellence in technology, science and teacher training, UMBC is well-positioned to fulfill the Shermans’ vision. Within five years, UMBC will host 50 Sherman Scholars (undergraduate students) and 10 Sherman Fellows (graduate students) annually. The inaugural Sherman STEM cohort will be assembled for fall, 2006 from existing UMBC students whose studies are concentrated in the STEM disciplines.

“World events of the past five years have further weakened one of our nation’s most competitive advantages: our ability to train, produce and retain graduates in science and technology,” George Sherman said. “The international marketplace is clearly growing and developing at a faster pace than we are right now. To win this race, we must start training tomorrow’s talent today. UMBC’s leadership and faculty are superb and are providing the fresh thinking needed to address contemporary issues.”

Said UMBC President Freeman A. Hrabowski, “This leadership gift from George and Betsy Sherman reflects the generosity and vision of two people closely connected to our campus for a long time. It demonstrates their commitment to preparing teachers for the youth in America and their confidence in UMBC’s ability to train teachers who will improve the quality of science and math education in Maryland.”

Summers, dean of the College of Natural & Mathematical Sciences, added, “Students get to college and don’t realize what a rewarding career teaching can be. Moreover, a very small percentage of science teachers actually earned their undergraduate degree in science. This program will allow us to work with students early in their college career and develop their interest in teaching math and science in public schools where the need for such education is great.”

For an overview of the UMBC $100 million capital campaign, click here.

Posted by mlurie

September 05, 2006

UMBC Computer Science Research in Wired Magazine

eBiquity Group's Research Part of Article on Spam Blogs

Research on detecting "splogs" by UMBC Computer Science and Electrical Engineering Professors Tim Finin, Anupam Joshi and Tim Oates and PhD students Pranam Kolari and Akshay Java was cited in an article in the September issue of Wired Magazine.

Splogs are spam weblogs that are automatically generated to host advertisements or to raise the rank or affiliated web sites. The UMBC eBiquity Group recently published a study showing that more than half of the active English language blogs were actually splogs and has a number of ongoing blog related research projects.

Posted by crose

August 29, 2006

Anne Spence on WYPR 88.1 FM's "Maryland Morning," Wednesday, Aug. 30

Mechanical Engineer to Discuss Improving Science, Math Education in Baltimore County Schools

CONTACT:
Mike Lurie

Office: 410-455-6380
Cellphone: 443-695-0262
mlurie@umbc.edu

Anne Spence, UMBC assistant professor of mechanical engineering, is scheduled to be profiled at 9:10 a.m. on Wednesday, Aug. 30 during Maryland Morning with Sheilah Kast on WYPR-88.1 FM. She will discuss her ongoing leadership role with the UMBC-BCPS STEM Partnership.

The partnership between UMBC and Baltimore County Public Schools (BCPS) is an innovative project that facilitates the implementation, testing, refinement and dissemination of promising practices for improving STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) student achievement. The project also facilitates teacher quality and retention in selected high-needs elementary, middle and high schools in Baltimore County Public Schools.

Maryland Morning with Sheilah Kast airs from 9-10 a.m. on Wednesdays and Fridays on WYPR-88.1 FM. More information about the program is available at http://www.wypr.org/MD_Morning.html. Audio archives of past stories are posted after their original air date.

Posted by crose

Anne Brodsky on WYPR's "Marc Steiner Show" Wednesday, Aug. 30

Advocate for Muslim Women to be Part of Show on Afghanistan

CONTACT: Chip Rose, UMBC News
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu

Anne Brodsky, UMBC associate professor of psychology and director of the Gender and Women's Studies program, is scheduled to be part of a panel of experts on Afghanistan for the noon to 1 p.m. hour of WYPR 88.1 FM's "Marc Steiner Show" on Wednesday, Aug. 30.

Brodsky has traveled and worked with the Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan (RAWA) and other women's rights groups in the Middle East for over five years. She is the author of "With All Our Strength," which chronicles her work with the group as Afghan women risked their lives to seek work, education and basic human rights under the Taliban regime.

Posted by crose

August 15, 2006

$1.5 Million NIH Grant Boosts UMBC's Research on HIV, Cancer

Powerful Instrument to Be Shared by Other UMBC Labs Studying Retroviruses

CONTACT: Chip Rose, UMBC News
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu

Dan Fabris, associate professor of chemistry at UMBC, is one of just 14 researchers nationally to receive a NIH National Center for Research Resources (NCRR) High-End Instrumentation grant announced today.

The $1.5 million grant will fund the purchase of an extremely powerful, high-resolution, mass spectrometer that greatly boosts UMBC's capabilities to analyze nucleic acids for research on drug resistance by HIV, other retroviruses and cancer.

The Fabris lab was the only one in Maryland to receive the NIH NCCR instrumentation grant this year, making UMBC one of just a handful of U.S. institutions to have such a powerful mass spectrometer.

The custom built instrument, a hybrid, 12 Tesla quadrupole-Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (Q-FTICR) mass spectrometer, won't arrive at UMBC for another six months or so. It will be shared by several other labs at the University working on research that could lead to new and more effective inhibitor drugs for AIDS therapy.

"This is extremely exciting for many of us at UMBC," said Fabris, who has studied the nucleic acid structure of HIV since joining the faculty of the Chemistry and Biochemistry department in 1999. "We are particularly happy that this grant will not only expand our lab's capabilities, but will also benefit the work of other researchers in UMBC's departments of Chemistry and Biochemistry and Biological Sciences and possibly other labs in the Baltimore area."

"The High-End Instrumentation program provides numerous investigators access to essential equipment, often benefiting entire research communities and dramatically advancing their research projects," said Barbara M. Alving, M.D., Acting Director of NCRR, in an NIH press release. "These awards spur the kind of scientific discoveries necessary for the development of treatments for a broad spectrum of diseases."

Other NIH NCCR High-End Instrumentation grants went to hospital labs in Boston and university labs at Purdue, Stanford, UCLA, U. Cal Santa Barbara, U. Penn., Yale and others.

Posted by crose

August 14, 2006

New Web Site Encourages Maryland Voters to Look and Learn

UMBC Public Policy, Information Technology Experts Team Up With State Board of Elections for Voter Info Site

CONTACT: Anne Roland, UMBC Public Policy Department
410-455-8457
anne@umbc.edu

A new web site at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County uses state-of-the-art technology to help voters in Maryland access information that will help them make decisions about voting in the upcoming 2006 Primary and General Elections. The web site, called the Maryland Voter Information Clearinghouse (mdelections.umbc.edu), is a joint project of the Maryland State Board of Elections and UMBC’s National Center for the Study of Elections (NCSE). SBE asked researchers at UMBC to design new publicly accessible, easily searchable databases for voter information.

“It’s where, who, and how,” said NCSE Director and Professor of Public Policy Donald F. Norris. “The site is actually three separate databases that each give Maryland voters information to help them learn where to vote, who is running for office, and how candidates are financing campaigns.”

“We initiated the Center last summer with the goal of using the academic and research capabilities of UMBC to apply expert analysis, study, and educational techniques to the various programs at the State Board of Elections,” said Linda Lamone, State Administrator of Elections. “This project is a good example of how well that partnership is working. UMBC’s multi-disciplinary approach to this project has lead to a terrific outcome for all Maryland citizens.”

Visitors to the site can look up information on candidates for federal and state offices, and search the state’s campaign finance database, which includes publicly available reports on campaign finance activity for all candidates, political action committees (PACs), and parties. Registered voters, after entering required information, can verify their voter registration information, learn their voting districts, and find their polling places.

"These web-based tools leverage departmental expertise in the areas of database design and implementation, human-centered computing, and accessibility, providing a great opportunity for Information Systems faculty and students to apply what we teach in the classroom to develop important tools for the citizens of Maryland,” said Andrew Sears, Chair and Professor of Information Systems. Dr. Sears is Associate Director of NCSE.

The National Center for the Study of Elections is a center within the UMBC Maryland Institute for Policy Analysis & Research (MIPAR), in partnership with UMBC’s Department of Information Systems, the Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering, and the State Board of Elections. The Center provides technical assistance and research support to the State Board of Elections, and also conducts studies about voting technologies, election administration, and other issues related to voting and elections. For more information, visit www.umbc.edu/mipar/ncse.

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August 04, 2006

Inaugural Wyeth Fellow Announced as UMBC and Wyeth Research Finalize Partnership

CONTACT:
Mike Lurie

Office: 410-455-6380
Cellphone: 443-695-0262
mlurie@umbc.edu

The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and Wyeth Research, having signed a formal agreement establishing a three-year partnership, have awarded the inaugural Wyeth Fellowship to Orrette R. Wauchope, a Ph.D. candidate studying synthetic organic chemistry.

The partnership includes graduate fellowships for talented students conducting research in fields of joint interest to UMBC faculty and Wyeth scientists.

Students selected for the two-year fellowships will be designated Wyeth Fellows and will receive an annual stipend and mentoring support from an industry scientist at Wyeth Research.

As the inaugural 2006 Wyeth Fellow, Wauchope was recognized as a rising Ph.D. candidate in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Wauchope will have the opportunity to present his or her research findings to a group of senior scientists at Wyeth Research. His doctoral research is being conducted under the guidance of Dr. Katherine Seley-Radtke, associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry and a 2006 Jefferson Science Fellow for the U.S. Department of State.

Wauchope’s research focuses on the design and methodological development of chemical agents that potentially serve as anticancer, antiviral and antiparasitic catalysts. Wauchope is a Summa Cum Laude graduate of Brooklyn College, where he majored in chemistry.

“Orrette has a keen interest in the use of synthetic organic chemistry to solve problems in medicinal chemistry,” said Dr. Jerauld S. Skotnicki, senior director of chemical and screening sciences with Wyeth Research. “His Ph.D. project with Professor Seley-Radtke is quite challenging and will enable him to enhance, apply and expand his interests and skills.

“As the Wyeth mentor, I am looking forward to the interactions and to contribute to their program. The Wyeth Fellowship exemplifies the ideal partnership of two innovative cultures from two distinct sectors, bringing out the best in people and their science.”

The Wyeth-UMBC partnership includes a three-year commitment to Gold-Level sponsorship for UMBC’s annual life science symposium - A Look Ahead: Futures in Biomedical Research. A signed memorandum of understanding between UMBC and Wyeth was completed on July 25, 2006 at the Wyeth Research facility in Collegeville, Pa. An additional Wyeth Fellow will be selected in the second year of the partnership.

“I am privileged to have mentoring support from the scientists at Wyeth,” Wauchope said. “I will have the opportunity to share and discuss aspects of my research in an industrial setting with chemists who possess years of experience.”

Wyeth, headquartered in Madison, N.J., is a global leader in pharmaceuticals, consumer health care products and animal health care products. The company is a leader in the discovery, development and manufacturing of pharmaceuticals, vaccines, biotechnology products and non-prescription medicines that improve the quality of life people worldwide. With research and development programs focused on small molecules, vaccines and biotechnology, Wyeth is exploring more than 60 new therapies for medical conditions such as diabetes, breast cancer, multiple sclerosis, HIV, Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia.

UMBC is a mid-sized, public research university located between Baltimore, Maryland and Washington, D.C. UMBC is a major center for cutting-edge research in the Baltimore-Washington corridor. The campus is home to more than 20 research centers and institutes.
UMBC’s College of Natural and Mathematical Sciences includes the Departments of Biological Sciences, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Mathematics and Statistics, and Physics. These four departments administer close to half of the Ph.D. programs at UMBC. The College has more than 100 full time faculty members, and includes approximately 1500 students in 7 undergraduate programs and 280 students in 13 graduate programs. Research expenditures currently top $13M per year.

For inquiries directly to Wyeth Pharmaceuticals:
Gerald Burr
Wyeth Pharmaceuticals
Office: 484-865-5138
Cell: 484-686-6998
Email: burrg@wyeth.com

Posted by crose

EXECUTIVE EDUCATION COURSES CONTINUE AT ERICKSON SCHOOL OF AGING STUDIES, SEPT. 18-21

“SALES AND MARKETING” TO BE LED BY DAVID SMITH

CONTACT:
Mike Lurie

Office: 410-455-6380
Cellphone: 443-695-0262
mlurie@umbc.edu

BALTIMORE – The Erickson School of Aging Studies at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) teams once again with the National Investment Center for the Seniors Housing & Care Industry (NIC) to offer a set of Executive Education courses. The series continues at UMBC on Sept. 18-21 with a four-day seminar, “Sales and Marketing,” led by David Smith.

David Smith is president of One On One, Service to Seniors, a consulting group based in St. Louis, Mo. Mr. Smith has nearly 20 years of hands-on sales and marketing experience and is also co-owner, developer, and manager of the The Gatesworth at One McKnight Place and Parc Provence, both nationally acclaimed senior housing communities in St. Louis.

A number of high caliber guest lecturers from the senior living industry will join Smith in facilitating discussions on best practices.

The four-day, interactive course focuses on how to generate higher occupancies and faster fill rates using better marketing and sales practices. Specific course work includes discovering customers’ wants and needs, segmenting markets through research, understanding the relationship of pricing and value, and obtaining honest feedback.

Students also learn about the science of promotion and how to develop leads, design an effective marketing plan and use successful selling techniques.

Finally, the best way to manage the marketing and sales process is discussed, including the use of mystery shopping and sales training.
Smith has been a regular contributor to the NIC Executive Education program at the Erickson School. He is also a frequent lecturer and presenter at NIC, ALFA, ASHA and other industry conferences.

Instructor Profiles:

Anthony Mullen
Chair, Research Committee
National Investment Center

Anthony J. Mullen brings almost twenty years of experience in seniors housing and care to NIC. He has been an executive officer in three major companies within the industry, and was the founder and CEO of Traditions of America, a mid-Atlantic builder of active adult communities, which he sold in 2000. He has experience across the entire spectrum off the continuum of care.

Mr. Mullen was also a founder of the NIC, where he served on the Board and Executive Committees for 12 years.

Mr. Mullen has been one of the industry's leading applied researchers, and has developed key industry guidelines for understanding penetration rates for general feasibility purposes. He has published several groundbreaking articles in the field and has won awards for his pioneering research on absorption rates.

A certified public accountant, Mr. Mullen holds a Master's degree from Drexel University and an undergraduate degree from St. Joseph's University.


Daniel P. Rexford
Executive Vice President of Marketing and Sales
Erickson Retirement Communities

Mr. Rexford is the Executive Vice President of Marketing. He is responsible for developing and implementing the marketing and sales strategies for all Erickson continuing care retirement communities.
He also served as the Executive Director of Charlestown, Erickson’s flagship community in Catonsville, Md. He originally joined the company in 1990, as the Director of Marketing for Charlestown.
Prior to joining Erickson, Mr. Rexford managed the marketing and operations for two companies that provided technical services to the National Cancer Institute, Environmental Protection Agency, Department of the Treasury, General Services Administration, and Department of Defense.

Brian C. Swinton
Retired, Executive Vice President
Sunrise Senior Living

Brian Swinton has been an industry pioneer and leader for the past 19 years. Starting in 1986, he headed the team that created Marriott’s Brighton Gardens, one of the nation’s most successful assisted living concepts, while at the same time he headed the sales and marketing efforts for the entire Marriott Senior Living Division—the nation’s leading provider of quality tier senior living at the time. He also spearheaded the successful Marriott CCRC prototype, Stratford Court, and was a key executive in the development of life care communities (i.e. The Fairfax, The Quadrangle, The Colonnades), senior condominiums (i.e. The Jefferson), and senior cooperatives (i.e. Maplewood) for Marriott.

Following a successful 7 year stint at Marriott, Brian joined The Forum Group team as Senior Vice President in 1993 and again spearheaded the development of another assisted living mainstay, the cottage concept, Hearthside (now MapleRidge), and successfully headed the sales and marketing, product development and construction aspects of the company resulting in the company’s sale to Marriott in 1996.

Mr. Swinton joined Sunrise in 1996 as Executive Vice President where he once again headed the sales and marketing efforts, as well as market feasibility, customer and employee satisfaction and product development. He also headed the innovative Sunrise concept, At Home Assisted Living, currently in major markets around the country.

Brian has served in various industry positions including Chairman of the National Council on Senior’s Housing (NCOSH), an affiliate of the National Association of Homebuilders (NAHB). He also served as a director and vice president of the National Association of Senior Living Industries (NASLI) and participated in dozens of conferences speaking on a variety of industry topics.

Mr. Swinton holds a Master’s Degree in Business Administration with Distinction from Harvard Business School specializing in Marketing and Real Estate.

Margaret Wylde, Ph.D.
President/CEO
ProMatura Group, LLC

Margaret Wylde began conducting research on mature consumers more than 25 years ago. ProMatura Group, LLC, the company founded by Wylde, has played an integral role in understanding what mature consumers want and practically applying this information to seniors housing, service sector, retailers and consumer product developers. Wylde’s mature market, senior housing, product research and development experience includes work for Fortune 100, and start-up corporations, for large companies and single proprietorships, for national associations, and state agencies (see list of Clients). Wylde’s knowledge and expertise of senior housing business issues come from practical day-to-day experience. During her career Wylde has designed, developed and managed seniors housing properties.

Wylde’s knowledge of the senior housing industry is widely recognized as being among the industry’s best. Her contribution to the industries serving mature consumers has been to conduct both proprietary and publically disseminated research. Recent research completed by ProMatura include: a study of 1,056 independent living residents and the communities they chose; a comparative study of independent living residents and a matched sample of household who have chosen not to move to an age-qualified community; a multi-year study of 4,500 60+ households to learn their awareness, knowledge, attitudes and opinions about seniors housing; a study of 12,600 satisfaction surveys from residents of independent living, assisted living and skilled nursing communities; surveys of 1,023 residents of assisted living communities throughout the 48 contiguous states, and a survey of 1,500 adults between 45 and 64 years of age about their responsibilities for parents and other relatives. These studies, and dozens more, were completed for the American Seniors Housing Association, the National Investment Center for the Seniors Housing & Care Industries (NIC) and the Assisted Living Federation of America. NIC is the premier organization that focuses specifically on financing senior housing developments and the myriad of issues that affect how these properties are financed.

Wylde serves on the Boards of Directors of the American Society on Aging, the National Association of Home Builders Seniors Housing Council and LifeSpec Cabinet Systems, Inc. She is a member of the Advisory Board for the National Center for Universal Design at Florida State University, and the Association of Marketing & Sales Executives in Senior Housing. Wylde was a Forum Group Board member during its successful acquisition by Marriott Senior Living Services. Her other professional affiliations include the International Association of Homes and Services for the Aging, the American
Seniors Housing Association, the American Statistical Association, Assisted Living Federation of America, American Marketing Association, Human Factors Society of America, and the Gerontological Society of America.

Wylde has authored four books, dozens of technical papers and articles, and is a prolific contributor to trade and business publications and scholarly journals. Her most recent books include Boomers on the Horizon: Housing Preferences of the 55+ Home Buyer published by Builder Books in 2002, Building for a Lifetime: The Design and Construction of Fully Accessible Homes published by The Taunton Press. She is a frequently sought after speaker, providing keynote addresses to many different audiences.


Specific Areas of Expertise: finding answers and putting information to work; mature consumers, attitudes, opinions and behaviors; research design and analysis; practical application of primary and secondary research to the design and development of seniors housing communities, technology use by mature adults, human factors of older adults, Federal regulations of accessibility.

About The Erickson School of Aging Studies:
The Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC was established in April 2004 with a $5 million commitment from John Erickson, CEO and founder of Erickson. The school focuses on credit and non-credit professional education, research, and policy in aging services and care.

The Executive Development Program at the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC is presented in partnership with NIC, a nonprofit organization that has been the leading source of business and financial information for the senior living industry since 1991. For the last six years, NIC has conducted executive development courses in operations, management, sales, marketing, development, finance, and service quality for emerging industry leaders.

UMBC, an Honors University in Maryland, is a four-year, public research university that is home to leading experts on aging who are active in research, education, and service in the field of gerontology. It is one of a handful of universities in the nation to offer a Ph.D. in Gerontology.

For further details, please call the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC at 443-543-5622.

More information online at:
http://www.umbc.edu/erickson

# # #


Remaining 2006 NIC Executive Education Courses
At the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC

Sales and Marketing
Led by David Smith, President, One on One, Service to Seniors
September 18-21, 2006

Finance, Underwriting and Investment Analysis
Led by Ray Braun, President, Chief Operating Officer & Chief Financial Officer, Health Care REIT, Inc.
October 24-27, 2006

Development
Led by Phil Golden, President and COO, Shelter Properties
November 1-4, 2006

Organizational Excellence and Continuous Quality Improvement
Led by Tony Ingelido, Vice President, Asbury Services, Inc.
TBA

Risk Management
TBA


Posted by mlurie

August 01, 2006

Warren R. Devries is New Dean of Engineering & Information Technology at UMBC

Former National Science Foundation Official to Pursue Business Partnerships, Innovation

CONTACT: Chip Rose, UMBC News
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu

The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) announced today the appointment of Warren R. DeVries, former National Science Foundation official and department chair of mechanical engineering at Iowa State University, as its new Dean of Engineering and Information Technology (IT).

DeVries is a leader in the national drive for excellence in engineering education and is also well known in his field for his pioneering research in manufacturing processes and systems. Since 2002, he has served as Division Director for the NSF’s Division of Design and Manufacturing Innovation, where he led a staff of 15 and managed an annual budget of $65 million. DeVries came to the NSF on assignment from Iowa State University, where he was a Professor and Chair of the Department of Mechanical Engineering.

DeVries said he believes that UMBC’s College of Engineering and Information Technology will thrive in the 21st century by developing: diverse knowledge-enabled graduates, faculty and staff who advance the frontiers of scholarship and innovation to benefit society, and partnerships with government and industry to create new opportunities that have an impact beyond the bounds of the campus.

DeVries, whose initial responsibilities at the NSF included work with the Small Business Innovation Research program, said that he would like to use his experience to spur innovation through education, research and industry partnerships, especially with small or startup technology-based firms.

DeVries said he first became acquainted with UMBC programs and faculty during a visit to the campus over a decade ago. “I saw that exciting things were really starting to happen here,” he said. Another strong impression was that “When you come into UMBC’s campus, the Research and Technology Park is right at the front door. I think that’s very interesting and an important opportunity,” DeVries said.

“I’d like to work with faculty and staff building on UMBC’s reputation for integration of education and research covering the whole spectrum of innovation, from discovery of new knowledge and creativity to that first commercial step of a small technology businesses,” DeVries said.

“This isn’t only important for the economic vitality of Maryland and the nation, but because knowledge and people are key to the research-education-innovation cycle its part of the University’s mission," said DeVries. "Students benefit too, since according to NSF data, the largest fraction of science and engineering graduates today, about 36 percent, are employed by small technology-based firms.”

Another of DeVries’ priorities will be giving students a multidisciplinary education that prepares them to be competitive in today’s global economy. He pointed out that the College of Engineering and Information Technology’s name is indicative of the multidisciplinary opportunities in the College at UMBC.

“In order for our students to have a good life and career, we first need to provide a relevant and solid education,” DeVries said. “We’ll need a truly global view so that our graduates not only have good career opportunities, but also aspire to be leaders in their chosen fields.”

In addition to being a member of the Iowa State faculty, DeVries has also held faculty positions at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, University of Michigan and University of Wisconsin-Madison. DeVries has supervised 11 Ph.D. students and nearly 40 M.S. students, and he has overseen more than $4 million in total research and educational contracts and grants.

He has authored or co-authored numerous technical papers, as well as two textbooks, and taught graduate and undergraduate courses. He received his Ph.D., M.S. and B.S. in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and also received a B.S. in Letters and Engineering from Calvin College.

DeVries has served on the Board of Governors and as Senior Vice President for Engineering for the American Society of Mechanical Engineers (ASME) and on the Board of Directors and as President for the North American Manufacturing Research Institution of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers (SME). He is a Fellow of both the ASME and the SME.

DeVries replaces Dr. Shlomo Carmi, who served as Dean of the College of Engineering and Information Technology and Professor of mechanical engineering since 1996. Carmi, who was the American Society of Mechanical Engineers’ Senior Vice President for Engineering Education from 2003 to 2006, will continue to serve UMBC as a member of the mechanical engineering faculty. DeVries begins his appointment at UMBC August 1.

Note to Media:
To download a high-resolution, color photo of Dr. DeVries, please click on the image at the top of this release.

Posted by crose

July 26, 2006

NASA Scientists Conduct Census of Nearby Hidden Black Holes

UMBC Astrophysicist, International Team, Searching X-Ray Sky

CONTACT: Chip Rose, UMBC News
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu

Scientists on a quest to find hidden black holes in the local universe have found surprisingly few.

The observation implies that if these hidden black holes exist - and most scientists are convinced they do - they must be from the more distant, earlier universe, a concept that has interesting implications for galaxy evolution.

This work constitutes the first census of the highest-energy part of the X-ray sky, where the most dust-enshrouded black holes are thought to shine. A team from NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md., conducted the census, comprised of nearly two years of continuous data from the European Space Agency's International Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory, or INTEGRAL, satellite.

"Naturally it is difficult to find something we know is hiding well and which has eluded detection so far," said Volker Beckmann of Goddard and the Joint Center for Astrophysics at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, lead author on a report in an upcoming issue of The Astrophysical Journal. "INTEGRAL is a telescope that should see nearby hidden black holes, but we have come up short."

The X-ray sky is thousands to millions of times more energetic than the visible sky familiar to our eyes. Much of the X-ray activity is from black holes violently sucking in gas from their surroundings.

Recent breakthroughs in X-ray astronomy, including a thorough black hole census with NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory and Rossi X-ray Timing Explorer, have all dealt with lower-energy X-rays. The energy range is roughly 2,000 to 20,000 electron-volts. Optical light, in comparison, is about 2 electron volts.

The INTEGRAL survey is the first of its kind to glimpse into the largely unexplored higher-energy, or "hard," X-ray regime of 20,000 to 40,000 electron-volts.

"The X-ray background, this pervasive blanket of X-ray light we see everywhere in the universe, peaks at about 30,000 electron volts, yet we really know next to nothing about what produces this radiation," said co-author Neil Gehrels of Goddard.

The theory is that hidden black holes, which scientists call Compton-thick objects, are responsible for the peak at 30,000 electron volts. These X-rays are so energetic that they would penetrate even the most dust-enshrouded black holes yet remain beyond the range of powerful lower-energy X-ray observatories such as Chandra.

High-energy light in general is harder to focus than optical and lower-energy (longer-wavelength) forms of light. As a result, INTEGRAL doesn't have the resolution to make sharp images like Chandra and Hubble can.

"Basically, the higher you go in energy, the harder it is to detect faint sources," said Chris Shrader of Goddard, another co-author. "This is why no hard X-ray mission has been able to study many individual objects in the distant universe. That would require a next-generation telescope. But INTEGRAL is now the first to resolve the local universe."

INTEGRAL can obtain an unbiased count of black holes in the local universe by virtue of seeing even those that are hidden. Of all the black hole galaxies that INTEGRAL detected---that is, galaxies with supermassive black holes in their cores actively accreting gas---about 40 percent were unobscured black hole galaxies, called Seyfert 1 galaxies. About 50 percent were somewhat obscured black hole galaxies called Seyfert 2 galaxies. And less than 10 percent were the heavily shrouded "Compton thick" variety.

This implies that if hidden black holes make up the bulk of the X-ray background, they aren't local. Why? One reason could be that, in the modern local universe, these black holes have had time to blow away the gas and dust that once enshrouded them, leaving them unobscured. This liberation of gas and dust would have its consequences; it would blow away to influence star and galaxy formation elsewhere.

"This is just the tip of the iceberg," Beckmann said. "In a few more months we will have a larger survey completed with the Swift mission. Our goal is to push this kind of observation deeper and deeper into the universe to see black hole activity at early epochs. That's the next great challenge for X-ray and gamma-ray astronomers."

Simona Soldi and Nicolas Produit of the INTEGRAL Science Data Centre near Geneva, Switzerland, also participated in this result.

This release courtesy of NASA Goddard News.

For images, visit:

http://www.nasa.gov/vision/universe/starsgalaxies/integral_blackholes.html

Posted by crose

July 25, 2006

ERICKSON SCHOOL OF AGING STUDIES KICKS OFF "HOT TOPICS" SERIES ON AGING TRENDS

CHARLES LONGINO, JR., PH.D., ASSESSES MIGRATION OF OLDER AMERICANS


CONTACT:
Mike Lurie

Office: 410-455-6380
Cellphone: 443-695-0262
mlurie@umbc.edu

July 25, 2006

BALTIMORE – The Erickson School of Aging Studies at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) introduces its “Hot Topics” series, an ongoing resource regarding aging issues and trends available for easy access by researchers and the general public. The series can be accessed at anytime at www.umbc.edu/erickson.

The inaugural “Hot Topics” installment, Migration of Older Americans: Where and Why, is offered by Charles F. Longino, Jr., Ph.D., and Visiting Professor to the Erickson School. Longino’s research has unearthed trends in the movement of older Americans that should be of interest to developers, planners and bankers, politicians and scholars.

A thorough understanding of migration trends among the aging population, Longino argues, depends on knowing who moves and why they move.

Widely known and celebrated for his work on the migration of people ages 60 and older, Longino assesses the threads common to older people more likely to make an interstate move. They are independent, have moved previously for career-related reasons and now make a relocation decision focused more on the place than the people.

The reasons older members of the population relocate for retirement, Longino says, “depend on the jelling of four factors: 1) demographic particulars (age, gender, race); 2) economic and health resources; 3) previous experience traveling; and 4) ties to people and places at the origin and the destination.

Longino argues that planners are well-advised to be armed with a realistic appraisal of the attractiveness of existing and planned communities and an understanding of the older people they can hope to attract and keep. With that knowledge, planners can be assured that retirement housing and related services can provide an environmentally friendly industry and the income, jobs and new citizens likely to help enrich their new community.

Longino is the president of the Gerontological Society of America, past president of the Association of Gerontology in Higher Education and served for four years as the editor of the Journal of Gerontology: Social Sciences. The second edition of Longino’s book Retirement Migration in America is due to be published in the near future. The publisher of more than 140 scholarly articles, Longino is the Washington M. Wingate Professor of Sociology at Wake Forest University where he directs the Reynolda Gerontology Program.


About The Erickson School of Aging Studies:
The Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC was established in April 2004 with a $5 million commitment from John Erickson, CEO and founder of Erickson Retirement Communities. The school focuses on credit and non-credit professional education, research, and policy in aging services and care.

For further details, please call the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC at 443-543-5622.

More information online at:
http://www.umbc.edu/erickson

# # #

Posted by mlurie

July 07, 2006

$2.9 Million National Science Foundation Grant Funds New UMBC PhD Training Program in Urban Water, Environment

Grant to Provide Multidisciplinary Training for 20 PhD Students Over 5 Years

CONTACT: Chip Rose, UMBC News
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu

The National Science Foundation (NSF) has awarded UMBC a $2.9 million grant to establish a new doctoral student training program in “Water in the Urban Environment.”

The NSF funding, part of a highly competitive and nationally prestigious Integrated Graduate Education and Research Traineeship (IGERT) program, will provide 20 Ph.D. students with annual stipends plus assistance with tuition and fees as UMBC recruits and trains teams of graduate students in the ecology, economics, engineering, public health and policy impacts of urbanization on the Chesapeake Bay region’s water resources.

The “Water in the Urban Environment” Ph.D. training program will involve 32 faculty members from nine UMBC departments and six partner institutions. Like all IGERT programs, the UMBC training will emphasize an interdisciplinary team approach for Ph.D. students. The program includes internships in industry, government, and non-governmental organizations.

“The NSF IGERT program is nationally recognized as a mark of academic excellence,” said Claire Welty, director of the Center for Urban Environmental Research and Education at UMBC. “This grant puts UMBC’s environmental programs on the national map in graduate environmental education and offers Marylanders a superb environmental educational opportunity right in their own back yard.”

According to Welty, “We’ve already recruited four outstanding students for the Fall 2006 semester– from North Carolina, Connecticut, Pennsylvania and Virginia -- and will recruit an additional five for fall 2007,”

The program takes advantage of UMBC’s longtime research partnerships with public agencies, nonprofits, and private consultants in the field of urban environmental and hydrology studies, as well as the proximity of Baltimore to the Chesapeake Bay. UMBC is home of the field headquarters of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study, one of two urban sites in the NSF Long-Term Ecological Research network. In June, UMBC broke ground for the US Geological Survey’s Maryland/Delaware/District of Columbia Water Science Center new home at bwtech@UMBC, the university’s on-campus research and technology park.

The UMBC program is one of approximately 20 new IGERT awards granted this year by the NSF. For more information on the NSF’s IGERT programs, visit www.igert.org.

Posted by crose

June 27, 2006

UMBC, USGS to Celebrate Groundbreaking of Water Science Center

Chesapeake Bay Watershed Researchers, Officials
to Mark Site of Tech Park’s 3rd Building Thursday

CONTACT: Chip Rose, UMBC
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu


The University of Maryland, Baltimore County celebrates a milestone for science in the state’s public interest Thursday as it breaks ground for the new home of the U.S. Geological Survey’s Maryland-Delaware-Washington, D.C. Water Science Center at bwtech@UMBC, the University’s on-campus research and technology park.

Baltimore County Executive Jim Smith, UMBC President Dr. Freeman Hrabowski, and other federal, state and local government officials will join UMBC and USGS environmental scientists at 5523 Research Park Drive, the future site of the one-story, 24,000 square-foot facility for a groundbreaking ceremony starting at 11:30 am.

Construction of the USGS building is scheduled to begin later this month. The real estate development firm Corporate Office Properties Trust (COPT) is managing construction of both the USGS building and a 110,000 square-foot, four-story, multi-tenant building at bwtech@UMBC, the park’s fourth of five planned buildings.

The USGS center employs over 60 scientists and support staff, who are expected to strengthen collaborative work with UMBC and U.S. Forest Service scientists who monitor the ecosystems of the Chesapeake Bay watershed and the health of the region’s water supply, rivers and streams.

The USGS’s decision to move from its previous location in White Marsh was strongly influenced by the longtime research partnership between USGS and UMBC’s Department of Geography and Environmental Systems, Center for Urban and Environmental Research and Education (CUERE), Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering, the U.S. Forest Service and the Baltimore Ecosystem Study.

According to UMBC and USGS officials, the move will give USGS scientists easier access to student employees, labs, scientific instruments, and university researchers. It is expected that UMBC science and engineering students will benefit from on-campus opportunities to combine classroom training with hands-on research experience.

UMBC’s formal connection with USGS goes back to 1997, the beginning of the Baltimore Ecosystem Study (BES), a National Science Foundation-funded Long-Term Ecological Research Project whose field headquarters are located on the UMBC campus. BES, which was renewed for another six-year term in 2004, makes Baltimore’s streams, rivers and water quality among the most highly monitored in the country thanks in large part to an extensive network of USGS equipment and personnel.

The USGS building is the latest in the progress of bwtech@UMBC, Maryland's first university research park, and the only research and development park in Baltimore County. The 41-acre park's first building was completed in 2001 and is occupied by RWD Technologies. The second building was completed in 2004 and is fully leased to 15 entities. The park’s first two buildings were sold to Merritt Properties for $22.5 million in December, 2005.

Posted by crose

June 26, 2006

HEFFNER NAMED DIRECTOR OF EXECUTIVE EDUCATION AT ERICKSON SCHOOL OF AGING STUDIES

JOINS ERICKSON SCHOOL FROM THE BEACON INSTITUTE

CONTACT:
Mike Lurie

Office: 410-455-6380
Cellphone: 443-695-0262
mlurie@umbc.edu

BALTIMORE – Kevin D. Heffner, CAE, CFRE, an executive with the Beacon Institute, has been selected as the new Director of Executive Education for the Erickson School of Aging Studies at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC).

Heffner brings to the Erickson School of Aging Studies considerable experience and expertise in senior care. He will coordinate a program of executive education courses offered by the Erickson School for leaders in the seniors housing and care industry.

The Executive Education Program at the Erickson School is presented in partnership with the National Investment Center for the Seniors Housing & Care Industry (NIC), a nonprofit organization that has been the leading source of business and financial information for the senior living industry since 1991.

“The National Investment Center welcomes Kevin to this position. He brings a proven track record, interpersonal and leadership skills and the desire to help make this a world-class program,” says Tony Mullen, Research Director at NIC. Mullen served as Acting Director of Executive Education during the search process.

Heffner has led the Beacon Institute, a charitable organization founded to encourage quality of life and quality of care for seniors, since its inception nine years ago. The Beacon Institute is the largest senior-case association in the greater Maryland/Washington D.C. region. He oversaw the development of its Handelman Learning Center, a site in Columbia, Md., that hosts more than 70 educational programs each year. Heffner also developed the Mid-Atlantic Wellspring Program, a nationally acclaimed quality-care improvement model.

“I look forward to leading the growth of the Executive Education Program at the Erickson School,” Heffner says. “The 2006 series of NIC Executive Education sessions is just one example of the resources our program delivers to leaders in our industry. We are eager to continue the cultivation and growth of this tradition.”

About The Erickson School of Aging Studies:
The Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC was established in April 2004 with a $5 million commitment from John Erickson, CEO and founder of Erickson Retirement Communities. The school focuses on credit and non-credit professional education, research, and policy in aging services and care.

The Executive Development Program at the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC is presented in partnership with NIC, a nonprofit organization that has been the leading source of business and financial information for the senior living industry since 1991. For the last six years, NIC has conducted executive development courses in operations, management, sales, marketing, development, finance, and service quality for emerging industry leaders.

UMBC, an Honors University in Maryland, is a four-year, public research university that is home to leading experts on aging who are active in research, education, and service in the field of gerontology. It is one of a handful of universities in the nation to offer a Ph.D. in Gerontology.

For further details, please call the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC at 443-543-5622.

More information online at:
http://www.umbc.edu/erickson

# # #


2006 NIC Executive Education Courses
At the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC

Business and Strategy of Seniors Housing and Care
Led by Brian Swinton, Retired, Executive Vice President, Sunrise Senior Living
February 22-25, 2006

Management and Operations
Led by Chris Hollister, CEO, Southern Assisted Living, Inc.
Date: May 17-20, 2006

Sales and Marketing
Led by David Smith, President, One on One, Service to Seniors
September 18-21, 2006

Finance, Underwriting and Investment Analysis
Led by Ray Braun, President, Chief Operating Officer & Chief Financial Officer, Health Care REIT, Inc.
October 24-27, 2006

Development
Led by Phil Golden, President and COO, Shelter Properties
November 1-4, 2006

Organizational Excellence and Continuous Quality Improvement
Led by Tony Ingelido, Vice President, Asbury Services, Inc.
TBA

Risk Management
Led by Allen Lynch, Partner, Nixon Peabody, LLP
TBA

Posted by mlurie

June 14, 2006

Wyeth Research and UMBC Form Partnership

CONTACT:
Mike Lurie

Office: 410-455-6380
Cellphone: 443-695-0262
mlurie@umbc.edu

BALTIMORE – The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and Wyeth Research have formed a three-year, multi-level partnership. The partnership will include graduate fellowships for talented students conducting research in fields of joint interest to UMBC faculty and Wyeth scientists and a three-year commitment to support UMBC’s annual life science symposium as a Gold-Level sponsor.

Wyeth’s sponsorship of the symposium, A Look Ahead: Futures in Biomedical Research, will provide direct support for the Departments of Biology, Chemistry and Biochemistry and Chemical and Biochemical Engineering at UMBC. The annual life science symposium features nationally recognized speakers, promotes the research of UMBC students, and attracts hundreds of scientists, educators and biotechnology business leaders.

“Wyeth’s contribution to UMBC is outstanding. They are an ideal partner for UMBC in the life sciences, demonstrating a strong commitment to scientific excellence, diversity and higher education,” said Dr. Geoffrey Summers, dean of the College of Natural and Mathematical Sciences.

The students selected for the two-year fellowships will be designated Wyeth Fellows and will receive an annual stipend and mentoring support from an industry scientist at Wyeth research.

The 2006 Wyeth Fellowship will be awarded to a rising, second- or third-year Ph.D candidate in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry. Each Wyeth Fellow will have the opportunity to present his or her research findings to a group of senior scientists at Wyeth Research.

“We are very pleased to be working with UMBC at this new level,” said Dr. Parimal Desai, Vice President, Analytical & Quality Sciences at Wyeth. “UMBC produces some of our most promising new scientists. Our experiences working with UMBC students and faculty have been excellent.”

UMBC and Wyeth have established a steering committee to identify promising areas of research and expand collaborative relationships between Wyeth scientists and UMBC faculty and students. The steering committee will build on the momentum of Wyeth’s active recruiting of UMBC students for internships and full-time positions.

Wyeth, headquartered in Madison, NJ, is a global leader in pharmaceuticals, consumer health care products and animal health care products. The company is a leader in the discovery, development and manufacturing of pharmaceuticals, vaccines, biotechnology products and non-prescription medicines that improve the quality of life people worldwide. With research and development programs focused on small molecules, vaccines and biotechnology, Wyeth is exploring more than 60 new therapies for medical conditions such as diabetes, breast cancer, multiple sclerosis, HIV, Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia.

UMBC is a mid-sized, public research university located between Baltimore, Maryland and Washington, D.C. UMBC is a major center for cutting-edge research in the Baltimore-Washington corridor. The campus is home to more than 20 research centers and institutes.

UMBC’s College of Natural and Mathematical Sciences includes the Departments of Biological Sciences, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Mathematics and Statistics, and Physics. These four departments administer close to half of the Ph.D. programs at UMBC. The College has more than 100 full time faculty members, and includes approximately 1500 students in 7 undergraduate programs and 280 students in 13 graduate programs. Research expenditures currently top $13M per year.

For inquiries directly to Wyeth Pharmaceuticals:
Gerald Burr
Wyeth Pharmaceuticals
Office: 484-865-5138
Cell: 484-686-6998
Email: burrg@wyeth.com

Posted by mlurie

June 12, 2006

Howard Hughes Medical Institute Awards $2.2 Million to HHMI Scholars Program at UMBC

CONTACT: Mike Lurie
410-455-6380 office
443-695-0262 cellphone
Email: mlurie@umbc.edu

The Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) has awarded a $2.2 million teaching grant to the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) to further develop the HHMI Scholars Program, a science education initiative that focuses on students from diverse backgrounds.

The HHMI Scholars Program provides a summer “bridge” structure that helps freshmen make a smooth college transition. During their freshman year, Hughes Scholars rotate through several labs and eventually choose a "home" laboratory in which they will do long-term research. The summer before their sophomore year, they start working in that lab. Scholars also complete at least one summer of research with an HHMI investigator elsewhere in the country, usually before their junior year. Each scholar also has the option of spending his or her junior year as an exchange student in the lab of another HHMI investigator.

Hughes Scholars also provide math and science tutoring for elementary and high school students in Baltimore to inspire the next generation of science majors. They might also tutor fellow UMBC undergraduates.

UMBC is one of 50 universities in the nation to receive an HHMI grant in this round of funding. The first UMBC Hughes Scholars supported by an undergraduate science education grant from HHMI graduated from UMBC in 2005. All three students have gone on to Ph.D. or M.D./Ph.D. programs at Stanford University, The Johns Hopkins University, and Case Western Reserve University. Five additional students recently graduated and all have been accepted into a Ph.D., M.D./Ph.D. or M.D. program at Baylor College of Medicine, University of Florida, University of Maryland, University of Michigan, and Cornell University.

"They're not just getting into graduate programs, they’re getting into the very best programs," said Michael Summers, the only HHMI investigator at a Maryland public university and director of the Hughes Scholar Program at UMBC. Of 25 Hughes Scholars so far, 23 are African American. While many Hughes Scholars are from Maryland, students also come to the program from as far away as California, Florida, North Carolina and South Carolina.

Hughes Scholars will interact with students who are in the UMBC Meyerhoff Scholarship Program, a program open to high-achieving high school seniors with an interest in pursuing doctoral study in the sciences or engineering and advancing minorities in the sciences and related fields.

“With this support, some of the brightest young students who are interested in biomedical research and issues of diversity will have the opportunity to focus on their studies and research while undergraduates and work with some of the nation’s best biomedical researchers,” Summers said.

Hughes Scholars are selected as incoming freshmen. An HHMI grant provides funds for summer research and travel to scientific meetings. The grant also covers tuition and room and board for their first two years of college. Tuition, room and board are covered for the students' junior and senior years through a federal grant.

Before classes start, Hughes Scholars attend a summer program to familiarize themselves with the campus and the research being done at UMBC.

“Summer bridge programs—a component of several of the new grants—are particularly important in helping minority students make a successful transition to the world of the research university,” said Peter J. Bruns, HHMI vice president for grants and special programs. “Individualized mentoring and early research experiences with working scientists also are vital components of a university education that prepares undergraduates for graduate school and careers in science. The universities want to offer their students these opportunities, and HHMI is pleased to help them do so.”

In selecting recipients of the new grants, HHMI reviewed 158 applications. A panel composed of leading scientists and educators, including HHMI professors and an invited 214 HHMI investigators, reviewed the applications.

“We believe it is vital to bring fresh perspectives to the teaching of established scientific disciplines and to develop novel courses in emerging areas, such as computational biology, genomics, and bio-imaging, said Thomas R. Cech, HHMI president. “Our grantee universities are providing hands-on research experiences to help prepare undergraduates, including women and minorities underrepresented in the sciences, for graduate studies and for careers in biomedical research, medicine, and science education.”

A nonprofit medical research organization, the Howard Hughes Medical Institute was established in 1953 by the aviator-industrialist. The Institute, headquartered in Chevy Chase, Maryland, is one of the largest philanthropies in the world, with an endowment of $14.8 billion at the close of its 2005 fiscal year. HHMI spent $483 million in support of biomedical research and $80 million for support of a variety of science education and other grants programs in fiscal 2005.

Posted by crose

UMBC Scientists Spot the Greatest of Great Balls of Fire

Contact:
Chip Rose

410-455-5793 office
443-690-0307 cellphone
Email: crose@umbc.edu



A research effort led by the University of Maryland, Baltimore County has found a comet-like ball of gas over a billion times the mass of the sun hurling through a distant galaxy cluster over 500 miles per second. This colossal "ball of fire" is by far the largest object of this kind ever identified.

Dr. Alexis Finoguenov and Prof. Mark Henriksen of the UMBC Department of Physics and visiting UMBC scientist Dr. Francesco Miniati discovered the gas ball with a European X-ray satellite called XMM-Newton.

The gas ball is about three million light years across, or about five billion times the size of our solar system. It appears from our perspective as a circular X-ray glow with a comet-like tail nearly half the size of the moon. This observation is described in the Astrophysical Journal.

"The size and velocity of this gas ball is truly fantastic," said Finoguenov, who is an adjunct assistant professor of physics at UMBC and an associated scientist at the Max Planck Institute for Extra-Terrestrial Physics in Garching, Germany. "This is likely a massive building block being delivered to one of the largest assembly of galaxies we know."

The gas ball is in a galaxy cluster called Abell 3266, millions of light years from Earth, thus posing absolutely no danger to our solar system. Abell 3266 contains hundreds of galaxies and great amounts of hot gas that is nearly a hundred million degrees. Both the cluster gas and the giant gas ball are held together by the gravitational attraction of unseen dark matter.

"What interests astronomers is not just the size of the gas ball but the role it plays in the formation and evolution of structure in the universe," said Miniati, who worked on this data at UMBC while visiting from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich, Switzerland.

Abell cluster 3266 is part of the Horologium-Reticulum super-cluster and is one of the most massive galaxy clusters in the southern sky. It is still actively growing in size, as indicated by the gas ball, and will become one of the largest mass concentrations in the nearby universe.

Using XMM-Newton data, the science team produced an entropy map, which is a thermodynamical property that allows for the separation of the cold and dense gas of the comet from the hotter and more rarefied gas of the cluster. This is based on X-ray spectra. The data show with remarkable detail the process of gas being stripped from the comet's core and forming a large tail containing lumps of colder and denser gas. The researchers estimate that a sun's worth of mass is lost every hour.

"In Abell 3266 we are seeing structure formation in action," said Henriksen. "Dark matter is the gravitational glue holding the gas ball together. But as it races through the galaxy cluster, a tug-of-war ensues where the galaxy cluster eventually wins, stripping off and dispersing gas that perhaps one day will seed star and galaxy growth within the cluster."

XMM-Newton was built by and is operated by the European Space Agency.

For images and more information about the result, refer to http://www.esa.int/esaSC/SEMWD1AATME_index_0.html.

For a directory of high-resolution images, refer to: http://universe.nasa.gov/press/xmm

Special Thanks to Christopher Wanjek at NASA-Goddard News for this release.

Posted by crose

May 19, 2006

UMBC Set to Graduate 1,200 Students

46th Commencement Ceremonies Award Degrees to 1,000 Undergraduates, 200 Graduate Students on May 24, 25

MIT Physicist/Author,
Hopkins Neuroscience Pioneer are Speakers


CONTACTS: Mike Lurie
410-455-6380 office
443-695-0262 cellphone
Email: mlurie@umbc.edu

Chip Rose
410-455-5793 office
443-690-0307 cellphone
Email: crose@umbc.edu

The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) will award degrees to over 1,000 undergraduates and 200 graduate students from the Class of 2006 during the University’s 46th commencement ceremonies to be held Wednesday, May 24 and Thursday, May 25.

The UMBC Class of 2006 includes students accepted by prestigious graduate programs at some of the world’s top universities, including Yale, Harvard, Stanford, King’s College London, the University of St. Andrews in Scotland, Johns Hopkins, the University of Chicago, Tufts University, the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill and the University of Michigan.

UMBC graduates have also secured jobs with a wide spectrum of corporations, nonprofits and government agencies, including Microsoft, Northrop Grumman, Booz Allen Hamilton, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Science Applications International Corporation, T. Rowe Price, Mercantile Bank, Xerox and the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

Graduate student commencement will be held Wednesday, May 24 at 10 a.m. on the UMBC campus at the Retriever Activities Center. Dr. Alan Lightman, a physicist and author and adjunct professor of humanities at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, will receive an Honorary Doctor of Humanities degree for his significant contributions to the literary, scientific and education communities. Lightman’s 1993 novel, "Einstein's Dreams," was an international bestseller and has been translated into 30 languages.

The undergraduate ceremony will be held on Thursday, May 25, at 1 p.m., at the 1st Mariner Arena in downtown Baltimore. Dr. Solomon Snyder, distinguished service professor of neuroscience, pharmacology and psychiatry at The Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, will deliver the commencement address and receive an Honorary Doctor of Science degree for his research accomplishments in neuroscience.

Snyder’s discoveries and techniques for identifying receptors for neurotransmitters and drugs have resulted in major advances in molecular neuroscience and drug design. He shared the prestigious Albert Lasker Award in 1978 for the discovery of the brain’s opiate receptors and, in 2003, received the National Medal of Science, the United States’ top scientific recognition.

Dr. Richard Brodhead, president of Duke University, will receive an Honorary Doctor of Humane Letters degree at the undergraduate ceremony for his achievements as a scholar, teacher and advocate for the advancement of higher education.

Brodhead, an expert in 19th-century American literature who has written or edited more than a dozen books, arrived at Duke after a 32-year career at Yale University. He has been involved with national higher education issues as a member of the Business-Higher Education Forum, a trustee of the Carnegie Corporation and a Presidential appointee to the J. William Fulbright Foreign Scholarship Board. His scholarly work has been honored by his election to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences.

Amber McGuigan, UMBC’s 2006 valedictorian, will also speak at Thursday’s ceremony. McGuigan, a Sondheim Public Affairs Scholar who maintained a 4.0 G.P.A. as a double major in social work and economics, recently completed a year-long internship in the children's program at the House of Ruth Maryland. McGuigan is a native of Blackwood, N.J. and graduated from Highland Regional High School.

The Co-Salutatorians are Joe Howley, an ancient studies major from Silver Spring, M.D., and Roxann Brooks, a biological sciences major from Chesapeake, V.A. Howley, a Rhodes Scholar nominee and graduate of Montgomery Blair High School, will pursue graduate studies in classics at the University of St. Andrews. Brooks, a graduate of Norfolk Academy and a Meyerhoff Scholar, will pursue a doctorate of veterinary medicine and a Ph.D. in the veterinary scientist training program at the University of California, Davis.

For more information on UMBC Commencement Ceremonies, please visit:
http://www.umbc.edu/commencement

Posted by crose

May 02, 2006

UMBC, Johns Hopkins, Join Princeton in Multi-Million NSF Engineering Research Center

Advanced Research in Mid-Infrared Spectrum Could Yield Sensor Breakthroughs for Medicine, Environment, Military, Homeland Security

CONTACTS: Mike Lurie
410-455-6380 office
443-695-0262 cellphone
Email: mlurie@umbc.edu

Chip Rose
410-455-5793 office
443-690-0307 cellphone
Email: crose@umbc.edu


BALTIMORE– The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and The Johns Hopkins University are part of a newly announced multimillion-dollar National Science Foundation (NSF) Engineering Research Center based at Princeton University that is expected to revolutionize sensor technology, yielding supersensitive devices that can detect minute amounts of chemicals found in the atmosphere, emitted from factories or exhaled in human breath.

The goal of the Center’s research is to produce devices that are so low in cost and easy to use that they transform the way physicians monitor patients, states track air quality, governments guard against terror attacks and scientists understand the evolution of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

Other partner institutions with Princeton, Johns Hopkins and UMBC are Rice University, Texas A&M University and City College of New York. NSF and industrial funding for the Center could exceed $40 million over 10 years. NSF funding started May 1 with $2.97 million for the first year.

The center – named MIRTHE, for Mid-Infrared Technologies for Health and the Environment – will combine the work of about 40 faculty members, 30 graduate students and 30 undergraduates from the six universities. The center also is collaborating with dozens of industrial partners on technology commercialization and is partnering with several educational outreach partners to apply MIRTHE research in improving science and engineering education.

“The sensors we are creating will be portable and easy to use,” said Claire Gmachl, associate professor of electrical engineering at Princeton and MIRTHE’s director. “Today’s state-of-the-art sensors are very sensitive, but require an expert to operate and are bulky and expensive. Our vision is to make sensors with the same or better level of sensitivity at a fraction of the size and cost.”

Sensor technologies developed by MIRTHE team members are expected to have a variety of commercial, military and educational applications. UMBC is home to several NASA-Goddard related atmospheric, environmental and earth science research centers and the Baltimore Ecosystem Study, where MIRTHE technologies should improve monitoring of pollution in the soil, water and air. Another potential application is an “invisible fence” sensor system that can vastly improve detection of chemical and biological hazards for military troops in the battlefield and homeland security first responders.

MIRTHE is a National Science Foundation Engineering Research Center, one of several interdisciplinary centers located at universities across the United States. The centers are among the foundation’s largest and most prestigious grants.

MIRTHE team members’ expertise ranges from fundamental science to applied technology. Work on MIRTHE at UMBC will be led by MIRTHE deputy director Anthony Johnson, a past president of the Optical Society of America and director of UMBC’s Center for Advanced Studies in Photonics Research (CASPR).

“This is an exciting day for engineering research in the Baltimore-Washington region” Johnson said. “With seven faculty researchers each from The Johns Hopkins University and UMBC, this is incredible news for science in the state of Maryland.”

As deputy director of MIRTHE, Johnson brings a wealth of knowledge on the design, workings and manufacture of next-generation sensors based on novel optoelectronic materials. These sensors will be capable of detecting chemical and biological molecular markers in the mid-infrared portion of the spectrum.

Other UMBC researchers on the MIRTHE team include: L. Michael Hayden, chair of physics; Yanhua Shih, professor of physics; Joel Morris, Curtis Menyuk and Fow-Sen Choa, professors of computer science and electrical engineering; and Claire Welty, director of the Center for Urban Environmental Research and Education.

Johns Hopkins researchers involved in MIRTHE include: Terence H. Risby of the Bloomberg School of Public Health; Katalin Szlavecz, a geologist and lecturer at the Krieger School of Arts and Sciences; Robert Brown of the Department of Anesthesiology and Critical Care Medicine in the School of Medicine; Jacob Khurgin of the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering in the Whiting School of Engineering; Charles Lowenstein and Steven Solga of the Department of Medicine in the School of Medicine; and Michael Trush of the Department of Environmental Health Sciences in the Bloomberg School of Public Health.

MIRTHE’s other key mission is in education – working to train a new and diverse generation of engineering students in the U.S. The center will incorporate extensive efforts to engage college and K-12 students in hands-on science and engineering projects, with major outreach programs taking place at UMBC, City College of New York and Princeton.

At UMBC, MIRTHE will link with the Meyerhoff Scholars Program, which is recognized nationally as a model for preparing high-achieving undergraduate students, particularly African-Americans, for research careers in science and engineering. Johnson also has extensive experience with K-12 optical science education outreach to under-represented minority students through his work with the Optical Society of America’s Hands-On Optics (HOO) program.

PROMISE: Maryland’s Alliance for Graduate Education and the Professoriate (AGEP), which is also sponsored by the NSF, will focus on the cultivation, retention and successful graduation of graduate students from populations that are underrepresented in MIRTHE’s core disciplines,” said UMBC’s PROMISE Director Renetta Tull.

The work of creating the successful proposal to the NSF already has established a sense of community among the participants. “We are delighted to be partnering with Princeton and the other fine institutions in the Engineering Research Center’s critical work,” said Freeman Hrabowski, president of UMBC.

Posted by crose

May 01, 2006

Grasmick to Be Honored for Fighting Tech Gender Gap at UMBC’s Computer Mania Day

Fashion Designer Cynthia Rowley to Link High-Tech, High Fashion
For 100’s of Middle School Girls Saturday

CONTACT: Chip Rose, UMBC
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu

BALTIMORE - State Superintendent of Schools Dr. Nancy Grasmick will be honored for her contributions to fighting the gender gap in information technology this Saturday at UMBC’s fourth annual Computer Mania Day event. Fashion designer Cynthia Rowley headlines the day of free, fun, hands-on activities which brings hundreds of middle school girls from across Maryland for tech career path inspiration by women role models from industry and academia.

The Center for Woman and Information Technology (CWIT) at UMBC, which addresses and rectifies women's under-representation in information technology and enhances the understanding of the relationship between gender and IT, will present the Joan Korenman Award to Grasmick during the start of the day’s activities at 10:10 AM in UMBC’s Retriever Activities Center.

The Joan Korenman Award is named for the founder of CWIT and honors an individual or group of individuals who have supported, promoted, and encouraged girls and women to strive to achieve personal and professional growth through the use of, employment in, or leadership in information technology or a related field, where women are traditionally underrepresented.

“I’m thrilled to be a recipient of the Joan Korenman Award this year,” said Grasmick. “I continue to encourage women to persevere in their efforts to achieve their objectives. We must strive to have equity in all fields, including those that are technology based. I truly believe that we should continue to create and sustain pathways for all individuals to enter and remain in Information Technology or a related technology field.”

Many Baltimore-Washington area technology firms give financial and volunteer support to Computer Mania Day, which they see as an effective way to increase gender diversity in high-tech industries.

Research shows that the information technology (IT) gender gap opens as early as the middle school years, when girls are most image-conscious and do not want to be labeled as “geeks” or “nerds.” Girls also make up only 14 percent of Advanced Placement students in computer science, a key to success in IT-related fields at the college level.

"We are thrilled to continue our support of CWIT and its goal to encourage students', especially girls', interest and involvement in information technology," said Jennifer Jones, Sales Vice President for AT&T, who will present the award to Grasmick.

"Computer Mania Day demonstrates that science and computer skills not only facilitate our fast-paced, 24/7 connected lives, these skills enhance job performance and improve efficiencies across all industries,” said Jones. “This message is especially important to share with our nation's young people so that the U.S. will not continue to lose its competitive advantage in the global marketplace." The AT&T Foundation is a sponsor of Computer Mania Day.

"There is no greater imperative for protecting the future technological strength and security of our nation than getting today's primary and secondary-school children interested in math, science and engineering-related disciplines,” said James F. Pitts, Corporate Vice President and President of Northrop Grumman’s Electronic Systems sector. “That's why we at Northrop Grumman strongly support activities such as Computer Mania Day at UMBC." Katherine A. Gray, VP of F16 Sensor Systems at Northrop Grumman Electronics Systems, will give the welcoming address to Computer Mania attendees.

Rowley, whose signature designs are found in Cynthia Rowley boutiques, better department stores and specialty stores across the U.S. and globe, has won multiple awards from The Council of Fashion Designers of America. Her creations have been featured in Vogue, Elle, Glamour, Harper’s Bazaar and The New York Times. She is also the co-author of a best-selling series of books on personal and home style and an entrepreneur.

At Computer Mania Day, kids will get the chance to meet Rowley and participate in workshops led by positive female role models from UMBC along with business, government and education leaders. Girls’ events highlights include “Hardware Rocks,” “Google of Opportunities,” digital art and imaging, and the physics of do-it-yourself hot air balloons. Adult workshop highlights include how to prepare your kids for college, “Computers 101,” and “Cyber Safety: Keeping Your Child Protected Online.” All attendees will have the chance to win great giveaways like the HP iPAQ, Dell USB Memory Key and Cisco Routers.

EVENT DETAILS: Saturday, May 6, 2006. 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. Check-in at UC Ballroom, UMBC. FREE lunch included. All adult and student attendees MUST register ahead of time online at www.computer-mania.info. To sign up or for more information, visit www.computer-mania.info or call 410-455-8433.

NOTE TO MEDIA:
A hi-resolution, color photo of Cynthia Rowley is available online at:
http://www.umbc.edu/NewsEvents/PhotoGal/CynthiaRowley.jpg

About the AT&T Foundation:

The new AT&T Foundation, the philanthropic arm of AT&T Inc., supports programs that build communities and improve access to information technologies, technology training and professional skills development. The new AT&T Foundation will provide more than $60 million in 2006 in charitable contributions, thereby placing it among the top five largest corporate foundations in the country. The new AT&T Foundation combines over forty years and $1.7 billion of philanthropic commitment to communities across the country.

Posted by crose

April 24, 2006

COPT to Develop Second Building for bwtech@UMBC Research Park

110,000 Square-Foot Building to be Multi-Tenant Facility

CONTACT: Chip Rose, UMBC
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu

UMBC's on-campus research and technology park, bwtech@UMBC, and Corporate Office Properties Trust (COPT) announced today that COPT will build and own a second building at the park.

The 110,000 square foot, four-story office building will located at 5520 Research Park Drive on ground leased from UMBC Research Park Corporation and will target large and small technology companies as tenants. The total construction cost of the project is projected to be approximately $22 million.

“We are very pleased to further our relationship with UMBC by being given the opportunity to develop a second building for their expanding research and technology park and to create more critical mass for COPT within the park,” said Randall M. Griffin, President and CEO of Corporate Office Properties Trust.

This building will be adjacent to a development project recently announced within bwtech@UMBC which is the 23,500 square foot new home for the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Maryland-Delaware-District of Columbia Water Science Center located at 5522 Research Park Drive. This would bring COPT’s total square foot ownership in the park to 133,900 square feet.

bwtech@UMBC was Maryland's first university research park and is the only research and development park in Baltimore County. The 41-acre park's first building, completed in 2001, is occupied by RWD Technologies. A second building, completed in 2004, is fully leased.

About COPT:
Corporate Office Properties Trust (COPT) is a fully integrated, self-managed real estate investment trust (REIT) that focuses on the ownership, management, leasing, acquisition and development of suburban office properties located primarily in submarkets within the Greater Washington, DC region. As of December 31, 2005, the Company owned 183 office properties totaling 14.6 million rentable square feet, which included 18 properties totaling 885,000 square feet held through joint ventures. The Company has implemented a core customer expansion strategy that is built around meeting, through acquisitions and development, the multi-location requirements of the Company’s existing strategic tenants. The Company’s property management services team provides comprehensive property and asset management to company owned properties and select third party clients.

COPT’s development and construction services team provides a wide range of development and construction management services for company owned properties, as well as land planning, design/build services, consulting, and merchant development to select third party clients. The Company’s shares are traded on the New York Stock Exchange under the symbol OFC. More information on Corporate Office Properties Trust can be found on the Internet at www.copt.com.

About bwtech@UMBC:
bwtech@UMBC is a 41-acre research and technology community at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). bwtech@UMBC has a total development capacity of up to 330,000 square feet of office and laboratory space. The USGS building will be the third of five planned state-of-the-art buildings containing over 300,000 square feet of office and wet lab space. The park’s 62,000 square-foot first building has been leased by the information technology firm RWD Technologies since 2001. The second building, a 60,000-square-foot multi-tenant building, is fully leased with tenants including The NASA Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center, software maker BD Metrics Inc., healthcare media and education firm Med-IQ, the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC, the engineering/design firm Edwards & Kelcey, and UMBC’s Alex. Brown Center for Entrepreneurship.

UMBC began planning for a new research and technology park in the early 1990s, based on the success of other U.S. parks and the vision of the late Michael Hooker, UMBC president from 1986-1992. To date, UMBC’s research park and technology incubator have received public and private sector funding from the Maryland Economic Development Corporation (MEDCO), the State of Maryland, the City of Baltimore, Baltimore County, the U.S. Department of Commerce, The Abell Foundation, and the Maryland Technology Development Corporation (TEDCO.) bwtech@UMBC is part of Baltimore County's Southwest Enterprise Zone, making companies moving to the park eligible for credits on real property and income taxes, as well as credits for job creation.

Posted by crose

April 18, 2006

Executive Education Courses Continue at Erickson School of Aging Studies, May 17-20

"Management and Operations" to be Led by CEO of Southern Assisted Living, Inc.

CONTACT: Mike Lurie
Office: 410-455-6380
Cellphone: 443-695-0262
mlurie@umbc.edu

BALTIMORE - The Erickson School of Aging Studies at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) teams once again with the National Investment Center for the Seniors Housing & Care Industry (NIC) to offer a set of Executive Education courses. The series continues at UMBC on May 17-20 with a four-day seminar, "Management and Operations," led by Chris Hollister, CEO of Southern Assisted Living, Inc.

The seminar is the latest in a series of four-day Executive Education
seminars which the Erickson School at UMBC will host in 2006. A complete
schedule and overview of the full 2006 series is available at the bottom
of this advisory.

Although "Management and Operations" can be completed as a non-credit
course, industry executives also may complete this course for credit
toward one of two new graduate credit options. Executives can take this
course for 3 credits, or they can complete it as part of their
enrollment in the 4-course graduate certificate in Seniors Housing
Administration. (Those interested in the graduate-certificate option
should contact Dr. Leslie Morgan for further information at 443-543-5622.)

"Management and Operations" is designed to examine best practices in the
management and operations of the professional seniors housing and care
company. It begins with an explanation of the diversity, size and
complexity of the industry. It proceeds to focus on the science of
management and ethical leadership as it applies to the field, and the
importance of strategic thinking, obtaining a sustainable competitive
advantage through uniqueness, lower cost or better objective value, and
providing economic value above the cost of capital.

Chris Hollister is co-founder, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of
Southern Assisted Living, Inc. (SALI). SALI is the largest provider of
assisted living services in the state of North Carolina and one of the
top 20 assisted living providers in the nation.

Before founding SALI, he held various management positions in the assisted living and seniors
housing industry for over 19 years and continues to be a frequent
speaker at regional and national conferences. He served on the board of
the Assisted Living Federation of American (ALFA) from 2000-2004,
serving as Treasurer from April, 2002 to April, 2004. He received a BS
in Economics from Texas A&M University and an MBA from the Fuqua School
of Business at Duke University. Guest speakers will include a variety of
other experts from the seniors housing and care industry.

"Management and Operations" will examine the crucial role of employee
engagement, loyalty and service quality in detail, with the necessary
passion for understanding residents and achieving resident loyalty. The
role of corporate culture, organizational excellence and performance
measurement, including the balanced scorecard, are explained in the
context of delivering service quality and clinical outcomes in health care.

The course proceeds to examine operations of the various functional
areas including the role of management information systems and
technology. It also addresses best practices in food service,
hospitality, maintenance, social activities and other areas.

The course concludes with an examination of financial management and
reporting and the critical role of risk management in an increasingly
regulated, litigated and competitive environment.

NIC is an active partner with the Erickson School of Aging Studies at
UMBC and works closely with the Erickson School on numerous initiatives.
NIC brings to this seminar and the rest of the 2006 Executive Education
series a legacy of expertise in the field of senior living executive
development. The series will be held on the grounds of the Erickson
School, known for training emerging industry leaders in the burgeoning
seniors housing and care business.

"The 'Management and Operations' course offers an opportunity for executives to
enhance their credentials with graduate credits while focusing on best practices in
the management and operations of the professional seniors housing and care company,"
says Tony Mullen, Acting Director of Executive Education at the Erickson School and
the NIC Research Director.

About The Erickson School of Aging Studies:

The Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC was established in April
2004 with a $5 million commitment from John Erickson, CEO and founder of
Erickson. The school focuses on credit and non-credit professional
education, research, and policy in aging services and care.

The Executive Development Program at the Erickson School of Aging
Studies at UMBC is presented in partnership with NIC, a nonprofit
organization that has been the leading source of business and financial
information for the senior living industry since 1991. For the last six
years, NIC has conducted executive development courses in operations,
management, sales, marketing, development, finance, and service quality
for emerging industry leaders.

UMBC, an Honors University in Maryland, is a four-year, public research
university that is home to leading experts on aging who are active in
research, education, and service in the field of gerontology. It is one
of a handful of universities in the nation to offer a Ph.D. in Gerontology.

For further details, please call the Erickson School of Aging Studies at
UMBC at 443-543-5622.

More information online at:

http://www.umbc.edu/erickson

Remaining 2006 NIC Executive Education Courses At the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC

Management and Operations
Led by Chris Hollister, CEO, Southern Assisted Living, Inc.
Date: May 17-20, 2006

Risk Management
Led by Allen Lynch, Partner, Nixon Peabody, LLP
June 7-10, 2006

Sales and Marketing
Led by David Smith, President, One on One, Service to Seniors
September 18-21, 2006

Finance, Underwriting and Investment Analysis
Led by Ray Braun, President, Chief Operating Officer & Chief Financial
Officer, Health Care REIT, Inc.
October 24-27, 2006

Development
Led by Phil Golden, President and COO, Shelter Properties
November 1-4, 2006

Organizational Excellence and Continuous Quality Improvement
Led by Tony Ingelido, Vice President, Asbury Services, Inc.
TBA

Posted by crose

April 03, 2006

Drs. Hrabowski, Summers Share Success Strategies for Producing Minority Scientists, Engineers

'Preparing Minority Scientists, Engineers' Appears in Science Magazine

CONTACT: Mike Lurie
Office: 410-455-6380
Cellphone: 443-695-0262
mlurie@umbc.edu

BALTIMORE – President Freeman Hrabowski and Dr. Michael Summers of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), have published an article in the March 31 issue of Science Magazine, "Preparing Minority Scientists and Engineers," that examines successful strategies for educating minority scientists and engineers in college and fostering their pursuit of doctorates and medical degrees.

The authors begin by noting that well-prepared minority students are originally interested in pursuing scientific or engineering careers, but far too few of those students actually graduate with degrees in those subjects. Students who entered UMBC's Meyerhoff Program, for example, were twice as likely to earn a science or engineering bachelor's degree and 5.3 times more likely to enroll in post-graduate study, when compared to those who were accepted to UMBC's Meyerhoff Program but attended other institutions.

Hrabowski and Summers then identify several factors necessary for minority student success, such as involving the students in scientific research projects as early as possible.

The Meyerhoff Program (named after its founders, Baltimore philanthropists Robert and his late wife Jane Meyerhoff), focuses on producing bachelor's degree recipients, particularly African-Americans, who go on to doctoral programs in science and engineering. UMBC is leading the nation as a producer of minority scientists who have gone on to earn Ph.D.s and medical degrees. Meyerhoff students with completed advanced degrees now number 44 with Ph.Ds or M.D.-Ph.Ds, 72 with master's degrees and 32 with medical degrees.

Meyerhoff Program alumni include a clinical fellow in cardiovascular medicine at Harvard Medical School, a post-doctoral fellow in neuroscience at Johns Hopkins Medical School and a research and development scientist at Eastman Kodak.

Dr. Michael Summers, professor of chemistry/biochemistry and investigator of the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) at UMBC, has worked closely with Meyerhoff Scholars in the course of his research on the application of nuclear magnetic resonance to studies of the structure and function of proteins.

Hrabowski and Summers identify five elements in achieving positive outcomes in retention and development of minority scientists and engineers. Those elements are recruiting a substantial body of high-achieving minority students with interests in math and science; offering merit-based financial support; providing an orientation program for freshman; recruitment of active research faculty to work with the students; and involvement of students in scientific research projects early in their undergraduate careers.

Posted by crose

UMBC Wins 2006 College Chess Final Four

Without Top Player, National Champs Rise to Occasion, Defeat Arch-Rivals

CONTACT: Chip Rose, UMBC
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu

DALLAS – While the Cinderella story of George Mason University men’s basketball ended this weekend, the nearby University of Maryland, Baltimore County‘s (UMBC) chess team emerged from the “Final Four” of college chess with a hard-fought victory over its arch-rivals the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) at the 2006 President’s Cup Tournament.

UMBC claimed the title with a final score of nine to UTD’s eight. Emerging national chess power Miami-Dade College placed a respectable third with five points. Duke University found the chessboard less hospitable than the basketball court, coming in last with two points.

International Grandmaster Pawel “The Polish Magician” Blehm was the hero for UMBC, leading his team to victory in the absence of UMBC’s top player and U.S. individual chess champion Alex Onischuk.

“Pawel really rose to the occasion on Board One,” said UMBC chess program director and associate professor of computer science and electrical engineering Alan Sherman. “He defeated two grandmasters with decisive play.”

Other UMBC players who performed solidly in the “Final Four” included Pascal “The Frenchman” Charbonneau, Bruci “The Cuban Cyclone” Lopez, Women’s International Grandmaster Katerina “The Kiev Killer” Rohonyan, and first alternate Beenish “The Indian Tiger” Bhatia.

UMBC and UTD are two of just a handful of U.S. universities to offer full scholarships for chess. As the recognized national powerhouses in their sport, they share a competitive fire on par with North Carolina vs. Duke in college basketball or the NY Yankees vs. Boston Red Sox in major league baseball.

UMBC and UTD have traded the “Final Four” title in a series of close matches since the event began six years ago. UTD claimed the title for the first two years, but UMBC since went on to win the last four in a row. Unlike most chess tournaments, the “Final Four” is a team round-robin format.

The teams qualified for the “Final Four” by being the top four finishing U.S. teams in the Dec. 2005 Pan American Intercollegiate Team Chess Championship, the Western Hemisphere’s most prestigious college chess competition. UMBC’s victory in the 2005 Pan Am was even tougher than the “Final Four,” with only a half-point deciding the outcome over UTD. UTD claimed the Pan-Am title in 2004 and 2003 and tied UMBC for first in 2001 and 2000.

UMBC will host the 2006 Pan Am tournament this December in Washington, DC.

Posted by crose

March 29, 2006

UMBC Student Featured on PBS Newshour Tonight

UMBC student Joe Jones, founder of the Center for Fathers, Family and Workforce Development, will appear on "The Newshour with Jim Lehrer" tonight, March 29, 2006.

UMBC student Joe Jones, founder of the Center for Fathers, Family and Workforce Development, will appear on "The Newshour with Jim Lehrer" tonight, March 29, 2006.

"Newshour" airs locally at 6 p.m. on Maryland Public Television (Channel 22) and WETA in Washington (Channel 26). For more information, visit http://www.pbs.org/newshour.

3/30/06 Update:

Jones is one of several commentators offering analysis following reporter Ray Suarez' "Losing Ground" feature on "the plight of black men, who have not kept up with the income, health, education, civil justice and civic engagement of other groups."

To hear the report (and Jones' comments), visit http://audio.pbs.org:8080/ramgen/newshour/expansion/2006/03/29/20060329_black28.rm?altplay=20060329_%20black28.rm.

Posted by fritz

March 28, 2006

Gigabytes of Glamour: Fashion Designer Cynthia Rowley to Help UMBC Make Tech Savvy Girls in Style

Award-Winning Designer to Lead Hundreds of Middle School Girls, Parents,
in Day of Hands-on, High-Tech Fun: Computer Mania Day, May 6

CONTACT: Chip Rose, UMBC
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu

If there’s one sure way to get more girls interested in
technology careers, just show them how computers help design some of the
world’s most glamorous clothes.

Cynthia Rowley, one of America’s most honored fashion designers, will
show hundreds of middle school girls, parents and teachers from across
Maryland how high technology helps create high fashion clothes worn by
supermodels as she headlines Computer Mania Day at UMBC on Saturday, May 6.

Rowley, whose signature designs are found in Cynthia Rowley boutiques,
better department stores and specialty stores across the U.S. and globe,
has won multiple awards from The Council of Fashion Designers of
America. Her creations have been featured in Vogue, Elle, Glamour,
Harper’s Bazaar and The New York Times. She is also the co-author of a
best-selling series of books on personal and home style and an entrepreneur.

Computer Mania Day is an annual day of free, hands-on, high-tech, fun
activities for adults and kids sponsored by UMBC’s Center for Women and
Information Technology (CWIT)
. The half-day event helps to get girls
interested in technology and computing careers while helping parents and
teachers sharpen their own computer skills. While boys are welcome, the
focus is on girls because of their continuing under-representation in
science, technology, engineering and math.

Research shows that the information technology (IT) gender gap opens as
early as the middle school years, when girls are most image-conscious
and do not want to be labeled as “geeks” or “nerds.” Girls also make up
only 14 percent of Advanced Placement students in computer science, a
key to success in IT-related fields at the college level.

At Computer Mania Day, kids will get the chance to meet Rowley and
participate in workshops led by positive female role models from UMBC
along with business, government and education leaders.

Girls’ events highlights include “Hardware Rocks,” “Google of Opportunities,” digital art and imaging, and the physics of do-it-yourself hot air balloons. Adult workshop highlights include how to prepare your kids for college, “Computers 101,” and “Cyber Safety: Keeping Your Child Protected Online.” All attendees will have the chance to win great giveaways like the HP iPAQ, Dell USB Memory Key and Cisco Routers.

EVENT DETAILS:
Saturday, May 6, 2006.
9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Check-in at
UC Ballroom, UMBC. FREE lunch included for students. All adult and student attendees MUST register ahead of time online at www.computer-mania.info. To sign up or for more information, visit www.computer-mania.info or call 410-455-8433.

NOTE TO MEDIA:
A hi-resolution, color photo of Cynthia Rowley is available online at:
http://www.umbc.edu/NewsEvents/PhotoGal/CynthiaRowley.jpg

Posted by crose

January 30, 2006

EXECUTIVE EDUCATION COURSES RETURN TO ERICKSON SCHOOL OF AGING STUDIES, FEB. 22-25

“BUSINESS AND STRATEGY OF SENIORS HOUSING & CARE”
MARKS START OF ONGOING 2006 SERIES

CONTACT:
Mike Lurie

Office: 410-455-6380
Cellphone: 443-695-0262
mlurie@umbc.edu

BALTIMORE – The Erickson School of Aging Studies at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) teams once again with the National Investment Center for the Seniors Housing & Care Industry (NIC) to offer a set of Executive Development courses. The series begins at UMBC on Feb. 22-25 with a four-day seminar, “The Business and Strategy of Seniors Housing & Care.”

The seminar is the first of seven, four-day Executive Education seminars that the Erickson School at UMBC will host through Nov. 4, 2006. A complete schedule and overview of the full 2006 series is available at the bottom of this advisory.

Although the initial seminar, “The Business and Strategy of Seniors Housing & Care,” can be completed as a non-credit course, industry executives also may utilize two new graduate credit options. Executives can take one course for 3 credits, or they may enroll in the 4-course graduate certificate in Seniors Housing & Care. (Those interested in the graduate-certificate option should contact Dr. Leslie Morgan for further information at 443-543-5622.)

“The Business and Strategy of Seniors Housing & Care” provides historical, philosophical and management overviews of the entire continuum of long-term care, from independent housing to skilled nursing. The course will analyze the strategy and underpinnings of seniors housing and care, including the drivers of success, real demographics of aging, cost of capital and the evolving marketplace.

The course has a major focus on the role of health care delivery within seniors housing. It also explores the current legal, regulatory and public policy environments confronting seniors housing and the challenges they pose for management. “The Business and Strategy of Seniors Housing & Care” will be led by Brian Swinton, retired executive vice president of Sunrise Senior Living. John Erickson, Chairman of the Board and CEO for Erickson Retirement Communities, also will serve as a guest instructor during the course.

NIC, a presenting partner with the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC, brings to this seminar and the rest of the 2006 Executive Education series a legacy of expertise in the field of senior living executive development. The series will be held at the Erickson School, known for training emerging industry leaders in the burgeoning seniors housing and care business.

“NIC is proud to have created with UMBC the premier, advanced-level program for executives in the industry,” says Tony Mullen, Acting Director of Executive Education and the NIC Research Director. “The courses are truly advanced level material with many examples of best practices in the field taught by recognized industry leaders. The sharing among the different companies that attend is exceptional and a unique benefit in and of itself. There is nothing else like the program in the country today.”

About The Erickson School of Aging Studies:

The Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC was established in April 2004 with a $5 million commitment from John Erickson, CEO and founder of Erickson. The school focuses on credit and non-credit professional education, research and policy in aging services and care.

The Executive Development Program at the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC is presented in partnership with NIC, a nonprofit organization that has been the leading source of business and financial information for the senior living industry since 1991. For the last six years, NIC has conducted executive development courses in operations, management, sales, marketing, development, finance and service quality for emerging industry leaders.

UMBC, an Honors University in Maryland, is a four-year, public research university that is home to leading experts on aging who are active in research, education and service in the field of gerontology. It is one of a handful of universities in the nation to offer a Ph.D. in Gerontology.

For further details, please call the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC at 443-543-5622.

More information online at:
http://www.umbc.edu/erickson

# # #

Upcoming NIC Executive Development Courses
At the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC

Business and Strategy of Seniors Housing and Care
Led by Brian Swinton, Retired, Executive Vice President, Sunrise Senior Living
February 22-25, 2006

Organizational Excellence and Continuous Quality Improvement
Led by Tony Ingelido, Vice President, Asbury Services, Inc.
March 22-25, 2006

Management and Operations
Led by Chris Hollister, CEO, Southern Assisted Living, Inc.
Date: May 17-20, 2006

Risk Management
Led by Allen Lynch, Partner, Nixon Peabody, LLP
June 7-10, 2006

Sales and Marketing
Led by David Smith, President, One on One, Service to Seniors
September 18-21, 2006

Finance, Underwriting and Investment Analysis
Led by Ray Braun, President, Chief Operating Officer & Chief Financial Officer, Health Care REIT, Inc.
October 24-27, 2006

Development
Led by Phil Golden, President and COO, Shelter Properties
November 1-4, 2006

Posted by crose

December 20, 2005

Merritt Properties Purchases bwtech@UMBC Buildings From Grosvenor


Strong Market Demand for UMBC Research Park Buildings

CONTACTS: Chip Rose, UMBC
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu

Leslie Braunstein, Grosvenor
703.871-1831
lbraunstein@schum.com

International property development and investment firm Grosvenor announced today the sale of two buildings at bwtech@UMBC, the University of Maryland, Baltimore County’s on-campus research and technology park, to Baltimore-based Merritt Properties, LLC.

Merritt acquired the 63,000 square foot three-story building at 5521 Research Park Drive, delivered in 2001 and fully occupied by RWD Technologies, and the 60,000 SF 5523 Research Park Drive building delivered in mid-2004. 5523 Research Park Drive is leased to multiple tenants including BDMetrics, Inc., Edwards and Kelcey, Invoke Systems, Convergent Technologies, Physicians Practice, Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center, and other organizations including several UMBC program offices.

The sale includes transfer of a long-term ground lease for the two building lots, totaling approximately eight acres. However, the sale terminated Grosvenor’s prior development agreement and plan for the remainder of the 41-acre site.

“Our successful sale of bwtech@UMBC is part of Grosvenor’s overall U.S. strategy to concentrate our holdings in four major markets -- Washington, D.C., Chicago, Los Angeles and San Francisco -- while focusing on urban office and boutique retail product,” said Andrew Galbraith, Senior Vice President, Grosvenor. “In divesting this suburban office park, we found a perfect match with Merritt Properties, which is locally based and has developed more than 13 million square feet of office, flex, and industrial property in the Baltimore-Washington corridor.”

"We were pleased to see such high market demand for our buildings," said Ellen Hemmerly, executive director of the UMBC Research Park Corporation. "Our team was also delighted to have a top-notch manager like Merritt Properties on board who will maintain the high standards and reputation in the real estate industry that Grosvenor had established so well with bwtech@UMBC."

"We look forward to working with UMBC and are excited about the acquisition of these two Class A office buildings which help further strengthen our position in the marketplace,” said Robb Merritt, Vice President of Merritt Properties.

Merritt manages several other top properties in the greater Baltimore region, including Columbia Corporate Park, Columbia Corporate Park 100, Beltway Business Park, Schilling Square, Timonium Business Park
and Merritt Owings Mills.


About bwtech@UMBC:

bwtech@UMBC allows tenants to benefit from access to UMBC’s expertise, students, technology, programs, and facilities. Businesses moving to the Research Park, which is part of Maryland’s Southwest Enterprise Zone, may receive tax incentives in exchange for creating new jobs and making capital investments.

UMBC began planning for a new research and technology park in the early 1990s, based on the success of similar endeavors in other parts of the U.S. In 1998, UMBC forged ahead with its approved plan for a research and technology park that would house more mature companies, potentially including “graduates” of the techcenter@UMBC incubator program. UMBC searched for a development partner and ultimately selected Grosvenor, based in part on the firm’s experience in developing other research parks including one at The University of Edinburgh in Scotland.

About Merritt Properties, LLC:
Merritt Properties, LLC defines its mission simply: Creating Homes for Businesses. Since 1967, this privately held commercial real estate firm has developed more than 13 million square feet of industrial and office properties in the Baltimore/Washington area. Merritt designs, builds, leases and manages their properties for the long-term and is committed to providing the highest quality service to all of its customers. For more information about the company, please visit www.merrittproperties.com.

About Grosvenor:
Grosvenor is a privately owned real estate development and investment company that has been active in North America for more than 50 years. The Company’s North American portfolio consists of more than six million square feet of space, including office, retail, industrial properties, and residential units. Internationally, Grosvenor has interests in properties with a total value of $20 billion, with operating companies in the Americas, UK and Ireland, Continental Europe and the Australia/Asia Pacific region. For more information about the Company, please visit the Grosvenor Web site at: www.grosvenor.com.

Posted by crose

December 07, 2005

$200,000 Given to Erickson School of Aging Studies

Donations to be Used for Student Scholarships

Contact Mike Lurie
UMBC News
410-455-6380
mlurie@umbc.edu


The Erickson School of Aging Studies at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), has been the happy recipient of $200,000 in donations from two prominent sources in the seniors housing and care industry.

The first $100,000 donation was made in honor of William E. Colson, president and CEO of Holiday Retirement Corp., by the National Investment Center for the Seniors Housing & Care Industry (NIC). Colson had received NIC’s first Lifetime Achievement Award at the 15th Annual NIC Conference in Washington, D.C.

Colson, a recognized industry leader and innovator, recently matched the gift, bringing the total donation to $200,000. The gifts will be used to fund a new scholarship program for students attending the Erickson School of Aging Studies. It will be named The William E. Colson Scholarship Fund.

“These major contributions are just two examples of the senior living industry’s recognition of the importance of this new school,” said Dr. Freeman A. Hrabowski, president of UMBC. “NIC’s and Mr. Colson’s gifts will help us significantly in our efforts to educate the next generation of leaders, both in the seniors housing and care industry, as well as other services for the aging population.”

The first scholarships will likely be awarded in fall 2006, when the School is expected to debut its undergraduate program.

The Erickson School of Aging Studies currently offers a series of Executive Education courses in seniors housing and care, ranging from business and operations issues, to marketing and finance. To date, every course has sold out. The next one, “Risk Management of Seniors Housing and Care,” takes place on December 5-7 at the School’s campus, just outside of Baltimore, Md.

For more information about the Erickson School of Aging Studies and its educational tracks, visit www.umbc.edu/erickson or call (410) 455-3361.

About The Erickson School of Aging Studies
The Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC was established in April 2004 with a $5 million commitment from John Erickson, CEO and founder of Erickson, a national developer and manager of campuses for middle-income people more than 62 years of age. The school focuses on academic programs, credit and non-credit professional education, research, and policy in aging services and care.

The Executive Development Program at the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC is presented in partnership with NIC, a nonprofit organization that has been the leading source of business and financial information for the senior living industry since 1991. For the last six years, NIC has conducted executive development courses in operations, management, sales, marketing, development, finance, and service quality for emerging industry leaders.

UMBC, an Honors University in Maryland, is a four-year, public research university that is home to leading experts on aging who are active in research, education, and service in the field of gerontology. It is one of a handful of universities in the nation to offer a Ph.D. in Gerontology.

Note to editors: Photographs of William E. Colson receiving the NIC Lifetime Achievement Award are available upon request.

Posted by crose

December 05, 2005

University of Maryland, Baltimore County and Montgomery College Partner in New Institute for Global and Cultural Studies at Wheaton High School

Specialized Program Open to Students in the Downcounty Consortium in Fall 2006

Contacts:
Mike Lurie
UMBC

410-455-6380
mlurie@umbc.edu

Kate Harrison
Montgomery County Public Schools

301-279-3077
Kate_Harrison@mcpsmd.org

ROCKVILLE, MD -- The new Institute for Global and Cultural Studies (IGCS) at Wheaton High School will offer an opportunity for students to earn up to 15 college credits before graduating from high school, thanks to Montgomery County Public Schools’ partnerships with the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and Montgomery College (MC). This addition to the specialized academy programs currently available at Wheaton High School is designed to connect students to college in new and innovative ways. The program is scheduled to open in the fall of 2006.

Leaders of the partnership institutions gathered at Wheaton High School on December 5 to announce the new venture, which has been two years in the making. They include Dr. Freeman A. Hrabowski, president of UMBC; Dr. Charlene R. Nunley, president of MC; Mrs. Patricia B. O’Neill, president of the Montgomery County Board of Education; and Dr. Jerry D. Weast, superintendent of schools. They were joined by Congressman Chris Van Hollen, who serves on the House Committee on Education and the Workforce, and Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan.

While other academy programs at Wheaton are science and technology oriented, the IGCS will respond to the academic needs of students whose interests include fields such as journalism, international relations, history, and human rights. It is a particularly good fit for the highly diverse student population in the consortium schools, where many of the students will be the first in their family to attend college.

“The IGCS is a wonderful opportunity for any student, but particularly for those whose families are new to the college application process and experience,” said Dr. Weast. “This program will open up a whole new world to these students, and I thank our two partner institutions for making this possible.”

“This new Institute provides balance to the science and technology academies already offered at Wheaton,” said Mrs. O’Neill. “It capitalizes on the richness of student diversity, and students will have a tremendous amount of life experience and cultural history to share.”

Students enrolled in the IGCS will be able to explore global and cultural issues from multiple perspectives while being introduced to the opportunities provided by college and university education. The focus will be on learning about different cultures through world studies, fine arts, technology, and foreign language study, some of which will be available through credit courses at the college level.

Teachers also will benefit from the program, which will provide ways for secondary and higher education faculty to exchange ideas and experiences. Faculty from all three institutions will engage in planning together, as well as co-teaching. Indeed, faculty members are already working jointly on the development of the e-portfolios that will be used to document and measure student success.

"The partnership represented by the new Institute for Global and Cultural Studies is an ideal fit for UMBC," said Dr. Hrabowski. "We are proud of the students who have come to the University from both Montgomery College and the Montgomery County Public Schools, and this initiative makes it possible for students, including those at Wheaton High, to accelerate their college experience."

IGCS students will participate in specialized research projects, summer enrichment experiences, and courses on learning strategies. They will travel to college campuses and benefit from added support from mentors and tutors. The Institute’s rigorous program will provide a series of college classes for juniors and seniors held at Wheaton High School and taught by professors from the partner institutions. High school students will be able to earn as many as 15 college credits before graduation from high school. Summer college residency programs for students entering their senior year in high school also will be among the offerings of this unique partnership.

Students who complete the program successfully and who meet admissions requirements will be guaranteed admission to UMBC and MC.

"Access to higher education is the single-most empowering advantage a young person can have in today’s world,” said Dr. Nunley. “We’re pleased to work together with the school system and UMBC to bring to Wheaton High School a program that will help to ensure more students will, ultimately, attend and succeed in college.”

“Education is the great equalizer, and we want to give all students the opportunity to succeed. That is why I have always put education first,” said Montgomery County Executive Douglas M. Duncan. “I salute everyone involved in developing this important educational bridge between our two regions.”

The Institute is one of the specialized programs available to students in the Downcounty Consortium, which includes Montgomery Blair, John F. Kennedy, Albert Einstein, Northwood, and Wheaton high schools. Prospective students are being introduced to the program this year, so that they will be prepared to decide whether it is the best match for their talents and interests when the program opens in the upcoming school year.

“I applaud the efforts of the leaders who have worked to make this partnership a reality,” said Congressman Chris Van Hollen. “This is the kind of collaboration that students need to prepare them to compete in our increasingly competitive global economy.”

Consortium Grade 8 students have the opportunity to select Wheaton High School as one of five high school choices. Preparation for IGCS enrollment actually begins in middle school following students’ choice of Wheaton High School, where students in the second semester of eighth grade will be introduced to the college campus setting and encouraged to plan their academic program with college in mind. If they choose to enroll in the IGCS in their freshman year at Wheaton, they will begin a pathway of courses and experiences that will prepare them for the college-level courses offered in their junior and senior years.

More information about the IGCS is available on the Web at www.montgomeryschoolsmd.org/schools/wheatonhs/academy/IGCS/IGCSWeb.htm or by calling Shauna Brown, head of the program, at 301-929-2050.

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November 17, 2005

UMBC Center for Aging Studies Researchers Present at World's Top Gerontology Science Conference

Contact Chip Rose
UMBC News
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu

17 UMBC Aging Experts to Take Part in Nov. 18-22
Gerontological Society of America Science Meeting

BALTIMORE – The University of Maryland, Baltimore County’s (UMBC) Center for Aging Studies will be well-represented this weekend as 17 of its researchers present at the 58th annual scientific meeting of the Gerontological Society of America (GSA), the world’s largest and most prestigious multidisciplinary scientific conference devoted to gerontological research.

According to Kevin Eckert, dean of the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC, 17 faculty and doctoral student researchers from UMBC’s Center for Aging Studies will present research posters, papers and/or participate in symposiums at the Orlando, FL conference.

“It’s an honor for UMBC to present a significant amount of research at the top scientific meeting of gerontologists in the world,” said Eckert. “We’re especially excited to present research findings on assisted living that include faculty as well as several doctoral students.”

UMBC is building a national reputation for aging studies, thanks to a strong foundation of research built by The Center for Aging Studies. The Center is affiliated with the University’s Department of Sociology and Anthropology and the new Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC, which Eckert leads. UMBC also partners with the University of Maryland, Baltimore on an interdisciplinary, multi-campus doctoral program in gerontology, one of a handful nationally.

The GSA meeting was originally scheduled to take place in New Orleans, but was relocated in the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. The conference’s closing session will address the lessons learned from Katrina on how government, communities and families can respond more effectively to the needs of the elderly during natural disasters. The closing session will be moderated by Charles Longino, president of the GSA and the first visiting professor to join the UMBC Erickson School of Aging Studies faculty.

According to Eckert, the highlight of the conference for UMBC will be the Saturday, Nov. 19 symposium, “Interpersonal Dynamics in Assisted Living.” The ethnographic study dispatched interviewers to large and small assisted living facilities across Maryland to speak directly to residents about their experiences. “UMBC researchers will be presenting real stories of family relationships around assisted living decision making, what life is like for residents, what it’s like to work in one and the relationship between residents and physicians in assisted living facilities,” Eckert said.

About the Gerontological Society of America:
Founded in 1945, the GSA’s membership includes some 5,000+ researchers, educators, practitioners, and other professionals in the field of aging. The Society's principal missions are to promote research and education in aging and to encourage the dissemination of research results to other scientists, decision makers, and practitioners.

More information online at:
http://www.geron.org/
http://www.agingconference.com

About the Center for Aging Studies at UMBC:
The Center for Aging Studies is a hub for faculty, undergraduate, graduate, and post-doctoral research activities on the policy and sociocultural dimensions of aging in the United States. The Center is the administrative and intellectual home for currently funded research (exceeding $5 million) on such topics as long-term care quality, consumer direction, physician/older patient interactions and practice, among others. Working with the doctoral program in Gerontology, housed jointly at UMBC and the University of Maryland Graduate School, Baltimore, the Center has greatly increased the contributions and visibility of UMBC faculty and students on aging-related issues of State and national importance.

About The Erickson School of Aging Studies:
The Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC was established in April 2004 with a $5 million commitment from John Erickson, CEO and founder of Erickson. The School’s goal is to become the preeminent resource for education, research and policy on services for the mid-life and older population.
To achieve this vision, the School will expand upon existing strengths at UMBC in public policy, aging and health services research through credit and non-credit educational programs and activities.

UMBC, an Honors University in Maryland, is a four-year, public research university that is home to leading experts on aging who are active in research, education, and service in the field of gerontology. It is one of a handful of universities in the nation to offer a Ph.D. in Gerontology.

More information online at:
http://www.umbc.edu/erickson

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October 20, 2005

UMBC to Dedicate Robert and Jane Meyerhoff Chemistry Building

Oct. 21 Ceremony Honors Innovative Philanthropy That Made UMBC National Leader in Science Diversity, Excellence

Contact: Mike Lurie
410-455-6380
mlurie@umbc.edu

To understand fully how dramatically Robert and Jane Meyerhoff have changed the face of American science, just consider the numbers.

In 2003, the most recent year for which data are available, only 306 Ph.D.s in science, technology, engineering or math (STEM) fields were awarded to African-Americans nationwide.

The philanthropists established the Meyerhoff Scholarship Program at UMBC in 1988 to address the under-representation of African American men in the sciences and engineering. Since then the Program has produced nearly 600 graduates who are minorities or dedicated to advancing representation of minorities in the sciences. Program graduates go on in large numbers to the country's most prestigious graduate and professional schools, placing UMBC among the top predominantly white institutions nationally producing minority bachelor's degree recipients who go on to earn Ph.D.s in STEM fields.

The Oct. 21 event will honor the Meyerhoffs’ pivotal commitment and generosity by renaming the University’s newly renovated chemistry and biochemistry facility as the Robert and Jane Meyerhoff Chemistry Building.

“Almost two decades ago, Robert Meyerhoff and his late wife, Jane, began to quite literally change the face of science in America,” said UMBC President Freeman A. Hrabowski, III. “It is only fitting that we name in their honor a building where the next generation of chemists and biochemists will train.”

The Meyerhoff Program’s impact is already clear as early graduates begin their careers at top institutions and companies:

  • In 2000, Chester Hedgepeth, (UMBC biological sciences ’93, Parkside High School, Salisbury, MD) became the first African American M.D./Ph.D. to graduate from the University of Pennsylvania. He is now a Fellow in Cardiovascular Medicine at the Harvard Medical School-affiliated Brigham and Women’s Hospital in Boston.

  • Adam Freeman (chemistry ‘95, Springbrook High School, Silver Spring, MD) received his Ph.D. from University of California-Berkeley in 2003 and is now a Senior Research Scientist at Eastman Kodak.

  • Melanie Smith (biological sciences ‘95, Western High School, Baltimore) was the first African-American M.D./Ph.D. at the University of Maryland, Baltimore and is now in residency at Harvard Medical School’s Brigham and Women’s Hospital.

  • Crystal Watkins (UMBC biological sciences ’95, Dulaney High School, Baltimore) received her M.D./Ph.D. from the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and is now a Research Fellow and Resident Physician in the Departments of Neuroscience, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences there.

The Meyerhoffs’ initial $500,000 gift that created the Program in 1988 was at the time the University’s largest private gift ever, and carved the path for future philanthropic support. Since then, the Meyerhoffs have continued their commitment to UMBC by building an endowment of nearly $8 million to support the Meyerhoff Scholarship Program, as well as serving as honorary co-chairs of The Campaign for UMBC.

The Chemistry building’s renovations will benefit all UMBC chemistry and biochemistry students and faculty. “The renovations provide an outstanding environment for the collaborative approach to teaching, learning and research,” said Ralph Pollack, chair and professor of UMBC’s chemistry and biochemistry department. “In addition to the state-of-the-art labs and instruments, we’re especially pleased that the building design encourages communication, mentoring, and shared research.”

The event celebrates the full renovation of the building’s interior and the Meyerhoffs' contributions to the University with a ribbon cutting, plaque dedication and reception.
Several members of the Meyerhoff family will join current and former Meyerhoff Scholars, chemistry and biochemistry faculty, students, alumni and staff along with supporters and friends of the University for the 2 p.m. event.

BACKGROUND FOR MEDIA:

Robert and Jane Meyerhoff:
The Meyerhoffs embarked on a partnership of philanthropy in 1945, creating a national legacy that spans the arts and sciences. Born in 1924, the Meyerhoffs matured during the Great Depression and World War II as members of a generation that believed in giving back to community and country. The Baltimore natives have brought passion and dedication to their varied roles as real estate developer, thoroughbred horse breeders, art collectors, and advocates for education.

After serving in the war, Robert Meyerhoff, a civil engineer and graduate of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, returned home to join the family construction business. He later left to establish Hendersen-Webb, a construction and property management company known for creating communities focused on quality and value. During this period, he and Mrs. Meyerhoff, a graduate of Goucher College, began to build the couple’s outstanding collection of post-World War II art, which they have donated “to the nation” as a gift to the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C.

While the Meyerhoffs’ contributions to education are many, perhaps the most significant is the Meyerhoff Scholars Program at UMBC, created in 1988. What began as an initiative to address the under-representation of African-American men in the sciences and engineering has evolved into a diverse program that now includes men and women from a range of backgrounds who share a dedication to advancing minorities in the sciences. The program has received national acclaim for producing an outstanding number of high-achieving minority students in science and engineering and inspiring them to attain advanced degrees at the nation’s most prestigious graduate and professional schools. The couple’s deep personal interest and pride in the Meyerhoff Scholars have added a nurturing element that strengthens the experience.

The Meyerhoff Scholarship Program at UMBC:

Undergraduate students accepted into the program have exceptional retention rates (95%) and GPAs (3.4) and are broadly distributed in scientific fields. Meyerhoff students have impressive research-related internships each year in laboratories throughout the U.S. and abroad; nearly all have presented research at professional conferences, and a number have published in top scientific journals as undergraduates. The program has nearly 600 graduates, almost all currently enrolled in Ph.D., M.D., or M.D./Ph.D. programs across the country (e.g., at Harvard, Yale, Stanford, MIT, Cornell, Hopkins, Penn, Virginia, Rice). Currently, there are just over 200 undergraduates in the Meyerhoff Program at UMBC.

UMBC Chemistry & Biochemistry/ Robert and Jane Meyerhoff Chemistry Building

In recent years, the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology ranked UMBC first nationally in the total number of undergraduate chemistry and biochemistry degrees awarded to African Americans; second in the total number of undergraduate degrees in chemistry and biochemistry awarded to minorities; and third in chemistry and biochemistry master's degrees awarded to minority students.

The building renovations include: state-of-the-art teaching labs and instrumentation, a new mass spectrometry facility, a laser laboratory and a suite of nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometers. The building design encourages communication, mentoring, and shared research through flexible, interconnected labs; clustered faculty offices; a tutorial center; space for small discussion and problem solving groups and a bridge connecting students and faculty with life sciences colleagues in the Department of Biological Sciences.

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September 19, 2005

AT&T Foundation Donates $50,000 to Center for Women and Information Technology

CONTACT: Mike Lurie, UMBC
Office: 410-455-6380
Cell phone: 443-695-0262
mlurie@umbc.edu

The AT&T Foundation has renewed its generous support of the Center for Women and Information Technology at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) with a donation of $50,000.

The Center for Women and Information Technology (CWIT), established at UMBC in July 1998, is dedicated to providing global leadership in all aspects of information technology (IT).

The $50,000 donation from the AT& T Foundation will continue to support two important initiatives at CWIT. The first is Computer Mania Day planned for May 6, 2006, a half day of technology-related activities at UMBC for 750 middle school girls, their parents, and teachers. The second initiative supported by the funds from AT&T is the CWIT Scholars program, a merit scholarship program for talented undergraduates majoring in computer science, computer engineering, information systems, or a related program. Both programs seek to address the declining participation of girls and women in IT education and careers in Maryland and nationally.

AT&T will be recognized for its generosity and ongoing support of CWIT during a ceremony at the CWIT Scholars annual reception. The reception takes place Sept. 20, 2005, from 6 p.m. to 8 p.m., in the University Commons, Skylight Room. CWIT Scholars and their families along with business leaders will join the UMBC community to thank AT&T and congratulate the new CWIT students selected and enrolled into the prestigious scholars program.

“With the generous support of AT&T Foundation and the men and women of AT&T who volunteer their time, CWIT will be able to continue to encourage and support more women and girls to enter their careers and become leaders in IT and related technology fields,” says CWIT executive director Claudia Morrell.

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September 01, 2005

UMBC Names Lynne Schaefer as Vice President for Finance and Administration


Lynne Schaefer, a veteran university administrator with expertise in financial and facilities management, is the new vice president for administration and finance at UMBC.


CONTACT: Mike Lurie
Office: 410-455-6380
Cellphone: 443-695-0262
mlurie@umbc.edu

Lynne Schaefer, a veteran university administrator with expertise in financial and facilities management, is the new vice president for administration and finance at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC).

Schaefer, who has 26 years of budget management and higher education administration experience in the state of Michigan, assumed her position on July 1. She succeeds Mark Behm, who has retired after 32 years of service to UMBC.

Schaefer comes to UMBC from Oakland University (Rochester, Mich.), where she was vice president for finance and administration. In that role, she had lead responsibilities for financial and facilities management, human resources, and business services. Under her guidance, Oakland University strengthened its financial management, redesigned its budget development process, and re-engineered its procurement process. Schaefer was also responsible for more than $100 million in capital improvements construction and development, and implementation of a new market-based compensation structure for 400 professional staff.

“We especially want to welcome Lynne Schaefer, who joined us after a national search," said Freeman Hrabowski, president of UMBC. "She has substantial experience, having served as administrative vice president at two other universities, President of the Michigan Education Trust, and earlier as a budget analyst in that state. We are very fortunate to have recruited her here."

Schaefer served Wayne State University as vice president of administrative services, a position she assumed after serving the school as director of the budget office. Schaefer also held positions at various state agencies, including the Michigan Department of Treasury, the Michigan Department of Management and Budget, and the Governor’s Council on Jobs and Economic Development.

Schaefer received a B.A. in political science from Michigan State and an MBA from Wayne State. A recipient of numerous awards, Schaefer was selected twice as one of the 100 Most Influential Women in Detroit and was named the 1981 Michigan Budget Person of the Year. She is active on several boards, including the Women’s Economic Club Advisory Board, the Michigan Women in Finance Board, Cranbrook Institute of Science Board, and the Auburn Hills Chamber of Commerce.

Note to Editors & Reporters:
To download a hi-res photo of Lynne Schaefer, please click on the photo above, then right-click with your mouse and select "save image as."

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August 29, 2005

Peabody Awards Director Horace Newcomb to Speak on the Changing Media Industry

4:00 p.m., Thursday, September 15, 2005
UMBC, Albin O. Kuhn Library, 7th Floor

CONTACT: Mike Lurie
Office: 410-455-6380
Cellphone: 443-695-0262
mlurie@umbc.edu

BALTIMORE – Horace Newcomb, director of the prestigious George Peabody Awards Program, will speak at UMBC on “Studying Television in the Post-Network Era: Responses to a Changing Media Industry.” The lecture, scheduled for Thursday, September 15, at 4:00 p.m. on the 7th floor of the Albin O. Kuhn Library, celebrates the recent establishment of UMBC’s upper-level undergraduate Certificate in Communications and Media Studies.

Professor Newcomb, who holds the Lamdin Kay Chair for the Peabody Awards in the Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication at the University of Georgia, pioneered UMBC’s first popular culture and mass media courses as an American Studies faculty member in the mid-1970s. During those years he also served as television columnist for the Baltimore Sun.

A widely respected scholar in mass media studies, he is author of “TV: The Most Popular Art” (Doubleday, 1974), co-author of “The Producer’s Medium” (Oxford, 1983), and editor of six editions of “Television: The Critical View” (Oxford, 1976-2000). From 1994 to1996 he served as Curator for the Museum of Broadcast Communications in Chicago, with primary duties as editor of The Museum of Broadcast Communications Encyclopedia, considered the definitive library reference work for the study of television.

Newcomb’s research and teaching interests are in media, society, and culture, and he has written widely in the field of television criticism and history. Recent lectures in the U.S. and abroad have focused on cultural exchange and international media industries. Known during his years at UMBC as an outstanding teacher, he was named one of three Outstanding Teachers in the Graduate School at the University of Texas at Austin in 1989.

The Peabody Awards, established in 1941 and based at the University of Georgia, are considered the most prestigious recognition of distinguished achievement by radio and television networks, stations, producing, organizations, cable television organizations and individuals. In 2004 32 awards were made, including one to WBAL-TV for a series of reports on the Chesapeake Bay, credited with spurring state environmental policies, and Bill Moyers was recognized for his life-time of contributions to electronic media.

The lecture is sponsored by the Department of American Studies, the Social Sciences Forum, and the Humanities Forum. For further information, contact the American Studies Department at UMBC, 410-455-2106.

Posted by mlurie

August 16, 2005

Executive Development at Erickson School to Address 'Finance, Underwriting & Investment Analysis'

Contact Chip Rose
UMBC News
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu

or

Renee Tilton
410-626-0805


Financiers who lend to and invest in the senior living industry, as well as financial professionals within management and development companies, will benefit from an upcoming, four-day Executive Development course at the Erickson School of Aging Studies at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). “Finance, Underwriting & Investment Analysis,” led Raymond Braun, president and CFO of Health Care REIT, will be offered on November 2-5, 2005.

“Financing and underwriting for seniors housing has its own set of challenges, mostly due to its unique composition of being part real estate, part health care,” said Braun. “Those who understand the industry’s inherent challenges and how to best assess its risks will also be the ones to reap the rewards of participating in this growing asset class.”

The intensive course assumes that students have a basic level of financial education. Highlights include:


  • How seniors housing and care compares to other commercial real estate asset classes.
  • An exploration of the business versus real estate components of senior living properties and how to measure each.
  • Detailed financial concepts and investment analysis techniques – including calculating the cost of capital; the use, risk and reward of leverage; discounted cash flow analysis; net present value and other investment return measures – applied to seniors housing and care examples.
  • Financial analysis issues unique to lenders, such as measuring default risk and using loan portfolio theory.
  • Financial analysis issues unique to equity investors, such as personal guarantees, construction risks and the use of land value toward equity requirements.
  • The due diligence process, including the proper use of market research, financial feasibility studies and appraisals.
  • The capital markets and the choices for different types of debt, equity and hybrids, including the use of sale/leaseback, mezzanine loans, low-floating rate bonds and other less traditional options that exist for seniors housing and care properties.

Other financial professional teaching portions of the course are: James Hands, managing partner, Salem Equity; Craig Jones, senior managing director, Red Capital Group; Anthony J. Mullen, research director, National Investment Center for the Seniors Housing & Care Industries (NIC); R. Buford Sears, SVP and manager, Health Care Services Group, M&T Bank; Chris Simon, senior analyst, Health Care REIT; and Rachel M. Watson, portfolio manager, Health Care REIT.

Since the launch of the NIC Executive Development Program last fall at the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC, every course has sold out. All courses are conducted in a participatory, seminar format. Each four-day course is $2750. To register, visit www.umbc.edu/erickson or call (410) 455-1570. For more information, email ericksonschool@umbc.edu or call (410) 455-3361.

About The Erickson School of Aging Studies

The Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC was established in April 2004 with a $5 million commitment from John Erickson, CEO and founder of Erickson. The school focuses on credit and non-credit professional education, research, and policy in aging services and care.

The Executive Development Program at the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC is presented in partnership with NIC, a nonprofit organization that has been the leading source of business and financial information for the senior living industry since 1991. For the last six years, NIC has conducted executive development courses in operations, management, sales, marketing, development, finance, and service quality for emerging industry leaders.

UMBC, an Honors University in Maryland, is a four-year, public research university that is home to leading experts on aging who are active in research, education, and service in the field of gerontology. It is one of a handful of universities in the nation to offer a Ph.D. in Gerontology.

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July 26, 2005

Mayo Shattuck New Chair of UMBC Board of Visitors

Greg Barnhill to Head Board of Alex. Brown Center

Greg Barnhill to Head Board of Alex. Brown Center

CONTACT: Mike Lurie
Office: 410-455-6380
Cellphone: 443-695-0262
mlurie@umbc.edu


BALTIMORE – Two prominent members of the greater Baltimore business community are assuming new positions in their ongoing volunteer leadership roles with the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). Mayo A. Shattuck, III is the new chair of the UMBC President’s Board of Visitors. Greg Barnhill will succeed Shattuck as chair of the external advisory board for the UMBC Alex. Brown Center for Entrepreneurship. The appointments became effective July 1, 2005.

Shattuck, now the Chairman of the board, President, and Chief Executive Officer of Constellation Energy, was the impetus behind a generous gift of $1 million from the Alex. Brown Foundation in Spring 2000 to start the Alex. Brown Center for Entrepreneurship. As new chair of the UMBC Board of Visitors, an advisory board, he succeeds Earl L. Linehan of Woodbrook Capital, Inc. Shattuck received his B.A. from Williams College and his M.B.A. from Stanford University.

The Alex. Brown Center for Entrepreneurship works closely with the Baltimore business community to establish entrepreneurial learning opportunities and business experiences for UMBC students.

Barnhill, a Partner and Member of the Board of Brown Advisory Securities, will help guide the Alex. Brown Center’s mission of developing entrepreneurs for the region. Barnhill and Shattuck have served together on the Center’s board.

“We're very grateful to Mayo Shattuck for his leadership and active involvement in establishing and guiding the Alex. Brown Center for Entrepreneurship,” said Vivian Armor, Director of the Alex. Brown Center. “We've made tremendous progress over the past few years, and we're excited about the opportunity to work with Greg Barnhill to continue to expand our initiatives.”

“Mayo Shattuck is a major asset for greater Baltimore,” said UMBC President Freeman A. Hrabowski, III. “UMBC is honored to have him as one of our leading ambassadors in the business community.”

Says Shattuck, “Greg Barnhill brings 28 years of investment industry experience to this position with the Alex. Brown Center. That background, coupled with his extensive participation in various civic projects throughout the Baltimore region, position Greg well to continue expanding the center’s impact on UMBC students.”

Barnhill is well-known for his extensive activity in civic activities throughout the region. He played a lead role in the winning bids that made Baltimore and Annapolis stopovers in the 1998 and 2002 Volvo Ocean Race, an around-the-world sailing regatta. More recently, he was co-chair of the finance committee for the 2005 Miss USA pageant, broadcast live from the Hippodrome Theater in Baltimore.

“My ongoing relationship with UMBC faculty and students has shown me that the university, through the Alex. Brown Center, is an ideal resource in providing students who make an entrepreneurial impact in our community,” Barnhill says.

Posted by mlurie

June 14, 2005

Alumni Connection Draws Physicians Practice, Inc. to bwtech@UMBC

Edwards and Kelcey Moves Baltimore Office

Contact: Chip Rose
UMBC News
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu

bwtech@UMBC, the University of Maryland, Baltimore County's on-campus research and technology park, announced today that two new corporate tenants have agreed to relocate to the park’s second building, 5523 Research Park Drive, recently completed by international property developer Grosvenor.

The new tenants are the healthcare communications and technology firm Physicians Practice, Inc., formerly of Glen Burnie, and the engineering/design firm Edwards and Kelcey, which moves its Baltimore office to UMBC from Caton Avenue.

Physicians Practice is publisher of Physicians Practice: The Business Journal for Physicians, the most widely circulated practice management journal for physicians in the country. The firm is also known for its award-winning Web site, www.PhysiciansPractice.com, and a weekly e-mail newsletter, Physicians Practice Pearls.

Physicians Practice comes to UMBC thanks in part to the close ties to the University by president, co-founder and UMBC alumnus Scott Weber, who graduated in 1985 with a degree in interdisciplinary studies. Weber, a former president of the UMBC Alumni Association, continues to advise students in UMBC's Alex. Brown Center for Entrepreneurship on starting up and running a successful business. The company, which will occupy most of the second floor, currently employs 45 people.

"UMBC offers an excellent strategic location for us to grow our business, with its thriving technology environment, wealth of intellectual capital, and convenient proximity to transportation," said Gerry Hartung, chief executive officer and co-founder of Physicians Practice. "We look forward to partnering with UMBC as our business continues to grow throughout the region and country."

Edwards and Kelcey is a nationally recognized engineering, design, planning and construction management firm which has been in business since 1946. Headquartered in Morristown, NJ, Edwards and Kelcey has 900 employees, 23 regional offices and is ranked 68th among the Top 500 U.S. Design Firms by Engineering News-Record (ENR). Edwards and Kelcey employs 25 transportation engineers and planners locally, and is currently providing services to the Maryland Aviation Administration, Maryland State Highway Administration, City of Baltimore, and other local DOTs.

K.R. Marshall, EK's Baltimore Office Manager said, "Our new location at UMBC will allow us to optimally service our transportation clients in the Baltimore region. With convenient access to BWI and downtown Baltimore, coupled with partnership opportunities with the UMBC engineering department, Edwards and Kelcey looks forward to continued success in the Maryland market."

"UMBC's thriving business community consists of nearly 40 companies in various industries," said Ellen Hemmerly, executive director of UMBC Research Park Corporation. "We are delighted to welcome Physicians Practice and Edwards and Kelcey to our entrepreneurial, research intensive campus."

"UMBC's research and technology park demonstrates the impact of higher education and business coming together," said David S. Iannucci, executive director for the Baltimore County Department of Economic Development. "The mix of new tenants at bwtech@UMBC represents the range of entrepreneurial organizations that will benefit from this unique facility."

bwtech@UMBC's first two buildings were developed by Grosvenor, one of the largest private real estate companies in the world with a global property portfolio of $7 billion. The park's 62,000 square-foot first building has been leased by the information technology firm RWD Technologies since 2001.

UMBC's research park and incubator have received public and private sector funding from the Maryland Economic Development Corporation, the State of Maryland, the City of Baltimore, Baltimore County, the U.S. Department of Commerce, The Abell Foundation, and the Maryland Technology Development Corporation. In 2003, bwtech@UMBC became part of Baltimore County's Southwest Enterprise Zone, making companies moving to the park eligible for credits on real property and income taxes, as well as credits for creating new jobs.

Posted by crose

June 06, 2005

ERICKSON SCHOOL OF AGING STUDIES ANNOUNCES ADVISORY COUNCIL MEMBERS

Contact Chip Rose
UMBC News
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu

or

Renee Tilton
410-626-0805

The Erickson School of Aging Studies at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) announced today the members of its newly created Advisory Council. The council members are comprised of top executives in the aging services arena, who will support the School in identifying, developing, connecting and providing resources for the advancement of educational, applied research and policy activities.

Members of the council include: Jo Anne Barnhart, commissioner, Social Security Administration; Dan Baty, CEO, Emeritus Assisted Living; William E. Colson, CEO, Holiday Retirement Corporation; John C. Erickson, chairman and CEO, Erickson; John Hurson, President, NCSL, Delegate, Maryland Legislature; Thomas J. Hutchinson III, CEO, CNL Retirement Properties, Inc.; Paul Klaassen, founder, chairman and CEO, Sunrise Senior Living; and Robert G. Kramer, president, National Investment Center for the Seniors Housing & Care Industries (NIC).

Other council members are: Mark B. McClellan, M.D., Ph.D., administrator, Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS); Larry Minnix, president and CEO, American Association of Homes and Services for the Aging (AAHSA); John J. Mulherin, CEO, Ziegler and Company; Tom Nelson, COO, AARP; Arnie Richman, CEO, The Shelter Group, LLP; William B. Sims, CEO, Herbert J. Sims and Co.; and Michael S. Steele, lieutenant governor, State of Maryland.

“We are delighted by the participation of this distinguished group of high-profile leaders who have agreed to be a part of this important council,” said J. Kevin Eckert, Ph.D., dean, Erickson School of Aging Studies. “As the Erickson School of Aging Studies continues to grow, their guidance will be invaluable in helping to define the needs of those who serve America’s aging population.”

The Advisory Council held its first meeting in early June at the UMBC campus. John C. Erickson, chairman and CEO of Erickson, opened the meeting by talking about the relevance and importance of the school to the aging industry. “The School of Aging Studies will touch every phase of post-retirement aging in America – from health care and housing to finance and development,” he said.

Eckert then led a discussion about the vision for the school – to become the preeminent resource for education, research and public policy on aging and services for the mid-life and older population. UMBC President Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, followed by affirming the Erickson School’s complementary role to the University’s strengths and mission.

“We are a public research university with a strong emphasis on public policy and we are home to one of the largest doctoral programs in gerontology,” Hrabowski said. “This School makes sense for our campus and our region.”

For more information about the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC, visit www.umbc.edu/erickson or call (410) 455-3361.

About The Erickson School of Aging Studies

The Erickson School of Aging Studies was established in April 2004 with a $5 million commitment from John Erickson, CEO and founder, of Erickson. The school focuses on credit and non-credit professional education, research and policy in aging services and care. An Executive Development program designed for seniors housing and care professionals is offered throughout the year with courses ranging from management and operations to sales and marketing. Plans include the creation of specialty degree programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels. For more information, visit http://www.umbc.edu/erickson.

UMBC, an Honors University in Maryland, is a four-year, public research university that is home to leading experts on aging who are active in research, education and service in the field of gerontology. It is one of a handful of universities in the nation to offer a Ph.D. in gerontology.

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May 27, 2005

WOMEN FROM AROUND THE WORLD TO ADDRESS THE ISSUE OF WOMEN IN TECHNOLOGY JUNE 12-14 IN BALTIMORE

The First International Symposium on Women and Information and Communication Technology

Baltimore, MD. -- For the first time, technology leaders from 22 countries and six continents will gather to explore concrete ways in which access by girls and women to technology can be increased in order to effect economic, social and political change. The First International Symposium on Women and Information and Communication Technology (ICT) will convene on Sunday, June 12 through June 14. Participants from developing and developed countries will include leaders from business, government, non-government agencies and education.

Through the exchange of ideas and experiences, the symposium's organizers expect to create an action agenda to significantly increase the international participation of girls and women in ICT - including leadership of women in technology business - in the next five years.

The symposium was organized and is co-hosted by the Center for Women and Information Technology (CWIT) at the University of Maryland, Baltimore Country (UMBC), the World Trade Center Institute, the World Bank and Women in Global Science and Technology; it is held in cooperation with the ACM (Association of Computer Machinery).

"This is an important time for women and technology," said Claudia Morrell, CWIT's executive director. "ICTs for girls and women will either become a new tool for increased access to education, economics, and social equity or it will create a new form of discrimination. In either case, the ramifications for all of us are vast. The symposium will address topics that we know need exploring, and we have sought out the world's leading authorities to discuss current hurdles and possible solutions."

Among the speakers will be authorities on ICT and the global economy, including widely published authors Jo Sanders, Sue Rosser and Sophia Huyer, as well as corporate leaders from North and South America, Europe, Asia, Africa and Australia. The U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations Commission for Women, Ellen Sauerbrey, is the honorary Chair. She and Freeman Hrabowski, president of UMBC, will be keynote speakers at the plenary session at 8:30 a.m., Monday, June 13.

"AT&T is proud to sponsor such a robust effort to universally address the technology needs of girls and women," said Jennifer Jones, AT&T Business Sales Center Vice President. "Information is power, and this type of collaboration offers a catalyst for change."

The meeting will be held at Baltimore's World Trade Center (401 E. Pratt Street) and the Renaissance Harborplace Hotel (202 E. Pratt Street).

Major sponsors of the symposium include: platinum sponsor Dell and gold sponsors Microsoft, AT&T, SM Consulting, HP, Xerox, Lockheed Martin, the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development and the National Science Foundation.

Media Contacts: Sue Hartt
UMBC News
410-455-2276
hartt@umbc.edu

Mike Lurie
410.455.6380
Cell: 443-695-0262
mlurie@umbc.edu

About UMBC and CWIT:
The University of Maryland, Baltimore County is a research university noted for its commitment to furthering the opportunities of women and minorities – especially in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Strong commitment from the highest levels is exemplified by the Meyerhoff Scholarship Program, which received the first Presidential Awards for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring, and participation in the National Science Foundation's ADVANCE program, which is aimed at increasing the participation of women in the scientific and engineering workforce through representation and advancement of women in STEM careers.

CWIT's programs - all designed to increase the number of women in information technology - include initiatives in schools to introduce middle-school girls to computer technology and engineering, and the CWIT Scholars Program, a merit scholarship program for talented undergraduates majoring in computer science, computer engineering, information systems, or a related program at UMBC. CWIT also provides programs for women in the workforce, including supporting women as technology entrepreneurs through the ACTiVATE program.

As a result of these and other efforts, UMBC was recently named one of the nation's 12 "Hot Schools" by Kaplan/Newsweek's "How to Get Into College" guide and as one CosmoGIRL's top 50 colleges for women.

Press Kit Materials:

Presskit materials and additional background documents are linked below for downloading or viewing as a PDF file. If you have trouble opening or viewing these documents, please contact UMBC News at 410-455-5793.

Agenda


Presentation Abstracts & Speaker Bios

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May 02, 2005

For Sondheim and UMBC, Shared Values Set in Stone

Dedication of Statue, Building Celebrates Walter Sondheim's Civic Leadership, May 11 at UMBC

Contact: Chip Rose
UMBC News
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu

UMBC honors Walter Sondheim, Jr., a pivotal leader of school desegregation and economic revitalization in Baltimore, for his achievements in community service, social justice and diversity on May 11 with the dedication of the University's first named academic building, Janet and Walter Sondheim Hall, and an accompanying sculpture.

The event caps off a successful $6 million campaign to endow the Sondheim Public Affairs Scholars Program at UMBC and rename the former social sciences building in honor of Sondheim and his late wife, Janet. The statue dedication and building ribbon cutting will be preceded by a public conversation with Sondheim on Baltimore's social and economic progress, moderated by WYPR 88.1 FM's Marc Steiner.

"Walter Sondheim embodies the values that the UMBC community treasures most," said UMBC President Freeman A. Hrabowski, III. "He is a visionary leader who cares deeply about children, families and education in Baltimore. The statue and building we dedicate in his honor will stand for a long time. But a more fitting and lasting tribute will be the Sondheim Public Affairs Scholars who bear his name as they serve the public and make a difference to generations to come."

Founded in 1999, the Sondheim Public Affairs Scholars Program supports talented undergraduate students who want to become effective leaders in government, non-profits, corporations and the community. Through an interdisciplinary approach combining service learning, internships and intensive advising/mentoring, over 40 Sondheim Public Affairs Scholars have graduated from the program or are currently receiving training for careers in law, social work, public administration, business, education, environmental policy, politics and other fields.

Sondheim is perhaps best known for leading the desegregation of Baltimore City Public Schools as chair of the City School Board and for guiding the "Baltimore Renaissance" of downtown and the Inner Harbor in the 1970s and 1980s as chairman of Charles Center-Inner Harbor Management, Inc.

The campaign to endow the Sondheim Public Affairs Scholars Program at UMBC attracted leadership support from The France-Merrick Foundation, The Abell Foundation, The Jacob and Hilda Blaustein Foundation and The Annie E. Casey Foundation, along with gifts from more than 20 other individual and foundation donors.

While Sondheim has received many honors over his career, the UMBC hall is the first entire structure named in his honor and the statue, sculpted from cast bronze by Maryland artist Antonio Tobias Mendez, is the first life-size rendition. The sculpture installation includes quotes from Sondheim reflecting his values.

"Like Mr. Sondheim, this statue is inspiring and educational," said Mendez. "In the future, students who view it will understand his character and dedication to community service."

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April 26, 2005

Executive Development at Erickson School to Address Risk Management

Contact Chip Rose
UMBC News
410-455-5793
crose@umbc.edu

or

Renee Tilton
410-626-0805

Senior living professionals can now take advantage of a subject not normally offered through executive development. This winter, risk management will be covered at an extensive, four-day course at the Erickson School of Aging Studies at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC).

“Risk Management of Seniors Housing & Care,” will be held on December 5-8. It will be led by Allen Lynch, Esq., partner at Nixon Peabody LLP. Other professionals teaching sections of the course include Robert Noonan, CFO at Benchmark Assisted Living; Phil Balderston, SVP of Risk Management at Sunrise Senior Living; Larry Minnix, president and CEO, and Suzanne Weiss, SVP of Advocacy at the American Association of Homes and Services for the Aging (AAHSA); Joel Goldman, Esq., partner of Hanson Bridgett Marcus Vlahos Rudy LLP; Joseph McCarron, Jr., SVP at Smith/Packett Med-Com; John Atkinson, partner at Thilman & Fillipini, LLC; Larry Cirka, president and CEO of Ultrabridge; Cindy Porter, director of Risk Management at Erickson Retirement Communities; and Cindy Graunke, director of the Division of Nursing Surveys and Certification of the Center for Medicare and Medicaid.

“Senior housing and care could be viewed as the ultimate risky business,” said Mr. Lynch, “due to, among other reasons, the vulnerability of our customers, extensive regulation, financial pressures, media attention, labor shortages and a litigious environment. Through the use of case studies, this course focuses on best practices to identify and manage the key risks important to every stakeholder in seniors housing and care, taught by a dream-team of leading professionals on the front line of risk management.”

Course highlights include:

  • Insights into the prevalent risks in -- and unique to -- each property type: independent living, assisted living, skilled nursing and CCRCs.
  • Seeing the risk management issues and practices in a complex and successful CCRC, as seen through the eyes of the senior risk manager on a guided discussion tour.
  • Building the foundation of risk management, from optimizing insurance protection (whether conventionally or through a captive) to reorganizing the enterprise to protect assets.
  • Understanding and managing the “Achilles Heels” of operations – five areas representing the greatest risk.
  • Learning the nuts and bolts of a state-of-the art risk management program at one of the world’s leading providers.
  • Participating in a mock trial with plaintiffs and defense lawyers, based on an actual case involving a large operator, eliciting powerful lessons learned.
  • Managing non-compliance risks – from the government’s top regulator.
  • Deploying technology to reduce risk.

    Since the launch of the NIC Executive Development Program last fall at the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC, every course has sold out. All courses are conducted in a participatory, seminar format. Each four-day course is $2750. To register, visit www.umbc.edu/erickson or call (410) 455-1570. For more information, email ericksonschool@umbc.edu or call (410) 455-3361.

    About The Erickson School of Aging Studies

    The Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC was established in April 2004 with a $5 million commitment from John Erickson, CEO and founder of Erickson. The school focuses on credit and non-credit professional education, research, and policy in aging services and care.

    The Executive Development Program at the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC is presented in partnership with NIC, a nonprofit organization that has been the leading source of business and financial information for the senior living industry since 1991. For the last six years, NIC has conducted executive development courses in operations, management, sales, marketing, development, finance, and service quality for emerging industry leaders.

    UMBC, an Honors University in Maryland, is a four-year, public research university that is home to leading experts on aging who are active in research, education, and service in the field of gerontology. It is one of a handful of universities in the nation to offer a Ph.D. in Gerontology.

    Posted by crose

    Executive Development at Erickson School to Address Organizational Excellence

    Contact Chip Rose
    UMBC News
    410-455-5793
    crose@umbc.edu

    or

    Renee Tilton
    410-626-0805

    Senior living professionals can now take advantage of a subject not normally offered through executive development. This summer organizational excellence will be covered at an extensive, four-day course at the Erickson School of Aging Studies at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC).

    This course, “Organizational Excellence and Continuous Quality Improvement in Seniors Housing & Care,” takes place on June 8-11. Anthony Ingelido, VP of Organizational Excellence at Asbury Services, will lead the course. He’ll be joined by Jill Haselman, SVP for Organizational Development and Culture at Benchmark Assisted Living; Bernie Dana, former executive at Vetter Health Services and associate professor of Business at Evangel University; Harry Furukawa, director of Quality for Goodwill Industries and a senior Baldridge Award examiner; and Dr. Leslie Grant, VP of Research at My InnerView and associate professor of Healthcare Management at the University of Minnesota.

    Topics covered include:


    • The business case for quality service and care.
    • Widely used quality systems and models (Malcolm Baldridge, ISO 9000 and Six Sigma).
    • Quality systems and models specific to senior living (JCAHO, “Quality First,” Eden Alternative and the Pioneer Network), with actual results reviewed by companies using these models.
    • Differences between product and service companies.
    • The link between employee and resident loyalty.
    • The difference between outcome and resident perception.
    • Balanced scorecard and benchmarking techniques.
    • Making service quality and performance management an integral part of company culture.

    Since the launch of the NIC Executive Development Program last fall at the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC, every course has sold out. Only a couple of spaces remain for “Sales and Marketing of Seniors Housing & Care,” which will be held on May 18-21. All courses are conducted in a participatory, seminar format. Each four-day course is $2750. To register, visit www.umbc.edu/erickson or call (410) 455-1570. For more information, email ericksonschool@umbc.edu or call (410) 455-3361.

    About The Erickson School of Aging Studies

    The Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC was established in April 2004 with a $5 million commitment from John Erickson, CEO and founder of Erickson. The school focuses on credit and non-credit professional education, research, and policy in aging services and care.

    The Executive Development Program at the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC is presented in partnership with NIC, a nonprofit organization that has been the leading source of business and financial information for the senior living industry since 1991. For the last six years, NIC has conducted executive development courses in operations, management, sales, marketing, development, finance, and service quality for emerging industry leaders.

    UMBC, an Honors University in Maryland, is a four-year, public research university that is home to leading experts on aging who are active in research, education, and service in the field of gerontology. It is one of a handful of universities in the nation to offer a Ph.D. in Gerontology.

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    April 22, 2005

    Maryland Secretary of Public Safety/Corrections Mary Ann Saar Talks Prison Reform April 25 at UMBC

    Project RESTART Aims to Reduce Repeat Offenders by Increasing Drug Treatment, Education

    Contact: Chip Rose
    UMBC News
    410-455-5793
    crose@umbc.edu

    Mary Ann Saar, secretary of public safety and correctional services, will speak about Maryland's Project RESTART (Reentry Enforcement Services Targeting Addictions, Rehabilitation and Treatment) on Monday, April 25 at 4 p.m. at the Albin O. Kuhn Library as part of UMBC's Spring 2005 Social Sciences Forum lecture series.

    "A New Direction in Corrections" is the theme of Saar's lecture, emphasizing the recent change in philosophy toward the goals of the state's prison system. Saar will talk about the policy implications of RESTART for the future of corrections and parole services and the ways in which the government and communities can collaborate to reduce recidivism.

    Project RESTART, an initiative proposed by Governor Ehrlich and developed by Saar to address the issues of reentry and recidivism in Maryland's correctional system, was launched in 2003. The program focuses not only on control and custody in state facilities but on education, substance abuse treatment and reentry support services to address the needs of inmates returning to the community.

    For more information about this or other UMBC Social Sciences Forum events, contact Delana Gregg at socsciforum@umbc.edu.

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    April 03, 2005

    UMBC Chess Team Captures Third Consecutive Presidential Cup

    Retrievers Take Down Arch-Rivals UT-Dallas in Chess Final Four

    Contact: Chip Rose
    UMBC News
    410-455-5793
    crose@umbc.edu

    (Lindsborg, KS) The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) team won its third consecutive Final Four of College Chess in convincing fashion Sunday afternoon by defeating its arch-rival the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) by a score of 2.5 to 1.5.

    As expected, UMBC and UTD climaxed the round robin tournament of the nation's top four college chess programs in a hard-fought final match. The rivalry between the two universities had grown even sharper in the past two years after UTD twice upset UMBC in the "Super Bowl of College Chess", the Pan American Intercollegiate Team Chess Tournament, by a half-point margin each time.

    UMBC never lost a game in the 2005 Final Four, dominating Stanford 4 to 0 in the first round and following with a solid 3.5 to 0.5 win over Miami Dade College in the second. The 2005 Final Four was held at the Karpov School of Chess in Lindsborg, Kansas.

    "Our players went into this tournament focused on the here and now, and we are elated to have won the Final Four three years in a row," said UMBC Chess Program Director and computer science professor Alan Sherman. "I'm very proud of how this team bounced back strongly from a disappointing second place finish at the 2004 Pan Am."

    The UMBC team will have a chance to improve its skills later this week, as former world chess champion Grandmaster Anatoly Karpov visits campus Wednesday and Thursday to give some private pointers to the UMBC players.

    Karpov will also lead some public events during his UMBC visit. He will simultaneously challenge up to 60 scholastic chess enthusiasts (grades 1 through 12, bring your own regulation chess set) from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. on Wednesday in the UMBC Commons. On Thursday from 7 to 10 p.m., Karpov will explain some of his best games, including recent encounters with Grandmaster Garry Kasparov. The talk will be held in Lecture Hall 8 of UMBC's Information Technology and Engineering Building.

    UMBC will host the 2006 Pan American Chess Championships, to be held December 27-30 at the Renaissance Hotel in Washington, DC.

    Posted by crose

    March 07, 2005

    The Real Story of UMBC Athletics' Academic Success

    Contact: Chip Rose
    UMBC News
    410-455-5793
    crose@umbc.edu

    Just imagine. You're literally Number One and then you find out that no, there's a report you're actually last among thousands. First there's disbelief, then you laugh -- who could believe it? -- and then you realize that some people might actually believe -- absurd though the notion is -- that you, UMBC, could be LAST in anything relating to academics.

    Such were the reactions of UMBC's athletic director Charlie Brown, his coaches, and athletes -- as well as most of the administration, faculty, staff and students at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. (Happily, a correction was issued as soon as the absurdity was recognized.)

    The Real Story of UMBC Athletics' Academic Success

    Background: On February 28, 2005, the NCAA released its preliminary (and first) Academic Progress Report, a new system for tracking how many student-athletes are staying in school and making adequate progress toward their degrees. That day the word went out that UMBC's indoor track team ranked last among all of the 5,270 men's and women's teams nationwide. Could not be, was not, true.

    THE FACTS:


    • UMBC is #1 of the ten schools in the America East Conference with an average score of 978 out of a possible 1000. The conference average is 958.

    • UMBC is ranked #2, behind the United States Naval Academy (990), in the ten Division I programs in Maryland.

    • Overall, out of 328 schools nationwide, UMBC ranks 36th.

    • In men's basketball, UMBC scored 1000, one of only 33 schools in the nation to achieve the perfect mark. Men's basketball players' majors include financial economics, history, sociology and environmental studies.

    • Eight of UMBC's 20 programs receive perfect scores and no program is below 925.

    • The accidentally maligned men's indoor track and field program has a score of 947; the team has a 2.85 cumulative GPA.

    • Currently, 228 -- or 52 percent -- of 438 student athletes have 3.0 grade-point averages or higher – 20 more than last spring.

    RECRUITING PRIORITIES AT UMBC

    Because UMBC is an Honors University, coaches recruit athletes who can succeed both athletically and academically at the Division I-AAA level. We want students who will integrate with the general campus population and be involved in the larger community.

    ACADEMIC SUPPORT

    The new Academic Center for Student-Athletes is equipped with 12 computers, individual study carrels, and three full-time staff members who assist the athletes in course selection, academic skills, time management, long-range academic planning and career development.

    The Center's EXCELL program gives special, individualized attention to student athletes who need additional academic and social support.

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    March 03, 2005

    Journalist Alan Elsner to Speak on America's Prison Crisis

    UMBC Social Sciences Forum Event Open to Public

    Contact: Chip Rose
    UMBC News
    410-455-5793
    crose@umbc.edu

    Alan Elsner, national correspondent for Reuters, will speak on "The Crisis in America's Prisons and Why You Should Care," on Monday, March 7 at 4 p.m. on the 7th floor of the Albin O. Kuhn Library at UMBC. The event, part of UMBC's Social Sciences Forum, is free and open to the public.

    Drawing from his book, Gates of Injustice: The Crisis in America's Prisons, Elsner will talk about the growth of the U.S. prison system, why it happened and why it should matter to the American public. He will also examine the costs of running correctional facilities, the health implications for inmates and address recidivism and how to reduce it. His book will be on sale the evening of the lecture.

    Future Social Sciences Forum speakers include Maryland Secretary of Public Safety and Correctional Services Mary Ann Saarr, who will discuss Maryland's Project RESTART on Monday, April 25.

    For more information on Social Sciences Forum events, contact Delana Gregg at 410-455-2916 or socsciforum@umbc.edu.

    Posted by crose | Comments (0)

    United Nations Commission on the Status of Women and UMBC Co-Sponsor a Panel On Women & Technology

    Monday, March 7, 1-3 pm at the UN's Dag Hammarskold Library Auditorium

    Contact: Chip Rose
    UMBC News
    410-455-5793
    crose@umbc.edu

    Claudia Morrell, executive director of the Center for Women and Information Technology (CWIT) at University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) will be one of five panelists participating in Creating Global Transformation: Women & ICT on Monday, March 7, from 1-3 p.m. at the United Nations.

    The meeting’s purpose is to build on the conclusions of an agreement signed March 14, 2003, in which the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women stated, "globally, there are substantial differences in participation in, access to and use of media and information and communications technologies (ICTs), their content and production."

    "Media and ICT," the agreement also stated, "offer tools for enhancing tools for women’s empowerment and the promotion of gender equality."

    National and international leaders representing business, education and nongovernment sectors will address the ways in which ICTs make a difference in the lives of women, their families and communities.

    Speakers include UN and corporate leaders from this country and the United Kingdom. Morrell will make the concluding remarks that will include suggestions for future opportunities for national and international collaboration.

    CWIT, a global resource building women's participation in information technology, has wide-ranging initiatives, including the annual Computer Mania Day (Saturday, April 9th this year), a designed especially for 11 and 12 year-old girls to have hands-on experiences with computers and technology; and June 12-14, 2005, the first International Symposium on Women and ICT: Creating Global Transformation.

    Posted by crose | Comments (0)

    Senior Living Executives to Highlight Selling & Marketing Best Practices at Erickson School's Next Executive Development Course

    ‘Sales and Marketing of Seniors Housing & Care’ to be Held May 18-21, 2005

    Contact Chip Rose
    UMBC News
    410-455-5793
    crose@umbc.edu

    or

    Renee Tilton
    410-626-0805

    David Smith, president of One On One, Service to Seniors, a St. Louis, Mo.-based sales consulting group, and partner of One McKnight Place, a large continuing care retirement community, will lead the next executive development course at the Erickson School of Aging Studies at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). “Sales and Marketing of Seniors Housing & Care” will be held on May 18-21, 2005.

    Guest lecturers from the senior living industry will join Mr. Smith in facilitating discussions on best practices in sales and marketing, including Brian Swinton, former executive vice president of Sunrise Senior Living; Dan Rexford, senior vice president of marketing for Erickson; Margaret Wylde, Ph.D., president and CEO of ProMatura Group LLC, a marketing research company based in Oxford, Miss.; and Tony Mullen, director of research for the National Investment Center for the Seniors Housing & Care Industries (NIC).

    The four-day course covers the role of marketing and sales, how it is linked to a competitive advantage, and why the best companies treat their entire staff as salespeople. Other topics include: discovering customers’ wants and needs, segmenting markets through research, understanding the relationship of pricing and value, and obtaining honest feedback. Students also learn about the science of promotion, and how to develop leads, design an effective marketing plan, and use successful selling techniques. Lastly, the best ways to manage the marketing and sales process is discussed, including the use of mystery shopping and sales training.

    The cost for “Sales and Marketing of Seniors Housing & Care” is $2750. Classes are conducted in a participatory, seminar format and are limited in size. To register, visit www.umbc.edu/erickson or call (410) 455-1570. For more information, email Jennifer Cathro at ericksonschool@umbc.edu or call (410) 455-3361.

    About The Erickson School of Aging Studies

    The Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC was established in April 2004 with a $5 million commitment from John Erickson, CEO and founder of Erickson. The school focuses on credit and non-credit professional education, research, and policy in aging services and care.

    The Executive Development Program at the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC is presented in partnership with NIC, a nonprofit organization that has been the leading source of business and financial information for the senior living industry since 1991. For the last six years, NIC has conducted executive development courses in operations, management, sales, marketing, development, finance, and service quality for emerging industry leaders.

    UMBC, an Honors University in Maryland, is a four-year, public research university that is home to leading experts on aging who are active in research, education, and service in the field of gerontology. It is one of a handful of universities in the nation to offer a Ph.D. in Gerontology.


    Posted by crose

    March 02, 2005

    UMBC Chess Master Juggles Dozens of Matches at Banneker Museum

    Contact: Chip Rose
    UMBC News
    410-455-5793
    crose@umbc.edu

    With 32 pieces and seemingly infinite strategies to contend with, it is difficult enough for most chess players to stay on top of their own games. Multiply that challenge by the more than 90 elementary through high school students participating in the Friends of Benjamin Banneker Museum’s Chess Day for a real concentration challenge. That is exactly what UMBC master Battsetseg Tsagaan and a few other local chess players will do at the Banneker Day of Chess on Saturday, March 5, 10 a.m.-3 p.m. at the museum, 300 Oella Avenue in Catonsville.

    Tsagaan, a UMBC chess team member originally from Mongolia,is ranked No. 11 among U.S. women by the U.S. Chess Federation. While she is known in chess circles as “the Mongolian Terror,” she has shown her softer side to young Howard County students, introducing them to the game and serving as their coach and mentor. Tsagaan will also run the tournament at the Banneker Day of Chess. Joe Summer, president of the Catonsville Chess Club, will assist her.

    According to Arthur Trush, Chess Day chair and board member of the Friends of Benjamin Banneker Historical Park and Museum (BBHPM), the event draws students from Baltimore and Howard Counties, Baltimore City, and from area church chess clubs. Many students playing in the tournament are involved in chess programs offered by Baltimore County Gifted and Talented programs. Prizes and certificates will be awarded to the children for competing and improving their playing and Thinking skills.

    Registration ended on February 23rd.

    Posted by crose | Comments (0)

    February 15, 2005

    Tom Grape to Lead Executive Development Course at Erickson School

    ‘Management and Operations of Seniors Housing & Care’ to be Held March 16-19, 2005

    Contact Chip Rose
    UMBC News
    410-455-5793
    crose@umbc.edu

    or

    Renee Tilton
    410-626-0805

    Tom Grape, chairman and CEO of Benchmark Assisted Living, will lead the next executive development course at the Erickson School of Aging Studies at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). “Management and Operations of Seniors Housing & Care” will be held on March 16-19, 2005. The course will examine best practices in the management and operations of the professional senior living company.

    Paul Klaassen, founder and CEO of Sunrise Senior Living, will join Mr. Grape in instructing the four-day course, along with Jill Haselman, SVP for Organizational Development and Culture at Benchmark Assisted Living; Allen Lynch, II, partner at Nixon Peabody; and Tony Mullen, director of research for the National Investment Center for the Seniors Housing & Care Industries (NIC).

    Topics discussed will include: the science of management and ethical leadership, obtaining a sustainable competitive advantage, attaining employee loyalty, understanding residents, and providing economic value above the cost of capital. Students will also learn about the role of corporate culture, performance measurement, technological systems, financial reporting, risk management, and best practices in food service, hospitality and other areas.

    “We’re excited by the exceptional response to our Executive Development series,” said Mr. Mullen, who is helping the Erickson School to develop and expand the program. “The first two courses were sold out,” he continued, “and the upcoming one in March is filling up very quickly. The feedback we’ve received from those taking the courses, including those who have significant experience in the industry, is that the course material is very sophisticated, and focused on best practices and the tough issues facing professionals in the field.”

    The cost for “Management and Operations of Seniors Housing & Care” is $2750. Classes are limited in size in order to encourage a participatory, seminar-style format. To register, visit www.umbc.edu/erickson or call (410) 455-1570. For more information, email Jennifer Cathro at ericksonschool@umbc.edu or call (410) 455-3361.

    About The Erickson School of Aging Studies

    The Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC was established in April 2004 with a $5 million commitment from John Erickson, CEO and founder of Erickson. The school focuses on credit and non-credit professional education, research, and policy in aging services and care.

    The Executive Development Program at the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC is presented in partnership with NIC, a nonprofit organization that has been the leading source of business and financial information for the senior living industry since 1991. For the last six years, NIC has conducted executive development courses in operations, management, sales, marketing, development, finance, and service quality for emerging industry leaders.

    UMBC, an Honors University in Maryland, is a four-year, public research university that is home to leading experts on aging who are active in research, education, and service in the field of gerontology. It is one of a handful of universities in the nation to offer a Ph.D. in Gerontology.

    Posted by crose

    February 13, 2005

    Liz Lerman Dance Exchange Moves and Grooves at UMBC

    The Liz Lerman Dance Exchange's February 4 performance at UMBC offers a sneak peek into a dance company whose moves, grooves and imagery are created from a multitude of voices spanning six decades.

    UMBC presents the Liz Lerman Dance Exchange in concert on Friday, February 4 at 8 p.m. in the UMBC Theatre.

    The Liz Lerman Dance Exchange's performance at UMBC offers a sneak peek into a dance company whose moves, grooves and imagery are created from a multitude of voices spanning six decades.

    The repertory evening includes excerpts from Nocturnes, set to music of Willie Nelson; In Praise of Animals and Their People, which celebrates the prayerful relationships of animal companionship and the kinesthetic beauty of animals; and other favorites from the company's menagerie of movement.

    Founded in 1976, the Liz Lerman Dance Exchange presents a unique brand of dance/theater, breaking boundaries between stage and audience, theater and community, movement and language, tradition and the unexplored. Through explosive dancing, personal stories and intelligent humor, Liz Lerman Dance Exchange stretches the expressive range of contemporary dance.

    Founding Artistic Director Liz Lerman has choreographed works that have been seen throughout the U.S. and abroad. Combining dance with realistic imagery, her works are defined by the spoken word, drawing from literature, personal experience, philosophy, and political and social commentary.

    Over the past 26 years she has received recognition for her work with Liz Lerman Dance Exchange and as a solo artist. In 2002, she received a MacArthur "Genius Grant" fellowship for her visionary work. She has received an American Choreographer Award, the American Jewish Congress "Golda" award, the first annual Pola Nirenska Award, the Mayor's Art Award, and was named Washingtonian Magazine's Washingtonian of the Year in 1988.

    Liz Lerman's work has been commissioned by Lincoln Center, American Dance Festival, Dancing in the Street, BalletMet, and The Kennedy Center. Her choreographic work has received support from AT&T, Meet The Composer, American Festival Project, National Endowment for the Arts, National Performance Network Creation Fund, and the National Foundation for Jewish Culture.

    Tickets for the concert at UMBC are $17 general admission and $7 for students and seniors, available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950.

    An open rehearsal will be held at 2:30 p.m. on Thursday, February 3 in the Theatre. Admission to the open rehearsal is free.

    Posted by dwinds1

    February 07, 2005

    UMBC Names J. Kevin Eckert Dean of Erickson School of Aging Studies

    Residential Care, Aging Services Expert to Lead School
    Focused on Improving Life for Growing Aging Population


    Media Note: Click on the photo above to access/download a high-resolution photo of Kevin Eckert.

    Contact: Chip Rose
    UMBC News
    410-455-5793
    crose@umbc.edu

    BALTIMORE - The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) announced today the appointment of J. Kevin Eckert as Dean of the Erickson School of Aging Studies. Eckert, a nationally renowned researcher on residential care, assisted living, and aging services, will lead the new school at UMBC. A primary focus of the school will be improving the quality of education for professionals in the burgeoning aging services and care industry, which is essential to ensuring a decent quality of life for America’s growing aging population.


    The Erickson School of Aging Studies was established in April 2004 with a $5 million gift from John Erickson, founder and chief executive officer of Erickson, the Baltimore-based firm that is a national manager and developer of campuses for middle income people over 62 years of age. The school provides executive education, public policy leadership, and applied investigative research related to aging, aging services and seniors housing and care. Future plans also include offering specialty degree programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels.

    “One of the goals of The Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC,” Eckert said, “is to improve the lives of the mid-life and older population,” Eckert said. “I am delighted to have this opportunity to address areas of importance to mid-life and older adults, solidify UMBC’s national reputation in the field and position Maryland as a national leader in innovative aging services, research and policy,” he said.

    Eckert is also the co-director of the joint UMBC/University of Maryland Baltimore doctoral program in gerontology, one of a handful of university programs in the nation offering a Ph.D. in gerontology. He has written or edited three books and 55 articles and book chapters on aging services, residential care and assisted living. Eckert has received several awards, including a prestigious Robert Wood Johnson Health Policy Fellowship, a Senior Fellowship from the National Institutes of Health’s National Research Service Award program and a University System of Maryland Board of Regents Award for Excellence.

    Since coming to UMBC in 1987, Eckert’s research projects have brought over $11 million in funding to the university. He is also Director of the Center for Aging Studies at UMBC and has been a faculty member in the University’s Department of Sociology and Anthropology since 1987.

    The Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC:

    The Erickson School of Aging Studies was established in April 2004 with a $5 million gift from John Erickson, CEO and founder, of Erickson. The school focuses on credit and non-credit professional education, research and policy in aging services and care. An Executive Development program designed for seniors housing and care professionals is offered throughout the year with courses ranging from management and operations to sales and marketing. Plans include the creation of specialty degree programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels. For more information, visit http://www.umbc.edu/erickson.

    Posted by crose | Comments (0)

    February 02, 2005

    UMBC Humanities Forum Examines History and Identity

    UMBC brings together scholars and professionals who represent the richness of contemporary work in philosophy, history, culture, language, literature, and the arts in the 2005 Humanities Forum. Among the topics to be discussed are the literary precursors to Homer's epics and themes in undergraduate research; speakers will include Walter Mosley, Mortimer Sellers and Jonathan Tuck.

    UMBC brings together scholars and professionals who represent the richness of contemporary work in philosophy, history, culture, language, literature, and the arts in the 2005 Humanities Forum. Among the topics to be discussed are the literary precursors to Homer's epics and themes in undergraduate research; speakers will include Walter Mosley, Mortimer Sellers and Jonathan Tuck.

    All lectures are free and open to the public.

    Wednesday February 16 at 4pmAlbin O. Kuhn Library Gallery
    "Undergraduate Experiences in Humanities Research"
    Students from the departments of History, English and Ancient Studies

    Wednesday March 2 at 4pmAlbin O. Kuhn Library Gallery
    "Darwin, Romantic Geologist?"
    Sandra Herbert, Professor of History, UMBC

    Wednesday March 9 at 4pmAlbin O. Kuhn Library Gallery
    "Straddling Borders: Literature and Identity in Subcarpathian Rus'"
    Elaine Rusinko, Associate Professor of Modern Languages and Linguistics, UMBC

    Thursday March 17 at 4pmAlbin O. Kuhn Library Gallery
    "Sons of Homer: the Genealogy of the Epic Poem"
    Jonathan Tuck, Tutor, St. John's College, Annapolis

    Monday April 4 at 7pmUniversity Center Ballroom
    The Daphne Harrison Lecture: "Bearing Witness"
    Walter Mosley, Novelist and social commentator

    Wednesday April 13 at 4pmAlbin O. Kuhn Library Gallery
    "America: the New Rome"
    Mortimer Sellers, University of Maryland Regents Professor, Director of the Center for International and Comparative Law, University of Baltimore School of Law

    Directions to UMBC and campus locations of the lectures
    For directions go to: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/index_map.html

    Posted by OIT

    January 24, 2005

    UMBC Middle East Experts Recommend Postponing Iraqi Vote, Partitioning Country

    The following experts on the Middle East and terrorism from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) are available to news media for commentary on the Iraqi elections scheduled for Jan. 30.

    The following experts on the Middle East and terrorism from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) are available to news media for commentary on the Iraqi elections scheduled for Jan. 30.

    Reporters may contact the experts directly (email & phone numbers are listed with their profiles below) or contact UMBC News: Chip Rose, 410-455-5793, crose@umbc.edu, or 443-690-0307 (after hours).

    Louis J. Cantori, Ph.D.
    Professor of Political Science
    410-455-2182
    Cellphone: 410-491-7003
    cantori@umbc.edu

    Profile:
    Dr. Cantori is an expert on Middle East politics and policy, having lived almost seven years collectively in the region. He is the author, co-author or editor of four books and over 40 articles on the Middle East and other subjects. A former U.S. Marine, Cantori has taught at the U.S. Military Academy, U.S. Air Force Academy and U.S. Marine Corps University. He has founded or is heavily involved with various groups concerned with Middle East policy and democracy.

    Point of View:
    "Without a smarter vision of Iraq's future, the Jan. 30 election will be meaningless," Cantori said in his Jan. 13 USA Today editorial.

    "Iraq cannot become a beacon of Middle Eastern democracy without full, democratic participation in its elections," Cantori wrote. "This must include Sunni Muslims, who make up 20 percent of the population and the heart of the insurgency."

    In the same editorial, Cantori noted news reports that put the insurgency at more than 200,000 fighters strong, and recommended that the U.S. immediately begin low-level negotiations with the Sunnis, followed by setting a date for a staged withdrawal, possibly January 2007.

    Mark Croatti, M.A.
    Instructor of Political Science
    410-455-2568
    mcroatti@umbc.edu

    Profile:
    Prof. Croatti teaches courses in political science and government at UMBC, The George Washington University, the United States Naval Academy and The Johns Hopkins University. He has lectured on foreign affairs at Georgetown University and served as a consultant to the International Program at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. His most recent class taught at UMBC was POLI409B "Politics of Iraq: Oil, Terrorism and Weapons of Mass Destruction."

    Point of View:
    "Arabs and Kurds in general, and Shiites and Sunnis in particular, have been fighting each other in one form or another for over a thousand years," said Croatti. "Just because the British created a country called Iraq in 1921 does not mean that the U.S. is obligated to uphold the integrity of its boundaries.

    "The Kurds need a state of their own and the Sunnis and Shiites should not be forced to live together if they don't want to. Partition is a realistic alternative to the ongoing violence, and should be considered before holding an election or writing a new constitution."

    Posted by OIT

    UMBC Middle East Experts Recommend Postponing Iraqi Vote, Partitioning Country

    The following experts on the Middle East and terrorism from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) are available to news media for commentary on the Iraqi elections scheduled for Jan. 30.

    The following experts on the Middle East and terrorism from the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) are available to news media for commentary on the Iraqi elections scheduled for Jan. 30.

    Reporters may contact the experts directly (email & phone numbers are listed with their profiles below) or contact UMBC News: Chip Rose, 410-455-5793, crose@umbc.edu, or 443-690-0307 (after hours).

    Louis J. Cantori, Ph.D.
    Professor of Political Science
    410-455-2182
    Cellphone: 410-491-7003
    cantori@umbc.edu

    Profile:
    Dr. Cantori is an expert on Middle East politics and policy, having lived almost seven years collectively in the region. He is the author, co-author or editor of four books and over 40 articles on the Middle East and other subjects. A former U.S. Marine, Cantori has taught at the U.S. Military Academy, U.S. Air Force Academy and U.S. Marine Corps University. He has founded or is heavily involved with various groups concerned with Middle East policy and democracy.

    Point of View:
    "Without a smarter vision of Iraq's future, the Jan. 30 election will be meaningless," Cantori said in his Jan. 13 USA Today editorial.

    "Iraq cannot become a beacon of Middle Eastern democracy without full, democratic participation in its elections," Cantori wrote. "This must include Sunni Muslims, who make up 20 percent of the population and the heart of the insurgency."

    In the same editorial, Cantori noted news reports that put the insurgency at more than 200,000 fighters strong, and recommended that the U.S. immediately begin low-level negotiations with the Sunnis, followed by setting a date for a staged withdrawal, possibly January 2007.

    Mark Croatti, M.A.
    Instructor of Political Science
    410-455-2568
    mcroatti@umbc.edu

    Profile:
    Prof. Croatti teaches courses in political science and government at UMBC, The George Washington University, the United States Naval Academy and The Johns Hopkins University. He has lectured on foreign affairs at Georgetown University and served as a consultant to the International Program at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. His most recent class taught at UMBC was POLI409B "Politics of Iraq: Oil, Terrorism and Weapons of Mass Destruction."

    Point of View:
    "Arabs and Kurds in general, and Shiites and Sunnis in particular, have been fighting each other in one form or another for over a thousand years," said Croatti. "Just because the British created a country called Iraq in 1921 does not mean that the U.S. is obligated to uphold the integrity of its boundaries.

    "The Kurds need a state of their own and the Sunnis and Shiites should not be forced to live together if they don't want to. Partition is a realistic alternative to the ongoing violence, and should be considered before holding an election or writing a new constitution."

    Posted by dwinds1

    January 21, 2005

    UMBC Gets It: Women Science Faculty Thrive

    As the national debate on gender and science in higher education heats up, UMBC is an excellent example of how a campus can increase the presence and success of women faculty in science and technology.

    Led by President Freeman A. Hrabowski, UMBC is a public research university with a national reputation for academic excellence and diversity. Over the last six years, UMBC has expanded campus-wide initiatives to attract and support female faculty and graduate students in science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields.

    "Since 2000, when we first began studies on how to tackle the problem,the number of UMBC's tenured or tenure-track women faculty in the STEM fields has more than doubled from 17 to 36," said Lynn Zimmerman, Vice Provost for Academic Initiatives and Professor of Biology at UMBC.

    UMBC now requires all departments to form diversity plans prior to starting faculty job searches. The campus also redesigned its family and medical leave policy to be more visible and attractive to women faculty.

    "Good things can happen once there is a genuine commitment to the issue," said Zimmerman. "UMBC's work is by no means finished, but I am excited about our progress in such a short period of time."

    Initiatives and Expert Sources on Women and Science:

    Hrabowski is leading gender diversity efforts on the campus as the principal investigator for ADVANCE at UMBC, a $3.2 million, five year, National Science Foundation (NSF) institutional transformation grant. ADVANCE is designed to change the campus structure and culture to improve recruitment, retention, career advancement and mentoring for talented women STEM faculty.

    "Programs like ADVANCE show that what's good for women is good for the entire university," said Zimmerman, who also leads the university's day-to-day efforts for ADVANCE and other science diversity programs.

    In 2001, UMBC appointed Janet Rutledge Associate Dean of the Graduate School. Rutledge was instrumental in bringing the PROMISE program to UMBC. Through this $2.5 million NSF grant, UMBC leads an effort by Maryland's three public research universities to increase the number and diversity of Ph.D. graduates in the sciences and engineering who go onto academic careers.

    As the first African American female to receive a Ph.D. from Georgia Tech's electrical engineering program, Rutledge knows firsthand the challenges that women and other minorities face in academia. "There's a feeling of invisibility," said Rutledge, who focused on the scarcity of minority science Ph.D.s at the NSF prior to coming to UMBC.

    In 2000, Zimmerman and fellow biological sciences professor Phyllis Robinson founded UMBC's faculty group Women in Science and Engineering(WISE). The informal support group for women STEM faculty became the foundation for ADVANCE and other efforts at UMBC.

    In 2004, UMBC was one of only five U.S. institutions to receive an award to establish a Clare Boothe Luce Professorship. The Clare Boothe Luce Program is among the most significant sources of private support for women in science, engineering and mathematics in the U.S. When hired, the new professor will make UMBC's Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering faculty over 50 percent female.

    UMBC is home to the Center for Women and Information Technology (CWIT),which is dedicated to strengthening the nation's technology workforce by increasing the participation and advancement of women and girls in information technology (IT) and IT careers.

    Claudia Morrell, Executive Director of the Center, has led a dramatic expansion at CWIT, including the development of a scholars program witha 93 percent retention rate and a $6.5 million increase in scholarships, research and program funding.

    Anne Spence is an Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering at UMBC and a member of WISE and CWIT's Advisory Board. An aerospace engineer,Spence is used to the challenges of being a woman in a technical field.

    "One of my college professors told me that women should not be engineers, so I got the highest grade in the class to prove him wrong,"she said. "When I graduated I had six job offers. I did encounter initial resistance, but I was always able to get rid of it by proving myself."

    Spence is a volunteer for CWIT's annual educational outreach event, Computer Mania Day. The event works to break stereotypes by building interest in technology among middle school girls, their parents and teachers via hands-on education and mentorship. She is also an advisor for UMBC's chapter of Mentor Net, a national mentoring program for women studying engineering and computer science.

    Posted by dwinds1

    January 15, 2005

    Discover Magazine Names UMBC Professor's 'Man Who Shocked the World' Among Top 20 Science Books of 2004

    Discover Magazine has named The Man Who Shocked the World: The Life and Legacy of Stanley Milgram (Basic Books, 2004) by UMBC psychology professor Thomas Blass as one of the Top 20 Science Books of 2004. The national honor is the latest accolade for Blass's biography of Milgram, one of the most controversial psychologists in modern history.

    Discover Magazine has named The Man Who Shocked the World: The Life and Legacy of Stanley Milgram (Basic Books, 2004) by UMBC psychology professor Thomas Blass as one of the Top 20 Science Books of 2004. The national honor is the latest accolade for Blass's biography of Milgram, one of the most controversial psychologists in modern history.

    Milgram is best known for his "Obedience Experiments" carried out at Yale University in the 1960s. In the experiments, 65 percent of test subjects repeatedly gave seemingly real and painful electrical shocks to another subject (actually an actor) just because a scientific "authority figure" commanded them to. Milgram was also the originator of the "Six Degrees of Separation" theory.

    Discover described Blass's book as "by turns both moving and chilling." The magazine's Top 20 Science Books list put "Shocked..." in good company beside other nationally honored nonfiction, including The Fabric of the Cosmos: Space, Time, and the Texture of Reality by Brian Greene, which was an Amazon.com Top Book of the Year. Blass' book was well received nationally by critics, including the Library Journal, American Scientist, the Washington Post, and the Jerusalem Post.

    "I am delighted to be part of Discover's list of excellent books," said Blass. "This is the kind of honor that helps make 10 years of work worthwhile."

    Blass, a social psychologist and Hungarian-born Holocaust survivor, has studied Milgram for 15 years and authored over 20 publications and an equal number of academic papers on Milgram's life and work. He also runs the Web site www.stanleymilgram.com, devoted to preserving Milgram's legacy and connecting his research to current and historical events.

    Posted by dwinds1

    Discover Magazine Names UMBC Professor's 'Man Who Shocked the World' Among Top 20 Science Books of 2004

    Discover Magazine has named The Man Who Shocked the World: The Life and Legacy of Stanley Milgram (Basic Books, 2004) by UMBC psychology professor Thomas Blass as one of the Top 20 Science Books of 2004. The national honor is the latest accolade for Blass's biography of Milgram, one of the most controversial psychologists in modern history.

    Discover Magazine has named The Man Who Shocked the World: The Life and Legacy of Stanley Milgram (Basic Books, 2004) by UMBC psychology professor Thomas Blass as one of the Top 20 Science Books of 2004. The national honor is the latest accolade for Blass's biography of Milgram, one of the most controversial psychologists in modern history.

    Milgram is best known for his "Obedience Experiments" carried out at Yale University in the 1960s. In the experiments, 65 percent of test subjects repeatedly gave seemingly real and painful electrical shocks to another subject (actually an actor) just because a scientific "authority figure" commanded them to. Milgram was also the originator of the "Six Degrees of Separation" theory.

    Discover described Blass's book as "by turns both moving and chilling." The magazine's Top 20 Science Books list put "Shocked..." in good company beside other nationally honored nonfiction, including The Fabric of the Cosmos: Space, Time, and the Texture of Reality by Brian Greene, which was an Amazon.com Top Book of the Year. Blass' book was well received nationally by critics, including the Library Journal, American Scientist, the Washington Post, and the Jerusalem Post.

    "I am delighted to be part of Discover's list of excellent books," said Blass. "This is the kind of honor that helps make 10 years of work worthwhile."

    Blass, a social psychologist and Hungarian-born Holocaust survivor, has studied Milgram for 15 years and authored over 20 publications and an equal number of academic papers on Milgram's life and work. He also runs the Web site www.stanleymilgram.com, devoted to preserving Milgram's legacy and connecting his research to current and historical events.

    Posted by OIT

    January 10, 2005

    Scientists See Matter Circling Black Hole at Breakneck Speed

    UMBC Joint Center for Astrophysics scientists and their colleagues at Oxford University used a speed-gun technique typical of the highway patrol to clock clumps of hot iron gas whipping around a black hole at 20,000 miles per second, over 10 percent of light speed. The findings, which provided a crucial new measurement for black hole studies, were presented Monday afternoon at a press conference at the American Astronomical Society in San Diego.

    UMBC Joint Center for Astrophysics scientists and their colleagues at Oxford University used a speed-gun technique typical of the highway patrol to clock three separate clumps of hot iron gas whipping around a black hole at 20,000 miles per second, over 10 percent of light speed.

    The observation, made with the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton satellite, marks the first time scientists could trace individual blobs of shredded matter on a complete journey around a black hole. This provides a crucial measurement that has long been missing from black hole studies: an orbital period. Knowing this, scientists can measure black hole mass and other characteristics that have long eluded them.

    Dr. Jane Turner, jointly affiliated with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Joint Center for Astrophysics (JCA) at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), presented this result today at a press conference at the American Astronomical Society in San Diego. Her co-presenter is Dr. Lance Miller of Oxford University.

    "For years we have seen only the general commotion caused by massive black holes, that is, a terrific outpouring of light," said Turner. "We could not track the specifics. Now, with XMM-Newton, we can filter through all that light and find patterns that reveal information about black holes never seen before in such clarity."

    Dr. Miller noted that if this black hole were placed in our Solar System, it would appear like a dark abyss spread out nearly as wide as Mercury's orbit. And the three clumps of matter detected would be as far out as Jupiter. They orbit the black hole in a lightning-quick 27 hours (compared to the 12 years it takes Jupiter to orbit the Sun).

    Black holes are regions in space so dense that gravity prevents all matter and light from escaping. What scientists see is not the black hole itself but rather the light emitted close to it as matter falls towards the black hole and heats to high temperatures.

    Turner's team observed a well-known galaxy named Markarian 766, about 170 million light years away in the constellation Coma Berenices (Bernice's Hair). The black hole in Markarian 766 is relatively small although highly active. Its mass is a few million times that of the Sun; other central black hole systems are over 100 million solar masses.

    Matter funnels into this black hole like water swirling down a drain, forming what scientists call an accretion disk. Flares erupt on this disk most likely when magnetic field lines emanating from the central black hole interact with regions on the disk.

    "Calculating the flares' speeds and the black hole mass was straightforward, based on Doppler shifting, the technique used by law officers to nab speeders." said Dr. Ian George of UMBC's JCA and NASA Goddard, a co-author on a scientific journal article the team has prepared. "Light appears to rise in energy as an object moves towards us and then fall in energy as it moves away. A similar phenomenon happens with the sound of a passing car on a highway, going 'eeeeeeyyoool.'"

    "We think we're viewing the accretion disk at a slightly tilted angle, so we see the light from each of these flares rise and fall in energy as they orbit the black hole," Miller said.

    When the scientists made a graph of energy (on the y-axis) and time (on the x-axis), they saw near-perfect sinusoidal curves from each of the three clumps of matter they observed. The width, or period, of the curves is proportional to black hole mass. The height of the curves is related to the viewing angle of the accretion disk. With a known mass and orbital period, the scientists could determine velocity using relatively simple Newtonian physics.

    Two factors made the measurement possible. The scientists observed particularly persistent flares during a long observation, nearly 27 hours. Also, "no telescope before XMM-Newton has had the light-collecting power to allow for a comparison of energy over time," said Dr. James Reeves of NASA Goddard, also part of the team.

    Turner said this observation confirms a preliminary XMM-Newton result announced by a European team in September -- that something as detailed as an orbital period could be detected with the current generation of X-ray telescopes. The combination of results indicates that scientists, given long observation times, are now able to make careful black hole measurements and even test general relativity in the domain of extreme gravity.

    Posted by dwinds1

    Scientists See Matter Circling Black Hole at Breakneck Speed

    UMBC Joint Center for Astrophysics scientists and their colleagues at Oxford University used a speed-gun technique typical of the highway patrol to clock clumps of hot iron gas whipping around a black hole at 20,000 miles per second, over 10 percent of light speed. The findings, which provided a crucial new measurement for black hole studies, were presented Monday afternoon at a press conference at the American Astronomical Society in San Diego.

    UMBC Joint Center for Astrophysics scientists and their colleagues at Oxford University used a speed-gun technique typical of the highway patrol to clock three separate clumps of hot iron gas whipping around a black hole at 20,000 miles per second, over 10 percent of light speed.

    The observation, made with the European Space Agency's XMM-Newton satellite, marks the first time scientists could trace individual blobs of shredded matter on a complete journey around a black hole. This provides a crucial measurement that has long been missing from black hole studies: an orbital period. Knowing this, scientists can measure black hole mass and other characteristics that have long eluded them.

    Dr. Jane Turner, jointly affiliated with NASA Goddard Space Flight Center and the Joint Center for Astrophysics (JCA) at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC), presented this result today at a press conference at the American Astronomical Society in San Diego. Her co-presenter is Dr. Lance Miller of Oxford University.

    "For years we have seen only the general commotion caused by massive black holes, that is, a terrific outpouring of light," said Turner. "We could not track the specifics. Now, with XMM-Newton, we can filter through all that light and find patterns that reveal information about black holes never seen before in such clarity."

    Dr. Miller noted that if this black hole were placed in our Solar System, it would appear like a dark abyss spread out nearly as wide as Mercury's orbit. And the three clumps of matter detected would be as far out as Jupiter. They orbit the black hole in a lightning-quick 27 hours (compared to the 12 years it takes Jupiter to orbit the Sun).

    Black holes are regions in space so dense that gravity prevents all matter and light from escaping. What scientists see is not the black hole itself but rather the light emitted close to it as matter falls towards the black hole and heats to high temperatures.

    Turner's team observed a well-known galaxy named Markarian 766, about 170 million light years away in the constellation Coma Berenices (Bernice's Hair). The black hole in Markarian 766 is relatively small although highly active. Its mass is a few million times that of the Sun; other central black hole systems are over 100 million solar masses.

    Matter funnels into this black hole like water swirling down a drain, forming what scientists call an accretion disk. Flares erupt on this disk most likely when magnetic field lines emanating from the central black hole interact with regions on the disk.

    "Calculating the flares' speeds and the black hole mass was straightforward, based on Doppler shifting, the technique used by law officers to nab speeders." said Dr. Ian George of UMBC's JCA and NASA Goddard, a co-author on a scientific journal article the team has prepared. "Light appears to rise in energy as an object moves towards us and then fall in energy as it moves away. A similar phenomenon happens with the sound of a passing car on a highway, going 'eeeeeeyyoool.'"

    "We think we're viewing the accretion disk at a slightly tilted angle, so we see the light from each of these flares rise and fall in energy as they orbit the black hole," Miller said.

    When the scientists made a graph of energy (on the y-axis) and time (on the x-axis), they saw near-perfect sinusoidal curves from each of the three clumps of matter they observed. The width, or period, of the curves is proportional to black hole mass. The height of the curves is related to the viewing angle of the accretion disk. With a known mass and orbital period, the scientists could determine velocity using relatively simple Newtonian physics.

    Two factors made the measurement possible. The scientists observed particularly persistent flares during a long observation, nearly 27 hours. Also, "no telescope before XMM-Newton has had the light-collecting power to allow for a comparison of energy over time," said Dr. James Reeves of NASA Goddard, also part of the team.

    Turner said this observation confirms a preliminary XMM-Newton result announced by a European team in September -- that something as detailed as an orbital period could be detected with the current generation of X-ray telescopes. The combination of results indicates that scientists, given long observation times, are now able to make careful black hole measurements and even test general relativity in the domain of extreme gravity.

    Posted by dwinds1

    January 08, 2005

    Maryland Universities Looking for a Few Good Women for Real-Life 'Apprentice'

    UMBC is looking for a few good women to compete in a high-tech, entrepreneurial take on the hit reality TV show "The Apprentice." The National Science Foundation (NSF) program, "Achieving the Commercialization of Technology in Ventures through Applied Training for Entrepreneurs" (ACTiVATE), will select up to 30 Baltimore/Washington-area women for a competitive class that, unlike traditional business courses, doesn't deal in hypothetical widgets.

    UMBC is looking for a few good women to compete in a high-tech, entrepreneurial take on the hit reality TV show "The Apprentice."

    The $600,000 National Science Foundation (NSF) program, "Achieving the Commercialization of Technology in Ventures through Applied Training for Entrepreneurs" (ACTiVATE), will select up to 30 Baltimore/Washington-area women for a competitive class that, unlike traditional business courses, doesn't deal in hypothetical widgets. Instead, ACTiVATE gives real-world lessons from experienced entrepreneurs and venture capitalists as students compete to take patented technology innovations from area universities to market.

    "ACTiVATE is looking for savvy, competitive women to have fun while going after an ultimate prize that's much better than a job with Donald Trump--the chance to start and run a real technology company," said Stephen Auvil, director of UMBC's Office of Technology Development.

    UMBC teams with the Maryland Technology Development Corporation (TEDCO) and six other Maryland universities on ACTiVATE, one of only 16 grants awarded nationwide this year from the NSF's highly competitive Partnerships for Innovation Program. While no one will hear the dreaded words "You're fired," the program aims to create six or more new, university-related, startup companies over the next three years while training 90 new women entrepreneurs in the process.

    Each year, TEDCO will screen 20 existing technology ideas from participating universities and select the 15 best to be used in ACTiVATE. Start-up firms that emerge from the course may be housed in techcenter@UMBC, the University's on-campus business incubator.

    Highly-motivated, mid-career women with business or technical backgrounds who are interested in learning more about ACTiVATE are invited to attend one of two upcoming open houses. These events will provide an overview of how ACTiVATE selects and trains applicants; introduce the entrepreneurs-in-residence at UMBC, give more information on the university technologies to be marketed, and provide details on how to apply for the program.

    The next Open House is January 11 from 6:30 until 8 p.m. at techcenter@UMBC, 1450 South Rolling Road in Catonsville.

    Directions are available online.

    For more information, visit:www.umbc.edu/activateor e-mail cwit@umbc.edu.

    Posted by dwinds1

    January 07, 2005

    Charities Accepting Donations for Tsunami Victims

    Guidelines on choosing a charity: www.guidestar.org.

    ACTION AGAINST HUNGER
    247 West 37th Street, Suite 1201
    New York, N.Y. 10018
    212-967-7800 x108
    www.actionagainsthunger.org

    AMERICAN JEWISH WORLD SERVICE
    45 West 36th Street, 10th Floor
    New York, N.Y. 10018
    800-889-7146
    www.ajws.orgAMERICAN JEWISH JOINT DISTRIBUTION COMMITTEE
    South Asia Tsunami Relief
    Box 321
    847A Second Avenue
    New York, N.Y. 10017
    212-687-6200 ext. 851
    www.jdc.org

    AMERICAN FRIENDS SERVICE COMMITTEE
    AFSC Crisis Fund
    1501 Cherry Street
    Philadelphia, Pa. 19102
    888-588-2372
    www.afsc.org

    AMERICAN RED CROSS
    International Response Fund
    P.O. Box 37243
    Washington, D.C. 20013
    800-HELP NOW
    www.redcross.org

    AMERICARES
    88 Hamilton Avenue
    Stamford, CT 06902
    (800) 486-4357
    www.americares.org

    CARE
    151 Ellis Street
    Atlanta, GA 30303
    800-521-CARE
    www.care.org

    CATHOLIC RELIEF SERVICES
    Tsunami Emergency
    P.O. Box 17090
    Baltimore, Md. 21203-7090
    800-736-3467
    www.catholicrelief.org

    DIRECT RELIEF INTERNATIONAL
    27 South La Patera Lane
    Santa Barbara, Calif. 93117
    805-964-4767
    www.directrelief.org

    DOCTORS WITHOUT BORDERS
    P.O. Box 1856
    Merrifield, Va. 22116-8056
    888-392-0392
    www.doctorswithoutborders.org

    EPISCOPAL RELIEF AND DEVELOPMENT
    Emergency Fund
    P.O. Box 12043
    Newark, NJ 07101
    800-334-7626
    www.er-d.org

    INTERACTION
    American Council for Voluntary International Action
    1717 Massachusetts Ave. NW, Suite 701
    Washington, DC 20036
    (202) 667-8227
    www.interaction.org

    INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION OF RED CROSS/RED CRESCENT
    www.ifrc.org

    INTERNATIONAL MEDICAL CORPS
    Earthquake/Tsunami Relief
    1919 Santa Monica Boulevard, Suite 300
    Santa Monica, Calif. 90404
    800-481-4462
    www.imcworldwide.org

    INTERNATIONAL ORTHODOX CHRISTIAN CHARITIES
    Asia Disaster Response
    P.O. Box 630225
    Baltimore, MD 21263-0225
    877-803-4622
    www.iocc.org

    INTERNATIONAL RESCUE COMMITTEE
    P.O. Box 5058
    Hagerstown, MD 21741-9874
    877-REFUGEE or 733-8433
    www.theIRC.org

    ISLAMIC RELIEF USA
    Southeast Asia Earthquake Emergency
    P.O. Box 6098
    Burbank, Calif. 91510
    888-479-4968
    www.irw.org/asiaquake

    LUTHERAN WORLD RELIEF
    700 Light Street
    Baltimore, Maryland 21230
    800-LWR-LWR-2
    www.lwr.org

    MERCY CORPS
    Southeast Asia Earthquake Response
    Dept. W
    P.O. Box 2669
    Portland, Ore. 97208
    800-852-2100
    www.mercycorps.org

    NETWORK FOR GOOD
    www.networkforgood.org

    OPERATION USA
    8320 Melrose Avenue, Suite 200
    Los Angeles, Calif. 90069
    800-678-7255
    www.opusa.org

    OXFAM AMERICA
    Donor Services Department
    26 West Street
    Boston, MA 12111-1206
    800-77-OXFAM
    www.oxfamamerica.org

    SAVE THE CHILDREN
    Asia Earthquake/Tidal Wave Relief Fund
    54 Wilton Road
    Westport, Conn. 06880
    800-728-3843
    www.savethechildren.org

    UNICEF
    General Emergency Fund
    333 E. 38th Street
    New York, NY 10016
    800-4-UNICEF
    www.unicef.org

    WORLD FOOD PROGRAMME
    US Friends of the WFP
    PO Box 11856
    Washington, D.C. 20008
    www.wfp.org/donate

    WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION
    www.who.int

    Posted by dwinds1

    January 03, 2005

    UMBC Chess Team Fights the Good Fight

    Wichita, KA The fierce rivalry between the chess teams of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and the University of Texas, Dallas (UTD) lost none of its intensity this week when 23 teams competed in the Pan American Intercollegiate Chess Championships, the Super Bowl of college chess.

    Wichita, KA The fierce rivalry between the chess teams of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and the University of Texas, Dallas (UTD) lost none of its intensity this week when 23 teams competed in the Pan American Intercollegiate Chess Championships, the Super Bowl of college chess.

    At the 2003 Pan Am, UMBC was knocked off its throne by UTD. This year, the only round UMBC's first team lost was the fourth to UTD the loss that ultimately meant the championship because UTD lost none, but tied in the fifth round.

    "Oddly, the first time we lost to UTD last year we also lost 5 to 5.5 points," said Alan Sherman, director of the UMBC chess program and associate professor of computer science. "We have a strong team, so the loss is disappointing, but we're one of the top four U.S. teams that will compete in the President's Cup this spring." The other teams will be from UTD, Miami Dade Community College and Stanford University. The meet will be in Wichita, presumably in April.

    The top ten teams were, in rank order: UTD, first team; UMBC, first team; UTD, second team; University of Waterloo; University of Toronto; Miami Dade; Catholic University of Peru; Stanford; UMBC, second team; Yale University.

    While the Retrievers were in Kansas, Dr. Sherman learned that UMBC will host the 2006 Pan American Chess Championships, to be held December 27-30 at the Renaissance Hotel in Washington, DC.

    Posted by dwinds1

    December 22, 2004

    Route 32 Expansion Will Reduce Congestion, Study Finds

    The best way to relieve congestion on Route 32 between Interstate 70 and Route 108 in Maryland is to adopt the State Highway Administration (SHA) plan to widen Route 32 to four lanes, according to a study by graduate students in the UMBC Department of Public Policy.

    The best way to relieve congestion on Route 32 between Interstate 70 and Route 108 in Maryland is to adopt the State Highway Administration (SHA) plan to widen Route 32 to four lanes, according to a study by graduate students in the UMBC Department of Public Policy.

    The study, Maryland Route 32: A Policy Analysis, examined alternatives for addressing the congestion on the heavily traveled, undivided two-lane stretch of road in Howard County. The SHA proposed that the road be widened to four lanes, with interchanges and service roads, and received an exemption from the Maryland's Smart Growth law to allow state funding for the project. However, community activists and environmental groups oppose the SHA plan, and one group has announced that it will file suit to stop state funding for the $220 million expansion.

    The students first analyzed projected growth for the region, and determined that population and the number of vehicles in Howard and neighboring Carroll and Frederick counties will continue to grow over the next 25 years. The study concluded that given projected growth rates, traffic on Route 32 will increase regardless of the width of the road.

    The study then evaluated three options: keep the road as it is (no-build); convert Route 32 to a limited access highway with interchanges (structural upgrades); or move forward with the SHA plan to widen Route 32 to four lanes (four-lane expansion). The report found that if reducing congestion is the primary objective, the SHA plan to widen Route 32 to four lanes receives the highest ranking.

    Recognizing the controversy surrounding major road projects in Maryland, the report also identified drawbacks to the four lane expansion, which include higher costs, negative environmental impacts, more noise and the potential to spur construction and urban sprawl.

    "If decision makers place more importance on these criteria than on reducing congestion, then we recommend that the structural upgrade alternative be pursued," the report said. The authors also questioned whether stopping the four lane expansion would actually slow the rate of sprawl in light of local economic development plans, noting: "One county's sprawl is another county’s economic lifeline." The study suggested that drawbacks such as cost, environmental impacts and noise will be offset by a widened and improved road with better access and an increased level of safety.

    About UMBC Public Policy Department:
    UMBC Public Policy graduate students analyzed Route 32 expansion alternatives in the state as part of their Public Policy Capstone seminar, a course where students, working with faculty and outside experts in relevant fields, prepare a policy analysis of a current topic. The study is available online as a PDF file at http://www.umbc.edu/mipar.

    The UMBC Department of Public Policy provides quality education for a diverse range of students who wish to pursue or further a career in a public policy related area. The interdisciplinary program offers both a Master of Public Policy and a Ph.D. in Public Policy.

    Posted by dwinds1

    December 20, 2004

    The Kiev Killer Comes to Kansas

    The Cuban Cyclone, The Polish Magician and The Kiev Killer are headed to Kansas, and they're out for revenge. Residents of Wichita may feel they aren't in Kansas anymore later this month when the international, intellectual sport of college chess brings top UMBC players from Cuba, India, Poland and the Ukraine to town for the 2004 Pan American Intercollegiate Chess Tournament, the Super Bowl of college chess.

    The Cuban Cyclone, The Polish Magician and The Kiev Killer are headed to Kansas, and they're out for revenge. Residents of Wichita may feel they aren't in Kansas anymore later this month when the international, intellectual sport of college chess brings top UMBC players from Cuba, India, Poland and the Ukraine to town for the 2004 Pan American Intercollegiate Chess Tournament, the Super Bowl of college chess.

    Recruited from around the globe, the Cyclone, Magician and Killer are nicknames for members of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) team, which is determined to recapture its standing as the number one college chess team in the western hemisphere.

    At the 2003 Pan Am, UMBC was knocked off the throne by arch-rival University of Texas at Dallas (UTD). Dozens of national and international universities participate annually, including Harvard, MIT, Princeton, Stanford, and the Universities of Chicago, Peru and Toronto; still, the only team able to defeat UMBC in recent years is UTD. If UMBC recaptures the top spot this year, it will be their seventh title in ten years and will break the record for the most wins by one team.

    The UMBC Retrievers team includes the number one player in Canada, Pascal "The Frenchman" Charbonneau, as well as the number one player in the U.S., Alexander "The Invincible" Onischuk, who is Ukrainian. Pawel "The Polish Magician" Blehm and and Bruci "The Cuban Cyclone," Lopez complete the Team A roster.

    Team B is comprised of Beenish "The Indian Tiger" Bhatia, Katerina "The Kiev Killer" Rohonyan, John "The Maryland Mauler" Rouleau and Battsetseg "The Mongolian Terror" Tsagaan.

    About the Pan American Intercollegiate Chess Tournament:

    Dates: December 27 through 30, 2004

    Place: Hilton Hotel and Conference Center, Wichita Airport, Wichita, KS

    More information on the Pan American Intercollegiate Chess Tournament is online here.

    Posted by dwinds1

    December 15, 2004

    Discover Magazine Names UMBC Professor's 'Man Who Shocked the World' Among Top 20 Science Books of 2004

    Discover Magazine has named "The Man Who Shocked the World: The Life and Legacy of Stanley Milgram" by UMBC psychology professor Thomas Blass as one of the Top 20 Science Books of 2004. The national honor is the latest accolade for Blass's biography of Milgram, one of the most controversial psychologists in modern history.

    Discover Magazine has named "The Man Who Shocked the World: The Life and Legacy of Stanley Milgram" (Basic Books, 2004) by UMBC psychology professor Thomas Blass as one of the Top 20 Science Books of 2004. The national honor is the latest accolade for Blass's biography of Milgram, one of the most controversial psychologists in modern history.

    Milgram is best known for his "Obedience Experiments" carried out at Yale University in the 1960s. In the experiments, 65 percent of test subjects repeatedly gave seemingly real and painful electrical shocks to another subject (actually an actor) just because a scientific "authority figure" commanded them to. Milgram was also the originator of the "Six Degrees of Separation" theory.

    Discover described Blass's book as "by turns both moving and chilling." The magazine's Top 20 Science Books list put "Shocked..." in good company beside other nationally honored nonfiction, including "The Fabric of the Cosmos: Space, Time, and the Texture of Reality" by Brian Greene, which was an Amazon.com Top Book of the Year. "Shocked..." was well received nationally by critics, including the Library Journal, American Scientist, the Washington Post, and the Jerusalem Post.

    "I am delighted to be part of Discover's list of excellent books," said Blass. "This is the kind of honor that helps make 10 years of work worthwhile."

    Blass, a social psychologist and Hungarian-born Holocaust survivor, has studied Milgram for 15 years and authored over 20 publications and an equal number of academic papers on Milgram's life and work. He also runs the website www.stanleymilgram.com, devoted to preserving Milgram's legacy and connecting his research to current and historical events.

    Posted by dwinds1

    December 08, 2004

    UMBC's 2005 Legislative Audit

    While three years may seem like a long time between legislative audits, there is no downtime for the Management Advisory Services Department (MAS)--and for the rest of the campus community--when it comes to preparation.

    While three years may seem like a long time between legislative audits, there is no downtime for the Management Advisory Services Department (MAS)--and for the rest of the campus community--when it comes to preparation.

    We work on a daily basis to educate everyone on the importance of internal controls, including proper separation of duties and complete and timely approvals, said Michele Evans, director of MAS. Especially important for our 2005 audit will be the conversion of our financial and human resources systems to PeopleSoft. The auditors will examine our conversion, the security in our new systems and our current business processes. MAS continues to work with the Office of Information Technology, Financial Services, Human Resources and the campus community to ensure the adequate controls were built into the system and are included in updated business processes.

    Frances Toth and Sharon Doherty-Ritter, MAS management analysts, just completed a wave of Internal Control Sessions for Campus Administrators, at the request of President Hrabowski. The president wanted us to get the message out to vice presidents, deans, directors and department chairs, who are often responsible for authorization and approval functions, so they would take an active interest in maintaining a proper system of internal controls in their areas of responsibility. The sessions were a big success, with over 200 people attending, said Evans.

    Evans added that although previous auditors had a high opinion of UMBC and felt that the campus community was putting forth a good effort, MAS is still concerned about problems that remain unresolved since the University's 2002 audit.

    One of the biggest issues is management of the University's VISA Purchasing or P-card, a matter made especially serious because the campus spends more than $10 million annually via the card. More than 70 percent of MAS P-card reviews uncovered insufficient supervision, while more than 55 percent of reviews revealed inaccuracies in purchasing records. The situation not only places the campus at risk that this item may be cited in a third Legislative Audit, it also jeopardizes UMBC's use of the card.

    Other problems that MAS recently assisted with include:

    *An employee who personally benefited from a relationship with a vendor.

    *An employee who falsified time/leave records, so that the employee's leave would not be charged.

    *An inadequately secured forced access code (FAC), which allowed unauthorized long distance calls to be made on campus.

    Evans encourages all departments to be aggressive in resolving problems, practice fiscal responsibility and use MAS as a resource. We offer solutions that people aren't aware of. For instance, some departments have a small staff and don't know how to handle issues like controls or separation of dutieswe can suggest ways to solve this problem, said Evans.

    Dates and other important information about the legislative audit will be sent to the campus via Insights Weekly. MAS's Audit Information Fact Sheet is available on the MAS Web site (click on Audit Information).

    For more information, visit the MAS Web site or call Michele Evans at ext. 5-1354.

    Posted by dwinds1

    December 04, 2004

    Kudos

    UMBC Photography Collections Images Seen Around the World

    Tom Beck, Chief Curator, Special Collections at the Albin O. Kuhn Library & Gallery, is proud to report that not only does UMBC send students abroad, but also images from its Photography Collections.

    Currently onloan to the Maison Europenne de la Photographie in Paris are 13photographs by Ted Serios from the Jules Eisenbud/Ted Serios Archive ofthe Special Collections of the Albin O. Kuhn Library & Gallery. Thephotographs are part of a major exhibition titled "Le troisime oeil, Laphotographie et l'occulte (scroll down at http://www.mep-fr.org/actu_1.htm, which is accompanied by a substantialbook of the same title (Paris: ditions Gallimard, 2004).

    The bookincludes reproductions of the images and an essay by Professor StephenE. Braude, Chair of UMBC's Department of Philosophy. The exhibitionwill be on view until Feb. 6, 2005, then will be presented at NewYork's Metropolitan Museum of Art from Sept. 27 to Dec. 31, 2005.

    Also on loan abroad from UMBC's Photography Collections are 22photographs by Lewis Hine which are currently on view at the TokyoMetropolitan Museum of Photography (TMMP) in their exhibition titled"Dreaming of Tomorrow."The exhibition, which is made up of works selected by TMMP CuratorYoshiko Susuki, includes works from UMBC as well as several otherimportant U.S. collections. It continues until Jan. 16, 2005.

    UMBC Represented at AAC&U Conference
    Diane M. Lee, vice provost for undergraduate education; Patricia A. Perillo, director, Office of Student Life; David Hoffman, coordinator, leadership and engagement initiatives; and Jordan Hadfield, chief of staff, SGA, represented UMBC at the Association of American Colleges and Universities (AAC&U) conference November 12 in Philadelphia. The conference theme was "Educating Intentional Learners: New Connections for Academic and Student Affairs" and the UMBC team presented at the session Making Civic Empowerment a Whole-Campus Enterprise.

    New Patent for Yung Jui Chen
    Yung Jui Chen's new patent, Integrated Spectral Encoder/Decoder for Optical CDMA Communication System, patent number US 6,807,372 B1, was issued on October 19. This encoder/decoder design for spectrum-encoded optical CDMA systems uses waveguide circuits monolithically integrated on one chip to fulfill essential encoding and decoding functions. The entire patent can be viewed in its entirety at www.uspto.gov. For more information on patents, trademarks, copyrights or start-up companies, please call the Office of Technology Development at 410-455-1414.

    Philosophers on Parade
    Assistant Professor Joseph Berkovitz recently had two papers accepted for publication. The first (co-authored with Meir Hemmo) is How to Reconcile Modal Interpretations of Quantum Mechanics with Relativity, forthcoming in Philosophy of Science. The second (also co-authored with Meir Hemmo) is Modal Interpretation and Relativity: A Reconsideration, forthcoming in Foundations of Physics.

    Professor and Department Chair Stephen Braude published "The Nature and Significance of Dissociation," in J. Radden's (ed.) The Philosophy of Psychiatry: A Companion (Oxford University Press, 2004). His paper, "Personal Identity and Postmortem Survival," presented last spring at the Bowling Green State University Conference on Personal Identity, is forthcoming in Social Philosophy and Policy 22 (2005).

    Braude has also given a number of invited lectures recently. On October 16, he gave a plenary address, "Personal Identity and Postmortem Survival," at the 26th Annual Conference of the Humanities & Technology Association in York, PA. On October 26, he gave a talk, "The Argument from Crippling Complexity," at the Division of Personality Studies at the University of Virginia. Later that day, he spoke on "The Creativity of Dissociation" at the University of Virginia Medical School's Department of Psychiatry. Then on November 15, he spoke on "Postmortem Survival: The State of the Debate" at Mt. St. Mary's University.

    Last April, Associate Professor Susan Dwyer developed and ran a workshop for Erickson Retirement Communities entitled "Ethics and Social Work with Seniors: Resident, Institutional and Personal Challenges." She also participated in the Workshop on Moral Psychology at Dartmouth May 24 and 25.

    Visiting Assistant Professor Matt McCabe published a book review of Physician Assisted Suicide: The Anatomy of a Constitutional Law Issue, by Susan M. Behuniak and Arthur G. Svenson, in The Social Science Journal (Vol. 41, No. 3, Fall 2004).

    Assistant Professor Jessica Pfeifer was accepted to and attended the Dibner Institute Summer Biological Seminar on Molecular Evolution at the Marine Biological Lab in Woods Hole, which took place May 19 through 26. She will present a paper, Why Selection and Drift Might be Distinct, at the Philosophy of Science Association meeting in Austin this month; and it was also accepted for publication in Philosophy of Science.

    In October, Visiting Lecturer Anna Ribeiro gave a talk at the annual meeting of the American Society for Aesthetics (ASA) entitled "Experiencing Poetry." The talk was part of "Cognitive Poetics," a panel discussion Ribeiro organized. Her guests were Morris Halle (linguistics, MIT), Nigel Fabb (literary linguistics, Strathclyde, Glasgow), Kristin Hanson (English, Berkeley) and Alex Neill (philosophy, Southhampton). Ribeiro also has a book review [Peter Lamarque's and Stein Haugom Olsen's Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art: The Analytic Tradition (Blackwell, 2004)]forthcoming in the fall issue of the ASA Newsletter.

    Associate Professor Steven Yalowitz's article, "Anomalous Monism," will appear in the Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy.

    Michael Patrick Smith '99 in the News
    Michael Patrick Smith's play, Woody Guthrie Dreams Before Dying, will be performed at the Creative Alliance at the Patterson November 18-21, 26, 27(www.missiontix.com). It is the longest running production sponsored by the Creative Alliance.

    The play has been the subject of features in the Washington Post, Baltimore Sun and Patuxent Publishing Papers, and on MPT's Art Works and WYPR's (88.1 FM) The Signal.

    Chamber of Commerce Recognizes the Shriver Center's Professional Practice Staff
    The Greater Catonsville Chamber of Commerce recognized the internship and cooperative education programs of the Shriver Center's Professional Practice staff at their Education-Business Partnership Breakfast on November 9. The staff was highlighted for maintaining a consistently outstanding effort in support of students enriching their education with meaningful work.

    The Office of Professional Practice cultivated and secured over 700 internship and cooperative education placements in more than 300 public and private organizations in the Baltimore/Washington area, nationally, and abroad during the 2003-2004 academic year. Additionally, the staff developed and managed several internship programs on behalf of partnering organizations including the Governor's Summer Internship Program, MDOT Fellows Internship Program, Kauffman Entrepreneur Internship Program and the WORTHY Program. All of these professional practice programs serve as a major resource for employers in the region and an excellent training ground for students.

    For more information on the Shriver Center's Professional Practice Programs, contact Christine Routzahn, associate director of professional practice, at 410-455-2493.

    Kunakorn Yisomruay and Tim Ward Named America East Swimmer and Diver of the Week
    Kunakorn Yisomruay and Tim Ward have been named America East Men's Swimming and Diving Performers of the Week, respectively.

    Yisomruay, a freshman, won first place in the 200 IM (1:55.59) and 200 backstroke (1:54.98) in the tri-meet against Binghamton and Seton Hall. He also swam the third leg of the 400 freestyle relay to help UMBC win with a time of 3:13.78. His closest competitor in the 200 IM came in at 1:58.55, while his closest competitor in the 200 back came in at 1:56.27. Ward, also a freshman, placed first in the 3-meter event in the tri-meet against Binghamton and Seton Hall with a score of 262.55. UMBC went 2-0 at this tri-meet to improve to 5-0 on the season.

    Matt Watson Named America East Midfielder, Rookie of the Year in Men's Soccer
    UMBC freshman midfielder Matt Watson was named America East Midfielder of the Year and the conference's Rookie of the Year. Watson earned First Team All America East honors, as did junior defender Marcus Gross.

    Other Retrievers honored were senior forward Derek McElligott, who earned Second Team All Conference honors and freshman defender Bryan Moffa, who joined Watson on the all-rookie team.

    Watson, the lone freshman to earn First Team honors, leads the America East and ranks fifth in the nation in assists with 9 in 17 games (0.60). He is sixth in the conference in scoring with 4 goals and 9 helpers for 17 points. The nine assists is the most ever by a UMBC freshman. He is UMBC's first conference Rookie of the Year since McElligott earned the honors in the Northeast Conference in 2001.

    Gross, a two-time First Team honoree, continued his dominating play on the Retriever backline. He also added a pair of goals and an assist in 2004.

    McElligott lead UMBC for the fourth straight year in goals scored, tallying eight in his final campaign. He set UMBC Division I marks for career goals (47), points (106), and game-winning goals (18).

    Moffa became a starter midway through the season and excelled as a marking back. He also added three assists in his eleven starts.

    UMBC completed its season with an 8-6-3 record, its seventh straight winning season.

    J.J. Young Selected to America East Women's Soccer All-Rookie Team
    Freshman J.J. Young was selected to the 2004 America East Conference Women's Soccer All-Rookie Team by the league's head coaches. Young, who led UMBC in goals (6) and points (16), was also tied for the team lead in assists, with four. In addition, she ranked third in the conference in shots per game (3.56), and tenth in both assists per game (0.25), and points per game (1.00).

    Young was a key component in the Retrievers' 2-1 upset of Northeastern, who at the time, was the top seed in the America East. In that game, Young scored both UMBC goals to record her second multi-goal game of the year and fourth contest with three or more points.

    Field Hockey's Julie Moore and Ashly Meehan Receive All-Conference Honors
    Sophomore Julie Moore was named to the 2004 America East All-Conference Second Team, while freshman Ashly Meehan was named to the All-Rookie Team.

    For the season, Moore led the Retrievers in goals (9) and points (21), and was ranked seventh in the conference in those categories. In addition, she finished seventh in the league in goals per game (0.53), ninth in points per game (1.24), and tenth in shots per game with 2.18.

    Meehan finished the year with six goals and three assists, good enough to be third on the UMBC team in goals in scoring. On Sept. 7, she received Rookie of the Week honors for her performance the week prior when she scored the first goal of her collegiate career, and assisted on another goal, as UMBC lost a heartbreaker during the season opener at Appalachian State in double overtime. During that same week, she netted two goals in just three shots as the Retrievers cruised to a 5-0 victory over Robert Morris.

    Carlo DiClemente, Psychology, Joins HealthAtoZ Advisory Board
    Carlo DiClemente, professor and chair of psychology, joined HealthAtoZ's Medical Advisory Board to aid in development of the next generation of online behavioral modification and condition management.

    Founded in 1995 by a team of physicians, nurses and pharmacists, HealthAtoZ's interactive tools, Web sites, community builders and information centers promote wellness, better condition management and compliance, improve communication between patients and health providers, and motivate patients to seek early treatment for their health concerns.

    Posted by dwinds1

    December 03, 2004

    Maryland Universities Looking for a Few Good Women for Real-Life 'Apprentice'

    UMBC is looking for a few good women to learn high-tech, entrepreneurial skills in ACTiVATE, a real-world class that could be as competitive as the hit reality TV show "The Apprentice."

    The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) islooking for a few good women to compete in a high-tech,entrepreneurial take on the hit reality TV show "The Apprentice."

    The $600,000 National Science Foundation (NSF) program, "Achieving theCommercialization of Technology in Ventures through Applied Training forEntrepreneurs" (ACTiVATE), will select up to 30Baltimore/Washington-area women for a competitive class that, unliketraditional business courses, doesn't deal in hypothetical widgets. Instead, ACTiVATE gives real-world lessons from experiencedentrepreneurs and venture capitalists as students compete to takepatented technology innovations from area universities to market.

    "ACTiVATE is looking for savvy, competitive women to have fun whilegoing after an ultimate prize that's much better than a job with DonaldTrump the chance to start and run a real technology company," saidStephen Auvil, director of UMBC's Office of Technology Development.

    UMBC teams with the Maryland Technology Development Corporation (TEDCO)and six other Maryland universities on ACTiVATE, one of only 16 grantsawarded nationwide this year from the NSF's highly competitivePartnerships for Innovation Program. While no one will hear the dreadedwords "You're fired," the program aims to create six or more new,university-related, startup companies over the next three years whiletraining 90 new women entrepreneurs in the process.

    Each year, TEDCO will screen 20 existing technology ideas fromparticipating universities and select the 15 best to be used inACTiVATE. Start-up firms that emerge from the course may be housed intechcenter@UMBC, the University's on-campus business incubator.

    Highly-motivated, mid-career women with business or technicalbackgrounds who are interested in learning more about ACTiVATE areinvited to attend one of two upcoming open houses. These events willprovide an overview of how ACTiVATE selects and trains applicants;introduce the entrepreneurs-in-residence at UMBC, give more informationon the university technologies to be marketed, and provide details onhow to apply for the program.

    Open House dates:
    December 7, 2004 or January 11, 2005

    6:30 until 8 p.m.

    techcenter@UMBC
    1450 South Rolling Road
    Catonsville, Maryland 21227

    Directions online:
    http://www.umbc.edu/Business/Research/location/directions.html

    For more information, please visit:
    http://www.umbc.edu/activate/ or email cwit@umbc.edu.

    About the ACTIVATE Team: Funded by the National Science Foundation,ACTIVATE partner universities include UMBC, The Johns HopkinsUniversity, the University of Maryland College Park, the University ofMaryland Baltimore, the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute,Towson University and the University of Maryland School of Law. Privatepartners include Legg Mason Wood Walker, Constellation Energy, GrantThornton, Venable LLP, Whiteford, Taylor & Preston LLP, New MarketsGrowth Fund, MGH Public Relations, The Eager Street Group, Darrah TaxAdvisory Services, BioPlan Associates, Inc., Anthem Capital Managementand American Express Tax & Business Services.

    Posted by dwinds1

    December 01, 2004

    Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery Presents A Thousand Hounds: A Walk with the Dogs Through the History of Photography

    Photography has offered a means of documentation and expression for more than 160 years. Focusing on a seemingly obscure subject, curators Raymond Merritt and Miles Barth have unearthed a delightful and varied array of images in which the dog's presence serves as a central trope in the history of the medium.

    UMBC's Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents A Thousand Hounds: A Walk with the Dogs Through the History of Photography, on display from September 20 through December 11, 2004. The exhibition was organized by the Cygnet Foundation and curated by Ray Merritt and Miles Barth.

    Photography has offered a means of documentation and expression for more than 160 years. Focusing on a seemingly obscure subject, curators Raymond Merritt and Miles Barth have unearthed a delightful and varied array of images in which the dog's presence serves as a central trope in the history of the medium. A Thousand Hounds: A Walk with the Dogs Through the History of Photography is based in part on the Cygnet Foundation's popular and critically acclaimed book of the same title, which, when it was released by Taschen in 2000, was announced as "a completely original history of photography told through images of canines."

    The exhibition celebrates the endearing and enduring partnership between human and dog in more than 150 photographs and one photographic sculpture, which date from 1840 to the current day and have been created by both masters of the medium and lesser-known practitioners.

    Among the noted artists included from the nineteenth century are Gustav Le Gray, W.A. Mooers and Henry Fox Talbot, and from the twentieth century, Bill Brandt, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Andr Kertsz, Jacques-Henri Lartigue, Man Ray, Robert Mapplethorpe, Paul Strand, and Weegee.

    Also prominently featured are works by contemporary artists, including William Wegman, Elliott Erwitt, and Keith Carter, all renowned for their images of dogs, as well as by Larry Clark, Robert Frank, Ralph Gibson, Sally Mann, Vik Muniz, and Sandy Skoglund.

    The exhibition is serious and scholarly in its considered presentation of the dog's place in momentous historical and cultural events of the past century and a half, ranging from polar expeditions to the Great Depression to the World Wars. It is also light-hearted and engaging in its celebration of photographers' longstanding artistic interest in the canine as model, muse and metaphor.

    Presented in two parts, its historical organization illuminates technological innovations, as well as cultural, sociological and aesthetic developments related to the medium, while contemporary work is organized thematically, with individual sections devoted to the notions of pathos, whimsy, elegance, companionship and inspiration.

    The Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents a panel discussion for the exhibition at 4 p.m. November 15. Discussants will include curator Ray Merritt, photographer Keith Carter, and Tom Beck, the chief curator of the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery. A reception will follow. For more information, call 410-455-2270.

    The local presentation of the exhibition is generously funded by the Maryland State Arts Council and the Friends of the Library & Gallery. The Gallery is open Monday through Friday, 12 noon to 4:30 p.m., on Thursday until 8 p.m., and Saturday 1 to 5 p.m. Admission is free. For more information, call 410-455-2270.

    Posted by dwinds1

    November 24, 2004

    Second Executive Development Course Offered at Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC

    ‘Development of Seniors Housing & Care’ Takes Place on January 26-29, 2005

    Contact Chip Rose
    UMBC News
    410-455-5793
    crose@umbc.edu

    or

    Renee Tilton
    410-626-0805

    The second executive development course at the recently established Erickson School of Aging Studies at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) is being held on January 26-29, 2005. The course, “Development of Seniors Housing & Care,” is geared to industry professionals and will examine the entire development process of the professionally managed, senior living company.

    The intensive, four-day course will include discussions on the crucial role of strategy, market and consumer research, financial feasibility and site selection. Other topics will cover project financing, architectural design, land planning and the construction process.

    Senior living executives who have personally directed and managed the development process in their own companies are teaching the course. Leading the course is Phil Golden, president of The Shelter Group, a national real estate development and management company of senior living properties. He will be joined by other guest lecturers, including Joe McElwee, senior vice president of development, Sunrise Senior Living; Jim May, vice president of construction, Sunrise Senior Living; David Segmiller, partner, CSD People Architecture; and Anthony J. Mullen, research director, National Investment Center for the Seniors Housing & Care Industries (NIC).

    The Executive Development Program is presented in partnership with NIC, a nonprofit organization that has been the leading source of business and financial information for the senior living industry since 1991. For the last five years, NIC has conducted executive development courses in operations, management, sales, marketing, development, finance and service quality for emerging industry leaders.

    UMBC, an honors university, is a four-year, public research university that is home to leading experts on aging who are active in research, education and service in the field of gerontology. It is one of a handful of universities in the nation to offer a Ph.D. in Gerontology.

    The Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC was started through a $5 million gift made by John Erickson, founder and chief executive officer of Erickson. Along with executive development, the school will eventually offer specialty degree programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels relating to senior care and aging.

    The cost for the “Development of Seniors Housing & Care” course is $2750 and space is limited. To register and for more information, visit www.umbc.edu/erickson or call UMBC at (410) 455-3361.

    2005 NIC Executive Development Courses at the Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC


    Development
    January 26-29, 2005

    Management & Operations
    March 16-19, 2005

    Sales & Marketing
    May 18-21, 2005

    Service Quality & Performance Measurement
    June 8-11, 2005

    Risk Management
    July 13-16, 2005

    Finance & Underwriting
    November 2-5, 2005

    Posted by crose

    November 12, 2004

    Meet UMBC's New Faculty

    Meet the newest members of the UMBC community.

    UMBC welcomes its newest faculty. If you are a new faculty member and would like to be profiled in Insights, e-mail insights@umbc.edu.

    Dawn J. Bennett
    Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering
    Ph.D., 2004, New Jersey Institute of Technology

    Prof. Bennett's dissertation examined dielectrophoresis of biological and non-biological particles. Before coming to UMBC, she was a research engineer at Sandia National Laboratories in Albuquerque, New Mexico as part of Sandia's MESA Institute Program, where she designed microfluidic channels and ran experiments in dielectrophoresis. Bennett has worked as a product and manufacture engineer for General Motors and Rockwell Automation Corporation, respectively. Bennett stresses the value of microfluidics research for its ability to aid in the detection of anthrax spores and other dangerous biological agents, to separate cancerous cells from noncancerous cells in blood, and to remove pollutant particles from fuel. Currently, Bennett is collaborating with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and is supported by the NSF-funded ADVANCE Program and the Henry C. Welcome Fellowship from the Maryland Higher Education Commission. Bennett most recently co-authored an article featured in Applied Physics Letters on particle manipulation in microfluidics. She enjoys traveling and spent a year teaching in the rural villages of Kenya, Africa. In addition, she enjoys skiing and has recently been hiking and sailing in the Baltimore area.

    Charissa S. L. Cheah
    Assistant Professor of Psychology
    Ph.D., 2000, University of Maryland, College Park

    Prof. Cheah's dissertation examined the parenting beliefs and practices of Mainland Chinese and European American mothers of preschoolers, regarding children's adaptive and maladaptive social behaviors. Before coming to UMBC, she was an assistant professor of psychology at the University of Saskatchewan, Canada in the Culture and Human Development program. Cheah is interested in the social emotional development and health of children and adolescents and the ways in which cultural factors contribute to this development. Her research is supported by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council. Cheah relates her research to the growing minority population in the United States and the need for an understanding of their parenting styles and developmental expectations in order to effectively inform public policy and address practices in education. She is the co-author of a recent article featured in the International Journal of Behavioral Development, which compares cross-cultural responses to asocial behavior in preschoolers.

    Carolyn Forestiere
    Assistant Professor of Political Science
    Ph.D., 2004, Emory University

    Prof. Forestiere's dissertation, which she is currently developing into a manuscript, examined opposition politics in parliamentary systems. A graduate Fulbright recipient, Forestiere spent a year in Italy working on her dissertation research. Last year she taught Italian and Italian politics at Emory University as a visiting lecturer. Her current research considers how opposition parties influence legislation in parliamentary systems, and she emphasizes the essential role of an official opposition in democratic politics. Last year Forestiere gave a series of lectures at a retirement community and encourages others to be active volunteers. She enjoys scuba diving and is a trained classical pianist.

    Amy M. Froide
    Assistant Professor of History
    Ph.D., 1996, Duke University

    Before coming to UMBC, Prof. Froide was a history professor at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts. She joins her husband, Terry Bouton, who is also a professor in UMBC's history department. Froide's research examines women in early modern Europe, and is particularly concerned with how marital status affected their lives. She addresses topics involving single mothers and welfare, the issue of marital choice and stereotypes about never-married women. Froide's research has been supported by the British Academy, the Rockefeller Foundation, the American Historical Association, the Rutgers Center for Historical Analysis, the Folger Shakespeare Library, the Newberry Library and Yale University's Walpole Library. Froide's forthcoming book, Never Married: Single women in early modern England (Oxford University Press) will be published in early 2005. While her one-year-old daughter takes up most of her time, she enjoys traveling in Europe and hopes to lead trips for UMBC students in the future.

    Theodosia Gougousi
    Assistant Professor of Physics
    Ph.D., 1996, University of Pittsburgh

    Before coming to UMBC, Prof. Gougousi was a research associate at North Carolina State University, where she studied the stability and electrical and interfacial properties of several rare earth and transition metal-based oxide and silicate materials. Gougousi was drawn to UMBC for the research prospects it offers to people in her field. In her research she studies the properties of thin film materials, such as those used in nanotechnology. Gougousi points out that advances in her field will contribute to the enrichment of people's lives with better, faster computers and electronic gadgets, impact space exploration and even offer new instrumentation for health care. Among Gougousi's most recent publications is a co-authored article in the Journal of Applied Physics examining the reactivity of thin films with other materials. She enjoys reading and watching movies when she is not spending time with her four-year-old daughter.

    John E. Nelson
    Clinical Assistant Professor of Education
    Ph.D., 1980, McGill University

    Prof. Nelson was brought to UMBC by Ron Schwartz in 1988 and has been teaching in the ESL MA Program as an adjunct lecturer. This year Schwartz retired and asked Nelson to take over his position as clinical assistant professor. Before coming to UMBC, Nelson worked as the parent involvement specialist and staff development specialist for the ESOL program in Prince George's County public schools. He is concerned with the growing numbers of non-English speaking children in American schools and the shortage of ESOL teachers despite the increasing influence of English in the world. Nelson considers UMBC's ESOL program to be one of the strongest in the country and is committed to its continued improvement. For the past several years he has coordinated a spring biking program bringing together adults and high school ESOL students from Prince George's County.

    -Steffany Magid

    Posted by dwinds1

    November 10, 2004

    UMBC Research Park Welcomes IT Firm, NASA Centers to Second Building

    UMBC announced today that three new tenants have agreed to move into the second building in bwtech@UMBC, the university's on-campus research and technology park. The new arrivals include the award-winning information technology firm BDMetrics, Inc.; the $148 million NASA Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center; and all UMBC departments related to technology transfer and entrepreneurship education.

    The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) announced today that three new tenants have agreed to move into the second building in bwtech@UMBC, the university's on-campus research and technology park. The new arrivals include the award-winning information technology firm BDMetrics, Inc.; the $148 million NASA Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center; and all UMBC departments related to technology transfer and entrepreneurship education.

    BDMetrics has leased approximately 7,000 square feet of office space in the recently completed, 60,000 square-foot, multi-tenant facility developed by Grosvenor. BDMetrics, which provides software and services to aid technology companies with business development, was previously located at techcenter@UMBC, the university's high-tech business incubator. Earlier this year, BDMetrics was named the Best New Incubator Company by the Maryland Business Incubation Association.

    "UMBC's wealth of brainpower and convenient location makes bwtech@UMBC an excellent place to grow our company," said Rick Geritz, CEO of BDMetrics. "UMBC is a thriving, entrepreneurial institution that embraces collaboration with business, which makes it an attractive environment for nurturing cutting edge technologies."

    The Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology (GEST) Center -- a $148 million, 10-year research collaboration with NASA-Goddard Space Flight Center to study the atmosphere, oceans and climate change -- is the second addition to the building. GEST is one of four major NASA-related research centers -- along with the Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology, Center for Advanced Studies in Photonics Research and the Joint Center for Astrophysics -- at UMBC, which is ranked 16th nationally in NASA funding. Elements of JCET will share office space with GEST in the new building.

    All UMBC departments engaged in technology transfer and entrepreneurship education will also move into the new building, including the Alex. Brown Center for Entrepreneurship.

    "This proves that our campus commitment to economic development is serious and strong," said Ellen Hemmerly, executive director of the UMBC Research Park Corporation. "We hope it will also make it more likely for future research park tenants to emerge from the growing number of bioscience tool and service firms located in techcenter@UMBC," Hemmerly said.

    bwtech@UMBC is being developed by Grosvenor, one of the largest private real estate companies in the world with a global property portfolio of $7 billion. The park's 62,000 square-foot first building has been leased by the information technology firm RWD Technologies since 2001.

    UMBC's research park and incubator have received public and private sector funding from the Maryland Economic Development Corporation, the State of Maryland, the City of Baltimore, Baltimore County, the U.S. Department of Commerce, The Abell Foundation, and the Maryland Technology Development Corporation. In 2003, bwtech@UMBC became part of Baltimore County's Southwest Enterprise Zone, making companies moving to the park eligible for credits on real property and income taxes, as well as credits for creating new jobs.

    Posted by dwinds1

    November 05, 2004

    Azar Nafisi and Lolita's Exodus to Iran

    Azar Nafisi's New York Times best-seller Reading Lolita in Tehran has raised a lot of interesting questions about women's roles in the expanding global community and the often underestimated power of literature to move ideological mountains. What's more, her memoirs depicting her experience as a resigned university professor hosting a clandestine reading group in her home reminds us how freedom can find a voice in the most repressive circumstances. Nafasi will discuss her book at UMBC on November 9 (7 p.m., U.C. Ballroom).

    The test of a first-rate intelligence is the ability to hold two opposing ideas in mind at the same time and still retain the ability to function. -- F. Scott Fitzgerald

    Azar Nafisi's New York Times best-seller Reading Lolita in Tehran has raised a lot of interesting questions about women's roles in the expanding global community and the often underestimated power of literature to move ideological mountains. What's more, Nafisi's memoirs depicting her experience as a resigned university professor hosting a clandestine reading group in her home reminds us how freedom can find a voice in the most repressive circumstances.

    "The Women's Studies program has chosen to sponsor Nafisi's talk because we want to encourage debate about the meaning of fundamentalism for the lives of women, as well as men, in the Middle East, says Marjoleine Kars, associate professor of history and affiliate faculty in Women's Studies. Nafisi's book undoubtedly sheds light on the state of affairs in Iran, which is one of the key elements that make her memoirs so meaningful. However, the fact that the release of her book coincided with the increasing relevance of the situation in the Middle East has drawn many readers to the political aspect of Reading Lolita and has perhaps created a focus that otherwise oversimplifies Nafisi's initial motivation for recording her memoirs.

    I think it will be too bad if we read her book and then congratulate ourselves on not being like Iran, says Thomas Field, director of the Center for the Humanities, one of the sponsors of the event. Nafisi's memoirs represent two years (1995-1997) in post-revolutionary Iran and reflect the repressive Islamist policies first introduced by the Ayatollah Khomeini in the late 1970's. Conversely, reformist parties in Iran are currently fighting against the tight restrictions of the conservative government and are struggling to promote a more democratic perspective. Iran is one of the first Muslim nations seeking a new way toward modernity that isn't based on the West, explains Field.

    But keep in mind, Nafisi's book is not just about politics and the effects of fundamentalist policies. The book is about how important it is for a woman to have an opportunity to expand her mind, says Field. Great literature gives you a broader range of experiences; it takes you places you can't get on your own. Kars agrees. We thought the talk would provide a great opportunity for students to think about the transformative power of literature: how it can help people make sense of their lives, especially in situations where open political discussion is prohibited."

    At UMBC, we encourage students majoring in the social sciences to take part in experiential learning, says Roy Meyers, director of the Sondheim Public Affairs Scholars program, which is also sponsoring the event. One way students do that is to interact with speakers who are working on interesting issues or doing important work to improve society. Nafisi would perhaps agree that the best way to realize our potential is to take advantage of the full range of our intellectual resources.

    Similarly, Field endorses the prospect that Nafisi's presentation will inspire students to exercise the first amendment and acknowledge literature's ability to enhance their understanding of the world. I hope people have an appreciation of the fact that we can say and do what we want [in the United States] and that people take advantage of that and read controversial literature that rubs them the wrong way, that stretches their minds in ways that are painful. That's very important.

    Azar Nafisi, visiting fellow and professorial lecturer at the Foreign Policy Institute of the Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies, will present her book Reading Lolita in Tehran on Tuesday, November 9, at 7 p.m. in the University Center Ballroom.

    The event is sponsored by the Center for the Humanities, the Sondheim Public Affairs Scholars Program, the Office of the Provost, the Department of English and the Women's Studies Program.

    -Steffany Magid

    Posted by dwinds1

    November 04, 2004

    In the News

    Please note: Some newspapers require registration in order to read articles.

    BD Metrics, in the news
    BD Metrics, a start-up based at techcenter@UMBC and soon moving to bwtech@UMBC, was featured in a Dec. 1 Baltimore Business Journal story, announcing former Advertising.com Chief Financial Officer Mike Woosley's appointment as their new CFO. Digital Harbor Online also covered the story.

    Dennis Coates, Economics, in Cato.org
    Dennis Coates, professor of economics, was quoted in a Nov. 30
    Cato Institute news feature, "D.C. Ballpark Vote Expected Today," about the anticipated decision of whether the D.C. Council will fund the construction of a new stadium.

    ACTiVATE in the news
    ACTiVATE, an entrepreneurial competition for women funded by the National Science Foundation and led by UMBC, was featured in The Baltimore Business Journal and The Daily Record this week. ACTiVATE teams UMBC with six other Maryland universities plus private and public sector partners with the ultimate goal of creating new startup companies using patented technologies from Maryland universities.

    Model UN Team in The Baltimore Chronicle
    UMBC's Model UN Team, led by Political Science professor and chair Cynthia Hody, was featured in the Dec. 3 Baltimore Chronicle. The team was recognized at the 15th Annual American Model United Nations International Conference as a Distinguished Delegation for their representation of the United Kingdom on five committees.

    AVIcode, techcenter@UMBC, in Digital Harbor Online
    AVIcode, an affiliate company of techcenter@UMBC, was highlighted in a Nov. 22 Digital Harbor Online news feature, AVIcode Launches Microsoft Operations Manager Add-in.

    Thomas Blass, Psychology, in Choice
    The Nov. issue of Choice magazine, a publication that reviews books for academic libraries, features a review of Professor of Psychology Thomas Blass' book, The Man Who Shocked the World: The Life and Legacy of Stanley Milgram.

    Terry Bouton, History, in the Baltimore Sun
    Terry Bouton, assistant professor of history, was quoted in a Nov. 21 Baltimore Sun story, Building democracy tougher than it looks, about the naivet of the idea that democracy is the most fundamental kind of government and how the history of our country proves it.

    Vondina Brown, Meyerhoff Scholar, in the Baltimore Sun
    Vondina Brown, a UMBC Meyerhoff Scholar, was mentioned in a Nov. 27 Baltimore Sun story, Getting careers down to a science, about Building STEPS, an innovative science program offered to students at Dunbar, Digital Harbor and Woodlawn High Schools.

    Christopher Corbett, English, in Style
    English Lecturer Christopher Corbett's December Back Page column, Aliens Among Us, appears in Style's print and online editions.

    George LaNoue, Political Science, in the Asbury Park Press
    Professor of Political Science George LaNoue was quoted in a Nov 21. Ashbury Park Press story, New Jersey's set-aside program on hold, about a state program intended to secure business contracts for women and minority-owned small businesses.

    Donald Norris, Public Policy, in the Baltimore Sun
    Donald Norris, professor of public policy and MIPAR director, was quoted in a Nov. 19 Baltimore Sun story, Inviting O'Malley onto Ehrlich's turf, about Baltimore Mayor O'Malley's appearance at the Arbutus Roundtable.

    Robert Provine, Psychology, in the Baltimore Sun
    Robert Provine, professor of psychology and modern laugh research pioneer, was quoted in a Nov. 29 Baltimore Sun story, Synthesizing human emotions, about research being done to make computers sensitive to and able to mimic emotions.

    Thomas Schaller, Political Science, in Baltimore Magazine
    Associate Professor of Political Science Thomas Schaller's Jim Smith, the Un-Politician, in the Dec. issue of Baltimore Magazine looks at the first-term Baltimore County executive's surprisingly apolitical nature.

    The Shriver Center in the Jeffersonian
    The Shriver Center's "Outstanding Transitioning program" award from the chamber of commerce was mentioned in a Nov. 22 Jeffersonian article, Chamber recognizes students' charity.

    Ellen Handler Spitz, Honors College and Visual Arts, in the San Francisco Chronicle
    Ellen Handler Spitz, honors professor of visual arts, was quoted in a Nov. 17 San Francisco Chronicle story, Childhood Isn't What It Used to Be. In the Arts, It's Dark and Complex," about the increasingly polarized notions of childhood being represented in contemporary art.

    UMBC Oral History Consortium, in the Detroit Free Press
    A UMBC panel chose two retired Marquette County, Michigan teachers to receive the 2004 Betty Key Oral History Award for their work with the Red Dust project, a chronicle of the region's mining history they started in 1983.

    Simon Carn, JCET, in the Baltimore Sun
    Simon Carn, JCET research associate and volcano expert, was quoted in a Nov. 12 Baltimore Sun story, Fire Alarm, about the largest man-made release of SO2 ever recorded when a sulfur plant in Al-Mishraq, Iraq was set ablaze.

    The research carried out by Carn and his associates is also mentioned in a Nov. 17 EurekAlert report.

    Dennis Coates, Economics, in the Business Gazette
    In a Nov. 11 Business Gazette story, Despite slow economy, demand high for stadium skyboxes, Dennis Coates, professor of economics, claims that tax benefits and large businesses can explain the continued demand for skyboxes, despite an ailing economy.

    Prof. Coates' Nov. 7 OpEd story for the Washington Post was reprinted online on Nov. 12 at the Cato Institute's Web site.

    UMBC's Hillel in Hillel.org
    Students in Hillel, a Jewish student organization on campus, were quoted in a Nov. 15 Hillel.org story, Baltimore Students Build Bears for Sick Children about the Hillel of Greater Baltimore's donation of 40 custom-made teddy bears to sick children.

    Albin O. Kuhn, UMBC's First Chancellor, in the Western Howard County View
    In a
    Nov. 10 Western Howard County View story, Farmer Kuhn, UMBC's first Chancellor remembers UMBC's early years.

    Senior Aaron Merki, Sondheim Public Affairs Scholar, in the Daily Record
    Aaron Merki, a senior who wrote a legal brief while interning for the Maryland Public Defender's Office that helped overturn an unjust sentence in a criminal case, was featured in a Nov. 17 Daily Record story, Court of Appeals rejects conundrum' of enhanced penalty.

    The Shriver Center in the Arbutus Times
    The Shriver Center's award from Catonsville's Chamber of Commerce is mentioned in a Nov. 18 Arbutus Times story, School efforts honored that intersect with society.

    UMBC's SGA in the Catonsville Times, Jeffersonian
    On Nov. 10 and 11, Patuxent Publishing newspapers the Catonsville Times and Jeffersonian published, UMBC celebrates elections, community acknowledges the success of the SGA's Election Night Extravaganza event held Nov. 2.

    UMBC in the Washington Post
    UMBC participated in the National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE) and is listed in the Nov. 16 Washington Post story, Finding the Best, Not the Best-Known, Colleges.

    UMBC in the Washington Times
    UMBC is mentioned in a Nov. 14 Washington Times story, Bringing their spirit home, as one of the local universities participating in the Peace Corps Fellows program, which places returning Peace Corps volunteers in public service internships.

    UMBC in the Hagerstown Morning Herald
    UMBC is one of the schools that will be offering courses for students enrolled in the new education program at UM Hagerstown, according to a Nov. 12 Hagerstown Morning Herald story.

    Christopher Corbett, English, in the Baltimore Sun
    English instructor Christopher Corbett's November 12 talk at this weekend's Carroll Community College's Book Fair was mentioned in the November 12 Baltimore Sun.

    Rick Geritz, techcenter@UMBC, in the Daily Record Business Writer
    Rick Geritz, CEO of BD Metrics Inc., has been appointed to the new Entrepreneur Council of Baltimore's National Foundation for Teaching Entrepreneurship, a volunteer advisory group that works with teachers who want to give their students more training in business skills.

    Dennis Coates, Economics, in the Washington Post
    Dennis Coates, professor of economics, wrote a Nov. 7 Washington Post story, A Stadium Deal For Suckers about the false belief that new sports stadiums necessarily create economic growth in the surrounding area. He predicts that bringing the Expos to D.C. will potentially result in a per capita income loss in the restaurant and hospitality businesses around the stadium.

    Doctoral student David Gurzick, Information Systems, in the Baltimore Sun
    David Gurzick, a UMBC doctoral student and the first employee of Sonum Technologies, Inc., an artificial intelligence start-up, was mentioned in the Nov. 7 Baltimore Sun story, Hoping to be heard. The article was the first in a multi-part series to chronicle the beginnings of the Sonum start-up.

    Gurzick was also mentioned in the Baltimore Sun's Nov. 7 Sonum's players, a profile of all of the employees of the company.

    Donald F. Norris, Public Policy, in the Houston Chronicle
    Donald Norris, professor of public policy and MIPAR director, was quoted in a Nov. 6 Houston Chronicle story about the lift of a 51-year ban on bear hunting in Maryland.

    Thomas Schaller, Political Science, in the NewsHour
    Thomas Schaller, associate professor of political science, was quoted in a Nov. 3 PBS NewsHour story, GOP Gains Senate Seats in Hotly Contested Races, about the Republican win of four new seats in the Senate.

    He was also quoted in the Nov. 3 Reuters story, Election Will Prompt Democratic Soul-Searching, about the significance of the Democratic loss in the presidential election.

    Prof. Schaller was a guest-host on WBAL's Rob Douglas Show Nov. 8.

    Christopher Corbett, English, in Baltimore Style Magazine and the Baltimore Sun
    English instructor Christopher Corbett's November Baltimore Style column, The Back Page is now available online.

    In his Oct. 31 Baltimore Sun op-ed, Corbett discusses Maryland's recent first bear hunt in more than 50 years and the image of bears throughout children's literature.

    Alumnus Douglas Gearhart in Philosophy Now Magazine
    Douglas Gearhart, philosophy '97, a member of the Army Reserve, chronicles his Bronze Star medal-winning service in Iraq and gives practical moral guidance for frontline soldiers in a Philosophy Now article.

    Senior Kevin Hurley in the Gloucester County Times
    Kevin Hurley, a senior in economics, won the Jonas Cattell Run, a 10-mile foot race started in 1969 to commemorate the anniversary of his maternal relative's contribution to the British defeat at Red Bank Battlefield in 1777.

    Roy Meyers, Political Science, in the Baltimore Sun
    Roy Meyers, associate professor of political science, was quoted in a Nov. 1 Baltimore Sun story about $230 million in government bonds for public works projects that Baltimore County is asking its residents to vote on.

    Music Department in the Baltimore Sun
    The Nov. 2 Baltimore Sun story Autumn offers an ample menu of music highlights the opening of the music department's fall music program, which debuted with a classical Brahms program and will continue with more classical and contemporary performances in the coming weeks.

    Donald Norris, Public Policy, in the News
    Donald Norris, professor of public policy and MIPAR director, was quoted in an Oct. 28 Baltimore Sun story, Tough race brewing for Ehrlich, survey shows about the serious challenge Ehrlich faces for reelection in view of the two strong Democratic candidates that oppose him.

    He also was quoted in the Oct. 28 Baltimore Sun story, Schaefer continues to draw solid backing, survey shows about 82-year-old comptroller and former mayor William Donald Schaefer's overall support among Maryland voters.

    On Oct. 31, Norris was quoted in the Washington Post story, Parties eye shifts in Maryland voting about the speculation that Republicans are gaining ground amongst Maryland voters.

    He was quoted in two Baltimore Sun stories on Nov. 3. House incumbents fend off challenges across state, looks at the ease with which reigning Maryland Representatives defeated their challengers, and O'Malley win sets stage for governor's race in 2006 examines political speculation regarding O'Malley's potential win of Maryland's gubernatorial election in 2006.

    On Nov. 4, Norris was quoted in the Baltimore Sun stories Election results show a growing partisan divide in Maryland" and "O'Malley's huge win is clouded."

    Thomas Schaller, Political Science, in the News
    Thomas Schaller, associate professor of political science, was quoted in an Oct. 29 WTOP story Ruppersberger Solidifies Hold on Md.'s 2nd District about the probability of Democratic Rep. Ruppersberger's reelection and the consequent challenges faced by his opponent, Jane Brooks.

    He was quoted in a Nov. 1 Detroit News story Now America decides giving political expert speculation about the election results and what it would take for each candidate to win the race.

    Also on Nov. 1, Schaller was quoted in the Nov. 1 Christian Science Monitor story Winner's tough task: governing about the difficulties the next president will have to face concerning America's polarized electorate, and the Cherry Hill Courier (New Jersey) article Roles reversed throughout history about the reversal since the 19th century of what the Democratic and Republican parties stand for and who is voting for them.

    Schaller was quoted in a Nov. 3 Baltimore Sun story Turnout propels Democrats about the question of whether certain Maryland precincts are becoming more Republican and if the GOP is taking advantage of the presidential elections to begin campaigning for 2006.

    Students' Election Night Extravaganza in the Baltimore Sun
    On Nov. 3, the Baltimore Sun mentions UMBC's bipartisan Election Night Extravaganza amongst the local gatherings organized to watch the results of the election. The event was sponsored by UMBC's SGA.

    Timmie Topoleski, Mechanical Engineering, in Chemical & Engineering News
    Timmie Topoleski, professor of mechanical engineering, was quoted in a Nov.1 Chemical & Engineering News story about the development of a biocompatible polymer layer graft that is being tested by Japanese researchers at the University of Tokyo to reduce wear and bone loss from artificial joints.

    Posted by dwinds1

    UMBC Self-Study Moves Forward

    UMBC achieved an important milestone in its 2006 reaccreditation process when the Middle States Commission on Higher Education approved the University's self-study design.

    UMBC achieved an important milestone in its 2006 reaccreditation process when the Middle States Commission on Higher Education approved the University's self-study design.

    Every 10 years, UMBC undertakes a University-wide review, or self-study, as part of the requirements for reaccreditation. The purpose of the self-study is to determine how well UMBC educational programs and services accomplish the University's goals and meet the Middle States Commission standards.

    In addition to responding to the Commission, UMBC will use the 2006 self-study to advance the campus planning process. Marvin Mandell, professor and chair of the Department of Public Policy, and Nancy Ochsner, director of the Office of Institutional Research, are co-chairing the 2006 self-study.

    Before proceeding with the self-study, UMBC must submit a plan, or design for the self-study to the Commission. The design, which was prepared by the self-study steering committee, outlines how the University will conduct the self-study, including areas of review, expected outcomes, organization and timetable. The Commission approved the UMBC design in late October.

    The steering committee is close to completing another major task-organizing work groups of faculty, staff and students to conduct the self-study. The work groups have already started to meet and gather information to address their charges. The design also includes a communications plan that describes how the committee will obtain feedback from the UMBC community on the self-study draft before finalizing the report.

    The self-study report will be completed by the end of 2005, in advance of the Middle States Evaluation Team visit to UMBC in spring 2006.

    To read the design document, or learn more about the self-study, visit the self-study Web site.

    -Anne Roland

    Posted by dwinds1

    November 01, 2004

    UMBC Students to Hold Bipartisan Election Night Extravaganza

    As the increased number of bumper stickers, yard signs and TV debate ratings attest, passions are running high this election season. Students at UMBC, many of them first-time voters, are no exception and will be making their voices heard by bringing their elected officials to campus for a bipartisan Election Night Extravaganza.

    As the increased number of bumper stickers, yard signs and TV debate ratings attest, passions are running high this election season. Students at UMBC, many of them first-time voters, are no exception and will be making their voices heard by bringing their elected officials to campus for a bipartisan Election Night Extravaganza..

    The event, sponsored by the UMBC Student Government Association, will take place on Tuesday, Nov. 2 at 8 p.m. in the University Commons Building. Students of all political stripes are expected to join the festivities, which will include refreshments, music, remarks by Maryland politicians and many, many televisions to follow election returns. Approximately 600 people are expected to attend.

    "My sense is that UMBC students are especially fired up about this election," says David Hoffman, coordinator of leadership and engagement for the UMBC Office of Student Life. "National and local issues are touching students' lives deeply. Tuition increases hit them in the pocketbook. Their peers are fighting, and some are dying, in a controversial war in Iraq. And ever since 9/11, students have become keenly aware of the connection between national and international events and their personal well-being."

    In addition to hearing remarks from elected officials, students will have the opportunity to ask questions and share their concerns individually with:

    • The Hon. Steven J. DeBoy, Sr., State Delegate, District 12A
    • The Hon. Adrienne A. Jones, Speaker Pro Tem, Maryland House of Delegates (District 10)
    • The Hon. Edward J. Kasemeyer, State Senator, District 12
    • The Hon. James E. Malone, Jr., State Delegate, District 12A
    • The Hon. S.G. Samuel Moxley, Chair, Baltimore County Council (District 1)

    Posted by dwinds1

    October 29, 2004

    UMBC Researchers in Nature This Month

    Research by UMBC faculty and graduate students was published in the prestigious Nature family of scientific journals four times in October, including work in molecular biochemistry, earth science and quantum photonics.

    Research by faculty and graduate students at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) was published in the prestigious Nature family of scientific journals four times in October, including work in molecular biochemistry, earth science and quantum photonics. Overviews of the findings by UMBC researchers follow below, with links to further coverage.

    Synchronize Quantum Watches
    Nature, October 14
    UMBC physics graduate students Alejandra Valencia and Giuliano Scarcelli teamed with UMBC physics professor and co-principal project investigator Yanhua Shih on a method for synchronizing distant clocks, an important function for telecommunications and global positioning satellite systems. Their experiment showed that quantum entanglement of photon pairs allowed the synchronization of two clocks three kilometers apart to within picoseconds of each other. The research was also featured in Applied Physics Letters and Science News.

    As the World Turns, It Drags Space and Time
    Nature, October 21

    UMBC Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology (JCET) scientist Erricos Pavlis co-led a team that proved how shifts in satellite orbits are caused by the Earth warping space and time as it rotates, a phenomenon first predicted in 1918 by Albert Einstein's theory of general relativity. The international team of NASA and university researchers studied the orbits of two satellites over an 11 year span to arrive at the first direct proof of what is known as "frame dragging." "It's like a bowling ball spinning in molasses," said Pavlis. "As the Earth rotates, it pulls space-time in its vicinity around itself, which shifts the orbits of satellites near Earth." The findings were covered by newspapers and science websites across the globe.

    Iraqi Fire Pollution Rivaled 1980 Mt. St. Helens Eruption
    Nature News, October 25

    JCET volcano expert Simon Carn led a group of earth scientists who used satellite monitoring to show how pollution caused by the ongoing war in Iraq has rivaled the output of one of the most powerful volcanic eruptions in recent history. Carn's group observed how a June, 2003 fire at a sulphur plant near Mosul, Iraq, probably started by arsonists, caused the largest man-made release of polluting sulphur dioxide ever recorded, which was similar in magnitude to the same type of pollution released by the 1980 Mount Saint Helens volcanic eruption. The story was covered by BBC News online and other national and international science media.

    Why Retrovirus Replication Takes Two
    Nature News & Views, October 28; Nature, Sept. 30
    UMBC molecular biochemist and AIDS researcher Michael Summers, the only Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) investigator at a Maryland public university, and UMBC HHMI research associate Victoria D'Souza discovered a potential answer to a question that has baffled scientists for 20 years, namely how and why retroviruses must make two copies of their RNA in order to successfully infect other cells. By studying MoMULV, a retrovirus commonly used in the lab to learn more about lethal viruses like HIV, the UMBC team discovered a potential "RNA switch" instrumental to this process that could lead to a next generation of antiretroviral drug therapies. The work originally appeared in Nature on Sept. 30 and was then reviewed in the Oct. 28 "News and Views" section of the journal.

    About UMBC Research:
    UMBC's research funding has quadrupled during the past decade to over $85 million and the campus ranks sixth nationally in inventions disclosed and ninth nationally in U.S. patent applications filed per million dollars spent on research. UMBC, which is ranked 16th nationally in NASA funding, is home to three major collaborative NASA research centers. Michael Summers, the only Howard Hughes Medical Institute investigator at a Maryland public university, has led student researchers in solving three of the seven protein structures which make up HIV. In 2000, Summers was one of only 10 recipients nationwide of the National Science Foundation's Presidential Award for Excellence in Science, Mathematics and Engineering Mentoring.

    Posted by dwinds1

    October 26, 2004

    Employee of the Quarter: Call for Nominations

    The Department of Human Resources seeks nominations for the next Employee of the Quarter. Please recognize the dedication and hard work of our staff by nominating a colleague that demonstrates outstanding qualities and makes contributions toward his/her department's and UMBC's goals and mission.

    The next Employee of the Quarter will be selected in December. Nomination forms are due by November 30. Previous nominations will be eligible for consideration for one year from the date received.

    Click here for nomination forms and further information.

    Posted by dwinds1

    October 25, 2004

    UMBC Presents
    Azar Nafisi

    On Tuesday, November 9th at 7 p.m. in the University Center Ballroom, UMBC presents a lecture by Azar Nafisi, author of Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books. Azar Nafisi is a Visiting Professor and the director of the SAIS Dialogue Project at the Foreign Policy Institute of Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, D.C.

    Azar NafisiOn Tuesday, November 9th at 7 p.m. in the University Center Ballroom, UMBC presents a lecture by Azar Nafisi, author of Reading Lolita in Tehran: A Memoir in Books.

    Azar Nafisi is a Visiting Professor and the director of the SAIS Dialogue Project at the Foreign Policy Institute of Johns Hopkins University’s School of Advanced International Studies in Washington, D.C. A professor of aesthetics, culture and literature, Dr. Nafisi held a fellowship at Oxford University, teaching and conducting a series of lectures on culture and the important role of Western literature and culture in Iran after the revolution in 1979. She taught at the University of Tehran, the Free Islamic University and Allameh Tabatabii before her return to the United States in 1997, earning national respect and international recognition for advocating on behalf of Iran’s intellectuals, youth and especially young women. She was expelled from the University of Tehran for refusing to wear the mandatory Islamic veil in 1981 and did not resume teaching until 1987.

    Dr. Nafisi conducted workshops in Iran for women students on the relationship between culture and human rights; the material culled from these workshops formed the basis of a new human rights education curriculum. She has lectured and written extensively in English and Persian on the political implications of literature and culture as well as the human rights of the Iranian women and girls and the important role they play in the process of change for pluralism and an open society in Iran. She has been consulted on issues related to Iran and human rights both by the policy makers and various human rights organizations in the United States and elsewhere.

    Dr. Nafisi has written for The New York Times, The Washington Post and The Wall Street Journal, and her cover story, “The Veiled Threat: The Iranian Revolution's Woman Problem” published in The New Republic (February 22, 1999) has been reprinted into several languages. She is the author of Anti-Terra: A Critical Study of Vladimir Nabokov’s Novels. She is currently teaching on the relation between culture and politics at SAIS and her new book, Reading Lolita in Tehran, was published by Random House in April 2003.

    This event is sponsored by the Center for the Humanities, the Sondheim Public Affairs Scholars Program, the Office of the Provost, the Department of English and the Women’s Studies Program.

    Admission
    Admission is free.

    Telephone
    Public information: 410-455-6798
    Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

    Web
    UMBC Center for the Humanities website: http://www.umbc.edu/humanities
    UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/NewsEvents/releases/index.phtml

    Directions

    • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the University Center.
    • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the University Center.
    • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the University Center.
    • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
    • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

    Images for Media
    A high resolution image for media is available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

    ###

    Posted by dwinds1

    UMBC Panel to Explore Media Bias

    As the subject of media bias continues to be a storyline in the homestretch of the 2004 presidential election, an interdisciplinary group of faculty media and political critics will debate "Bias and the American Media" on Oct. 27 at UMBC.

    As the subject of media bias continues to be a storyline in the homestretch of the 2004 presidential election, an interdisciplinary group of faculty media and political critics will debate "Bias and the American Media" on Oct. 27 at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC).

    UMBC's 2004 Interdisciplinary Studies Mosaic Roundtable, "Bias in the American Media," will bring together four UMBC faculty experts on the media and politics along with special guest Terry Eastland, publisher of The Weekly Standard and a contributing columnist to The Dallas Morning News.

    The panel will discuss the issue in light of recent controversies such as Maryland-based Sinclair Broadcasting Group's plans to air a film criticizing Democratic presidential candidate John Kerry's protests of the Vietnam War (the final broadcast was altered after pro-Kerry protests hurt Sinclair's stock price), and the retraction of a "60 Minutes" story questioning President Bush's National Guard service that lead to an on-air apology by CBS News anchorman Dan Rather.

    Faculty experts include:

    Christopher Corbett, a former reporter and news editor with The Associated Press, has been a journalist for over 30 years. His latest book, Orphans Preferred: The Twisted Truth and Lasting Legend of the Pony Express (Random House/Broadway Books, 2003) is in its seventh printing and was published in paperback this fall. In 1990, Corbett was the James Thurber Journalist-in-Residence at the Thurber House in Columbus, Ohio, where he also taught in the Ohio State University's journalism school. Since 1994, he has written The Back Page for Baltimore's Style magazine, which received the City and Regional Magazine Award for best column in 1998 and 1999. At UMBC, Corbett serves as faculty advisor to The Retriever Weekly and teaches journalism courses in the English department.

    Susan Dwyer (moderator) is a specialist in moral psychology and ethics and public policy, and has published on reconciliation, moral development, feminist theory, free speech and cyberpornography. She is editor (with the late Joel Feinberg) of The Problem of Abortion and The Program of Pornography. Dwyer is associate professor of philosophy and director of the master's program in applied and professional ethics at UMBC and is an adjunct member of the philosophy department at the University of Maryland College Park.

    Jason Loviglio is co-editor (with Michele Hilmes) of Radio Reader: Essays in the Cultural History of Radio (Routledge, 2002) and is author of the forthcoming The Intimate Public: Network Radio and Mass Mediated Democracy ( University of Minnesota Press). In 2003, he was awarded the J. Franklin Jameson Fellowship by the Library of Congress and the American Historical Association to conduct research in the NBC archives at the Library of Congress. Loviglio is a founding member of the North American Radio Studies Network, a member of the international Radio Studies Network and a member of the International Advisory Board of Radio Journal. At UMBC, he is assistant professor of American studies and teaches courses in media, popular culture and multiculturalism.

    Thomas Schaller has published commentaries and op-ed features in the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, the Boston Globe, the Baltimore Sun, Salon.com and the American Prospect online, and is frequently interviewed on public television and radio. He is co-founder and executive editor of Gadflyer.com, a progressive Internet magazine. Schaller has published academic articles in American Review of Politics, Constitutional Political Economy, Presidential Studies Quarterly, Public Choice and Publius: The Journal of Federalism. He is co-author of a forthcoming book on black state legislators (State University of New York Press). At UMBC, Schaller is associate professor of political science.

    "The notion of a liberal media is largely a myth," says Schaller. "There is a liberal tilt to university faculty, some print reporters and the Internet blogging community. But most everywhere else--among think tanks, on network and especially cable television, among print editors and publishers, and certainly on talk radio--the bias is decidedly and often unabashedly conservative."

    "The news media's role in the circulation of the attacks [between the presidential candidates] has become highly controversial," Loviglio says. "More and more, Americans are becoming turned off and distrustful of media bias in political coverage."

    "Americans live in a free society--and they are free to choose," says Corbett. "They have chosen not to be well informed."

    The Mosaic series is the creation of UMBC's Interdisciplinary Studies (INDS) program, with a goal of bringing diverse expertise together twice per year to examine a controversial societal issue.

    "What we hope students will come away with after this forum is the ability to look at media with a critical eye," says Patricia La Noue, chair of the INDS program at UMBC.

    The 2004 Mosaic Roundtable forum is open to the public. The event will be held Wednesday, October 27, from 1 to 3 p.m. on the 7th floor of the Albin O. Kuhn Library & Gallery on the UMBC Campus.

    Posted by dwinds1

    October 19, 2004

    Anita Maddox Jackson Elected UMBC Alumni Association President

    As UMBC celebrates its 2004 homecoming this week, the University also welcomes alumna and Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (BGE) executive Anita Maddox Jackson as the newly elected president of the UMBC Alumni Association.

    As the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) celebrates its 2004 homecoming this week, UMBC also welcomes alumna and Baltimore Gas and Electric Company (BGE) executive Anita Maddox Jackson as the newly elected president of the UMBC Alumni Association.

    "I am delighted that Anita has been elected President of our Alumni Association," says UMBC president Freeman A. Hrabowski, III. "She brings substantial experience both in the corporate world and in connecting institutions across the public and private sectors. She has a stellar reputation in Baltimore as a highly respected professional and caring human being."

    Currently director of supplier diversity for BGE, Jackson credits UMBC as "the foundation for my professional success. UMBC helped me forge a satisfying career and, at the same time, broaden my view of the world."

    Jackson's role as president of UMBC's Alumni Association is fitting, given her commitment to become more involved with the University. "When I returned to campus recently, I couldn't believe how much had changed," she explains.

    Jackson's first priority will be to increase alumni involvement. "We need alumni time and talent to help UMBC continue to excel," she says. The UMBC Alumni Association offers social events, professional development activities and volunteer opportunities to more than 36,000 graduates of the university.

    Jackson's 21-year tenure with BGE, a subsidiary of Constellation Energy (NYSE:CEG), has included positions in human resources, marketing and sales and corporate communications. Jackson, a native of the Eastern Shore and a resident of Catonsville, is a 1980 UMBC alumna, having earned a B.S. in Health Science & Policy. She also holds an M.A.S. from Johns Hopkins University.

    Nationally, Jackson is a committee vice chair of the Edison Electric Institute. She sits on the regional board of the MD/DC Minority Supplier Development Council and the local boards of BB&T Bank and Alliance, Inc. She is a member of the Executive Committee of the Rho Xi Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority, Inc.

    Like many UMBC alumni, Jackson will return to her alma mater this week for UMBC's Homecoming/Family Day Celebration. The event, held October 20 through 24, is open to all members of the UMBC community. A complete schedule of events is available online at http://www.umbc.edu/StudentLink/homecoming/schedule.html.

    Posted by dwinds1

    October 15, 2004

    Important Update: Flu Vaccine Available at UHS Until 11/4

    University Health Services (UHS) has revised its deadline for getting a flu vaccination at UHS, in order to free up vaccine sooner for other facilities that need vaccine for high risk individuals. If you are at high risk, as stated in the CDC guidelines, please call for an appointment at UHS to have your flu shot before November 4. (We had previously set November 15 as the deadline.)

    CDC GUIDELINES:

    Who should be vaccinated? The existing flu vaccine supplies should be given to protect people who are at greatest risk from serious complications from influenza disease.Everyone in this group should seek vaccination:
    *People 65 years of age or older
    *Children ages 6 months to 23 months
    *Adults and children 2 years of age and older with chronic lung or heart disorders including heart disease and asthma
    *Pregnant women
    *Adults and children 2 years of age and older with chronic metabolic diseases (including diabetes), kidney diseases, blood disorders (such as sickle cell anemia), or weakened immune systems, including persons with HIV/AIDS
    *Children and teenagers, 6 months to 18 years of age, who take aspirin daily
    *Residents of nursing homes and other chronic-care facilities
    *Household members and out-of-home caregivers of infants under the age of 6 months
    (Children under the age of 6 months cannot be vaccinated.)
    *Healthcare workers who provide direct, hands-on care to patients

    Who should go without vaccination? Healthy people 2 to 64 years of age are asked to not get vaccinated this year at all or to wait to get their vaccine after persons in priority groups in their area have had a chance to be vaccinated, so that available vaccine can go to protect those at greater risk for flu complications.

    What about the nasal vaccine, FluMist ? FluMist , the nasal-spray flu vaccine, is an option for healthy individuals, ages 5 to 49 years of age, who are in contact with infants under 6 months of age or who are healthcare workers who provide direct patient care. FluMist is not recommended for healthcare workers taking care of severely immunocompromised people when they are in a protective environment and cannot be given to pregnant women.

    What else can you do to prevent the spread of flu? There are certain good health habits that can help prevent the spread of flu.*Avoid close contact with people who are sick. When you are sick, keep your distance from other to protect them from getting sick too.
    *Cover your nose and mouth with a tissue when you cough or sneeze--and dispose of the tissue afterward.
    *If you don't have a tissue, cough or sneeze into your sleeve.
    *Wash your hands after you cough or sneeze with soap and warm water, or an alcohol-based hand cleaner.
    *If you get the flu, stay home from work or school. You will help prevent others from catching your illness.

    What if you are in a high risk group and your clinic has no vaccine?
    Contact your local health department and ask your regular vaccine provider about other options for influenza vaccination. Health departments throughout the United States are trying to make sure that as many high-risk people as possible will eventually be able to go to either their regular vaccine provider or a flu shot clinic to get the vaccine. Some public vaccination clinics may also be posted at www.lungusa.org.

    Information provided by the Minnesota Department of Health.

    Posted by dwinds1

    WALKER AVENUE CLOSURE 10/16

    Walker Avenue is scheduled to be closed Saturday, October 16, between 8 a.m. and 12 p.m. Repairs and maintenance are necessary at the intersection of Walker Avenue and Hilltop Circle for safety concerns. The campus police will assist in re-directing traffic during this time. We regret any inconvenience caused from this road closure.

    Posted by dwinds1

    October 14, 2004

    UMBC Trains Future Entrepreneurs

    The Kauffman Entrepreneur Internship Program (KEIP) introduces UMBC students to the challenges and rewards of becoming entrepreneurs through intensive internships.

    The Kauffman Entrepreneur Internship Program (KEIP) introduces UMBC students to the challenges and rewards of becoming entrepreneurs through intensive internships. UMBC's Shriver Center and the Alex. Brown Center for Entrepreneurship launched KEIP in the fall of 2002 with the goal of offering graduates and undergraduates a first-hand learning experience in entrepreneurship while providing companies with outstanding students at half the cost.

    Since its inception, KEIP has exposed 48 students to entrepreneurship through mentoring and internships in 28 start-up and emerging firms in Maryland. The types of industries include: 40 percent information technology, 21 percent health care consulting/manufacturing and 21 percent engineering firms. Students hail from many disciplines, including: information systems, history, economics, bioinformatics, graphic design, computer engineering, psychology, computer science, mathematics and mechanical engineering.

    The program is cost effective for participating companies, paying nearly 50% of the internship. Companies obtain access to a pool of pre-screened, high achieving UMBC students with an entrepreneurial interest. Organizations participating in the program's third year include: Absolute Quality Inc., Athena Environmental Sciences Inc., Carter International Concierge Inc., Cybergroup Inc., E-Global Interactive, Engenium Technologies Inc. and PCTechSource.

    AthenaES, a techcenter@UMBC incubator graduate, has utilized several UMBC student interns during its ten year history. Interns have been a great resource for the company and an excellent way of developing the talent that the company needs to continue its growth, says Sheldon Broedel, chief executive and science officer.

    AthenaES, which is developing a reagent tool that will allow researchers to monitor contamination levels in preparations of recombinant proteins, has taken on two Kauffman interns this year. A UMBC bioinformatics and computational biology major, Nabila Bashir-Bello, will learn the technical aspects of developing biotechnology-based products and will become acquainted with the process of commercialization. This is a fantastic opportunity, how many students get the chance to actually develop a product, says Bashir-Bello.

    AthenaES' second student, Melissa Taylor, is a UMBC graphic arts major. Taylor will help design marketing collateral for the company. It is very exciting working for a small company," she says. "I cannot believe the level of responsibility I have been given.

    Christine Routzahn, project director for KEIP, says, The Shriver Center and the Alex. Brown Center for Entrepreneurship are pleased with the program's results and are eager to move forward to implement our third year of the Kauffman Entrepreneur Internship Program. Given the vision of UMBC and the quality of our existing efforts, we have developed a model that will continue to impact our students and entrepreneurial firms in a positive way.

    UMBC encourages students to explore entrepreneurship at all levels. Students who break new ground in science and technology, push the envelope in the creative arts and provide solutions to society's problems can all become future entrepreneurs.

    For more information about KEIP visit www.umbc.edu/entrepreneurship.

    Posted by dwinds1

    October 07, 2004

    New Executive Development Program Launches at Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC

    BALTIMORE - Executive education for senior living professionals is now offered at the new Erickson School of Aging Studies, established earlier this year at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). The executive development program is created in partnership with the National Investment Center for the Seniors Housing & Care Industries (NIC). The first course, "The Business and Strategy of Seniors Housing & Care," will take place on November 10-13, 2004.


    BALTIMORE - Executive education for senior living professionals is now offered at the new Erickson School of Aging Studies, established earlier this year at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). The executive development program is created in partnership with the National Investment Center for the Seniors Housing & Care Industries (NIC). The first course, "The Business and Strategy of Seniors Housing & Care," will take place on November 10-13, 2004.

    The four-day course will analyze the strategy and underpinnings of seniors housing and care, including the drivers of success, real demographics of aging, cost of capital and the evolving marketplace. A major focus will be placed on the role of health care delivery within seniors housing, with attention devoted to the critical role of continuous quality improvement, performance measurement and the determinants of quality care, and resident/family satisfaction. The course will also explore the current legal, regulatory and public policy environments confronting seniors housing, and the challenges they pose for management.

    The course is being led by Brian Swinton, recently retired executive vice president of Sunrise Senior Living. Guest lecturers include John Erickson, chairman and CEO, Erickson, Dr. Charles Roadman, former president of the American Health Care Association and former surgeon general for the Air Force, Allen Lynch, partner, Nixon Peabody LLP, and Tony Mullen, NIC research director.

    The Erickson School of Aging Studies at UMBC was started through a $5 million commitment made by Mr. Erickson through The Erickson Foundation. His Baltimore-based company has 13 campuses in eight states that are home to approximately 15,000 middle-income people.

    In addition to the Erickson support, the school will seek matching funds from other external sources. Along with executive development, the school will eventually offer specialty degree programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels relating to senior care and aging.

    UMBC, an honors university, is a four-year, public research university that is home to leading experts on aging who are active in research, education and service in the field of gerontology. It is one of a handful of universities in the nation to offer the Ph.D. in Gerontology.

    NIC, a nonprofit organization, has been the leading source of business and financial information for the senior living industry since 1991. For the last five years, it has conducted executive development courses in operations, management, sales, marketing, development, finance and service quality for emerging industry leaders.

    The cost for "The Business and Strategy of Seniors Housing & Care" course is $2750 and space is limited. To register and for more information, visit www.umbc.edu/erickson or call UMBC at (410) 455-3361.

    Posted by dwinds1

    October 01, 2004

    UMBC Celebrates!

    Mark your calendars for the Graduate School Welcoming Reception October 6.

    Take part as UMBC celebrates our growing graduate student community.

    The Human Resources department has granted release time for employees to take part in these events, and everyone is encouraged to attend. All campus offices will remain open and services should continue to be offered. Supervisors and staff are asked to work together to coordinate staffing.

    GRADUATE SCHOOL WELCOME RECEPTION
    Wednesday, October 6
    4:30-6 p.m. (Candidacy ceremony begins at 5 p.m.)
    U.C. Ballroom
    Take part as faculty, staff and continuing students welcome to campus all new master's and doctoral students and also recognize doctoral students who have attained candidacy status. All members of the UMBC community are invited to join President Hrabowski and Provost Johnson in the welcoming ceremony.

    Previous UMBC Celebrates! Events

    FALL OPENING MEETING
    Thursday, August 26
    8:30-10:30 a.m.
    U.C. Ballroom
    Take part as UMBC celebrates the start of the '04-'05 academic year. Join President Hrabowski and Provost Johnson at an opening meeting focused on what undergraduate and graduate students need to succeed, and programs on campus that support students in innovative ways. In addition, Vice President Mark Behm will present a special facilities update to help you navigate your way around renovated and relocated campus sites.

    FALL CONVOCATION
    Tuesday, August 31
    2-3 p.m.
    Retriever Activities Center
    Take part as we welcome our new students and kick off the academic year. President Hrabowski and Provost Johnson will deliver remarks and Presidential Teaching Professor, Dr. Alan Rosenthal (Modern Languages & Linguistics), will present the Keynote Address.

    PRESIDENTIAL FACULTY & STAFF AWARDS CEREMONY
    Wednesday, September 29
    1-2 p.m.
    U.C. Ballroom
    Take part in this new University event designed to honor the accomplishments of UMBC's Presidential Award recipients. President Hrabowski will present his State of the University Address to the campus community and acknowledge the special achievements of:

    Cynthia Hody, Associate Professor and Chair, Political Science
    Presidential Teaching Professor

    James Grubb, Professor, History
    Presidential Research Professor

    Jack Suess, Chief Information Officer, Office of Information Technology
    Presidential Distinguished Staff Award
    Professional Staff

    Terry Aylsworth, Executive Administrative Assistant, College of Arts andSciences
    Presidential Distinguished Staff Award
    Non-Exempt Staff

    Posted by dwinds1

    UMBC Students to Discuss Summer Internship Experiences

    Three UMBC undergraduates will discuss their recent summer internships with Baltimore-area news organizations at a panel discussion on internships October 6. Amy Segreti, Patrick Tyler and Grant Huang, who are also on the Retriever Weekly editorial staff, will speak at 1 p.m. on the 7th floor of the Albin O. Kuhn Library. The panel discussion is open to the public and all members of the UMBC community are welcome to attend.

    Three UMBC undergraduates will discuss their recent summer internships with Baltimore-area news organizations at a panel discussion on internships October 6. The three students, Amy Segreti, Patrick Tyler and Grant Huang, who are also on the editorial staff of UMBC's Retriever Weekly, will speak at 1 p.m. on the 7th floor of the Albin O. Kuhn Library.

    The panel discussion is open to the public and all members of the UMBC community are welcome to attend.

    Segreti, a 21-year-old senior from Lakewood, New Jersey, is currently the features editor for the Retriever Weekly. During the past summer she interned at the Baltimore Sun as a reporter on the City Desk.

    Joining Segreti will be Patrick Tyler, a senior majoring in English and economics. During the previous summer months, Tyler interned for the Baltimore Sun at its Harford County bureau in his hometown of Bel Air where he covered news ranging from a mustard gas release at the nearby Aberdeen Proving Ground to murder trials. Tyler is the current news editor at the Retriever Weekly.

    Also working as an intern last summer was 20-year-old Grant Huang, a resident of Columbia and native of China.Huang, who previously worked for the Baltimore Sun on its City Desk in downtown Baltimore, was a reporter for the Baltimore Messenger, one of the Patuxent Publishing Company's weekly newspapers, part of a chain that covers much of Maryland. Huang, who is currently the assistant features editor at the Retriever Weekly, is a junior majoring in political science with a concentration in international relations.

    In summing up his summer internship experience, Huang observed: "Virtually everything I learned about journalism in the real world came from my internship experiences. My internships, one at a large metropolitan daily and one at a small community weekly, gave me a tremendous amount of firsthand experience about the career. I could see the real thing happening: from covering stories to observing office politics to talking casually with industry veterans, I felt thrilled to know that everything I was experiencing wasn't somehow prepared or simulated for my benefit. Myinternships allowed me to network with professional journalists, but more importantly they were the best opportunity I've had to sample that life and career choice without committing to it.

    Posted by dwinds1

    Employee of the Quarter Awards Announced

    The Human Resources Department has announced the Employee of the Quarter Awards.

    The Department of Human Resources has announced UMBC's Employee of the Quarter award recipients.

    Danita Eichenlaub, assistant director of the Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology (JCET), is the exempt Employee of the Quarter. Eichenlaub, who has been at UMBC for four years, is known for demonstrating outstanding leadership skills during the PeopleSoft implementation, while assisting two other UMBC NASA Centers, Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center (GEST) and the Center for Advanced Studies in Photonics Research (CASPR). This year, she has taken on additional responsibilities since the passing of Sharon Davis, JCET's business manager.

    Gayle E. Chapman, assistant director of CASPR, says, Danita is knowledgeable, sensitive and helpful to the UMBC community at large and to those she supervises. After the unfortunate passing of Sharon Davis, Danita has been responsible for Sharon's work as well as her own. In addition, she is taking classes in a Ph.D. program at University of Maryland University College. Danita handles all of this daunting responsibility with grace.

    "Recognition and acknowledgement are strong motivators, so it was adelightful surprise to be selected for the Employee of the Quarter Award, says Eichenlaub. Being notified of the award during our monthly JCET Faculty meeting allowed me to share the moment with many of the people that I work so closely with at UMBC."

    Sylvia Wickham, administrative assistant II in the procurement office, is the non-exempt Employee of the Quarter. After 13 years as an administrative assistant at the University of Maryland Baltimore, Wickham began her UMBC career in 1998 as an administrative assistant to the Director of Capital Planning and the Assistant Vice President of Administrative Services. In September 2000, she became an administrative assistant in procurement, providing complex administrative and clerical support to both procurement and Management Advisory Services.

    Sylvia has outstanding people and customer service skills, says Ann Fusselbaugh, administrative assistant in procurement. She is very proficient in helping others. If she doesn't know the answer, she will know the best way to find the answer. She is a designated peer mentor' for the campus community and as such, she fields inquiries regarding technical difficulties. She is improving the functioning of the department and helping to keep the purchasing/receiving aspect of the PeopleSoft system running smoothly. Her professionalism is an asset to our department and to the UMBC campus community.

    Wickham says, "I try to do my job here at UMBC to the best of my ability. I never expected to receive this award. I am very appreciative and honored that my peers think so highly of me that they nominated me for this award."

    Each recipient will receive a check for $500, a personalized parking space, one day of administrative leave, a certificate, his/her name on the Employee of the Quarter plaque and an invitation to the annual luncheon for all the recipients.

    Human Resources offers special thanks to everyone that nominated an employee for the award. Previous nominations received will be eligible for consideration for one year from the date received. The next Employee of the Quarter recipients will be selected in December. Nomination forms and information may be found on the Human Resources Web site.

    Posted by dwinds1

    Q & A with John Martello, Vice Provost and Executive Director of the Shriver Center, and President/CEO, UMBC Training Centers; and Kent Malwitz, Director of Business Development, UMBC Training Centers

    UMBC, a regional leader in workforce development, established UMBC Training Centers, LLC as its noncredit continuing education and industry training company, addressing critical regional employment priorities in areas such as information technology, biotechnology, engineering, professional development, business, and allied health. Insights spoke with the Centers' President/CEO and Director of Business Development--both UMBC alumni--about the Center's mission and campus partnerships.

    UMBC, a regional leader in workforce development, established UMBC Training Centers, LLC as its noncredit continuing education and industry training company, addressing critical regional employment priorities in areas such as information technology, biotechnology, engineering, professional development, business and allied health.

    UMBC Training Centers is currently settling into its new home at techcenter@umbc on the University's South Campus. Insights spoke with the Centers' President/CEO and Director of Business Development--both UMBC alumni--about the Center's mission and campus partnerships.

    What is the mission of the UMBC Training Centers?
    John Martello: Our mission is to provide high quality, reasonably priced training and certification to both individuals and organizations throughout the region and State. Our focus is non-credit short courses in information technology, biotechnology, engineering, professional development and business, as well as allied health.

    Across the nation, universities are being called on to demonstrate how their research and programs benefit the needs of our society. The Training Centers could be UMBC's results-oriented, private sector response to that call.

    Kent Malwitz: It's also important to point out that since we are a privately held company, that we are not part of the public subsidy that UMBC receives, so we aren't competing with the rest of the campus for funding.

    JM: Kent's point is critical. We receive funding through contracts and Training Centers tuition. Taxpayers aren't subsidizing the Training Centers.

    How does UMBC Training Centers respond to the needs of today's workforce?
    JM: We provide high quality, short-term, non-credit courses that are focused and outcomes-oriented. Our courses provide skilled training in areas of need. In addition to our outstanding faculty and an excellent facility, we offer affordable prices and convenient schedules.

    We attract a broad audience--since there are no entrance requirements (SAT, GRE) we cast a broader net. Our students can also learn more about UMBC, which might lead them to enroll in for-credit courses. The private sector platform also empowers us to move quickly and efficientlywhich is an appropriate way to be organized as a for-profit business.

    KM: Our courses are designed to meet the needs of working professionals. We can also customize courses for organizations to help them to achieve their specific organizational objectivesand training can be delivered at our facilities or we can go to them. It's very flexible.

    How many students are enrolled at UMBC Training Centers?
    JM: Annually, we have about 2,000 students, on- and off-site.

    Who are some of your clients? How do you work with clients?
    JM: Our clients include T. Rowe Price, the Social Security Administration, the FDA, Computer Science Corporation (CSC), the State of Maryland and CareFirst, among others.

    KM: We work with organizations to help them determine their professional development needs and to develop and deliver training programs that meet those needs. We also help them to promote Training Centers' programs to their staff.

    How do you plan to work with the UMBC community?
    JM: We hope to play a key role as training partner for faculty and staff.

    For example, this fallin partnership with UMBC's Human Resources department--we will begin offering short, two to three day courses in business communication, accounting for non-financial managers, supervision and leadership. Staff can use their tuition reimbursement benefitthey pay for courses up front and are reimbursed when they satisfactorily complete the course.

    We want to do a needs-assessment for the campus, and are very open to suggestions on how we can help train our outstanding staff. We are working closely with HR to target real needs and welcome any direct feedback from UMBC staff.

    Are UMBC students involved with UMBC Training Centers?
    JM: We offer test preparation--GRE, LSAT, licensing exams for engineers, among others--to help our students move on to the next level of their academic and professional careers. They can also complement their UMBC degree with additional training in one of our IT certification programs and become even more valuable in the marketplace.

    Students can also get hands-on experience through internships in marketing, Web site design, IT, etc. We currently have a UMBC visual arts major on board helping us with several online marketing initiatives. We'll be launching a new Web site this fall.

    For more information, visit the UMBC Training Centers Web site.

    Posted by dwinds1

    September 08, 2004

    UMBC Changing Information Technology World One Girl at a Time

    On Tuesday, September 14, UMBC will formally welcome a new class of scholarship students from a program that has changed the lives and career directions of dozens of young women interested in information technology careers.

    On Tuesday, September 14, UMBC will formally welcome a new class of scholarship students from a program that has changed the lives and career directions of dozens of young women interested in information technology careers.

    The Center for Women and Information Technology (CWIT) Scholars program at UMBC is dedicated to reaching girls as early as middle school to help them resist gender stereotypes and peer pressure as they pursue computer technology-related college majors and career tracks.

    CWIT Scholars receive four-year scholarships and major in computer science, computer engineering, information systems, or a related program at UMBC. The students are mentored by faculty and successful IT business professionals, and participate in programs and internships throughout their college years. Graduates of the CWIT Scholars Program are expected to take a leadership role in the IT field and to foster the continued growth of women in the industry.

    One of the new scholars is Lindsey Beaubien, of Gaithersburg, Md. Although she was accepted at Penn State and Virginia Tech, she says, "the only college I really considered attending was UMBC...I know that since I am in CWIT, there will always be somebody to turn to and ask for help."

    Candice Scarborough, a third-year CWIT scholar, will address the incoming class. She confirms Beaubien's expectations, stating, "CWIT is the reason I remain a computer science major. CWIT is the reason I am still in college." Another third-year scholar, Heidi Brueckner, adds, "Even though my parents encouraged, even expected, me to excel, it was difficult to feel comfortable without any other girls in my classes" at Montgomery Blair High School. "I never had a strong female role model in IT until I...met my CWIT mentor. Meeting women in the IT field has definitely encouraged me to continue my studies."

    The CWIT Scholars reception, to be held from 6 until 8 p.m. Tuesday evening in the Skylight Room of the UMBC Commons building, will also give the scholars and their families a chance to connect directly with corporate and government sponsors supporting CWIT's mission.

    During the reception, AT&T will present a check for $50,000, their latest in a series of ongoing gifts in support of the program.

    "Programs such as these help create confidence in women to help them achieve their potential in all professions, including the IT industry," said Jennifer Jones, Sales Vice-President, AT&T Business Services. "AT&T is delighted to make this important contribution to CWIT, providing invaluable support to the students and their families."

    Maryland State Delegate Jean Cryor (R- Montgomery County), President of the Women Legislators of Maryland and another CWIT supporter, will discuss her work to pass a recent bill that established the Taskforce on the Status of Women and IT in Maryland, the first of its kind in the nation.

    While recent studies show that female college students are gradually closing the tech gender gap, enrollment of women in college IT programs continues to decline. The CWIT Scholars Program at UMBC is designed to address this imbalance. The merit-based program is open to both women and men who support women's full involvement in information technology. The 11 entering students are the third and largest class of CWIT scholars to date.

    The Center for Women and Information Technology (www.umbc.edu/cwit/) established at UMBC in 1998, has a four-fold mission: to encourage more women and girls to study computer science and/or information systems and to pursue careers in IT; to enable all women and girls to use IT comfortably and knowledgeably; to assure that the richness and breadth of women's lives and concerns are fully represented and readily available on the Internet; and to foster research concerning the relationship between gender and IT.

    The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) is a distinguished research university with a deep commitment to the education of undergraduates. The University was recently named one of the nation's 12 "Hot Schools" by Kaplan/Newsweek's How to Get into College, and is one of only 151 U.S. institutions to be ranked as "Doctoral/Research Universities Extensive" by the Carnegie Foundation.

    AT&T (Corporate Sponsor). For more than 125 years, AT&T (NYSE "T") has been known for unparalleled quality and reliability in communications. Backed by the research and development capabilities of AT&T Labs, the company is a global leader in local, long distance, internet and transaction-based voice and data services.

    Posted by dwinds1

    September 02, 2004

    From the CIO

    CIO Jack Suess provides the UMBC community with an update on changes and ongoing developments in technology.

    By Jack Suess, Chief Information Officer

    As we prepare to start another academic year I want to give you an update on changes you will see upon your return and also highlight ongoing developments. I am privileged to lead an organization that has a great staff and great leadership. While I have been focused primarily on PeopleSoft you will see that OIT continues to provide a quality technology infrastructure.

    One of the most visible changes faculty and students will see is that we have upgraded from Blackboard 5 to Blackboard 6. We continue to see increased usage with Blackboard and expect to have almost 500 courses utilizing it this fall (twice as many as 2 years ago). As part of this upgrade, OIT upgraded the hardware infrastructure that Blackboard utilizes and enhanced some of the software integration services we offer to the campus. For example, we are able to auto-create courses in Blackboard, auto-enroll students in the course, and provide options for integrating the Scantron exams into the Blackboard grade book. As we evolve Blackboard 6 you will see better integration with the UMBC portal and more services integrated into the Blackboard portal.

    A second initiative, though not as visible, is our work this past year focusing on enhancing IT security. As the risk of worms, viruses and hacking continues to increase we have had to rethink and reengineer the way we provide IT services. Our goal is to make sure you have a safe computing environment in which to work or perform scholarship. Some of these projects are driven by State audit requirements but many of these are also something we feel are necessary to ensure that you can safely use your computer. Over the spring and summer we have implemented the following initiatives:

    Installed a campus firewall to begin adding a layer of initial protection for many of the computers on campus (generally those on our Novell network) ;

    For windows machines using our Novell servers we have integrated those machines into a Microsoft System Management Domain. This allows OIT to install critical patches and updates on your machine as needed;

    We have made a major effort on enhancing security on the residential network. We developed a special CD that students can load that will install our virus protection and configure their machines to use OIT's Microsoft System Update Service (SUS) to keep them patched;

    We have added authentication to our campus wireless service to limit unauthorized access and also to allow us to identify machines with viruses or worms and work with that person to get the machine corrected;

    Finally, over the fall semester OIT will be launching a campaign to inform people about the dangers of spyware, provide tools and instructions for removing spyware, and work to make sure you can protect your privacy.

    A third initiative has been focusing on our mail processing infrastructure. Because of Spam and email-based viruses we have been seeing tremendous increases in mail volumes. It is not uncommon to see UMBC process over 1 million messages in a single day! In addition, with the use of attachments now common we see much larger mail messages on average. We have turned spam filtering on by default (level 4, which is a safe level with few false positives) for all users who are not currently using it, changed the mail box format to speed up message folder searching, and added more capability into our mail processing environment to support virus and Spam filtering. During the academic year we will be working on an initiative to raise all student and faculty disk quotas to a minimum of 100 megabytes.

    A fourth initiative is working to improve classroom technology. We have updated the projectors in lecture halls two and six, updated the laptop carts, brought two new classrooms online in Chemistry with integrated technology and added technology to three additional classrooms in Social Sciences. Our goal is to continue to make certain we can provide faculty with a quality classroom environment.

    Beyond these projects, our major work this academic year will be planning a replacement for the myUMBC portal. This portal was launched in 1999 and among the first in higher education; however, it is clear we need to move on. Today, portals are expected to provide much more customized content, have a finer granularity of roles and provide better integration with applications like PeopleSoft. Our intent is to work this fall and select a new portal technology to build upon. During the winter and spring we will integrate our existing content into this portal and launch the portal before next fall. OIT is working closely with the campus eMedia group on this project and will keep the campus informed as we go forward.

    Posted by dwinds1

    UMBC Awarded NSF Grant To Increase University Technology Commercialization

    UMBC has been awarded a $600,000 grant for Achieving the Commercialization of Technology in Ventures through Applied Training for Entrepreneurs (ACTiVATE) from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The ACTiVATE program will create a systematic model for increasing the commercialization of technology innovations from universities by training women entrepreneurs to create technology-based, start-up companies.

    UMBC has been awarded a $600,000 grant for Achieving the Commercialization of Technology in Ventures through Applied Training for Entrepreneurs (ACTiVATE) from the National Science Foundation (NSF). The ACTiVATE program will create a systematic model for increasing the commercialization of technology innovations from universities by training women entrepreneurs to create technology-based, start-up companies.

    The ACTiVATE program will provide an awareness of entrepreneurship for a significant number of women, who traditionally have been underrepresented among entrepreneurs, while also providing a model for commercializing innovations at universities and federal labs that can be used at other institutions across the country, says UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski.

    Although Maryland is a leader in R&D activity due to a high concentration of research universities and national research laboratories, a relatively low number of start-up companies are formed from university technology. According to the Corporation for Enterprise Development's 2002 Development Report Card, Maryland is ranked 32nd nationally in university spinouts.

    Increasing the availability of experienced entrepreneurs is critical to raising the number of technology-based start-up companies. Governor Ehrlich's Commission on the Development of Advanced Technology Business (the Pappas Commission) supports the need for more entrepreneurial development in the State. UMBC's ACTiVATE program will address these needs by introducing 90 mid-career women to the basics of entrepreneurship and technology commercialization. One of the Program's goals is to create six to nine new companies during the first three years.

    Women entrepreneurs are a vital part of Maryland's and America's economy. We are highly supportive of this joint effort to support women entrepreneurs and, at the same time, commercialize promising technologies from Maryland's research institutions, said Christopher C. Foster, deputy secretary of the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development.

    UMBC will partner with the Maryland Technology Development Corporation (TEDCO) to identify appropriate technologies for the ACTiVATE program. The UMBC team includes the Office of Technology Development, techcenter@UMBC, Alex. Brown Center for Entrepreneurship and the Center for Women and Information Technology (CWIT). In addition to commercializing technologies from UMBC, the ACTiVATE team will work with other Maryland institutions, including Johns Hopkins University, University of Maryland College Park, University of Maryland Baltimore, University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute, Towson University and the University of Maryland School of Law

    The ACTiVATE program will partner with the public and private sectors to train entrepreneurs, with a focus on women, through a hands-on approach using university technologies, says Ellen Hemmerly, executive director of the UMBC Research Park Corporation. Marylanders benefit from the Program through job creation and increases in tax revenue.

    Private partners involved in the ACTiVATE program include Legg Mason Wood Walker, Constellation Energy, Grant Thornton, Venable LLP, Whiteford, Taylor & Preston LLP, New Markets Growth Fund, MGH Public Relations, The Eager Street Group, Darrah Tax Advisory Services, BioPlan Associates, Inc., Anthem Capital Management and American Express Tax & Business Services.

    -Tammi Thomas

    Posted by dwinds1

    August 30, 2004

    Tip Sheet: Homeland Security Research & Training Projects at UMBC

    As both the 2004 presidential election and the third anniversary of the 9-11 attacks grow nearer, homeland security remains a top priority for government and citizens. Whether they're working to train first responders, developing new technologies to detect dangers, or helping to map new threats and resources, UMBC researchers are partnering with state and federal agencies to improve homeland security in Maryland and across the U.S.

    As both the 2004 presidential election and the third anniversary of the 9-11 attacks grow nearer, homeland security remains a top priority for government and citizens. Whether they're working to train first responders, developing new technologies to detect dangers, or helping to map new threats and resources, UMBC researchers are partnering with state and federal agencies to improve homeland security in Maryland and across the U.S.

    1. Mapping the Unthinkable

    As first responders and homeland security officials prepare for the new threats and challengesof post-9-11 America, the need for a new type of map became clear. Recently, faculty, staffand student mapmakers in UMBC's Geography andEnvironmental Sciences department rose to the challenge as part of a project for theU.S. Census Bureau and the Department of Homeland Security.

    The department's Cartography Lab, one of only a handful of such map production facilities atU.S. universities today, helped design new map symbols to depict the new threats and resources thatfirst responders and state and federal homeland security officials must be aware of whenlooking at the map of post-9-11 America.

    Contact: TomRabenhorst, Lecturer
    JoeSchool, Director of Cartographic Services Laboratory;
    UMBC Geography andEnvironmental Systems

    410-455-3845, tom.rabenhorst@umbc.edu /410-455-2900, school@umbc.edu.

    2. Online Training for First-Responders -- more than 16,000 reached sofar

    UMBC Emergency Health Services (EHS) participates in theU.S. Department of Homeland Security's National Disaster MedicalSystem (NDMS) by providing online training for first-responders. To date, UMBC EHShas used the Internet to train more than 16,000 physicians, nurses, paramedics, andlogistical staff in emergency preparedness and disaster-response and created over 130online courses through the NDMS program.

    Contact: Lori Riegert, Program Director, UMBC Emergency Health Services, 410-455-1741, riegert@umbc.edu.

    3. Finding the Face of Terror

    The emerging field of biometrics technology uses optical scanning among other technologiesto rapidly identify individuals based on biological traits such as fingerprints or facerecognition. Through an anti-bioterror grant from the National Institute of Standards &Technology (NIST), UMBC mathematics professor Andrew Rukhin islooking to improve biometric visual recognition of faces. Rukhin hopes to improve thealgorithms used in facial identification software that will be used in the near future byhomeland security officers at border crossings, transportation hubs, and other sensitivelocations.

    Contact: Andrew Rukhin, Professor, UMBC department of mathematics410-455-2408, rukhin@math.umbc.edu

    4. Replacing Fido with Fiber Optics

    Bradley Arnold, professorof Chemistry at UMBC, is working with Dr. George Murray of the Johns Hopkins AppliedPhysics Lab (APL), on an invention that may give a high-tech break to bomb-sniffing dogsin homeland security K-9 units. The duo is developing a hand-held, fiber-optic devicethat changes color based on the presence of explosives.

    "We hope our detector will beas sensitive as the bomb detecting dogs - plus you will not have to feed it and it never needs arest," says Arnold.

    Contact: Bradley Arnold, Assistant Professor, UMBC Chemistry Department
    410-455-2503 or barnold@umbc.edu

    5. On-Site Training of Emergency Workers

    Through a two-yearcontract with the Maryland Department of Health and Mental Hygiene, UMBC'sEmergency Health Services (EHS) department is training hospital staff membersacross the state of Maryland in disaster-preparedness skills and planning. The day-longtraining workshops cover both man-made disaster scenarios such as terrorist acts and naturaldisaster situations such as snow collapsing a building roof.

    Contact: Rick Bissell, Graduate Program Director, UMBC EHS410-455-3776 or bissell@umbc.edu

    Posted by dwinds1

    August 12, 2004

    New UMBC e-Government Program to Debut This Fall

    UMBC's departments of Public Policy and Information Systems will debut a new graduate certificate program in electronic government (e-government) this fall. The program is the first in the Baltimore/Washington area focused on skills needed to increase and improve online transactions and services offered by federal, state and local government to individuals and businesses.

    The University of Maryland, Baltimore County's (UMBC) departments of Public Policy and Information Systems will debut a new graduate certificate program in electronic government (e-gov) this fall. The program is the first in the Baltimore/Washington area focused on skills needed to increase and improve online transactions and services offered by federal, state and local government to individuals and businesses.

    Professors in the program include three of the nation's top e-gov experts:

    Pattee Fletcher, a professor in UMBC's Public Policy department, has extensive federal information technology (IT) experience, having worked for the General Accounting Office and consulted for the U.S. Treasury and Freddie Mac.

    Stephen Holden brought 16 years of federal government IT experience to UMBC's Information Systems department after helping to develop the Internal Revenue Service's (IRS) e-file system. The increasingly popular program, which enables taxpayers to securely file and pay their taxes electronically, has made the IRS a pioneer in e-government at the federal level.

    Donald F. Norris, director of the Maryland Institute for Policy Analysis and Research and a professor of Public Policy at UMBC, is a nationally known analyst, author and consultant on state and local government IT management. Norris and Fletcher are co-editors in chief of The International Journal of Electronic Government Research.

    According to Holden, the push towards e-government comes straight from the White House, a process started under Clinton/Gore and continuing in the Bush administration. "In his February 2002 budget, President Bush outlined a management agenda for making government more focused on citizens and results, which includes expanding electronic government," Holden says.

    The federal government has recognized the need for additional training in the area of e-government. A recent study by the CIO Council found that less than 5 percent of more than 19,000 federal IT workers have extensive knowledge in e-government. Private sector contractors supporting public agencies can also benefit from UMBC's graduate certificate and help to fill this knowledge gap.

    Holden notes that customer satisfaction ratings in the public sector lag far behind private industry when governments continue to use paper transactions. "The payoff for e-government is significant, because customer satisfaction ratings for e-gov rival, and in some cases, beat private sector standards," says Holden.

    The new certificate will bring management, policy and IT perspectives to a slate of courses aimed at mid-career professionals with technical or management backgrounds. The 15-credit program starts its first classes this fall semester.

    For more information on e-gov at UMBC, please call 410-455-2336, email egov@umbc.edu or visit http://www.umbc.edu/egov/.

    Posted by dwinds1

    August 05, 2004

    Kudos

    President Hrabowski Speaks at NCSU Convocation
    President Freeman Hrabowski was a guest speaker at North Carolina State University's Convocation ceremony.

    Lou Cantori, Political Science, to Give Keynote Address
    Professor of Political Science Lou Cantrori was invited to give the keynote address to the fall faculty assembly at Metropolitan State University (St. Paul, MN) on September 18. The topic of the assembly is "Student Centered Teaching and Learning."

    Undergraduate Allison Buckley Wins Taking It Global Photo Contest
    UMBC junior Allison Buckley won TakingITGlobal Gallery's July photo contest. The gallery is one of the world's largest and most diverse online collections of youth artwork. Thousands of pieces of artwork have been submitted by youth from more than 50 countries. TakingITGlobal (TIG) is an international organization helping youth find inspiration, access information, get involved, and take action to improve their local and global communities. It is the most popular online community for young people interested in connecting across cultures and making a difference, with hundreds of thousands of visitors each month. TIG also works with global partners--from UN agencies, to major companies, and especially youth organizations--in order to build the capacity of youth for development, support youth artistic and media expression, make education more engaging and involve young people in global decision-making.

    UMBC Alumna to Serve as Peace Corps Volunteer in East TimorEunice Eun Hae Ban, biological sciences and psychology '03, has been accepted into the Peace Corps. She will be departing for East Timor on August 13 to train and serve as a community development volunteer. Ban will focus on enhancing the development of community-based organizations while increasing participation of rural communities in their own development.

    "I've always had a strong desire and will to help others in need and help, somehow, to promote peace in our world today," says Ban. "The Peace Corps has found a very realistic and genuine approach to fulfill these dreams: integrating our lives by living and working with communities in developing countries."

    Ban joins the 107 UMBC graduates who have served in the Peace Corps since the agency was established in 1961. Today 10 UMBC alumni are working in places such as Niger, Ecuador, Kazakstan, Costa Rica and Madagascar.

    Lauren Traber '03 Named Assistant Women's Lacrosse Coach at UMBC
    A standout on the field during her four-year tenure for the Retrievers, Lauren Traber information systems '03, has been named assistant women's lacrosse coach at UMBC after serving as a volunteer assistant coach during the 2004 campaign.

    Traber tallied 83 goals and 105 points as a midfielder for UMBC. She recorded her best season in her senior year, tallying 35 goals, 42 points and 60 ground balls. She earned First Team All Northeast Conference honors in both 2002 and 2003 and served as one of the team's captains in both seasons.

    UMBC Student Honored by the Computing Research Association as an Outstanding Undergraduate
    UMBC undergraduate Katherine Hirsch received honorable mention in the Computing Research Association's tenth annual CRA Outstanding Undergraduate Awards competition, which recognizes undergraduate students who show outstanding research potential in an area of importance to computing research. The awards were presented on July 28 at the 2004 National Conference of the American Association of Artificial Intelligence in San Jose, California.

    The candidates, nominated by their departments, had to be majoring in computer science, computer engineering, or an equivalent program and possess outstanding research potential, academic talent and achievements. The 2004 awards were made possible by the generous support of Mitsubishi Electric Research Labs. Microsoft Research and Mitsubishi Electric Research Labs sponsor the awards in alternate years.

    Katherine will graduate from UMBC in December 2004 with a BS in computer science and a BA in imaging and digital arts with a concentration on animation. Her emphasis has been on the intersection of these two fields, encompassing computer graphics from two sides--the technical details of algorithms and current research, as well as the artistic aspect of the content. She has worked with Professors Mark Olano and Penny Rheingans in the CSEE Department and is a student fellow in the UMBC Imaging Research Center. In addition to her strong academic work in two majors, she has been very active with the Center for Women and Information Technology and is a varsity pole vaulter.

    CSEE Student Team Wins Second Place in Supply Chain Contest
    A team of three graduate students from the UMBC Department of Computer Science and Electrical Engineering developed a software agent that won second place in the finals of the 2004 Trading Agent Competition for Supply Chain Management held in New York City on July 22, 2004.

    Guang Huang, Yang Yu, and Xu Fei developed an agent that competed in a field of 30 entries implemented by teams from universities, research labs and companies from around the world. Each agent acted as a virtual computer manufacturer that interacted over the Internet with other software agents representing virtual suppliers of computer components and customers for the completed PCs.

    The agents participated in rounds in which they competed for customer orders and for procurement of a variety of components over a period of several months. Each day customers issued requests for quotes and selected from quotes submitted by the agents, based on delivery dates and prices. The agents are limited by the capacity of their simulated assembly lines and have to procure components from a set of eight suppliers. Four types of components are represented in the game: CPUs, motherboards, memory, and hard drives with several varieties of each type. Customer demand comes in the form of requests for quotes for different types of PCs, each requiring a different combination of components.

    The UMBC agent competed in a series of qualifying and seeding rounds during June and July and, based on its performance, was invited to participate in the final contest held at Columbia University as part of the Third International Joint Conference on Autonomous Agents and Multi Agent Systems. The final showdown involved six agents that bought and sold for eight hours, simulating over eight years of business. The UMBC agent ended the contest with a simulated profit of over $120 million.

    Derek McElligott, Men's Soccer, Honored by College Soccer News
    UMBC senior forward Derek McElligott was recently named Third Team Pre-Season All America by College Soccer News.

    McElligott is a three-time First Team all conference standout and earned Second Team All South Atlantic region honors in his last two years. He enters the 2004 season with 38 career goals, already third on UMBC's all-time scoring list and within range of school record-holder Ray Ford's (1977-18) 51 career goals. McElligott needs just four goals to surpass current Baltimore Blast standout Giuliano Celenza (1999-2000) and become UMBC's Division I all-time leading scorer.

    In addition, UMBC was ranked #38 in the 2004 College Soccer News Top 30 National Poll. The Retrievers were among 20 teams cited as those "To Keep An Eye On" by the Web site.

    Posted by dwinds1

    In the News

    Charles Brown, Athletics, in the Baltimore Sun
    Director of Athletics Charles Brown, the longest-tenured college athletic director in Maryland, was interviewed in the Baltimore Sun on August 22.

    Jack Suess, CIO, in the Washington Post
    Chief Information Officer Jack Suess is featured in a August 23 Washington Post article on the recent Microsoft Windows upgrade and its effects on campus technology.

    UMBC in Baltimore Magazine
    The September 2004 Baltimore magazine Fall Arts Preview, Baltimore icons are interviewed by up-and-comers in the arts. Brian Dannelly 97 interviews filmmaker John Waters, while music faculty Lafayette Gilchrist interviews pianist Leon Fleisher.

    The upcoming Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery exhibition, A Thousand Hounds, is featured in the magazine's exhibit section.

    Tim Brennan, Public Policy, in Alternet
    Tim Brennan, professor of public policy, was quoted in AlterNet on August 26. He discusses how, despite the Bush administration's refusal to sign the Kyoto climate change agreements, some forward-thinking companies are already voluntarily trading greenhouse emission credits in the Chicago Climate Exchange.

    UMBC Incubator Grad Cybergroup in the Baltimore Business Journal
    Baltimore IT firm Cybergroup, a recent graduate of the business incubator program at techcenter@UMBC, was featured in the Baltimore Business Journal on August 23. Cybergroup is putting its expertise to work for over a dozen startup companies located in the Chesapeake Innovation Center (CIC), the homeland security incubator in Annapolis.

    Cleopatra Borel '02 Places 11th, Brings Home Diamond from Athens
    UMBC All American and former NCAA champion Cleopatra Borel, interdisciplinary studies '02, placed 11th in the women's shot put in the Olympic Games in Athens, Greece. Following the competition, former Retriever athlete Balvin Brown '02, Borel's longtime boyfriend, proposed. The story was featured in the Baltimore Sun on August 19. Registration is required to view the story.

    techcenter@UMBC Tenant in the Daily Record
    Aurora Analytics LLC was profiled in the Daily Record on August 16. The article is available to subscribers only.

    Melanie Smith '95 and Meyerhoff Scholarship Program in Baltimore Sun
    On August 8, Baltimore Sun education columnist Mike Bowler profiled Melanie Smith, biological sciences '95. The former Meyerhoff Scholar recently began a four-year residency in obstetrics and gynecology at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital, having graduated in the spring with combined medical and doctorate degrees from the UMB. Bowler's article also provided an historic perspective on the Meyerhoff Program while reinforcing UMBC as a leader in STEM areas and outreach to underrepresented minorities.

    Bill LaCourse, Chemistry, and the techcenter@UMBC's Aurora Analytics in The Jeffersonian
    Aurora Analytics, led by UMBC chemistry professor Bill LaCourse and Aris Kalivretenos was profiled in The Jeffersonian on August 11. Aurora Analytics is the first technology company UMBC has launched from techcenter@umbc.

    Christopher Hewitt, Sociology, on Fox 45 News
    Christopher Hewitt, professor of sociology and one of UMBC's resident terrorismexperts, was interviewed by Fox 45 TV News for a segment broadcastAugust 9. Hewitt commented on the reaction to the FBI raid of an Albany,NY, mosque as part of a sting operation and investigation.

    Anthony Johnson, Physics and CASPR, in Physics Today
    Anthony Johnson, professor of physics and director of the Center for Advanced Studies in Photonics Research, was quoted in an article that appeared in the August 2004 issue of Physics Today. The article discusses the efforts of the Optical Society of America and the International Society for Optical Engineering to create educational programs for underrepresented middle school students.

    Tom Schaller, Political Science, on WYPR
    Assistant professor of political science Tom Schaller was on WYPR 88.1 FM's Marc Steiner Show on August 2 to discuss the upcoming presidential election.

    UMBC Company in Baltimore Business Journal
    Aurora Analytics, LLC, the first spinout of UMBC's Office of Technology Development, was the subject of a story in the Baltimore Business Journal on July 30. The company, headed by adjunct assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry Aris Kalivretenos and associate professor of chemistry and biochemistry William LaCourse, is developing test kits for seafood processors to check for spoiled fish-a technology that they believe can be made applicable for the poultry and meat industries as well.

    UMBC's New Systems Engineering Program in Baltimore Business Journal
    On August 6, the Baltimore Business Journal published an article on two new graduate programs in systems engineering which debut this fall through UMBC's Department of Professional Education & Training.

    Posted by dwinds1

    August 03, 2004

    New UMBC Graduate Programs Developed to Meet Regional Workforce Need for Systems Engineers

    The Division of Professional Education and Training (DPET) at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) is responding to the staffing needs of regional high-tech industries by offering two graduate programs in Systems Engineering (SE) this fall.

    The Division of Professional Education and Training (DPET) at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) is responding to the staffing needs of regional high-tech industries by offering two graduate programs in Systems Engineering (SE) this fall.

    According to officials with Northrop Grumman Corporation's (NYSE: NOC) Electronic Systems Sector -- headquartered close to UMBC near BWI Airport and a sponsor of the new programs -- the shortage of qualified systems engineers (SEs) is urgent and will grow over the next few years.

    "We need 90 to 100 more systems engineers than we currently have, and when you factor in program growth and retirements, Northrop Grumman and many other similar high-technology companies across the region and the nation will continue to face a long term shortage of such specialized technical talent," says Jim Armitage, vice president of Engineering at Northrop Grumman, who played a key role in founding the SE training at UMBC.

    The two new programs differ from traditional systems engineering training by offering curricula that is focused more on the technical (i.e., hands-on) side of the field instead of management. UMBC's DPET programs will offer both the masters of science in electrical engineering and the graduate certificate in systems engineering.

    Systems engineers typically work on large-scale projects in high-tech industries including aerospace, information technology, defense, transportation, space exploration, manufacturing and telecommunications.

    "There will be a heavy emphasis on problem solving, practical application, mentoring by experienced systems engineers and a teamwork approach," says Ted Foster, assistant dean of the college of engineering at UMBC and director of the new SE program.

    Northrop Grumman's Electronic Systems sector will select 15 employees to start the first two UMBC classes this fall. Both courses will be taught in UMBC's new, state-of-the-art Information Technology and Engineering building located on UMBC's main campus.

    For more information, please visit http://www.csee.umbc.edu/se/ or call 410-455-1564.

    Posted by dwinds1

    July 29, 2004

    Kudos, 7/30/04

    UMBC's GEST Center Hosts GEWEX Executive Meeting
    The Global Water and Energy Cycle Experiment (GEWEX) held its annual Executive Level meeting at UMBC on July 21-22. GEWEX is the principal component of the World Climate Research Programme (WCRP) concerned with hydrometeorological aspects of the global climate system.

    In 2003, the UMBC Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology (GEST) Center was awarded a 3-year grant by NASA to host the International GEWEX Project Office (IGPO). The IGPO is responsible for planning and coordinating all international aspects of GEWEX research involving global observing systems (satellites and ground-based systems); theoretical and experimental physical process studies; land/atmosphere/ocean coupled modeling; and data assimilation and prediction. For further information about GEWEX, contact either Robert Schiffer or Rick Lawford at the GEST Center.

    Alumna Lana Khvalina Named America East Women's Scholar-Athlete of the Year
    Lana Khvalina '04 was selected as the 2003-04 America East Women's Scholar-Athlete of the Year. Khvalina, who was a member of UMBC's women's tennis team, was chosen from the 22 scholar-athletes in each of the America East conference's sports by a committee of athletics administrators and NCAA Faculty Athletics Representatives at America East institutions.

    Khvalina completed her bachelor's degree in political science in three years with a perfect 4.0 GPA. She was recently selected one of 174 student-athletes from the more than 360,000 student-athletes at NCAA Division I, II and III institutions to receive an NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship. She will apply that scholarship toward her first year at the College of William and Mary Law School.

    On the tennis court, she finished her singles career with a record of 62-20. The first two-time First Team Academic All-American in UMBC history, Khvalina twice earned all-conference honors and competed on teams that went to the NCAA Championships in 2002 and 2003.

    Posted by dwinds1

    In the News, 7/30/04

    UMBC in Baltimore Magazine's "Best of" Issue
    Two members of the UMBC community received kudos in Baltimore magazine's annual "Best of Baltimore" issue. Brian Dannelly, visual and performing arts '97, received best feature film debut for Saved! (p. 166, August 2004).

    The Music According to Lafayette Gilchrist by Lafayette Gilchrist, instructor of music and director of UMBC's jazz ensemble, was named Baltimore's best jazz CD (p. 168, August 2004).

    Tom Schaller, Political Science, in the News
    Assistant Professor of Political Science Tom Schaller wrote an editorial that appeared in the Philadelphia Inquirer on July 25. The editorial, which originally appeared in the Washington Post in April, discusses the possibility that November's presidential election could result in one candidate winning the popular vote and the other winning the election through the Electoral College. Free registration is required to view the article online.

    Schaller was also quoted in the Washington Post on July 28 in a story about the roles Baltimore mayor Martin O'Malley and Montgomery County Executive Doug Duncan are playing at this week's Democratic National Convention and their impact on a possible 2006 gubernatorial run.

    Dennis Coates, Economics, in the Business Journal of Kansas City
    Professor of Economics Dennis Coates was quoted in an article about the economic impact of professional sports teams on their surrounding cities and localities that appeared on July 16 in the Business Journal of Kansas City.

    Alumna Amanda Miracle, History, in the Baltimore Sun
    Alumna Amanda Miracle, history '02 and '04, was featured in the Baltimore Sun on July 25 in a story detailing her pursuit of the world endurance record for women for the longest continual row on a rowing machine. Miracle set the record of 25 hours and 170,425 meters in January.

    Ellen Handler Spitz, Honors College, in the Baltimore Sun
    Honors College Professor of Visual Arts Ellen Handler Spitz was quoted in an article about what the Cinderella fairy tale has to say about women and society that appeared July 25 in the Baltimore Sun.

    Thomas Blass, Psychology, in the Washington Post
    The Man Who Shocked the World (Basic Books, 2004), a biography of psychologist Stanley Milgram written by Professor of Psychology Thomas Blass, was reviewed by the Washington Post on July 25.

    Stephen Holden, Information Systems, in USA Today
    Assistant Professor of Information Systems Stephen Holden was quoted in an article on the latest methods used by government agencies to make secure online transactions that appeared on July 27 in USA Today.

    Lou Cantori, Political Science, in the Baltimore Sun
    Professor of Political Science Lou Cantori was quoted in an op-ed piece about the United States' policy options with Iran that appeared in the Baltimore Sun on July 25.

    Sheldon Caplis, Institutional Advancement, in the Baltimore Business Journal
    Vice President for Institutional Advancement Sheldon Caplis was quoted in a story about fundraising within USM institutions that appeared in the July 23-29 edition of the Baltimore Business Journal. The article is not available online.

    Posted by dwinds1

    July 22, 2004

    Kudos, 7/23/04

    Dawn Bennett, Mechanical Engineering, Awarded Henry C. Welcome Fellowship
    Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering Dawn Bennett is one of ten faculty members from universities in Maryland awarded a 2004 Henry C. Welcome Fellowship Grant by the Maryland Higher Education Commission. The Welcome Fellowship program is an incentive grant program designed to help institutions attract and maintain a diverse faculty. Awards are made to new, tenure-track or tenured, full-time minority faculty members nominated by their college president. The grants provide each fellow with $20,000 over a three-year period for research and education expenses.

    The fellowship honors the late Dr. Henry C. Welcome, a prominent Baltimore physician who served on the State Board of Higher Education, the predecessor of the Maryland Higher Education Commission. Welcome was also active in politics and the civil rights movement with his wife, the late Senator Verda F. Welcome, the first black woman in the United States to be elected a state senator.

    UMBC Student-Athletes Named America East Conference Scholar-Athletes
    UMBC's Lana Khvalina and Adam Grossman were named America East Conference Scholar-Athletes for their respective sports.

    For Khvalina, the award was another in her celebrated career as one of UMBC's best-ever student-athletes. The tennis standout recently became UMBC's first-ever two-time First Team Academic All American after completing her undergraduate program with a 4.0 grade-point average in three years. The native of Rochester, New York also received an NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship, which she will use to attend law school at the College of William & Mary in the fall. A political science major, Khvalina posted a 62-20 record on the court and participated in a pair of NCAA Tournaments for the Retrievers.

    Grossman earned the award for both indoor and outdoor men's track and field. The sophomore won the 55 meters and finished second in the 200 meters at the America East Indoor Track & Field Championships, and was having an excellent outdoor season until suffering an injury at the outdoor championships. The Pikesville (MD) High School graduate is majoring in environmental sciences.

    The America East Conference awards the honor in each of its 22 championship sports.

    UMBC to Host 2005 America East Swimming & Diving Championships
    UMBC has been selected as host to the 2005 America East Swimming & Diving Championships. With the opportunity comes UMBC's first chance to host an America East Championship in any sport since joining the league in 2003.

    The championships, which are scheduled for February 18-20, will be held in the UMBC Natatorium, an indoor facility that houses an eight-lane, 25-yard pool, separate diving well, and balcony seating for spectators. In past years, it has served host to numerous competitions, including the Northeast Conference Championships.

    At the three-day event, the UMBC men's swimming & diving team will look to defend their crown as America East champions, while winning their eighth straight league title overall. The Retriever women, who finished second to conference rival Northeastern in 2004, will vie for their first America East crown.

    Corris Davis and David Sanders, UMBC Classic Upward Bound, Participate in Workshop Panel
    Corris Davis, assistant director, and David Sanders, academic advisor/counselor of the UMBC Classic Upward Bound Program, participated as panelists at the Counselors of Color Workshop of the National Association of College Admissions Counselors (NACAC) on July 16.

    The panel, entitled, "Establishing Partnerships that Work: the Value of Non-Profit Organizations in Counseling and Recruitment of Diverse Populations," was designed to give counselors responsible for recruiting underserved populations insight into programs that help these populations with the college admissions process. Other members of the panel were Jessica Arkin, National Director of the Ventures Scholars Program, Alexandra Quinn of College Summit and Jimmy Tadlock of The College Bound Foundation.

    The UMBC Upward Bound Programs, a federally funded TRiO program hosted by UMBC, is designed to help low-income, first generation high school students gain the skills necessary to successfully matriculate to and graduate from post-secondary education. The program currently serves 70 students from the Baltimore metropolitan area. If you would like more information about the Upward Bound Program, please visit the office in Mathematics/Psychology Building, room 007, or call ext. 5-2700.

    Posted by dwinds1

    In the News, 7/23/04

    Tom Schaller, Political Science, in the Gazette
    Assistant Professor of Political Science Tom Schaller was quoted in a story about Montgomery County Executive Doug Duncan's early campaigning for the 2006 Democratic gubernatorial nomination that appeared in the Gazette on July 16.

    Tom Cronin, Biological Sciences, in the New York Times
    Tom Cronin, professor of biological sciences, was quoted in an article about animal markings and color that appeared in the New York Times on July 20. Cronin's research on the visual systems of manta shrimp offers insight into how these shrimp perceive color. (Free registration required to view the article online.)

    techcenter@UMBC in the Baltimore Business Journal
    The Baltimore Business Journal ran a story on July 20 announcing techcenter@UMBC's newest tenant, AVIcode, Inc. AVIcode Inc., a privately held software products company, will become the fourth new company to move into the techcenter@UMBC incubator this year. AVIcode develops products to detect and report application faults in interconnected systems. The company was formerly based in Hartford, Connecticut.

    Posted by dwinds1

    July 16, 2004

    Kudos, 7/16/04

    UMBC Artists Participate in Artscape
    UMBC's Center for Art and Visual Culture (CAVC) will be well-represented at Artscape this weekend. Symmes Gardner, director of the CAVC, and Renee van der Stelt, projects coordinator for the CAVC, both have artwork in exhibitions showing in conjunction with Artscape.

    Gardner's work is on display with the "Baltimore/Chicago Show," running now through July 31 at the Decker Gallery in the Station Building at the Maryland Institute College of Art and in "Our Perfect World", running through July 24 at Maryland Art Place.

    Van der Stelt's work will be on display in "Surplus: Buy the Square Foot," an exhibition showing at Area 405 through July 24 and in "achromatic/maximum-minimum," showing now through August 7 at the Villa Julie College Gallery.

    Members of the campus community who are participating in Artscape can send information about their work to insights@umbc.edu.

    Alyson Spurgas, Sociology and Anthropology, Given Award
    Alyson Spurgas, a master's degree student studying applied sociology, has been selected as the First Prize Winner of the 2004 Alpha Kappa Delta Graduate Student Paper Competition for her paper entitled "Body Image and Cultural Background." First prize includes $600 and a travel allowance of up to $600 to travel to this year's American Sociological Association meetings where she will be presented with a certificate. If she chooses, Spurgas can also submit her paper for publication in Alpha Kappa Delta's official journal, Sociological Inquiry.

    Judith Schneider, MLL, Participates in Panel
    Judith Schneider, professor and chair of the Department of Modern Languages & Linguistics, participated in a panel discussion about the documentary Terrorists in Retirement after its Baltimore premiere on July 14. This controversial documentary tells the story of French Resistance fighters in WWII--many of them illegal Jewish refugees-who assassinated Nazis and carried out incredibly dangerous assignments. The surviving fighters, now elderly men, recount their experiences as "terrorists". Others joining Schneider in the panel discussion following the movie were Edith Cord, French occupation survivor and Nicole Dombrowski, associate professor of history, Towson University. The event was presented by the Creative Alliance and The Jewish Museum of Maryland.

    CUERE Research Assistants Awarded EPA Grant
    CUERE research assistants and public policy Ph.D. candidates Steve Sharkey,Bernadette Hanlon, and Tom Vicino have been awarded a grant under U.S. EPA's P3 national student design competition. Their winning submission is entitled "Using An 'Impervious Permit' Allowance System to Reduce Impervious Surface Coverage for Environmental Sustainability".

    The EPA P3 Award program provides grants to teams of students to research, develop and design solutions to sustainability challenges. P3 highlights people, prosperity, and the planet--the three pillars of sustainability--as the next step beyond P2 or pollution prevention.

    The proposed design is an application of a permit allowance system to reduce impervious surface coverage of the landscape. The design would establish a "cap" on impervious surfaces on a per lot basis in watersheds of specific size. Similar to the acid rain "cap and trade" program, this policy design would allow land developers to trade "impervious surface credits" and would offer flexibility in how developers choose to reduce impervious surface coverage. This design applies market-based approaches to reduce pollution, making pervious surface a valued good. The product of this design will be a strategic manual for policymakers and practitioners interested in implementing the policy program.

    Faculty advisors for the design team are Claire Welty, director, Center forUrban Environmental Research and Education and professor of civil and environmental engineering, and Royce Hanson, professor of practice in public policy.

    Center for Art and Visual Culture Wins Awards
    UMBC's Center for Art and Visual Culture won two awards in the 2004 Museum Publication Design Competition, sponsored by the American Association of Museums. It won first prize in the books category for Paul Rand: Modernist Design and second prize in the scholarly journals category for Postmodernism: A Virtual Discussion. An article that appeared in the July/August edition of Museum News described both prize-winning publications as "creative and effective, easily competing with publications produced at higher budgets."

    Posted by dwinds1

    In the News, 7/16/04

    Tom Schaller, Political Science, In the News
    Assistant Professor of Political Science Tom Schaller appeared on Maryland Public Television's "Direct Connection" on July 12. Schaller appeared on a panel with Baltimore Sun columnist Gregory Kane to discuss this year's presidential election. Also on July 12, he discussed the upcoming presidential election on WYPR 88.1 FM's "Marc Steiner Show."

    Schaller has also made several recent radio appearances to comment on the selection of John Edwards as vice president for the Democratic presidential ticket. These appearances have included: WEAA 88.9 FM's "Daybreak with Anthony McCarthy" on July 8; the nationally-syndicated "Tony Trupiano Show" on July 7; WBAL 1090 AM's "Chip Franklin Show" on July 9; and WBAL 1090 AM's "Bruce Elliott Show" on July 10.

    On July 2, Schaller appeared on WYPR's "Marc Steiner Show" to comment on the possible political implications of the war with Iraq.

    Constantine Vaporis, History, in Japanese Newspaper
    Constantine Vaporis, associate professor of history, authored an article that appeared on June 15 in Nikkei Shinbun, a Japanese national daily newspaper similar to the Wall Street Journal. The article is entitled "Lord's Procession, People's Show--Alternate Attendance as Theater." It briefly explains Vaporis' research on the annual processions of the feudal lords to Edo (modern-day Tokyo) during the Tokugawa period (1603-1868) from the perspective of political power and theater, as well as sites of competing production, with multiple levels of performance and audience.

    Vaporis has spent the last year in Kyoto, Japan as a visiting professor of research at the International Research Center for Japanese Studies.

    UMBC Athletics in the Baltimore Sun
    UMBC Athletics made two appearances in the education supplement to the July 11 Baltimore Sun.

    UMBC athletic facilities and quotes from Gary Wohlstetter, associate athletic director for recreation and physical education, were featured in an article discussing the expanded facilities and athletic activities offered to students at Baltimore area colleges and universities.

    Geoff Rupert, assistant athletic director for recreation and intramurals, discussed his course on sports officiating in an article about unusual electives titled "Unexpected Courses Add Dimension to Learning."

    Posted by dwinds1

    In the News, 7/16/04

    Tom Schaller, Political Science, In the News
    Assistant Professor of Political Science Tom Schaller appeared on Maryland Public Television's "Direct Connection" on July 12. Schaller appeared on a panel with Baltimore Sun columnist Gregory Kane to discuss this year's presidential election. Also on July 12, he discussed the upcoming presidential election on WYPR 88.1 FM's "Marc Steiner Show."

    Schaller has also made several recent radio appearances to comment on the selection of John Edwards as vice president for the Democratic presidential ticket. These appearances have included: WEAA 88.9 FM's "Daybreak with Anthony McCarthy" on July 8; the nationally-syndicated "Tony Trupiano Show" on July 7; WBAL 1090 AM's "Chip Franklin Show" on July 9; and WBAL 1090 AM's "Bruce Elliott Show" on July 10.

    On July 2, Schaller appeared on WYPR's "Marc Steiner Show" to comment on the possible political implications of the war with Iraq.

    Constantine Vaporis, History, in Japanese Newspaper
    Constantine Vaporis, associate professor of history, authored an article that appeared on June 15 in Nikkei Shinbun, a Japanese national daily newspaper similar to the Wall Street Journal. The article is entitled "Lord's Procession, People's Show--Alternate Attendance as Theater." It briefly explains Vaporis' research on the annual processions of the feudal lords to Edo (modern-day Tokyo) during the Tokugawa period (1603-1868) from the perspective of political power and theater, as well as sites of competing production, with multiple levels of performance and audience.

    Vaporis has spent the last year in Kyoto, Japan as a visiting professor of research at the International Research Center for Japanese Studies.

    UMBC Athletics in the Baltimore Sun
    UMBC Athletics made two appearances in the education supplement to the July 11 Baltimore Sun.

    UMBC athletic facilities and quotes from Gary Wohlstetter, associate athletic director for recreation and physical education, were featured in an article discussing the expanded facilities and athletic activities offered to students at Baltimore area colleges and universities.

    Geoff Rupert, assistant athletic director for recreation and intramurals, discussed his course on sports officiating in an article about unusual electives titled "Unexpected Courses Add Dimension to Learning."

    Posted by dwinds1

    July 15, 2004

    Jessica Soto Perez University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez-UMBC Graduate School Bridge Fund to be Announced at Campuswide Memorial

    At a campuswide memorial for UMBC graduate student Jessica Soto Perez, the University will announce the establishment of the "Jessica Soto Perez University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez-UMBC Graduate School Bridge Fund" and award Perez a posthumous master of science degree in chemical and biochemical engineering, with a conferral date of August 2004. The Perez memorial will be held Friday, July 16 at 3 p.m. in Lecture Hall III of the Administration Building at UMBC.

    At a campuswide memorial for UMBC graduate student Jessica Soto Perez, the University will announce the establishment of the "Jessica Soto Perez University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez-UMBC Graduate School Bridge Fund" and award Perez a posthumous master of science degree in chemical and biochemical engineering, with a conferral date of August 2004.

    The Perez memorial will be held Friday, July 16 at 3 p.m. in Lecture Hall III of the Administration Building at UMBC. Perez was the victim of a fatal shooting on the edge of the campus June 29.

    An outstanding Ph.D. student and engaged member of the UMBC community, Perez was a peer mentor for PROMISE, one of many UMBC pacesetting initiatives to increase the number and diversity of Ph.D. graduates in the sciences and engineering who go on to careers in academia. (UMBC's partners in the NSF-funded PROMISE program are the University of Maryland Baltimore and the University of Maryland College Park.)

    Faculty and students say Perez embodied the spirit of PROMISE, as she hoped to return to the University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez-where she received her B.S. in chemical engineering-to teach and to encourage young people to consider careers in the sciences and engineering.

    Now, UMBC and the University of Puerto Rico are working to ensure that Perez's legacy lives on. The "Jessica Soto Perez University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez-UMBC Graduate School Bridge Fund" will provide financial support for University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez students to study at UMBC's Graduate School.

    Tax-deductible contributions to the fund can be sent to: Kim Robinson, Director of Capital Campaigns and Stewardship, Office of Institutional Advancement, UMBC, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, Maryland 21250. Checks must be made to University of Maryland Foundation, Inc. Online contributions are also welcome at www.umbc.edu/giving. Please call 410-455-3700 for more information.

    UMBC is recognized nationally as a leader in producing diverse undergraduates who are well-prepared for graduate school and the workforce. The Meyerhoff Scholarship Program is a flagship of more than 10 programs-including PROMISE-targeted at strengthening the presence of underrepresented minorities in a variety of disciplines.

    # # #

    Posted by dwinds1

    July 13, 2004

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    This is a test to see if the edit function is working.And now I am trying to edit the test to check it out.

    Posted by dwinds1

    July 12, 2004

    Jessica Soto Perez University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez-UMBC Graduate School Bridge Fund Announced at Campuswide Memorial

    At a recent campuswide memorial for UMBC graduate student Jessica Soto Perez, the University will announce the establishment of the "Jessica Soto Perez University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez-UMBC Graduate School Bridge Fund" and awarded Perez a posthumous master of science degree in chemical and biochemical engineering, with a conferral date of August 2004.

    At a recent campuswide memorial for UMBC graduate student Jessica Soto Perez, the University announced the establishment of the "Jessica Soto Perez University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez-UMBC Graduate School Bridge Fund" and awarded Perez a posthumous master of science degree in chemical and biochemical engineering, with a conferral date of August 2004. Perez was the victim of a fatal shooting on the edge of the campus June 29.

    An outstanding Ph.D. student and engaged member of the UMBC community, Perez was a peer mentor for PROMISE, one of many UMBC pacesetting initiatives to increase the number and diversity of Ph.D. graduates in the sciences and engineering who go on to careers in academia. (UMBC's partners in the NSF-funded PROMISE program are the University of Maryland Baltimore and the University of Maryland College Park.)

    Faculty and students say Perez embodied the spirit of PROMISE, as she hoped to return to the University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez--where she received her B.S. in chemical engineering--to teach and to encourage young people to consider careers in the sciences and engineering.

    Now, UMBC and the University of Puerto Rico are working to ensure that Perez's legacy lives on. The "Jessica Soto Perez University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez-UMBC Graduate School Bridge Fund" will provide financial support for University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez students to study at UMBC's Graduate School.

    Tax-deductible contributions to the fund can be sent to:
    Kim Robinson, Director of Capital Campaigns and Stewardship
    Office of Institutional Advancement
    UMBC
    1000 Hilltop Circle
    Baltimore, Maryland 21250.

    Checks must be made to University of Maryland Foundation, Inc. Online contributions are also welcome at www.umbc.edu/giving. Please call 410-455-3700 for more information.

    UMBC is recognized nationally as a leader in producing diverse undergraduates who are well-prepared for graduate school and the workforce. The Meyerhoff Scholarship Program is a flagship of more than 10 programs--including PROMISE--targeted at strengthening the presence of underrepresented minorities in a variety of disciplines.

    Posted by dwinds1

    July 09, 2004

    In the News, 7/9/04

    techcenter@UMBC and bwtech@UMBC in the Business Monthly
    An article on UMBC's role in technology development through the techcenter@UMBC business incubator and the bwtech@UMBC research park is featured in the July edition of the Business Monthly.

    Don Norris, Public Policy and MIPAR, on WJZ News
    Don Norris, professor of public policy and director of MIPAR, appeared on WJZ's evening news on July 1 to discuss the harmful effects of personal attacks on political debate.

    Computer Mania Day, CWIT in the Business Monthly
    Computer Mania Day and its founder, Howard County business leader Shirley Collier, were featured in a story in the July edition of the Business Monthly. UMBC's Center for Women and Information Technology has administered Computer Mania Day, a program designed to encourage girls to study information technology, since 2002; Collier is also on CWIT's External Advisory Board.

    UMBC in The Gazette
    A proposed new partnership between UMBC and Wheaton High School in Montgomery County was featured in the July 7 edition of The Gazette. The new partnership would create a pre-college academy for the students of Wheaton High, offering additional assistance to first-generation college students and underrepresented minorities, as well as offering courses to complement a new high-tech curriculum to be offered at Wheaton beginning this fall.

    Lorie Logan-Bennett, Career Development Center, in the Business Monthly
    Lorie Logan-Bennett, interim associate director of the Career Development Center, wrote an article about job prospects for 2004 college graduates for the July edition of the Business Monthly.

    Thomas Blass, Psychology, in the San Francisco Chronicle
    On July 4, San Francisco Chronicle reviewed The Man Who Shocked the World: The Life and Legacy of Stanley Milgram (Basic Books, 2004) written by Professor of Psychology Thomas Blass.

    Posted by dwinds1

    Kudos, 7/9/04

    Andrew Sears, Information Systems, Receives Award from IBM
    Dr. Andrew Sears, professor and chair of information systems, was selected to receive a 2004 IBM Faculty Award. This highly competitive award recognizes outstanding research programs of importance to IBM's industry. The accompanying $40,000 will be used to support research on accessibility, speech recognition and mobile computing.

    Center for History Education Awarded U.S. Department of Education Grant
    The Center for History Education--in partnership with Anne ArundelCounty Schools--has won a $994,000 "Teaching American History" grant from the U.S. Department of Education. The grant will fund a three-year professional development program for AACPS teachers of American history. Supporting partners for this program include the Maryland State Archives and the Martha Ross Center for Oral History. This is the third such grant the CHE has won; the CHE's previous TAH grants were with the Baltimore County and Baltimore City Schools. The U.S. Department of Education awarded 122 grants under the FY 2004 TAH competition; the CHE grant was the only grant funded in Maryland. The full text of the grant abstract is available online.

    Devendra Mistry, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Awarded Professional Staff Senate Scholarship
    Devendra Mistry, an undergraduate majoring in biochemistry and molecular biology, has been selected the winner of the 2003-2004 Professional Staff Senate (PSS) $500 Book Scholarship. Mistry has demonstrated a strong commitment to helping others by tutoring at the Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry's Chemistry Tutorial Center. In addition, he has worked at the Department of Sociology and Anthropology as a student assistant, as well as a research assistant at the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.

    115 UMBC Student-Athletes Named to America East Academic Honor Roll
    115 UMBC student-athletes were among the 1,114 student athletes named to the 2003-2004 America East Winter/Spring Academic Honor Roll. The honor roll recognizes students who earned GPAs of 3.0 or higher while competing during the last athletic season. In addition, 49 UMBC student-athletes were named to the Commissioner's Honor Roll, which recognizes athletes who earned a 3.5 or higher GPA during the last athletic season.

    With 13 student-athletes named to the Academic Honor Roll, UMBC's women's lacrosse team led all women's lacrosse teams in the America East Conference.

    The following students were named to the America East Winter/Spring Academic Honor Roll. Asterisks note students named to the Commissioner's Honor Roll as well.

    Baseball
    Chris Becraft*, Matthew Buchholz, Dan Carpenter, Jonathan Gossard*, Jerry Long, Michael Orlando, Bryan Owens*, John Saffran

    Men's Basketball
    Seth Davis, Jerrell Dinkins, Andrew Feeley, Robert Gogerty

    Women's Basketball
    Anastasia Goncharova, Heather Luttrell, Matea Pender*, Tyecia Powell*, Erin Voss*

    Men's Lacrosse
    Franklin Berry*, Jeff Clark, David Coker, Brooks Fisher*, Andrew Gallagher, Joseph Gallagher, James Hyland, Brian Johnson*, Kelvin Moulden, Patrick Muston, Luke Powell, Drew Westervelt

    Women's Lacrosse
    Jennifer Dragoni, Kelly Fahey, Kelly Fiorani*, Anna Jacobs*, Jennifer Kasper, Heather Licht*, Erin Lynn, Traci McClintic*, Megan Mullins*, Christina Raab, Kelly Reese*, Emily Sawyer*, Ashley Wilson

    Softball
    Heather Bennett*, Sarah Crowell, Jessica Keenan*, Lauren Nicholson, Kristie Pickeral, Amy Sadowl, Jen San Filippo*, Jessica Taylor, Kristian Troster*

    Men's Swimming and Diving
    Adam Blais, Carlos Canepa*, Ian Carey*, Timothy Conway*, Brad Green, Brian Jaeggi*, Nicolas Lombo*, John Saums, Geza Szabo*, Patrick Woodward

    Women's Swimming and Diving
    Stehpanie Alexander, Elizabeth Bigelow-Rubin*, Casey Conner*, Amber Harris, Katrin Harrsen*, Cara Linehan, Elizabeth Maldin*, Amy Mensch*, Kristen Moorby*, Amanda Otis*, Lindsey Prather*, Peggy Preston, Jessica Prosen, Astrid Sperling, Katherine Spohnholz, Holly Wittsack

    Men's Tennis
    Luis Baraldi*,Djan Gusmao, Mehrban Iranshad*, Mikhail Kouznetsov, Josef Novotny, James Tyler

    Women's Tennis
    Tia Kaasalainen*, Svetlana Khvalina*, Aimee Lim*, Sarah Mostellar*, Alessandra Pedergnana, Anne Perez

    Men's Track and Field
    Michael Caputi, Ryan Cartwright, John Commins, Nicholas Demianovich, Jonathan Desi*, Adam Driscoll, Adam Grossman*, Kevin Hurley, Issac Mathews*, James Simms, Aaron Smith, Edward Warner*, John Wetzel

    Women's Track and Field
    Crystal Barkley*, Yasmin Fields, Kathleen Galan, Pamela Hobbs, Alesia Hovatter, Anita Lawver*, Morgan Little*, Chiagoze Obionwu, Desiree Tubb, Francine Ward, Cara Wettlaufer*, Dellisa Williams*, Jenelle Wilson

    Posted by dwinds1

    July 08, 2004

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    Posted by dwinds1

    July 07, 2004

    Lana Khvalina '04 is First UMBC Student-athlete to Receive NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship

    UMBC tennis standout Lana Khvalina '04 has become the first student-athlete in school history to receive a scholarship from the NCAA Postgraduate Scholarship Committee. Khvalina, who will utilize the $7,500 award to attend law school at the College of William & Mary this fall, is one of 174 NCAA student-athletes to receive the scholarship in the 2003-04 academic year.

    A month ago, the Rochester, New York native Khvalina became the first student-athlete in school history to earn First Team Academic All American honors in back-to-back years. Another tennis player, Oscar Lopez, earned First Team honors in 1998-99 and Second Team honors in 1999-2000.

    Khvalina earned her undergraduate degree in three years with a 4.0 GPA in political science and was the University's salutatorian this spring. On the tennis court, she finished her singles career with a record of 62-20 and reached the "B" flight singles final the the Old Point National Bank ITA Invitational last fall. A state finalist for a Rhodes Scholarship, the two-time All Conference honoree competed on two squads which went to the NCAA Championships (2002, 2003).

    She also recently earned a 2004 post-graduate scholarship from the Maryland Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics.

    Khvalina is just one of many outstanding student-athletes at UMBC. The Retrievers broke four school records in the classroom for the spring 2004 semester.

    Posted by dwinds1

    July 02, 2004

    UMBC Athletics Grieves for Passing of Tom Rider, Former Coach, Administrator and Teacher

    Tom Rider, 63, a former UMBC Head Coach of several sports and an administrator, passed away after a lengthy illness on Sunday, June 27. Rider, who coached UMBC's first baseball and soccer teams, was associated with UMBC Athletics, Physical Education, and Recreation since the early days of the university until 2003.

    To read the full tribute to Tom, please visit the UMBC Athletics web site at:http://www.umbcretrievers.com/sports/news/release.asp?RELEASE_ID=1454.

    Posted by dwinds1

    In the News: 7/2/2004

    UMBC in Maryland Family Magazine

    UMBC is featured in the July edition of Patuxent Publishing's Maryland Family magazine.

    Rebecca Boehling, History, on WAMU 88.5 FM

    Rebecca Boehling, associate professor and graduate program director in the department of history, was a guest on the Monday, June 28 broadcast of Washington, DC, National Public Radio affiliate WAMU 88.1 FM's "Kojo Nnamdi Show." Boehling spoke about lessons learned from the Post-World-War-II American occupation of Germany and comparisons with the current occupation of Iraq.

    Donald Norris, MIPAR and Public Policy, In the News

    Donald Norris, professor of public policy and director of MIPAR, was quoted in June 27 article in the Baltimore Sun discussing the political impact of tax increases in Baltimore City.

    Norris was also quoted in The Sun on June 28 in an article about John Kerry's recent campaign visit to Baltimore.

    The Washington Post quoted Norris in a story that appeared on June 27 about the Ehrlich administration's new public relations efforts.

    Posted by dwinds1

    July 01, 2004

    In the News: 7/2/2004

    UMBC in Maryland Family Magazine

    UMBC is featured in the July edition of Patuxent Publishing's Maryland Family magazine.

    Donald Norris, MIPAR and Public Policy, In the News

    Donald Norris, professor of public policy and director of MIPAR, was quoted in June 27 article in the Baltimore Sun discussing the political impact of tax increases in Baltimore City.

    Norris was also quoted in The Sun on June 28 in an article about John Kerry's recent campaign visit to Baltimore.

    The Washington Post quoted Norris in a story that appeared on June 27 about the Ehrlich administration's new public relations efforts.

    Posted by dwinds1

    UMBC Community Mourns the Loss of Graduate Student Jessica Soto Perez

    The UMBC administration, faculty and staff are grieving for the tragic loss of student Jessica Soto Perez. Ms. Perez, an outstanding, 26-year-old Ph.D. student in the department of chemical & biochemical engineering, was the victim of a fatal shooting on the edge of the UMBC campus early in the evening on Tuesday, June 29.

    The Baltimore County Police department has determined that the tragedy was an isolated domestic incident. There is no threat to the campus or campus community as a whole.

    Ms. Perez earned her B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Puerto Rico in Mayaguez prior to coming to UMBC. An active and engaged member of the UMBC community, Ms. Perez was a graduate teaching assistant in the department of Chemical & Biochemical Engineering and served as a peer mentor and counselor to other graduate and undergraduate students. She also served as a senator in the graduate student association.

    "Our Jessica was dear to all of us and this will be hard to deal with," said Govind Rao, chair of chemical and biochemical engineering. "While every such tragedy is senseless, hers seems particularly more so, given her absolutely positive and life-embracing spirit. While this is hard for us, it is even more important to keep her family in our thoughts and prayers, as it must be far worse for them."

    Perez was one of the first peer mentors for PROMISE, an alliance of the three public research universities in Maryland, led by UMBC and funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF.) PROMISE is dedicated to increasing the number and diversity of Ph.D. graduates in the sciences and engineering who go on to academic careers.

    According to a tribute to Perez on the PROMISE website, "Jessica was a light to all who knew her. She always had a smile, a word of encouragement, a wink, or a laugh. She shared her passion for life. She loved her family and her friends. She loved PROMISE, her lab, the people in the TRC building, her department (Chemical and BioChemical Engineering), and her schools (UMBC and the University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez). We will miss her!"

    University Counseling Services (410-455-2473 or ext. 5-2474) has trained counselors available to lend support to students, faculty and staff who knew Ms. Perez or who are otherwise affected by this incident. University Counseling Services hours are Monday Friday, from 8:30 a.m. 5:00 p.m. No appointments are needed.

    Funeral and/or memorial arrangements will be announced to the campus community as soon as the information becomes available.

    Posted by dwinds1

    UMBC Community Mourns the Loss of Graduate Student Jessica Soto Perez

    The UMBC administration, faculty and staff are grieving for the tragic loss of student Jessica Soto Perez. Ms. Perez, an outstanding, 26-year-old Ph.D. student in the department of chemical & biochemical engineering, was the victim of a fatal shooting on the outer edge of the UMBC campus early in the evening on Tuesday, June 29.

    The Baltimore County Police department has determined that the tragedy was an isolated domestic incident. There is no threat to the campus or campus community as a whole.

    Ms. Perez earned her B.S. in Chemical Engineering from the University of Puerto Rico in Mayaguez prior to coming to UMBC. An active and engaged member of the UMBC community, Ms. Perez was a graduate teaching assistant in the department of Chemical & Biochemical Engineering and served as a peer mentor and counselor to other graduate and undergraduate students. She also served as a senator in the graduate student association.

    "Our Jessica was dear to all of us and this will be hard to deal with," said Govind Rao, chair of chemical and biochemical engineering. "While every such tragedy is senseless, hers seems particularly more so, given her absolutely positive and life-embracing spirit. While this is hard for us, it is even more important to keep her family in our thoughts and prayers, as it must be far worse for them."

    Perez was one of the first peer mentors for PROMISE, an alliance of the three public research universities in Maryland, led by UMBC and funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF.) PROMISE is dedicated to increasing the number and diversity of Ph.D. graduates in the sciences and engineering who go on to academic careers.

    According to a tribute to Perez on the PROMISE website, "Jessica was a light to all who knew her. She always had a smile, a word of encouragement, a wink, or a laugh. She shared her passion for life. She loved her family and her friends. She loved PROMISE, her lab, the people in the TRC building, her department (Chemical and BioChemical Engineering), and her schools (UMBC and the University of Puerto Rico Mayaguez). We will miss her!"

    University Counseling Services (410-455-2473 or ext. 5-2474) has trained counselors available to lend support to students, faculty and staff who knew Ms. Perez or who are otherwise affected by this incident. University Counseling Services hours are Monday Friday, from 8:30 a.m. 5:00 p.m. No appointments are needed.

    Funeral and/or memorial arrangements will be announced to the campus community as soon as the information becomes available.

    Posted by dwinds1

    Kudos: 7/2/2004

    UMBC to be Represented in Maryland Arts Festival Production

    UMBC connections run high in the upcoming production of Cabaret, which is headlining the Maryland Arts Festival in the Stephens Hall Theatre on the campus of Towson University.

    Michael Stebbins (UMBC student 1986-89, adjunct faculty from 1995-1997 in UMBC's theatre and music departments and actor for several seasons with the UMBC-based Maryland Stage Company) is appearing as the Emcee.

    The set for Cabaret was built in the theatre shop at UMBC, as much of TowsonUniversity's arts departments are under construction. Greg Schraven, technical director of UMBC's Theatre, is overseeing the construction of the set. Gary Hiel, a UMBC student majoring in ancient studies is directing the production.

    Show dates/times are:

    Friday, July 9 and Saturday, July 10 @ 8 pm
    Friday, July 16 and Saturday, July 17 @ 8 pm
    Sunday, July 18 @ 2 pm
    Thursday - Saturday, July 22 - 24 @ 8 pm

    For ticket info call 410-704-2787 or log on to www.new.towson.edu/maf.

    Posted by dwinds1

    June 25, 2004

    In the News, 6/25/04

    Thomas Blass, Psychology, in American Scientist

    The July-August 2004 issue of American Scientist contained a review of professor of psychology Thomas Blass's "The Man Who Shocked the World: The Life and Legacy of Stanley Milgram" (Basic Books, 2004).Lou Cantori, Political Science, on WYPR

    Lou Cantori, professor of political science, was a guest on 88.1 WYPR's "Marc Steiner Show" on June 21 as part of a panel discussion about the current situation in Iraq.

    Posted by dwinds1

    In the News 6/25/2004

    Thomas Blass, Psychology, in American Scientist

    The July-August 2004 issue of American Scientist contained a review of professor of psychology Thomas Blass's "The Man Who Shocked the World: The Life and Legacy of Stanley Milgram" (Basic Books, 2004).

    Lou Cantori, Political Science, on WYPR

    Lou Cantori, professor of political science, was a guest on 88.1 WYPR's "Marc Steiner Show" on June 21 as part of a panel discussion about the current situation in Iraq.

    Posted by dwinds1

    Kudos 6/25/04

    UMBC Student-Athletes Break School Academic Records in Spring 2004

    UMBC's student-athletes broke four school records in the classroom for the Spring 2004 semester.208 of UMBC's 393 student-athletes earned 3.00 grade-point averages or higher, for a record of 52.9 percent of student-athletes with 3.00 or higher GPAs for the Spring 2004 semester.

    The combined athletic team grade-point average was 2.92.

    The combined overall team (to include the support teams of student trainers, pep band, dance team, and tumbling team) grade point average was 2.94.

    A record 12 athletic and support teams, Volleyball, Men's Tennis, Field Hockey, Women's Swimming & Diving, Pep Band, Tumbling Team, Women's Basketball, Women's Soccer, Women's Lacrosse, Women's Tennis, Student-Trainers, and Women's Track & Field, earned 3.00 or higher semester grade-point averages.

    Moreover, 91 student-athletes (23.1 percent) earned semester honors (3.50 GPA or higher) and 23 Retrievers produced perfect 4.00 semesters.

    Judit Pap, GEST Center, Publishes New Book

    Judit Pap, senior research scientist with the Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center, is the lead editor of a new monograph published by the American Geophysical Union entitled "Solar Variability and Its Effects on Climate."

    An interview with Pap on the subject of solar variability and climate change is forthcoming in the journal EOS, Transactions of the American Geophysical Union.

    Posted by dwinds1

    Kudos 6/25/2004

    UMBC Student-Athletes Break School Academic Records in Spring 2004

    UMBC's student-athletes broke four school records in the classroom for the Spring 2004 semester.208 of UMBC's 393 student-athletes earned 3.00 grade-point averages or higher, for a record of 52.9 percent of student-athletes with 3.00 or higher GPAs for the Spring 2004 semester.

    The combined athletic team grade-point average was 2.92.

    The combined overall team (to include the support teams of student trainers, pep band, dance team, and tumbling team) grade point average was 2.94.

    A record 12 athletic and support teams, Volleyball, Men's Tennis, Field Hockey, Women's Swimming & Diving, Pep Band, Tumbling Team, Women's Basketball, Women's Soccer, Women's Lacrosse, Women's Tennis, Student-Trainers, and Women's Track & Field, earned 3.00 or higher semester grade-point averages.

    Moreover, 91 student-athletes (23.1 percent) earned semester honors (3.50 GPA or higher) and 23 Retrievers produced perfect 4.00 semesters.

    Judit Pap, GEST Center, Publishes New Book

    Judit Pap, senior research scientist with the Goddard Earth Sciences and Technology Center, is the lead editor of a new monograph published by the American Geophysical Union entitled "Solar Variability and Its Effects on Climate."

    An interview with Pap on the subject of solar variability and climate change is forthcoming in the journal EOS, Transactions of the American Geophysical Union.

    Posted by dwinds1

    June 18, 2004

    Kudos, 6/18/04

    UMBC's BD Metrics Takes State's Top Honor for New Incubator Firms
    BD Metrics Inc., a technology startup located at UMBC, was named the Best New Incubator Company at Maryland Business Incubation Association's fourth annual awards, the statewide group announced Thursday. The awards, presented at the Center Club in Baltimore City, recognized the achievements of six current and graduate companies based on each company's goals and success in achieving its objectives.

    Suzanne Ostrand-Rosenberg, Biological Sciences, Elected to Johns Hopkins University Society of Scholars
    Suzanne Ostrand-Rosenberg, professor of biological sciences, has been elected to The Johns Hopkins University Society of Scholars. Ostrand-Rosenberg, a former postdoctorial fellow at Hopkins, and 14 other scientists and clinicians were honored during the society's 35th induction ceremony on May 19 and again at the university's commencement ceremony the following day.

    The Society of Scholars was created on the recommendation of former Hopkins president Milton S. Eisenhower and approved by the university board of trustees on May 1, 1967. The society--the first of its kind in the nation--inducts former postdoctoral fellows and junior or visiting faculty at Johns Hopkins who have gained marked distinction in their fields of physical, biological, medical, social, or engineering sciences or in the humanities. The Committee of the Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars elects the scholars from among nominations made by Johns Hopkins faculty members. The society now has 460 members.

    Posted by dwinds1

    Kudos, 6/18/04

    UMBC's BD Metrics Takes State's Top Honor for New Incubator Firms
    BD Metrics Inc., a technology startup located at UMBC, was named the Best New Incubator Company at Maryland Business Incubation Association's fourth annual awards, the statewide group announced Thursday. The awards, presented at the Center Club in Baltimore City, recognized the achievements of six current and graduate companies based on each company's goals and success in achieving its objectives.

    Suzanne Ostrand-Rosenberg, Biological Sciences, Elected to Johns Hopkins University Society of Scholars
    Suzanne Ostrand-Rosenberg, professor of biological sciences, has been elected to The Johns Hopkins University Society of Scholars. Ostrand-Rosenberg, a former postdoctorial fellow at Hopkins, and 14 other scientists and clinicians were honored during the society's 35th induction ceremony on May 19 and again at the university's commencement ceremony the following day.

    The Society of Scholars was created on the recommendation of former Hopkins president Milton S. Eisenhower and approved by the university board of trustees on May 1, 1967. The society--the first of its kind in the nation--inducts former postdoctoral fellows and junior or visiting faculty at Johns Hopkins who have gained marked distinction in their fields of physical, biological, medical, social, or engineering sciences or in the humanities. The Committee of the Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars elects the scholars from among nominations made by Johns Hopkins faculty members. The society now has 460 members.

    Posted by dwinds1

    June 17, 2004

    Kudos, 6/18/04

    Suzanne Ostrand-Rosenberg, Biological Sciences, Elected to Johns Hopkins University Society of Scholars
    Suzanne Ostrand-Rosenberg, professor of biological sciences, has been elected to The Johns Hopkins University Society of Scholars. Ostrand-Rosenberg, a former postdoctorial fellow at Hopkins, and 14 other scientists and clinicians were honored during the society's 35th induction ceremony on May 19 and again at the university's commencement ceremony the following day.

    The Society of Scholars was created on the recommendation of former Hopkins president Milton S. Eisenhower and approved by the university board of trustees on May 1, 1967. The society--the first of its kind in the nation--inducts former postdoctoral fellows and junior or visiting faculty at Johns Hopkins who have gained marked distinction in their fields of physical, biological, medical, social, or engineering sciences or in the humanities. The Committee of the Johns Hopkins Society of Scholars elects the scholars from among nominations made by Johns Hopkins faculty members. The society now has 460 members.

    Posted by dwinds1

    In the News, 6/18/04

    Diane Crump-Fogle, Career Development Center, in the Towson Times
    Diane Crump-Fogle, interim director of the Career Development Center, was quoted in the Towson Times on June 16 in an article about the job market for this year's college graduates.

    Thomas Blass, Psychology, on WYPR
    Thomas Blass, professor of psychology, appeared on WYPR 88.1 FM's "Marc Steiner Show" on June 17. Blass discussed his new biography of controversial psychologist Stanley Milgram, The Man Who Shocked the World, and how Milgram's famous experiments on obedience to authority are still relevant today.

    Dennis Coates, Economics, on Maryland Public Television
    Dennis Coates, professor of economics and an expert on the economics of sports, appeared on MPT's "Business Connection" to discuss what economic impact a proposed Major League Baseball team in Washington, D.C., would have on the Baltimore Orioles and the greater Baltimore economy.

    Kriste Lindenmeyer, History, on WYPR
    Associate professor of history Kriste Lindenmeyer was a guest on WYPR 88.1 FM's "Marc Steiner Show" on June 7 as part of a panel discussing the "greatest generation."

    Posted by dwinds1

    2004 Legislative Session Ends with Modest Budget Increases for the University System

    While the 2004 legislative session featured much debate about the relationship between State funding and access to high quality public education, a modest increase in State funds has been approved for the University System of Maryland for FY 2005. Governor Ehrlich also announced that his administration is using its best efforts to provide additional operating and capital support to USM in FY 2006.

    While the 2004 legislative session featured much debate about the relationship between State funding and access to high quality public education, a modest increase in State funds has been approved for the University System of Maryland for FY 2005. Governor Ehrlich also announced that his administration is using its best efforts to provide additional operating and capital support to USM in FY 2006.

    Session outcomes

    The Governor included funds in the State operating budget for a $752 flat-rate COLA for employees, while the General Assembly approved a 2.5 percent merit raise, which each State agency must "self-fund." (Click here to read details in President Hrabowski's recent budget update).

    One of the most high profile bills during the session, The Higher Education Affordability and Access Act (SB770/HB1188), was vetoed by the Governor. The bill would have limited tuition increases for resident undergraduates to 5 percent, and required the Governor to include an increase in funding for higher education in his annual budgets.

    Despite the bill's veto and the State's continuing budget deficit, the 2004 session ended with Governor Ehrlich, legislators and USM committing to work together to provide students affordable access to a quality education, and to meet the demands that come with a projected increase in statewide college enrollments.

    Voices for UMBC heard throughout session

    The UMBC community was a significant voice in Annapolis during the Session, demonstrating a commitment to excellence in public education. Letters and calls to representatives and local papers, as well as testimony before special legislative committees, were just a few of the ways that UMBC students, faculty, staff, alumni and friends demonstrated their commitment to the University and its students.

    The UMBC Legislative Reception hosted by the Alumni Association in February was a tremendous success. In spite of very late bill hearing schedules and multiple events on the calendar, attendance by legislators and State agency representatives was excellent. Students, faculty and staff spoke with elected officials on the importance of higher education in Maryland and the need for continued support of UMBC. UMBC advocacy groups, including the President's Advisory Council, Board of Visitors and Alumni Board and Association members, provided an equally important perspective on the importance to business of maintaining quality higher education for Marylanders.

    UMBC students were particularly active in Annapolis during the Session. Several students worked hard to energize the campus student community on significant issues, including tuition concerns. They created a strong campus advocacy group, SPIN@UMBC, whose members identified, contacted and visited with legislative leaders working on higher education issues. They attended budget proceedings and bill hearings and testified before Senate and House Committees. "The University was well represented by these student activists who got their message across while earning the respect of elected officials throughout the legislature," says Joan Kennedy Cody, UMBC's director of community and government relations.

    Strengthening USM and the State of Maryland

    Other important bills that will strengthen the University System and the Maryland workforce were passed during the 2004 session. The General Assembly passed legislation -- which Governor Ehrlich signed into law -- that assures the autonomy of the University System and its institutions and reduces the steps involved in working with the Department of Budget and Management and other State agencies.

    The legislation specifically states that the authority of the USM Board of Regents may not be superseded by any other State agency or office in managing the affairs of the USM or of any constituent institutions. The USM will retain independence in areas of governance including position control, development of policies, guidelines and plans, but will submit an annual report to the Department of Budget and Management, Department of Legislative Services and the Maryland Higher Education Commission.

    "This legislation is particularly important during challenging budgetary times," explains Cody. "With the USM retaining autonomy and independence, the institutions can work better and more creatively with what we are given."

    Lawmakers also adopted legislation which changes the procedures governing the approval of new programs offered at USM institutions. "The process for program development between USM and the Maryland Higher Education Commission will be more streamlined, so we can continue to create and offer programs that will prepare graduates to work in areas of greatest demand in the state," says Cody.

    UMBC's Center for Women and Information Technology (CWIT), led by Director Claudia Morrell, was instrumental in the creation and successful passage of a bill establishing the Task Force on the Status of Women and Information Technology to address women's under-representation in information technology. Morrell and CWIT worked closely with bill sponsors to establish the purpose, membership and staffing necessary to prepare a comprehensive report to the Maryland General Assembly.

    The Task Force will present an annual report on its findings and recommendations to the Governor and the General Assembly on or before October 1 of each year, beginning on October 1, 2004, for a five-year period.

    What's Next?

    Although the 2004 session is over, it is important that the UMBC community continue its commitment to advocacy. "It is clear that our students and their families appreciate the first-rate education available at UMBC and that they want it to remain affordable," notes Cody. "We appreciate the UMBC community's support during the 2004 legislative session, and our voices on these issues must continue to be heard." Be sure to bookmark the Voices for UMBC advocacy site and sign up for e-mail updates and action alerts on how to be a voice for quality public higher education in Maryland.

    Posted by dwinds1

    June 11, 2004

    In the News, 6/11/04

    Lou Cantori, Political Science, on Iranian TV
    Lou Cantori, professor of political science, appeared on Iranian television station Alalam TV on June 8. Cantori was interviewed by phone on the impact that the recent resignation of George Tenet will have on the CIA.

    President Hrabowski in the Kalamazoo Gazette
    On June 4, the Kalamazoo Gazette covered a speech President Hrabowski gave before the Kalamazoo Community Foundation. In his speech, President Hrabowski discussed the need to create higher academic expectations for American students, especially those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

    Alumnus Brian Dannelly in the News
    UMBC alum and filmmaker Brian Dannelly appeared on National Public Radio's Fresh Air on June 7 to discuss his new film, Saved!

    Dannelly was also featured in the June 9 City Paper and the June 10 Washington Post.

    Mark Croatti, Political Science, in the Business Monthly
    Mark Croatti, adjunct professor of political science, was quoted on the political and economic impact of redeveloping historic Ellicott City's riverfront in a story about the economic development of the town that appeared in the June 2004 issue of the Business Monthly.

    Posted by dwinds1

    Kudos, 6/11/04

    Ellen Handler Spitz, Honors College, Awarded Fellowship
    Ellen Handler Spitz, Honors College professor of visual arts, was awarded one of six Clark Fellowships at the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute for this summer of 2004 in Williamstown, Massachusetts. This is a coveted fellowship for art historians from all over the world, and it enables them to write scholarly works in a peaceful and collegial setting.

    UMBC Students Among Regents Scholars Award Winners
    Three UMBC students have been awarded Regents Scholars Awards by the University System of Maryland. Danielle Allor has been named the Loughran Regents Scholar; Gregory Johnson has been named the Burgee Regents Scholar; and Michael Patoka has been named the Kelly Regents Scholar. These awards cover costs for in-state tuition and fees, room and board costs, and include a $500/semester stipend for books and educational costs.

    Two UMBC Students Named Goldwater Scholars
    Two UMBC students have been named Goldwater Scholars. Kenny Gibbs is a Meyerhoff Scholar with a 4.0 in biochemistry and molecular biology, and Aliya Frederick is a Meyerhoff Scholar with a 3.82 GPA in biochemistry and molecular biology. Nationally, there were a total of 310 scholarships awarded from a field of 1,113 nominees. Four UMBC students were nominated to this program.

    Claire Welty, CUERE, Named to National Research Council
    Claire Welty, director of the Center for Urban Environmental Research and Education (CUERE) and professor of civil and environmental engineering, has been appointed to the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board, effective July 1, 2004, for a term of three years. The Water Science and Technology Board provides a focal point for studies related to water resources under the aegis of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering. The board's objective is to improve the scientific and technological basis for resolving important questions and issues associated with the efficient management and use of water resources. The scope of the board's work covers all dimensions of water resources, including science, engineering, economics, policy, educational issues and social aspects.

    Kathy O'Dell, Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences, Participating in Panel at Guggenheim
    Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences Kathy O'Dell will be participating in a panel discussion, "The Tactile Photograph," at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City on June 29. The panel addresses the ways in which tactility is evoked in photographs, whether through the representation of form or as an integral part of the creative process. The panel is being held in conjunction with the exhibition "Speaking With Hands: Photographs from the Buhl Collection," on display now through September 8.

    Khvalina, Canepa Named Academic All Americans
    UMBC tennis standout Lana Khvalina (Rochester, N.Y./Brighton) has been named to the 2003-04 CoSIDA Academic All America University Division Women's At-Large First Team.

    Senior swimmer Carlos Canepa earned Second Team All District II honors. The teams are selected by the College Sports Information Directors of America.

    Khvalina becomes the first student-athlete in school history to earn First Team Academic All American honors in back-to-back years. Another tennis player, Oscar Lopez, earned First Team honors in 1998-99 and Second Team honors in 1999-2000.

    Khvalina, who carries a 4.0 GPA in political science, earned her undergraduate degree in three years, and will attend William & Mary law school this fall. She finished her singles career with a record of 62-20 and reached the B flight singles final the the Old Point National Bank ITA Invitational last fall. A state finalist for a Rhodes Scholarship, the two-time All Conference honoree competed on two squads which went to the NCAA Championships (2002, 2003).

    She also recently earned a 2004 post-graduate scholarship from the Maryland Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics.

    Khvalina also recently earned a 2004 post-graduate scholarship from the Maryland Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics.

    Canepa spearheaded the men's swimming team's 12-1 record and helped UMBC capture the University's first America East Conference title this past winter. He won both the 500 and 1650 freestyle events and is currently training to compete for the Peruvian Olympic team. Canepa carries a 3.50 GPA in information systems.

    Posted by dwinds1

    June 10, 2004

    In the News, 6/11/04

    Lou Cantori, Political Science, on Iranian TV
    Lou Cantori, professor of political science, appeared on Iranian television station Alalam TV on June 8. Cantori was interviewed by phone on the impact that the recent resignation of George Tenet will have on the CIA.

    President Hrabowski in the Kalamazoo Gazette
    On June 4, the Kalamazoo Gazette covered a speech President Hrabowski gave before the Kalamazoo Community Foundation. In his speech, President Hrabowski discussed the need to create higher academic expectations for American students, especially those from disadvantaged backgrounds.

    Alumnus Brian Dannelly in the News
    UMBC alum and filmmaker Brian Dannelly appeared on National Public Radio's Fresh Air on June 7 to discuss his new film, Saved!

    Dannelly also discussed Saved! in an article that appeared in the Baltimore City Paper on June 9.

    Mark Croatti, Political Science, in the Business Monthly
    Mark Croatti, adjunct professor of political science, was quoted on the political and economic impact of redeveloping historic Ellicott City's riverfront in a story about the economic development of the town that appeared in the June 2004 issue of the Business Monthly.

    Posted by dwinds1

    Kudos, 6/11/04

    Ellen Handler Spitz, Honors College, Awarded Fellowship
    Ellen Handler Spitz, Honors College professor of visual arts, was awarded one of six Clark Fellowships at the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute for this summer of 2004 in Williamstown, Massachusetts. This is a coveted fellowship for art historians from all over the world, and it enables them to write scholarly works in a peaceful and collegial setting.

    UMBC Students Among Regents Scholars Award Winners
    Three UMBC students have been awarded Regents Scholars Awards by the University System of Maryland. Danielle Allor has been named the Loughran Regents Scholar; Gregory Johnson has been named the Burgee Regents Scholar; and Michael Patoka has been named the Kelly Regents Scholar. These awards cover costs for in-state tuition and fees, room and board costs, and include a $500/semester stipend for books and educational costs.

    Two UMBC Students Named Goldwater Scholars
    Two UMBC students have been named Goldwater Scholars. Kenny Gibbs is a Meyerhoff Scholar with a 4.0 in biochemistry and molecular biology, and Aliya Frederick is a Meyerhoff Scholar with a 3.82 GPA in biochemistry and molecular biology. Nationally, there were a total of 310 scholarships awarded from a field of 1,113 nominees. Four UMBC students were nominated to this program.

    Claire Welty, CUERE, Named to Water Science and Technology Board
    Claire Welty, director of the Center for Urban Environmental Research and Education (CUERE) and professor of civil and environmental engineering, has been appointed to the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board, effective July 1, 2004, for a term of three years. The Water Science and Technology Board provides a focal point for studies related to water resources under the aegis of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering. The board's objective is to improve the scientific and technological basis for resolving important questions and issues associated with the efficient management and use of water resources. The scope of the board's work covers all dimensions of water resources, including science, engineering, economics, policy, educational issues and social aspects.

    Kathy O'Dell, Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences, Participating in Panel at Guggenheim
    Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences Kathy O'Dell will be participating in a panel discussion, "The Tactile Photograph," at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City on June 29. The panel addresses the ways in which tactility is evoked in photographs, whether through the representation of form or as an integral part of the creative process. The panel is being held in conjunction with the exhibition "Speaking With Hands: Photographs from the Buhl Collection," on display now through September 8.

    Khvalina, Canepa Named Academic All Americans
    Junior tennis standout Lana Khvalina was named to the District II First Team Women's At-Large Verizon Academic All America team.

    Senior swimmer Carlos Canepa earned Second Team All District II honors. The teams are selected by the College Sports Information Directors of America.

    Khvalina is seeking to become UMBC's first two-time First Team Academic All American. She was the lone sophomore in the nation to earn First Team honors in the Women's At-Large category last spring. Khvalina, who carries a 4.0 GPA in political science, earned her undergraduate degree in three years, and will attend William & Mary law school this fall. She finished her singles career with a record of 62-20 and reached the "B" flight singles final at the Old Point National Bank ITA Invitational last fall. A state finalist for a Rhodes Scholarship, the two-time All Conference honoree competed on two squads which went to the NCAA Championships (2002, 2003).

    Khvalina also recently earned a 2004 post-graduate scholarship from the Maryland Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics.

    Canepa spearheaded the men's swimming team's 12-1 record and helped UMBC capture the University's first America East Conference title this past winter. He won both the 500 and 1650 freestyle events and is currently training to compete for the Peruvian Olympic team. Canepa carries a 3.50 GPA in information systems.

    Posted by dwinds1

    Kudos, 6/11/04

    Ellen Handler Spitz, Honors College, Awarded Fellowship
    Ellen Handler Spitz, Honors College professor of visual arts, was awarded one of six Clark Fellowships at the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute for this summer of 2004 in Williamstown, Massachusetts. This is a coveted fellowship for art historians from all over the world, and it enables them to write scholarly works in a peaceful and collegial setting.

    UMBC Students Among Regents Scholars Award Winners
    Three UMBC students have been awarded Regents Scholars Awards by the University System of Maryland. Danielle Allor has been named the Loughran Regents Scholar; Gregory Johnson has been named the Burgee Regents Scholar; and Michael Patoka has been named the Kelly Regents Scholar. These awards cover costs for in-state tuition and fees, room and board costs, and include a $500/semester stipend for books and educational costs.

    Two UMBC Students Named Goldwater Scholars
    Two UMBC students have been named Goldwater Scholars. Kenny Gibbs is a Meyerhoff Scholar with a 4.0 in biochemistry and molecular biology, and Aliya Frederick is a Meyerhoff Scholar with a 3.82 GPA in biochemistry and molecular biology. Nationally, there were a total of 310 scholarships awarded from a field of 1,113 nominees. Four UMBC students were nominated to this program.

    Claire Welty, CUERE, Named to Water Science and Technology Board
    Claire Welty, director of the Center for Urban Environmental Research and Education (CUERE) and professor of civil and environmental engineering, has been appointed to the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board, effective July 1, 2004, for a term of three years. The Water Science and Technology Board provides a focal point for studies related to water resources under the aegis of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering. The board's objective is to improve the scientific and technological basis for resolving important questions and issues associated with the efficient management and use of water resources. The scope of the board's work covers all dimensions of water resources, including science, engineering, economics, policy, educational issues and social aspects.

    Kathy O'Dell, Arts & Sciences, Participating in Panel at Guggenheim
    Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences Kathy O'Dell will be participating in a panel discussion, "The Tactile Photograph," at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City on June 29. The panel addresses the ways in which tactility is evoked in photographs, whether through the representation of form or as an integral part of the creative process. The panel is being held in conjunction with the exhibition "Speaking With Hands: Photographs from the Buhl Collection," on display now through September 8.

    Khvalina, Canepa Named Academic All Americans
    Junior tennis standout Lana Khvalina was named to the District II First Team Women's At-Large Verizon Academic All America team.

    Senior swimmer Carlos Canepa earned Second Team All District II honors. The teams are selected by the College Sports Information Directors of America.

    Khvalina is seeking to become UMBC's first two-time First Team Academic All American. She was the lone sophomore in the nation to earn First Team honors in the Women's At-Large category last spring. Khvalina, who carries a 4.0 GPA in political science, earned her undergraduate degree in three years, and will attend William & Mary law school this fall. She finished her singles career with a record of 62-20 and reached the "B" flight singles final at the Old Point National Bank ITA Invitational last fall. A state finalist for a Rhodes Scholarship, the two-time All Conference honoree competed on two squads which went to the NCAA Championships (2002, 2003).

    Khvalina also recently earned a 2004 post-graduate scholarship from the Maryland Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics.

    Canepa spearheaded the men's swimming team's 12-1 record and helped UMBC capture the University's first America East Conference title this past winter. He won both the 500 and 1650 freestyle events and is currently training to compete for the Peruvian Olympic team. Canepa carries a 3.50 GPA in information systems.

    Posted by dwinds1

    Kudos, 6/11/04

    Ellen Handler Spitz, Honors College, Awarded Fellowship
    Ellen Handler Spitz, Honors College professor of visual arts, was awarded one of six Clark Fellowships at the Sterling and Francine Clark Art Institute for this summer of 2004 in Williamstown, Massachusetts. This is a coveted fellowship for art historians from all over the world, and it enables them to write scholarly works in a peaceful and collegial setting.

    UMBC Students Among Regents Scholars Award Winners
    Three UMBC students have been awarded Regents Scholars Awards by the University System of Maryland. Danielle Allor has been named the Loughran Regents Scholar; Gregory Johnson has been named the Burgee Regents Scholar; and Michael Patoka has been named the Kelly Regents Scholar. These awards cover costs for in-state tuition and fees, room and board costs, and include a $500/semester stipend for books and educational costs.

    Two UMBC Students Named Goldwater Scholars
    Two UMBC students have been named Goldwater Scholars. Kenny Gibbs is a Meyerhoff Scholar with a 4.0 in biochemistry and molecular biology, and Aliya Frederick is a Meyerhoff Scholar with a 3.82 GPA in biochemistry and molecular biology. Nationally, there were a total of 310 scholarships awarded from a field of 1,113 nominees. Four UMBC students were nominated to this program.

    Claire Welty, CUERE, Named to Water Science and Technology Board
    Claire Welty, Director of CUERE and Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, has been appointed to the National Research Council's Water Science and Technology Board, effective July 1, 2004, for a term of three years. The Water Science and Technology Board provides a focal point for studies related to water resources under the aegis of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering. The board's objective is to improve the scientific and technological basis for resolving important questions and issues associated with the efficient management and use of water resources. The scope of the board's work covers all dimensions of water resources, including science, engineering, economics, policy, educational issues and social aspects.

    Kathy O'Dell, Arts & Sciences, Participating in Panel at Guggenheim
    Associate Dean of Arts and Sciences Kathy O'Dell will be participating in a panel discussion, "The Tactile Photograph," at the Guggenheim Museum in New York City on June 29. The panel addresses the ways in which tactility is evoked in photographs, whether through the representation of form or as an integral part of the creative process. The panel is being held in conjunction with the exhibition "Speaking With Hands: Photographs from the Buhl Collection," on display now through September 8.

    Khvalina, Canepa Named Academic All Americans
    Junior tennis standout Lana Khvalina was named to the District II First Team Women's At-Large Verizon Academic All America team.

    Senior swimmer Carlos Canepa earned Second Team All District II honors. The teams are selected by the College Sports Information Directors of America.

    Khvalina is seeking to become UMBC's first two-time First Team Academic All American. She was the lone sophomore in the nation to earn First Team honors in the Women's At-Large category last spring. Khvalina, who carries a 4.0 GPA in political science, earned her undergraduate degree in three years, and will attend William & Mary law school this fall. She finished her singles career with a record of 62-20 and reached the "B" flight singles final at the Old Point National Bank ITA Invitational last fall. A state finalist for a Rhodes Scholarship, the two-time All Conference honoree competed on two squads which went to the NCAA Championships (2002, 2003).

    Khvalina also recently earned a 2004 post-graduate scholarship from the Maryland Association of Collegiate Directors of Athletics.

    Canepa spearheaded the men's swimming team's 12-1 record and helped UMBC capture the University's first America East Conference title this past winter. He won both the 500 and 1650 freestyle events and is currently training to compete for the Peruvian Olympic team. Canepa carries a 3.50 GPA in information systems.

    Posted by dwinds1

    June 03, 2004

    Nafi Shahegh and Gary Rupert Named Employees of the Quarter

    The Department of Human Resources has announced UMBC's first Employee ofthe Quarter award recipients. Nafi Shahegh, an administrative assistant II for the Departments of Philosophy and Ancient Studies, is the nonexempt Employee of the Quarter. Gary Rupert, the senior major gifts officer in the Office of Institutional Advancement, is the exempt Employee of the Quarter.

    The Department of Human Resources has announced UMBC's first Employee ofthe Quarter award recipients.

    Nafi Shahegh, an administrative assistant II for the Departments of Philosophy and Ancient Studies, is the nonexempt Employee of the Quarter. She has 12 years of service at UMBC, beginning as a contractual employee with the education department. Since then, Shahegh has also worked for the history and physics departments before coming to philosophy in May 2000. Last summer, she was assigned to handle the administrative affairs for both the philosophy and ancient studies departments.

    Shahegh acknowledges that it was a significant challenge to take on the administrative responsibilities for two departments, but, according to those who work with her, she has managed the added workload with competence and grace. Says Terry Aylsworth, executive administrative assistant in the College of Arts and Sciences, "Nafi is a dedicated UMBC employee. She has taken on two departments without complaint and has managed them beautifully, asking for nothing in return. She has taken a difficult situation and managed to make everyone extremely happy."

    Despite these kind words, Shahegh never expected to be honored for her work. "I was very surprised when I was informed about the award," she says. "I am very proud to be one of the first to be given the new Employee of the Quarter award and it feels good that my colleagues recognize the effort I put into my work."

    Gary Rupert, the senior major gifts officer in the Office of Institutional Advancement, is the exempt Employee of the Quarter.

    Rupert came to UMBC as the associate director of athletics and has been working in Institutional Advancement for nearly 15 years. Under his leadership, both the alumni and faculty/staff fundraising campaigns have exceeded their goals, with the last faculty/staff campaign raising over $1 million.

    David Moore, a former colleague from the Office of Institutional Advancement, says, "Because people know Gary cares, they feel comfortable talking with him about philanthropic support. People also know that Gary is not just there for their money. He builds relationships with people across the campus in all capacities. He knows that faculty and staff contribute in many ways beyond their dollar-they give of their time, their talent and, like Gary, they give of their heart."

    "It's always nice to be recognized by one's peers," says Rupert, reflecting on this honor. "But it's even nicer to be rewarded for something you love doing. I believe in UMBC, which makes it very easy to do my job well."

    Each recipient will receive a check for $500, a personalized parking space, one day of administrative leave, a certificate, his/her name on the Employee of the Quarter plaque and an invitation to the annual luncheon for all the recipients.

    Human Resources offers special thanks to everyone that nominated an employee for the award and encourages members of the campus community to nominate employees deserving of the award. Nominations received during the first quarter are eligible for consideration throughout 2004. The next Employee of the Quarter award will be given in August. Nomination forms and additional information may be found on the Human Resources Web site: www.umbc.edu/hr/EOQ.html.

    Posted by dwinds1

    In the News, 6/4/04

    Tom Schaller, Political Science, In the News
    Assistant professor of political science Tom Schaller appeared on May 29 on "The Laura Flanders Show," which airs weekend evenings on Air America Radio. The topic of discussion for the show was the recent increase in gas prices and the political impact of higher gas prices.

    Schaller also appears in the June 2004 issue of Baltimore magazine as the author of a profile of Ken Mehlman, a Pikesville native who is now manager for the Bush-Cheney '04 campaign. The article is not available online.

    Claudia Morrell, CWIT, in Tech Target
    Claudia Morrell, director of CWIT, was quoted in an article on opportunities for women in information technology careers that appeared on May 26 in Tech Target.

    Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery Photography Exhibit in The Sun
    The current exhibit on display at the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery, "We Shall Overcome: Photographs from the American Civil Rights Era," was featured in The Sun on June 1.

    Lou Cantori, Political Science, In the News
    Professor of Political Science Lou Cantori discussed the current political situation in the Sudan on June 2 on the radio show, "The Breakfast Club," which is broadcast throughout the Caribbean from Jamaica's Hot 102 FM.

    Cantori also was a guest in a discussion on the war in Iraq on May 25 that was broadcast on "AirTalk," a radio show produced by Los Angeles NPR affiliate KPCC.

    President Hrabowski on WBFF Fox 45 News
    President Hrabowski appeared on June 2 on WBFF Fox 45's nightly news. In the segment, President Hrabowski discusses the need for higher standards in public education, especially for minority students.

    Endowment Honoring Professor Joseph Arnold Featured in Catonsville Times
    On June 2, the Catonsville Times featured a story on the Albin O. Kuhn Library's new Joseph L. Arnold Endowment. The endowment, established in honor of the late Joseph L. Arnold, professor of history, will support a Maryland history collection, also named in memory of Professor Arnold.

    Posted by dwinds1

    Kudos, 6/4/04

    Christopher Corbett, English, Reading at Chicago's Printer's Row Book Fair
    The English Department's Christopher Corbett will be reading this weekend (June 5-6) at the Printer's Row Book Fair in Chicago. Corbett will read from Orphans Preferred: The Twisted Truth and Lasting Legend of the Pony Express (Random House/Broadway Books). Sponsored by the Chicago Tribune, the Printer's Row Book Fair is the nation's second largest book festival and is the largest free literary event in the Midwest--featuring five tented blocks in the historic Printer's Row district. Annually, the Book Fair offers more than 90 free literary programs including readings and book-signings by famous authors, panel discussions of cutting edge issues, non-stop poetry readings, a Writers' Marketplace and two full days of children's programming.

    Franklin Berry, Men's Lacrosse, Selected to Play in North-South Classic
    Senior midfielder Franklin Berry has been selected to play in the United States Intercollegiate Lacrosse Association's 63rd annual North-South Classic, which will be held at Nazareth College in Rochester, New York on Saturday, June 12.

    Berry, one of the Retrievers' tri-captains this season, recorded a career high 13 goals and 20 points in his final campaign. During his four seasons as a Retriever, Berry competed in all 51 games and tallied 34 goals and 18 assists for a total of 52 points.

    Kenneth Dovale, Residential Life, Presents at Conference
    Kenneth Dovale, community director in the Office of Residential Life, recently presented at the University of Maryland College Park Black Faculty and Staff Association's 17th Annual Conference for African Americans in Higher Education. His presentation was titled "Reviewing Our Past to Redefine Our Future: Hip Hop and Academic Excellence."

    NCAA President Myles Brand Visits UMBC
    NCAA President Myles Brand came to UMBC on May 30 for the NCAA Youth Education through Sports (YES) lacrosse clinic. The NCAA hosts YES clinics at various NCAA championship sites across the nation allowing young people from ages 10-18 to work with college student-athletes and coaches on sports skills development while emphasizing NCAA principles of fair play, character, learning, balance, spirit and community.

    Posted by dwinds1

    In the News, 6/4/04

    Tom Schaller, Political Science, In the News
    Assistant Professor of Political Science Tom Schaller appeared on May 29 on "The Laura Flanders Show," which airs weekend evenings on Air America Radio. The topic of discussion for the show was the recent increase in gas prices and the political impact of higher gas prices.

    Schaller also appears in the June 2004 issue of Baltimore magazine as the author of a profile of Ken Mehlman, a Pikesville native who is now manager for the Bush-Cheney '04 campaign. The article is not available online.

    Claudia Morrell, CWIT, in Tech Target
    Claudia Morrell, director of CWIT, was quoted in an article on opportunities for women in information technology careers that appeared on May 26 in Tech Target.

    Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery Photography Exhibit in The Sun
    The current exhibit on display at the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery, "We Shall Overcome: Photographs from the American Civil Rights Era," was featured in The Sun on June 1.

    Lou Cantori, Political Science, In the News
    Professor of Political Science Lou Cantori discussed the current political situation in the Sudan on June 2 on the radio show, "The Breakfast Club," which is broadcast throughout the Caribbean from Jamaica's Hot 102 FM.

    Cantori also was a guest in a discussion on the war in Iraq on May 25 that was broadcast on "AirTalk," a radio show produced by Los Angeles NPR affiliate KPCC.

    President Hrabowski on WBFF Fox 45 News
    President Hrabowski appeared on June 2 on WBFF Fox 45's nightly news. In the segment, he discusses the need for higher standards in public education, especially for minority students.

    Endowment Honoring Professor Joseph Arnold Featured in Catonsville Times
    On June 2, the Catonsville Times featured a story on the Albin O. Kuhn Library's new Joseph L. Arnold Endowment. The endowment, established in honor of the late Joseph L. Arnold, professor of history, will support a Maryland history collection, also named in memory of Professor Arnold.

    Posted by dwinds1

    UMBC Graduates Over 2,400 Students at May Commencement Ceremonies

    UMBC awarded degrees to 2,226 undergraduates and nearly 200 graduate students from the Class of 2004 during the University's 42nd commencement ceremonies on May 19 and May 20.

    The UMBC Class of 2004 includes students headed to prestigious graduate programs at universities including Princeton, Stanford, Johns Hopkins, UNC-Chapel Hill, William & Mary, Rice and Columbia. Graduates have secured jobs across a wide spectrum of corporations, nonprofits and government agencies, including IBM, Northrop Grumman, Booz Allen Hamilton, ABC News, Titan Systems and SAIC.

    Anthony Hoffman, who maintained a 4.0 GPA while earning a B.S. in physics with a minor in mathematics, is UMBC's 2004 valedictorian. He will begin Princeton University's Ph.D. program in electrical engineering this fall on a Princeton Graduate School Endowed Fellowship.

    Hoffman says he chose to attend UMBC because of opportunities to conduct research in the new Physics building's facilities. Another strong draw was the dedication of UMBC's faculty. "The professors here seemed the most welcoming," Hoffman says. "They aren't just teachers; they reach out to mentor students."

    Also graduating was former University System of Maryland student regent Phil Shockley, a double major in political science and information systems. Shockley, who served as UMBC Student Government Association president during the 2002-03 academic year, was just the second student in UMBC history to be named to the Board of Regents, and holds the distinction of being the only student regent to never miss a meeting. While serving on the Board, Shockley became known as a consistent voice for students during state budget cuts to higher education and resulting tuition increases.

    The Graduate School Commencement speaker was Dr. William A. Haseltine, chairman and chief executive officer of Human Genome Sciences, Inc. (HGSI). Haseltine, who founded HGSI in 1992, is a former professor at Harvard's schools of medicine and public health. He has received numerous honors and awards for his cancer and AIDS research and work in the field of regenerative medicine and is active on many corporate boards and civic organizations. Haseltine received a doctorate of science at the Graduate School ceremony.

    At the Undergraduate Commencement ceremony, Ursula M. Burns, president of Business Group Operations and corporate senior vice president at Xerox Corporation, delivered the keynote address to the Class of 2004. President Freeman A. Hrabowski presented Burns with her first honorary degree, a doctorate of engineering. Burns' career highlights include being named to Fortune magazine's 2002 list of "Most Powerful Black Executives;" Time magazine/CNN's annual list of "Global Business Influentials;" and U.S. Black Engineering & Information Technology magazine's 2004 list of the "50 Most Important African-Americans in Technology."

    Posted by dwinds1

    UMBC Historian Awarded Top Honor in Field

    Warren I. Cohen, distinguished university professor of history at UMBC, has been awarded one of the top honors given to American historians--the Norman and Laura Graebner Prize of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. Given every two years, the Graebner Prize is a career achievement honor that recognizes a senior historian of U.S. foreign relations who has made significant contributions to the field through excellence in teaching, scholarship and service.

    Warren I. Cohen, distinguished university professor of history at UMBC, has been awarded one of the top honors given to American historians--the Norman and Laura Graebner Prize of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. Cohen is the ninth person to ever win the award.

    Given every two years, the Graebner Prize is a career achievement honor that recognizes a senior historian of U.S. foreign relations who has made significant contributions to the field through excellence in teaching, scholarship and service. The award was established by the former students of Norman A. Graebner, professor of diplomatic history at the University of Illinois and the University of Virginia, to honor Graebner and his wife Laura for their years of devotion to teaching and research.

    Cohen is one of the world's leading experts on the history of American-East Asian relations. He has been a pioneer in the study of U.S.-Chinese relations as a bilateral phenomenon, examining closely the Chinese side of the relationship. He has also been a keen observer and, at times, harsh critic of evolving American policy on the Korean Peninsula.

    A prolific writer, Cohen is author or editor of some 17 books, including the recently published fourth edition (revised) of his book, America's Response to China, which continues to be a standard text on the history of Chinese-American relations, used by officials of the U.S. and Chinese governments, as well as by students and scholars of both countries.

    He was general editor of the authoritative Cambridge History of American Foreign Policy, and author of the concluding book in the series, America in the Age of Soviet Power, 1945-1991.

    Most recently, the Harvard University Press published his book, The Asian American Century, which has already been published in Japanese and Italian versions. In addition to his scholarly publications, Cohen writes for the Atlantic Monthly, Times Literary Supplement, and the Nation, as well as many of the nation's leading newspapers.

    "Professor Cohen is quite accurately described by his peers as a towering figure among historians of American foreign relations," says John Jeffries, professor and chair of history at UMBC. "The recipient of numerous prizes and awards, he is one of the most distinguished and accomplished historians in the United States, and he is a superb teacher as well. We are delighted to have a scholar of his stature on our faculty."

    Cohen came to UMBC in 1993 as distinguished university professor of history. He was named a presidential research professor at UMBC for 2001 through 2004.

    In 1994, he was appointed the first scholar-in-residence at the National Foreign Affairs Training Center at the U.S. State Department. Shortly thereafter he served a term as director and is now senior scholar in the Asia Program at the Smithsonian's Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Cohen holds a BA from Columbia University, a master's degree from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy of Tufts University and a Ph.D. from the University of Washington.

    Posted by dwinds1

    Roots of Iraqi Prison Abuse Seen in Famous 60's Psychology Experiments

    As news coverage of the abuse and torture of Iraqi POWs at Baghdad's Abu Ghraib Prison continues, many Americans are trying to fathom what made the accused U.S. soldiers behave so inhumanely towards other human beings.More puzzling still is the question of why some soldiers blew the whistle while others carried out violations of the Geneva Conventions so routinely that souvenir snapshots were taken.

    There are many historical precedents of soldiers "just following orders" and comparisons to My Lai and the Holocaust have already been made in the mass media, but perhaps the most troubling questions about Abu Ghraib are the underlying ones about human nature and authority.

    Thomas Blass, UMBC professor of psychology, thinks many of the answers lie in his research and writing about the work of Dr. Stanley Milgram, one of the most controversial psychologists in modern history, known for his experiments on obedience to authority.

    "We should all be shocked by the sheer humiliating, degrading aspect of it," Blass said in a recent Houston Chronicle interview about the abuse at Abu Ghraib, "But...I'm not that surprised, given what we know about the power of an authority whom a person accepts as legitimate enough to dictate my behavior."

    Milgram is best known for his "Obedience Experiments" carried out at Yale University in the 1960's. These experiments showed how 65 percent of test subjects repeatedly gave seemingly real and painful electrical shocks to another subject (actually an actor) just because a scientific authority figure running the experiment commanded them to.

    Blass, a social psychologist and Hungarian-born Holocaust survivor, has studied Milgram for 15 years and authored over 20 publications and an equal number of academic papers on Milgram's life and work, including a recent article for Psychology Today.

    Blass recently completed The Man Who Shocked the World: The Life and Legacy of Stanley Milgram (Basic Books, 2004), which Library Journal called "among the best biographies of psychologists...highly recommended." He also runs the website www.stanleymilgram.com, devoted to preserving Milgram's legacy and connecting his research to current events.

    In 1965, Milgram, who is also famous for originating the "small world" or "Six Degrees of Separation" method, summed up his infamous obedience experiments with an observation that still echoes through today's headlines:

    "A substantial proportion of people do what they are told to do, irrespective of the content of the act and without limitations of conscience, so long as they perceive that the command comes from a legitimate authority," Milgram said.

    For more information on Blass, his book and Stanley Milgram, please visit www.stanleymilgram.com.

    Posted by dwinds1

    May 27, 2004

    UMBC Historian Awarded Top Honor in Field

    Warren I. Cohen, distinguished university professor of history at UMBC, has been awarded one of the top honors given to American historians-the Norman and Laura Graebner Prize of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. Cohen is the ninth person to ever win the award.

    Warren I. Cohen, distinguished university professor of history at UMBC, has been awarded one of the top honors given to American historians--the Norman and Laura Graebner Prize of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. Cohen is the ninth person to ever win the award.

    Given every two years, the Graebner Prize is a career achievement honor that recognizes a senior historian of U.S. foreign relations who has made significant contributions to the field through excellence in teaching, scholarship and service. The award was established by the former students of Norman A. Graebner, professor of diplomatic history at the University of Illinois and the University of Virginia, to honor Graebner and his wife Laura for their years of devotion to teaching and research.

    Cohen is one of the world's leading experts on the history of American-East Asian relations. He has been a pioneer in the study of U.S.-Chinese relations as a bilateral phenomenon, examining closely the Chinese side of the relationship. He has also been a keen observer and, at times, harsh critic of evolving American policy on the Korean Peninsula.

    A prolific writer, Cohen is author or editor of some 17 books, including the recently published fourth edition (revised) of his book, America's Response to China, which continues to be a standard text on the history of Chinese-American relations, used by officials of the U.S. and Chinese governments, as well as by students and scholars of both countries.

    He was general editor of the authoritative Cambridge History of American Foreign Policy, and author of the concluding book in the series, America in the Age of Soviet Power, 1945-1991.

    Most recently, the Harvard University Press published his book, The Asian American Century, which has already been published in Japanese and Italian versions. In addition to his scholarly publications, Cohen writes for the Atlantic Monthly, Times Literary Supplement, and the Nation, as well as many of the nation's leading newspapers.

    "Professor Cohen is quite accurately described by his peers as a towering figure among historians of American foreign relations," says John Jeffries, professor and chair of history at UMBC. "The recipient of numerous prizes and awards, he is one of the most distinguished and accomplished historians in the United States, and he is a superb teacher as well. We are delighted to have a scholar of his stature on our faculty."

    Cohen came to UMBC in 1993 as distinguished university professor of history. He was named a presidential research professor at UMBC for 2001 through 2004.

    In 1994, he was appointed the first scholar-in-residence at the National Foreign Affairs Training Center at the U.S. State Department. Shortly thereafter he served a term as director and is now senior scholar in the Asia Program at the Smithsonian's Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Cohen holds a BA from Columbia University, a master's degree from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy of Tufts University and a Ph.D. from the University of Washington.

    Posted by dwinds1

    UMBC Historian Awarded Top Honor in Field

    Warren I. Cohen, distinguished university professor of history at UMBC, has been awarded one of the top honors given to American historians--the Norman and Laura Graebner Prize of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. Cohen is the ninth person to ever win the award.

    Warren I. Cohen, distinguished university professor of history at UMBC, has been awarded one of the top honors given to American historians-- the Norman and Laura Graebner Prize of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. Cohen is the ninth person to ever win the award.

    Given every two years, the Graebner Prize is a career achievement honor that recognizes a senior historian of U.S. foreign relations who has made significant contributions to the field through excellence in teaching, scholarship and service. The award was established by the former students of Norman A. Graebner, professor of diplomatic history at the University of Illinois and the University of Virginia, to honor Graebner and his wife Laura for their years of devotion to teaching and research.

    Cohen is one of the world's leading experts on the history of American-East Asian relations. He has been a pioneer in the study of U.S.-Chinese relations as a bilateral phenomenon, examining closely the Chinese side of the relationship. He has also been a keen observer and, at times, harsh critic of evolving American policy on the Korean Peninsula.

    A prolific writer, Cohen is author or editor of some 17 books, including the recently published fourth edition (revised) of his book, America's Response to China, which continues to be a standard text on the history of Chinese-American relations, used by officials of the U.S. and Chinese governments, as well as by students and scholars of both countries.

    He was general editor of the authoritative Cambridge History of American Foreign Policy, and author of the concluding book in the series, America in the Age of Soviet Power, 1945-1991.

    Most recently, the Harvard University Press published his book, The Asian American Century, which has already been published in Japanese and Italian versions. In addition to his scholarly publications, Cohen writes for the Atlantic Monthly, Times Literary Supplement, and the Nation, as well as many of the nation's leading newspapers.

    "Professor Cohen is quite accurately described by his peers as a towering figure among historians of American foreign relations," says John Jeffries, professor and chair of history at UMBC. "The recipient of numerous prizes and awards, he is one of the most distinguished and accomplished historians in the United States, and he is a superb teacher as well. We are delighted to have a scholar of his stature on our faculty."

    Cohen came to UMBC in 1993 as distinguished university professor of history. He was named a presidential research professor at UMBC for 2001 through 2004.

    In 1994, he was appointed the first scholar-in-residence at the National Foreign Affairs Training Center at the U.S. State Department. Shortly thereafter he served a term as director and is now senior scholar in the Asia Program at the Smithsonian's Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Cohen holds a B.A. from Columbia University, a master's degree from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy of Tufts University, and a Ph.D. from the University of Washington.

    Posted by dwinds1

    May 26, 2004

    UMBC Historian Awarded Top Honor in Field

    Warren I. Cohen, Distinguished University Professor of History at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), has been awarded one of the top honors given to American historians the Norman and Laura Graebner Prize of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. Cohen is the ninth person to ever win the award.

    Warren I. Cohen, Distinguished University Professor of History at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), has been awarded one of the top honors given to American historians the Norman and Laura Graebner Prize of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations. Cohen is the ninth person to ever win the award.

    Given every two years, the Graebner Prize is a career achievement honor that recognizes a senior historian of U.S. foreign relations who has made significant contributions to the field through excellence in teaching, scholarship and service. The award was established by the former students of Norman A. Graebner, professor of diplomatic history at the University of Illinois and the University of Virginia, to honor Graebner and his wife Laura for their years of devotion to teaching and research.

    Cohen is one of the world's leading experts on the history of American-East Asian relations. He has been a pioneer in the study of U.S.-Chinese relations as a bilateral phenomenon, examining closely the Chinese side of the relationship. He has also been a keen observer and, at times, harsh critic of evolving American policy on the Korean Peninsula.

    A prolific writer, Cohen is author or editor of some 17 books, including the recently published fourth edition (revised) of his book, America's Response to China, which continues to be a standard text on the history of Chinese-American relations, used by officials of the U.S. and Chinese governments, as well as by students and scholars of both countries.

    He was general editor of the authoritative Cambridge History of American Foreign Policy, and author of the concluding book in the series, America in the Age of Soviet Power, 1945-1991.

    Most recently, the Harvard University Press published his book, The Asian American Century, which has already been published in Japanese and Italian versions. In addition to his scholarly publications, Cohen writes for the Atlantic Monthly, Times Literary Supplement, and the Nation, as well as many of the nation's leading newspapers.

    "Professor Cohen is quite accurately described by his peers as a towering figure among historians of American foreign relations," says John Jeffries, professor and chair of History at UMBC. "The recipient of numerous prizes and awards, he is one of the most distinguished and accomplished historians in the United States, and he is a superb teacher as well. We are delighted to have a scholar of his stature on our faculty."

    Cohen came to UMBC in 1993 as Distinguished University Professor of History. He was named a Presidential Research Professor at UMBC for 2001 through 2004.

    In 1994, he was appointed the first Scholar-in-Residence at the National Foreign Affairs Training Center at the U.S. State Department. Shortly thereafter he served a term as director and is now Senior Scholar in the Asia Program at the Smithsonian's Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars. Cohen holds a BA from Columbia University, a master's degree from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy of Tufts University, and a Ph.D. from the University of Washington.

    Posted by dwinds1

    May 18, 2004

    UMBC to Graduate Over 1,100 Students This Week

    UMBC will award degrees to 950 undergraduates and nearly 200 graduate students from the Class of 2004 during the University's 42nd commencement ceremonies to be held Wednesday, May 19 and Thursday, May 20.

    The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) will awarddegrees to 950 undergraduates and nearly 200 graduate students from the Class of 2004during the University's 42nd commencement ceremonies to be held Wednesday, May 19and Thursday, May 20.

    Graduate student commencement will be held Wednesday, May 19 at 10 a.m. on theUMBC campus at the Retriever Activities Center (RAC.) Dr. William A. Haseltine, Chairman and ChiefExecutive Officer of Human Genome Sciences, Inc. (HGSI), will be the keynote speaker.

    The undergraduate ceremony will be held on Thursday, May 20, at 1 p.m., at the 1stMariner Arena (formerly Baltimore Arena) in downtown Baltimore. Ursula M. Burns, President of Business Group Operations and Corporate SeniorVice President at Xerox Corporation, will deliver the commencement keynote address tothe Class of 2004.

    At this spring's ceremonies, UMBC will award degrees in disciplines ranging fromphysics to visual arts, biological sciences to information systems. The UMBC Class of2004 includes students headed to prestigious graduate programs at universities includingPrinceton, Stanford, Johns Hopkins, UNC-Chapel Hill, William & Mary, Rice andColumbia.

    UMBC graduates have secured jobs across a wide spectrum of corporations, nonprofitsand government agencies, including IBM, Northrop Grumman, Booz Allen Hamilton,ABC News, Titan Systems and SAIC.

    Anthony Hoffman, UMBC's 2004 valedictorian, will alsospeak at Thursday's ceremony. Hoffman, who maintained a 4.0 GPA while earning aB.S. in physics with a minor in mathematics, will begin Princeton University's Ph.D.program in electrical engineering this fall on a Princeton Graduate School EndowedFellowship.

    Hoffman, whose ultimate goal is to become a NASA astronaut, says he chose to attendUMBC because of opportunities to conduct research in the new Physics building'sfacilities. Another strong draw was the dedication of UMBC's faculty. "The professorshere seemed the most welcoming," Hoffman says. "They aren't just teachers; they reachout to mentor students."

    Also graduating on Thursday is former University System of Maryland student regent Phil Shockley, a double major in PoliticalScience and Information Systems. Shockley also served as UMBC Student GovernmentAssociation president.

    Shockley was just the second student in UMBC history to be named to the Board ofRegents, and holds the distinction of being the only student regent to never miss ameeting. While serving on the Board, Shockley became known as a consistent voice forstudents during state budget cuts to higher education and resulting tuition increases.

    Commencement Speakers

    Haseltine, who founded HGSI in 1992, is a former professor at Harvard's schools ofmedicine and public health. He has received numerous honors and awards for his cancerand AIDS research and work in the field of regenerative medicine and is active on manycorporate boards and civic organizations.

    At Thursday's ceremony, UMBC President Freeman A. Hrabowski will present Burnswith her first honorary degree, a doctorate of engineering. Burns' career highlightsinclude being named to Fortune magazine's 2002 list of "Most Powerful BlackExecutives;" Time magazine/CNN's annual list of "Global Business Influentials;" andU.S. Black Engineering & Information Technology magazine's 2004 list of the "50 MostImportant African-Americans in Technology."

    For more information on UMBC Commencement Ceremonies, please visit: http://www.umbc.edu/commencement

    Posted by dwinds1

    UMBC to Graduate Over 1,100 Students This Week

    UMBC will awarddegrees to 950 undergraduates and nearly 200 graduate students from the Class of 2004during the University's 42nd commencement ceremonies to be held Wednesday, May 19and Thursday, May 20.

    The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) will awarddegrees to 950 undergraduates and nearly 200 graduate students from the Class of 2004during the University's 42nd commencement ceremonies to be held Wednesday, May 19and Thursday, May 20.

    Graduate student commencement will be held Wednesday, May 19 at 10 a.m. on theUMBC campus at the Retriever Activities Center (RAC.) Dr. William A. Haseltine, Chairman and ChiefExecutive Officer of Human Genome Sciences, Inc. (HGSI), will be the keynote speaker.

    The undergraduate ceremony will be held on Thursday, May 20, at 1 p.m., at the 1stMariner Arena (formerly Baltimore Arena) in downtown Baltimore. Ursula M. Burns, President of Business Group Operations and Corporate SeniorVice President at Xerox Corporation, will deliver the commencement keynote address tothe Class of 2004.

    At this spring's ceremonies, UMBC will award degrees in disciplines ranging fromphysics to visual arts, biological sciences to information systems. The UMBC Class of2004 includes students headed to prestigious graduate programs at universities includingPrinceton, Stanford, Johns Hopkins, UNC-Chapel Hill, William & Mary, Rice andColumbia.

    UMBC graduates have secured jobs across a wide spectrum of corporations, nonprofitsand government agencies, including IBM, Northrop Grumman, Booz Allen Hamilton,ABC News, Titan Systems and SAIC.

    Anthony Hoffman, UMBC's 2004 valedictorian, will alsospeak at Thursday's ceremony. Hoffman, who maintained a 4.0 GPA while earning aB.S. in physics with a minor in mathematics, will begin Princeton University's Ph.D.program in electrical engineering this fall on a Princeton Graduate School EndowedFellowship.

    Hoffman, whose ultimate goal is to become a NASA astronaut, says he chose to attendUMBC because of opportunities to conduct research in the new Physics building'sfacilities. Another strong draw was the dedication of UMBC's faculty. "The professorshere seemed the most welcoming," Hoffman says. "They aren't just teachers; they reachout to mentor students."

    Also graduating on Thursday is former University System of Maryland student regent Phil Shockley, a double major in PoliticalScience and Information Systems. Shockley also served as UMBC Student GovernmentAssociation president.

    Shockley was just the second student in UMBC history to be named to the Board ofRegents, and holds the distinction of being the only student regent to never miss ameeting. While serving on the Board, Shockley became known as a consistent voice forstudents during state budget cuts to higher education and resulting tuition increases.

    Commencement Speakers

    Haseltine, who founded HGSI in 1992, is a former professor at Harvard's schools ofmedicine and public health. He has received numerous honors and awards for his cancerand AIDS research and work in the field of regenerative medicine and is active on manycorporate boards and civic organizations.

    At Thursday's ceremony, UMBC President Freeman A. Hrabowski will present Burnswith her first honorary degree, a doctorate of engineering. Burns' career highlightsinclude being named to Fortune magazine's 2002 list of "Most Powerful BlackExecutives;" Time magazine/CNN's annual list of "Global Business Influentials;" andU.S. Black Engineering & Information Technology magazine's 2004 list of the "50 MostImportant African-Americans in Technology."

    For more information on UMBC Commencement Ceremonies, please visit: http://www.umbc.edu/commencement

    Posted by dwinds1

    UMBC to Graduate Over 2,400 Students This Week

    The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) will awarddegrees to 2,226 undergraduates and nearly 200 graduate students from the Class of 2004during the University's 42nd commencement ceremonies to be held Wednesday, May 19and Thursday, May 20.

    The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) will awarddegrees to 2,226 undergraduates and nearly 200 graduate students from the Class of 2004during the University's 42nd commencement ceremonies to be held Wednesday, May 19and Thursday, May 20.

    Graduate student commencement will be held Wednesday, May 19 at 10 a.m. on theUMBC campus at the Retriever Activities Center (RAC.) Dr. William A. Haseltine, Chairman and ChiefExecutive Officer of Human Genome Sciences, Inc. (HGSI), will be the keynote speaker.

    The undergraduate ceremony will be held on Thursday, May 20, at 1 p.m., at the 1stMariner Arena (formerly Baltimore Arena) in downtown Baltimore. Ursula M. Burns, President of Business Group Operations and Corporate SeniorVice President at Xerox Corporation, will deliver the commencement keynote address tothe Class of 2004.

    At this spring's ceremonies, UMBC will award degrees in disciplines ranging fromphysics to visual arts, biological sciences to information systems. The UMBC Class of2004 includes students headed to prestigious graduate programs at universities includingPrinceton, Stanford, Johns Hopkins, UNC-Chapel Hill, William & Mary, Rice andColumbia.

    UMBC graduates have secured jobs across a wide spectrum of corporations, nonprofitsand government agencies, including IBM, Northrop Grumman, Booz Allen Hamilton,ABC News, Titan Systems and SAIC.

    Anthony Hoffman, UMBC's 2004 valedictorian, will alsospeak at Thursday's ceremony. Hoffman, who maintained a 4.0 GPA while earning aB.S. in physics with a minor in mathematics, will begin Princeton University's Ph.D.program in electrical engineering this fall on a Princeton Graduate School EndowedFellowship.

    Hoffman, whose ultimate goal is to become a NASA astronaut, says he chose to attendUMBC because of opportunities to conduct research in the new Physics building'sfacilities. Another strong draw was the dedication of UMBC's faculty. "The professorshere seemed the most welcoming," Hoffman says. "They aren't just teachers; they reachout to mentor students."

    Also graduating on Thursday is former University System of Maryland student regent Phil Shockley, a double major in PoliticalScience and Information Systems. Shockley also served as UMBC Student GovernmentAssociation president.

    Shockley was just the second student in UMBC history to be named to the Board ofRegents, and holds the distinction of being the only student regent to never miss ameeting. While serving on the Board, Shockley became known as a consistent voice forstudents during state budget cuts to higher education and resulting tuition increases.

    Commencement Speakers

    Haseltine, who founded HGSI in 1992, is a former professor at Harvard's schools ofmedicine and public health. He has received numerous honors and awards for his cancerand AIDS research and work in the field of regenerative medicine and is active on manycorporate boards and civic organizations.

    At Thursday's ceremony, UMBC President Freeman A. Hrabowski will present Burnswith her first honorary degree, a doctorate of engineering. Burns' career highlightsinclude being named to Fortune magazine's 2002 list of "Most Powerful BlackExecutives;" Time magazine/CNN's annual list of "Global Business Influentials;" andU.S. Black Engineering & Information Technology magazine's 2004 list of the "50 MostImportant African-Americans in Technology."

    For more information on UMBC Commencement Ceremonies, please visit: http://www.umbc.edu/commencement

    Posted by dwinds1

    UMBC to Graduate Over 2,400 Students This Week

The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) will award degrees to 2,226 undergraduates and nearly 200 graduate students from the Class of 2004 during the University's 42nd commencement ceremonies to be held Wednesday, May 19 and Thursday, May 20.

The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) will awarddegrees to 2,226 undergraduates and nearly 200 graduate students from the Class of 2004during the University's 42nd commencement ceremonies to be held Wednesday, May 19and Thursday, May 20.

Graduate student commencement will be held Wednesday, May 19 at 10 a.m. on theUMBC campus at the Retriever Activities Center (RAC.) Dr. William A. Haseltine, Chairman and ChiefExecutive Officer of Human Genome Sciences, Inc. (HGSI), will be the keynote speaker.

The undergraduate ceremony will be held on Thursday, May 20, at 1 p.m., at the 1stMariner Arena (formerly Baltimore Arena) in downtown Baltimore. Ursula M. Burns, President of Business Group Operations and Corporate SeniorVice President at Xerox Corporation, will deliver the commencement keynote address tothe Class of 2004.

At this spring's ceremonies, UMBC will award degrees in disciplines ranging fromphysics to visual arts, biological sciences to information systems. The UMBC Class of2004 includes students headed to prestigious graduate programs at universities includingPrinceton, Stanford, Johns Hopkins, UNC-Chapel Hill, William & Mary, Rice andColumbia.

UMBC graduates have secured jobs across a wide spectrum of corporations, nonprofitsand government agencies, including IBM, Northrop Grumman, Booz Allen Hamilton,ABC News, Titan Systems and SAIC.

Anthony Hoffman, UMBC's 2004 valedictorian, will alsospeak at Thursday's ceremony. Hoffman, who maintained a 4.0 GPA while earning aB.S. in physics with a minor in mathematics, will begin Princeton University's Ph.D.program in electrical engineering this fall on a Princeton Graduate School EndowedFellowship.

Hoffman, whose ultimate goal is to become a NASA astronaut, says he chose to attendUMBC because of opportunities to conduct research in the new Physics building'sfacilities. Another strong draw was the dedication of UMBC's faculty. "The professorshere seemed the most welcoming," Hoffman says. "They aren't just teachers; they reachout to mentor students."

Also graduating on Thursday is former University System of Maryland student regent Phil Shockley, a double major in PoliticalScience and Information Systems. Shockley also served as UMBC Student GovernmentAssociation president.

Shockley was just the second student in UMBC history to be named to the Board ofRegents, and holds the distinction of being the only student regent to never miss ameeting. While serving on the Board, Shockley became known as a consistent voice forstudents during state budget cuts to higher education and resulting tuition increases.

Commencement Speakers

Haseltine, who founded HGSI in 1992, is a former professor at Harvard's schools ofmedicine and public health. He has received numerous honors and awards for his cancerand AIDS research and work in the field of regenerative medicine and is active on manycorporate boards and civic organizations.

At Thursday's ceremony, UMBC President Freeman A. Hrabowski will present Burnswith her first honorary degree, a doctorate of engineering. Burns' career highlightsinclude being named to Fortune magazine's 2002 list of "Most Powerful BlackExecutives;" Time magazine/CNN's annual list of "Global Business Influentials;" andU.S. Black Engineering & Information Technology magazine's 2004 list of the "50 MostImportant African-Americans in Technology."

For more information on UMBC Commencement Ceremonies, please visit: http://www.umbc.edu/commencement

Posted by dwinds1

May 13, 2004

In the News, May 14, 2004

CWIT in The Sun
UMBC's Center for Women and Information Technology was featured in an article, "Bridging the Gender Gap," in the High-Tech Education special section that appeared in The Sun on May 7. The article on efforts Baltimore-area colleges are making to encourage women to study information technology featured photos and quotes from CWIT director Claudia Morrell and students Verity Rowell and Candice Scarborough.

UMBC Training Centers in The Sun
The UMBC Training Centers were featured in the May 7 High-Tech Education special section of The Sun. "A New Milestone in Project Management," included quotes from Kent Malwitz, director of business development at UMBC/TC, on certifications for project management.

President Hrabowski in The Sun
Sun columnist Gregory Kane featured President Hrabowski and his recent lecture on the Brown vs. Board of Education decision in his column on May 8.

Thomas Blass, Psychology, in the Sunday Telegraph
Thomas Blass, professor of psychology and an expert on the life and work of psychologist Stanley Milgram, was mentioned in an article about the abuse of prisoners in Iraq that appeared on May 9 in London's Sunday Telegraph newspaper.

Stephen Holden, Information Systems, in Federal Computer Week
Assistant professor of information systems Stephen Holden was quoted in the May 10 issue of Federal Computer Week in an article on the technological modernization of the IRS.

Library Gallery Exhibition in the Catonsville Times
The current exhibit on display at the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery, "We Shall Overcome: Photographs from the American Civil Rights Era," was featured in the Catonsville Times on May 12.

Tom Schaller, Political Science, in The Sun
Tom Schaller, assistant professor of political science, was quoted on May 13 in The Sun in an article about Governor Ehrlich's recent comments on multiculturalism.

Posted by dwinds1

Kudos, May 14, 2004

Warren Cohen, History, Wins Award
Distinguished University Professor of History Warren Cohen was given the Norman and Laura Graebner Prize of the Society for Historians of American Foreign Relations, which "is awarded biennially to a senior historian of United States foreign relations in recognition of significant contributions to the development of the field, through excellence in teaching, scholarship, and service, over his or her career." Cohen is only the ninth person to win this award, the pre-eminent distinction in his field.

Michael Summers, Chemistry and Biochemistry, Renewed as Howard Hughes Medical Investigator
Michael Summers, professor of chemistry and biochemistry, was renewed as a Howard Hughes Medical Investigator. Summers' appointment now runs through August 31, 2009; he continues to be the only HHMI at a public university in Maryland.

Undergraduate Olusegun Williams Wins First Place in Research Competition
Undergrad biochemistry major Olusegun Williams won first place in the National Organization of Black Chemists and Chemical Engineers' (NOBCCHe) undergraduate research competition in San Diego, California. Williams is a Meyerhoff Scholar and MARC student with a 4.0 GPA; he was nominated for the research competition by his research mentor, assistant professor of chemistry and biochemistry Veronika Szalai.

NSBE Chapter Wins Awards at National Convention
UMBC's chapter of the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) won several awards at the organization's recent national convention. The awards included: Medium Chapter of the Year Award, the Region 2 President of the Year award to Nicole Onyeneho, Region 2 Public Relations Chair of the Year Award to Aimee L. Strang, and a second place award in the Undergraduate Students in Technical Research competition to Seth Miller.

techcenter@UMBC Companies Among Finalists for State Award
Three techcenter@UMBC companies, Fluorometrix (a company headed by UMBC professor and chair of the Department of Chemical and Biochemical Engineering, Govind Rao), Cybergroup, Inc., and BD Metrics, were among the 18 finalists chosen in 6 categories for the fourth annual Maryland Incubator Company of the Year Awards. The awards recognize the achievements of current and graduate companies within Maryland's incubators. Winners from each category will be announced at a reception on Wednesday, June 16 at The Center Club in Baltimore. American Express Tax and Business Services, the Maryland Business Incubation Association (MBIA), the Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development (DBED), the Maryland Technology Development Corp. (TEDCO) and Saul Ewing, LLP sponsor the awards. For more information, visit www.mdincubatoraward.com.

Five Retrievers Win All America East Honors in Men's Lacrosse
Five UMBC men's lacrosse players received All America East Conference honors, as the two All-League teams and All-Rookie team were announced on May 6. Sophomore attackman Brendan Mundorf and senior midfielders Franklin Berry and Pat Muston earned First Team All America East honors, senior defender Brad Preisinger was a Second Team selection, and freshman attackman Drew Westervelt earned a spot on the All Rookie Team.

UMBC Crew Shines at Mid-Atlantic Collegiate Crew Championships
UMBC Crew had an outstanding performance at the Mid-Atlantic Collegiate Crew Championships, held May 2 in Occoquan, VA. The women's four boat won a gold medal, beating Johns Hopkins University, Lasalle University, and University of Maryland, College Park with a winning time of 8:08 for 2000 meters. Karyn Lowery, Becca Cluster, Ruthanne Doetzer, and Liz Humphries made up the crew of the boat.

Also at the MACCCS, Amanda Miracle, who set a world record for distance on the ergometer earlier this year, won a third place medal in the women's heavyweight 2000 meter single sculls competition.

UMBC Honors Student-Athletes
UMBC honored its student-athletes at the Varsity Sports Awards, held May 10 at the RAC Arena.

Senior swimmer Astrid Sperling and junior soccer standout Derek McElligott were named Outstanding Female and Male Athletes respectively. Sperling capped a sterling career by becoming the America East Champion in the 200 backstroke. She is the current school record-holder in both the 100 and 200 backstroke events and is part of the 200 and 400 medley relay teams that hold UMBC records. McElligott earned his third straight First Team all league honor this fall, and was a Second Team All South Atlantic striker for the second straight year. He finished seventh in the nation in 2003 with 15 goals scored, and has already climbed to third place on UMBC's all-time scoring chart with 39 career goals and 85 points.

Jen Dragoni and Brad Green were named Outstanding Senior Female and Male Athletes. Dragoni amassed 123 goals, 63 assists, and 186 points in her four-year career with the women's lacrosse program. The 63 assists is a school record, while the 186 points is fourth on UMBC's all-time list. She was a First Team America East selection as a senior, after earning Northeast Conference Player of the Year honors last season. Green led the men's swimming and diving teams to a 12-1 record and UMBC's first America East title. He was named the conference's Most Outstanding Swimmer after capturing four gold and one silver medal at the league championships, and went on to win the 50 yard freestyle at the ECAC Championships, also earning Swimmer of the Meet honors. His best 50 yard freestyle time of 44.82 broke a 12-year old school record.

A pair of tennis standouts, Lana Khvalina and Josef Novotny won the Matt Skalsky Outstanding Scholar Athlete awards. Khvalina, who will earn her undergraduate degree in three years and attend law school at William & Mary next fall, was the lone sophomore in the country last season to earn First Team Women's At-Large Verizon Academic All America honors. The 4.0 student studying political science finished her singles career with a record of 62-20 and was a two-time all conference performer. Novotny has become UMBC's best men's tennis player, climbing to #4 in the Northeast regional rankings. He was 25-5 at #1 singles this season and posted a career mark of 75-17. The two-time Cornell Invitational champion has a 3.58 grade-point average in the major of Visual Arts.

Retriever Club Scholarship Awards were presented to juniors Cecile Banas and Meghan Polek of the field hockey team and junior Mike Orlando of the baseball team. Seniors Lauren Guilfoyle, founder and coach of the tumbling team, and Nancy Nguyen, student-trainer and SAAC President, earned the Leon Upshur Memorial Award, symbolic of outstanding contributions to the Athletic Department outside of the field of play.

Amanda Bile, Softball, Named to American East All-Conference Second Team
Junior outfielder Amanda Bile was selected to the America East Softball All-Conference Second Team. Bile batted .308 with 57 hits, including ten doubles, three triples and six homeruns. As the leadoff batter, she led the team in runs scored with 44, and in stolen bases with eight. In addition, Bile drove in 17 runs and committed just four errors as a starting outfielder.

Posted by dwinds1

May 12, 2004

Roots of Iraqi Prison Abuse Seen in Famous 60's Psychology Experiments

As Americans try to make sense of the abuse and torture of Iraqi POWs at Baghdad's Abu Ghraib Prison, Thomas Blass, a professor of psychology at UMBC and author of the book "The Man Who Shocked The World: The Life and Legacy of Stanley Milgram," sees connections to Milgram's famous and controversial experiments on obedience to authority.

As news coverage of the abuse and torture of Iraqi POWs at Baghdad's Abu Ghraib Prison continues, many Americans are trying to fathom what made the accused U.S. soldiers behave so inhumanely towards other human beings.

More puzzling still is the question of why some soldiers blew the whistle while others carried out violations of the Geneva Conventions so routinely that souvenir snapshots were taken.

There are many historical precedents of soldiers "just following orders" and comparisons to My Lai and the Holocaust have already been made in the mass media, but perhaps the most troubling questions about Abu Ghraib are the underlying ones about human nature and authority.

Thomas Blass, a professor of psychology at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), thinks many of the answers lie in his research and writing about the work of Dr. Stanley Milgram, one of the most controversial psychologists in modern history, known for his experiments on obedience to authority.

"We should all be shocked by the sheer humiliating, degrading aspect of it," Blass said in a recent Houston Chronicle interview about the abuse at Abu Ghraib, "But...I'm not that surprised, given what we know about the power of an authority whom a person accepts as legitimate enough to dictate my behavior."

Milgram is best known for his "Obedience Experiments" carried out at Yale University in the 1960's. These experiments showed how 65% of test subjects repeatedly gave seemingly real and painful electrical shocks to another subject (actually an actor) just because a scientific authority figure running the experiment commanded them to.

Blass, a social psychologist and Hungarian-born Holocaust survivor, has studied Milgram for 15 years and authored over 20 publications and an equal number of academic papers on Milgram's life and work, including a recent article for Psychology Today.

Blass recently completed "The Man Who Shocked the World: The Life and Legacy of Stanley Milgram" (Basic Books, 2004), which Library Journal called "among the best biographies of psychologists...highly recommended." He also runs the website www.stanleymilgram.com, devoted to preserving Milgram's legacy and connecting his research to current events.

In 1965, Milgram, who is also famous for originating the "small world" or "Six Degrees of Separation" method, summed up his infamous obedience experiments with an observation that still echoes through today's headlines:

"A substantial proportion of people do what they are told to do, irrespective of the content of the act and without limitations of conscience, so long as they perceive that the command comes from a legitimate authority," Milgram said.

For more information on Blass, his book, and Stanley Milgram, please visit http://www.stanleymilgram.com.

Media Contact Information:

Thomas Blass
Professor of Psychology
University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC)

Office: 410-455-2428

blass@umbc.edu

Personal Homepage:

http://www.umbc.edu/psyc/personal/blass/toms.html

Posted by dwinds1

Roots of Iraqi Prison Abuse Seen in Famous 60's Psychology Experiments

As Americans try to make sense of the abuse and torture of Iraqi POWs by U.S. troops at Baghdad's Abu Ghraib Prison, Thomas Blass, a professor of psychology at UMBC and author of the book "The Man Who Shocked The World: The Life and Legacy of Stanley Milgram," sees connections to Milgram's famous and controversial experiments on obedience to authority.

As news coverage of the abuse and torture of Iraqi POWs at Baghdad's Abu Ghraib Prison continues, many Americans are trying to fathom what made the accused U.S. soldiers behave so inhumanely towards other human beings.

More puzzling still is the question of why some soldiers blew the whistle while others carried out violations of the Geneva Conventions so routinely that souvenir snapshots were taken.

There are many historical precedents of soldiers "just following orders" and comparisons to My Lai and the Holocaust have already been made in the mass media, but perhaps the most troubling questions about Abu Ghraib are the underlying ones about human nature and authority.

Thomas Blass, a professor of psychology at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), thinks many of the answers lie in his research and writing about the work of Dr. Stanley Milgram, one of the most controversial psychologists in modern history, known for his experiments on obedience to authority.

"We should all be shocked by the sheer humiliating, degrading aspect of it," Blass said in a recent Houston Chronicle interview about the abuse at Abu Ghraib, "But...I'm not that surprised, given what we know about the power of an authority whom a person accepts as legitimate enough to dictate my behavior."

Milgram is best known for his "Obedience Experiments" carried out at Yale University in the 1960's. These experiments showed how 65% of test subjects repeatedly gave seemingly real and painful electrical shocks to another subject (actually an actor) just because a scientific authority figure running the experiment commanded them to.

Blass, a social psychologist and Hungarian-born Holocaust survivor, has studied Milgram for 15 years and authored over 20 publications and an equal number of academic papers on Milgram's life and work, including a recent article for Psychology Today.

Blass recently completed "The Man Who Shocked the World: The Life and Legacy of Stanley Milgram" (Basic Books, 2004), which Library Journal called "among the best biographies of psychologists...highly recommended." He also runs the website www.stanleymilgram.com, devoted to preserving Milgram's legacy and connecting his research to current events.

In 1965, Milgram, who is also famous for originating the "small world" or "Six Degrees of Separation" method, summed up his infamous obedience experiments with an observation that still echoes through today's headlines:

"A substantial proportion of people do what they are told to do, irrespective of the content of the act and without limitations of conscience, so long as they perceive that the command comes from a legitimate authority," Milgram said.

For more information on Blass, his book, and Stanley Milgram, please visit http://www.stanleymilgram.com.

Media Contact Information:

Thomas Blass
Professor of Psychology
University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC)

Office: 410-455-2428

blass@umbc.edu

Personal Homepage:

http://www.umbc.edu/psyc/personal/blass/toms.html

Posted by dwinds1

May 11, 2004

Roots of Iraqi Prison Abuse Seen in Famous 60's Psychology Experiments

As Americans try to make sense of the abuse and torture of Iraqi POWs at Baghdad's Abu Ghraib Prison, Thomas Blass, a professor of psychology at UMBC and author of the book "The Man Who Shocked The World: The Life and Legacy of Stanley Milgram," sees connections to Milgram's famous and controversial experiments on obedience to authority.

As news coverage of the abuse and torture of Iraqi POWs at Baghdad's Abu Ghraib Prison continues, many Americans are trying to fathom what made the accused U.S. soldiers behave so inhumanely towards other human beings.

More puzzling still is the question of why some soldiers blew the whistle while others carried out violations of the Geneva Conventions so routinely that souvenir snapshots were taken.

There are many historical precedents of soldiers "just following orders" and comparisons to My Lai and the Holocaust have already been made in the mass media, but perhaps the most troubling questions about Abu Ghraib are the underlying ones about human nature and authority.

Thomas Blass, a professor of psychology at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), thinks many of the answers lie in his research and writing about the work of Dr. Stanley Milgram, one of the most controversial psychologists in modern history, known for his experiments on obedience to authority.

"We should all be shocked by the sheer humiliating, degrading aspect of it," Blass said in a recent Houston Chronicle interview about the abuse at Abu Ghraib, "But...I'm not that surprised, given what we know about the power of an authority whom a person accepts as legitimate enough to dictate my behavior."

Milgram is best known for his "Obedience Experiments" carried out at Yale University in the 1960's. These experiments showed how 65% of test subjects repeatedly gave seemingly real and painful electrical shocks to another subject (actually an actor) just because a scientific authority figure running the experiment commanded them to.

Blass, a social psychologist and Hungarian-born Holocaust survivor, has studied Milgram for 15 years and authored over 20 publications and an equal number of academic papers on Milgram's life and work, including a recent article for Psychology Today.

Blass recently completed "The Man Who Shocked the World: The Life and Legacy of Stanley Milgram" (Basic Books, 2004), which Library Journal called "among the best biographies of psychologists...highly recommended." He also runs the website www.stanleymilgram.com, devoted to preserving Milgram's legacy and connecting his research to current events.

In 1965, Milgram, who is also famous for originating the "small world" or "Six Degrees of Separation" method, summed up his infamous obedience experiments with an observation that still echoes through today's headlines:

"A substantial proportion of people do what they are told to do, irrespective of the content of the act and without limitations of conscience, so long as they perceive that the command comes from a legitimate authority," Milgram said.

For more information on Blass, his book, and Stanley Milgram, please visit http://www.stanleymilgram.com.

Media Contact Information:

Thomas Blass
Professor of Psychology
University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC)

Office: 410-455-2428

blass@umbc.edu

Personal Homepage:

http://www.umbc.edu/psyc/personal/blass/toms.html

Posted by dwinds1

May 06, 2004

Computer Mania Day Aims to Get Girls Excited about Technology

On May 8, 500 sixth through eighth grade girls from public schools in Baltimore City and a dozen surrounding counties will spend a half-day with some of the top women in information technology (IT) fields for hands-on learning sessions aimed at closing the technology gender gap. Soledad O'Brien, anchor of CNN's "American Morning," will launch the "Computer Mania Day" program to be held at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) on Saturday, May 8.

On May 8, 500 sixth through eighth grade girls from public schools in Baltimore City and a dozen surrounding counties will spend a half-day with some of the top women in information technology (IT) fields for hands-on learning sessions aimed at closing the technology gender gap. Soledad O'Brien, anchor of CNN's "American Morning," will launch the "Computer Mania Day" program to be held at UMBC on Saturday, May 8 from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Computer Mania Day is a hands-on extension of the mission of UMBC's Center for Women and Information Technology (CWIT), which ABC News.com has named "the best resource on women and technology on the Web."

While recent studies show that female college students are gradually closing the gender gap in computer technology use and competency, enrollment of women in college IT programs continues to decline and the middle school years remain a vital crossroads as girls consider their academic and career choices. A 2003 online survey of 210,000 K-12 students by NetDay and BellSouth showed that "a significant gap in technology adeptness exists along gender lines, with far fewer females considering themselves advanced users of technology."

Research shows that the IT gender gap opens as early as the middle school years, when girls are most image-conscious and do not want to be labeled as "geeks" or "nerds." Girls make up only 14.3 percent of the students who take Advanced Placement courses in computer science, a key to success in IT-related fields at the college level.

Computer Mania Day is based on a program founded by Shirley Collier, CEO of Howard County-based wireless optical technologies firm, Optemax, LLC. Collier chaired the program from 1995 1998 in Howard County as it successfully increased the percentage of high school girls in elective IT classes in Howard County Public School System from 20 percent to 50 percent.

Since the founding program ended, the numbers of female high school students taking IT electives appear to be slipping. Last year, UMBC and CWIT partnered with Collier and area business and education leaders to revive and expand Computer Mania Day. The 2003 event hosted by UMBC drew 300 students from Baltimore and Howard County schools.

"Events like Computer Mania Day allow parents, educators and executives to help young women find their place in the world of information technology and as tomorrow's leaders," said Jennifer Jones, AT&T sales vice-president for the Mid-Atlantic region. AT&T joins several other high profile companies in sponsoring this event.

Computer Mania Day plans to welcome 500 participating girls from the following public school systems: Anne Arundel County, Baltimore City, Baltimore County, Calvert County, Cecil County, Harford County, Howard County, Montgomery County, Prince George's County, Queen Anne's County, Somerset County, and St. Mary's County.

Throughout the day, students will work in small groups, rotating between interactive demonstration sessions covering such topics as "hardware that rocks," digital art and imaging, and the physics of a build-it-yourself hot air balloon.

Area high schools will highlight their elective IT courses and programs to the middle school girls while role-model businesswomen will discuss their high-tech careers. CWIT Scholars--scholarship students at UMBC dedicated to bridging the IT gender gap--will offer real-world advice to girls and parents on college majors and career paths involving technology.

A parallel parent and teacher program will complement the day by providing information about causes for girls' low enrollment in technology courses and what parents can do to encourage girls to embrace technology.

O'Brien will provide the keynote address. Jennifer Jones, Sales Center vice president of AT&T Business, will speak about "Why Businesses Should Care About Girls in Technology." Other scheduled speakers for the day's parent/teacher program include: UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski; Baltimore County Schools superintendent Joe Hairston; Assistant State Superintendent, Maryland State Department of Education Katharine M. Oliver, and CWIT Director Claudia Morrell.

The event ties into ongoing concerns by business and education leaders about long-term growth and workforce diversity in the IT industry. Decisions are being made now by middle school students that will have an impact on the workforce five to 10 years down the road.

For more information on Computer Mania Day, go to www.computer-mania.info. For more information on women and information technology, go to www.umbc.edu/cwit.

Posted by dwinds1

Kudos, 5/7/04

Maryland Film Festival Features Work of UMBC Filmmakers
The work of UMBC faculty, students and alumni takes center stage at the 2004 Maryland Film Festival, being held May 6-9 in Baltimore. Among the highlights of the Festival will be a new feature film, Saved!, by Brian Dannelly (Visual Arts '03, magna cum laude), which had been featured in the 2004 Sundance Festival and is scheduled for national theatrical release later this month.

In addition to Saved!, UMBC's contributions to the Maryland Film Festival include Fulton Fish Market by Mark Street (assistant professor, visual arts); Overpass by Alan Price (assistant professor, visual arts); Site Visits by Carol Hess (associate professor and chair, dance), which features a sound score by Timothy Nohe (associate professor, visual arts); Bludren by Jill Johnston-Price (adjunct assistant professor, visual arts); Today is Thursday and Warp & Weft by Jo Israelson (IMDA '04); L'Invitation and Love and a '61 by Nick Prevas (visual arts '03); Method for Self-Defense Against Scorpions by Tanner Almon (visual arts '03); and Remission by Dan Stack (undergraduate, visual arts).

UMBC Alumna Receives Baltimore County Teacher of the Year Award
Sharon Grimes, English '90, was recently selected as Baltimore County's 17th Teacher of the Year. Grimes, a librarian at Lansdowne Elementary School, was featured in The Sun on May 6.

Four Retrievers Receive America East All-Conference Honors in Women's Lacrosse
Senior Jen Dragoni, junior Stephanie Crouch and sophomore Kelly Fiorani were named to the America East All-Conference First Team, while freshman Kelly Fahey earned Second Team All-Conference honors and was named to the league's All-Rookie Team.

Dragoni, named First Team on Attack, notched 32 goals and 12 assists this season, with multi-goal performances in 11 games, including a four-goal effort on Senior Day against Vermont. She currently ranks fourth in the conference in shots per game, fifth in game-winning goals, seventh in goals per game, eight in points per game and first in free-position goals per game. The 2003 Northeast Conference Player of the Year, she has amassed a career total of 122 goals, good for sixth all-time at UMBC, and 182 points, good for fourth all-time. In addition, her 60 career assists places her atop UMBC's All-Time Assists Leaders.

Crouch, named First Team on Defense, leads the team in caused turnovers with 13, and is second in draw controls with 24. The 2002 Northeast Conference player of the year, she has also scored four goals and posted one assist on the year.

Fiorani, named First Team at Midfield, boasts a team-high 33 ground balls on the season, and is tied with Dragoni for the team lead in goals (32). The 2003 Northeast Conference Rookie of the Year, she also ranks second on the team in assists with 12.

Fahey, selected to the Second Team at Midfield and as part of the All-Rookie Team, had a great freshman campaign. Currently, she leads the team in draw controls (37), and is second in ground balls (30). In addition, her 22 goals and nine assists are good for third on the team in both categories.

Posted by dwinds1

In the News, 5/7/04

CAVC Exhibit in the New York Times
"Fred Wilson, Objects and Installations: 1979-2000," a traveling exhibit organized by the Center for Art and Visual Culture, was reviewed in the New York Timeson April 30. The exhibition remains in Harlem's Studio Museum through July 4.

Lou Cantori, Political Science, in the Christian Science Monitor
Lou Cantori, political science professor and expert on the Middle East, was quoted in April 30's Christian Science Monitor. The story, by staff writer Scott Peterson, examined the likely outcomes of U.S. troops' pullback from the Iraqi city of Fallujah as a new Iraqi security force moves in. The story also appeared on the Web sites of NPR affiliates in Boston, North Texas and Atlanta.

Brian Dannelly '97 in the Sun's "Maryland Live"
Saved!, a movie written and directed by alumnus Brian Dannelly, is mentioned as one of movie critic Chris Kaltenbach's picks for the Maryland Film Festival in the May 6 Baltimore Sun's "Maryland Live" section. Dannelly is also interviewed for "Live's" weekly Q&A.

Posted by dwinds1

May 04, 2004

Computer Mania Day Aims to Get Girls Excited about Technology

On May 8, 500 sixth through eighth grade girls from public schools in Baltimore City and a dozen surrounding counties will spend a half-day with some of the top women in information technology (IT) fields for hands-on learning sessions aimed at closing the technology gender gap. Soledad O'Brien, anchor of CNN's "American Morning," will launch the "Computer Mania Day" program to be held at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) on Saturday, May 8, 2004 from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

On May 8, 500 sixth through eighth grade girls from public schools in Baltimore City and a dozen surrounding counties will spend a half-day with some of the top women in information technology (IT) fields for hands-on learning sessions aimed at closing the technology gender gap. Soledad O'Brien, anchor of CNN's "American Morning," will launch the "Computer Mania Day" program to be held at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) on Saturday, May 8, 2004 from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

Computer Mania Day is a hands-on extension of the mission of UMBC's Center for Women and Information Technology (CWIT), which ABC News.com has named "the best resource on women and technology on the Web."

While recent studies show that female college students are gradually closing the gender gap in computer technology use and competency, enrollment of women in college IT programs continues to decline and the middle school years remain a vital crossroads as girls consider their academic and career choices. A 2003 online survey of 210,000 K-12 students by NetDay and BellSouth showed that "a significant gap in technology adeptness exists along gender lines, with far fewer females considering themselves advanced users of technology."

Research shows that the IT gender gap opens as early as the middle school years, when girls are most image-conscious and do not want to be labeled as "geeks" or "nerds." Girls make up only 14.3% of the students who take Advanced Placement courses in computer science, a key to success in IT-related fields at the college level.

Computer Mania Day is based on a program founded by Shirley Collier, CEO of Howard County-based wireless optical technologies firm, Optemax, LLC. Collier chaired the program from 1995 1998 in Howard County as it successfully increased the percentage of high school girls in elective IT classes in Howard County Public School System from 20% to 50%.

Since the founding program ended, the numbers of female high school students taking IT electives appear to be slipping. Last year, UMBC and CWIT partnered with Collier and area business and education leaders to revive and expand Computer Mania Day. The 2003 event hosted by UMBC drew 300 students from Baltimore and Howard County schools.

"Events like Computer Mania Day allow parents, educators and executives to help young women find their place in the world of information technology and as tomorrow's leaders," said Jennifer Jones, AT&T sales vice-president for the Mid-Atlantic region. AT&T joins several other high profile companies in sponsoring this event.

Computer Mania Day plans to welcome 500 participating girls from the following public school systems: Anne Arundel County, Baltimore City, Baltimore County, Calvert County, Cecil County, Harford County, Howard County, Montgomery County, Prince George's County, Queen Anne's County, Somerset County, and St. Mary's County.

Throughout the day, students will work in small groups, rotating between interactive demonstration sessions covering such topics as "hardware that rocks," digital art and imaging, and the physics of a build-it-yourself hot air balloon.

Area high schools will highlight their elective IT courses and programs to the middle school girls while role-model businesswomen will discuss their high-tech careers. CWIT Scholars - scholarship students at UMBC dedicated to bridging the IT gender gap - will offer real-world advice to girls and parents on college majors and career paths involving technology.

A parallel parent and teacher program will complement the day by providing information about causes for girls' low enrollment in technology courses and what parents can do to encourage girls to embrace technology.

O'Brien will provide the keynote address. Jennifer Jones, Sales Center Vice President of AT&T Business, will speak about "Why Businesses Should Care About Girls in Technology." Other scheduled speakers for the day's parent/teacher program include: UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski; Baltimore County Schools superintendent Joe Hairston; Assistant State Superintendent, Maryland State Department of Education Katharine M. Oliver, and CWIT Director Claudia Morrell.

The event ties into ongoing concerns by business and education leaders about long-term growth and workforce diversity in the IT industry. Decisions are being made now by middle school students that will have an impact on the workforce five to 10 years down the road.

For more information on Computer Mania Day, go to http://www.computer-mania.info For more information on women and information technology, go to http://www.umbc.edu/cwit.

About CWIT:

The Center for Women and Information Technology (CWIT) established at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) in July, 1998, has a four-fold mission: to encourage more women and girls to study computer science and/or information systems and to pursue careers in IT; to enable all women and girls to use IT comfortably and knowledgeably; to assure that the richness and breadth of women's lives and concerns are fully represented and readily available on the Internet; and to foster research concerning the relationship between gender and IT.

About UMBC:The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), is a distinguished research university with a deep commitment to undergraduate education. UMBC is known for its research centers in gerontology, digital imaging, photonics, structural biochemistry, urban environmental research and education, and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute at UMBC. The University's commitment to engaged learning, and to the social and economic development of the State of Maryland, is put into action through such programs as The Shriver Center for Work and Service-Learning, the Alex. Brown Center for Entrepreneurship, the Center for Women and Information Technology and techcenter@UMBC / bwtech@UMBC, the University's technology center and research park, home to more than 20 companies.

About AT&T (Corporate Sponsor): For more than 125 years, AT&T (NYSE "T") has been known for unparalleled quality and reliability in communications. Backed by the research and development capabilities of AT&T Labs, the company is a global leader in local, long distance, Internet and transaction-based voice and data services.

Posted by dwinds1

April 29, 2004

$5 Million Erickson Foundation Commitment Launches School for Seniors Housing, Aging Services At UMBC

The Erickson Foundation has announced a $5 million commitment to support the formation of a new school to develop leaders in the burgeoning seniors housing and care business and related fields. The Erickson School at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) will focus on courses and research in seniors housing and aging service. It will be named in honor of John Erickson, chairman and CEO of the Baltimore-based Erickson Retirement Communities, who initiated the gift to establish the school.

The Erickson Foundation has announced a $5 million commitment to support the formation of a new school to develop leaders in the burgeoning seniors housing and care business and related fields. The Erickson School at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) will focus on courses and research in seniors housing and aging service. It will be named in honor of John Erickson, chairman and CEO of Baltimore-based Erickson, which initiated the gift to establish the school. In addition, the school will seek matching funds from other external sources.

UMBC - a four-year, public research university - is currently home to several leading experts on aging who are active in research, education and service in the field of gerontology. It is one of only five universities in the nation to offer the Ph.D. in Gerontology. The Erickson Foundation gift will allow the University to expand its faculty and array of offerings to reach developing leaders in the seniors housing and care industry and expand its influence in the field.

"We are very excited and fortunate to have received this generous gift from one of the recognized leaders of the senior living industry," said Dr. Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, president of UMBC. In 1983, Mr. Erickson created an award-winning retirement community from an abandoned college campus in Maryland. Its success made it the prototype for other such communities across the country. Today, Erickson Retirement Communities has 13 retirement communities in eight states that are home to nearly 13,000 people.

A strong proponent of the new school, Dr. Hrabowski will be actively involved in its development. "We have great ambitions for this initiative," he added. "We will be training tomorrow's leaders in the field of seniors housing and care, and focusing on key policy questions of aging, including Medicare and Medicaid system funding and other seniors-related issues."

To help develop the school, Dr. Morton I. Rapoport, former head of the University of Maryland Medical System, will lead the Erickson-UMBC partnership. Under Dr. Rapoport's direction, the University of Maryland Hospital was transformed from a public institution with aging facilities and millions of dollars in annual losses to a modern and financially successful private, non-profit organization with six hospitals, a revenue base of $1.2 billion and 10,000 employees. Among his greatest achievements was a capital improvement program of more than $1 billion over 20 years, resulting in outstanding, state-of-the-art hospital facilities and programs.

The Erickson School's first offering will be non-credit Executive Development courses in the fall of 2004 at UMBC. Helping to develop and lead the Executive Development component of the school will be the National Investment Center for the Seniors Housing & Care Industries (NIC). Since 1991, this nonprofit organization has been the leading source of business and financial information for the senior living industry. For the last five years, it has conducted Executive Development courses for emerging industry leaders, including courses in operations, management, sales, marketing, development, finance and service quality.

"John Erickson's leadership, vision and commitment to the senior living industry are truly to be admired," said Robert G. Kramer, president of NIC, which is headquartered in Annapolis, Md. "Many future leaders will benefit from his generosity, which will help to ensure that they get the same professional training as their counterparts in other fields."

For more information about the Executive Development courses at The Erickson School at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, contact NIC at (410) 267-0504.Media Contact for Erickson Retirement Communities: Mel Tansill, (410) 402-2006

Posted by dwinds1

Low Lecture to Mark 50th Anniversary of Brown vs. Board of Education Decision

Freeman A. Hrabowski, III -- UMBC president, author and nationally recognized authority on expanding educational standards and opportunities for minority students -- will give UMBC's annual Low Lecture, "Reflections on America's Academic Achievement Gap: A 50-Year Perspective," on May 5 at 7:00 p.m. in UMBC's University Center Ballroom.

Freeman A. Hrabowski, III -- UMBC president, author and nationally recognized authority on expanding educational standards and opportunities for minority students -- will give UMBC's annual Low Lecture, "Reflections on America's Academic Achievement Gap: A 50-Year Perspective," on May 5 at 7:00 p.m. in UMBC's University Center Ballroom.

The lecture will honor the 50th anniversary of the Brown vs. Board of Education decision that desegregated American public schools. From his early participation in the civil rights movement to his groundbreaking work sending young African-Americans into careers in science and technology, Hrabowski has a wealth of personal experience to draw upon for the speech.

Born in 1950 in Birmingham, Alabama, Hrabowski graduated at 19 from Hampton Institute with highest honors in mathematics, and he received his M.A. (mathematics) and Ph.D. (higher education administration/statistics) at 24 from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Hrabowski serves as a consultant to the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Education, and universities and school systems nationally. He also is a member of numerous corporate and civic boards. Hrabowski's research and publications focus on science and math education, with special emphasis on minority participation and performance.

Hrabowski is co-author of the books, "Overcoming the Odds: Raising Academically Successful African American Young Women," published by Oxford University Press in 2001, and "Beating the Odds, Raising Academically Successful African American Males," published by Oxford University Press in 1998.

The UMBC History department's annual Low Lecture is named for founding faculty member and distinguished African American historian Augustus (Gus) Low. Low was a noted historian of the U.S. civil rights movement era.

Posted by dwinds1

Low Lecture to Mark 50th Anniversary of Brown vs. Board of EducationDecision

Freeman A. Hrabowski, III -- UMBC president, author and nationally recognized authority on expanding educational standards and opportunities for minority students -- will give UMBC's annual Low Lecture, "Reflections on America's Academic Achievement Gap: A 50-Year Perspective," on May 5 at 7:00 p.m. in UMBC's University Center Ballroom.

Freeman A. Hrabowski, III -- UMBC president, author and nationally recognized authority on expanding educational standards and opportunities for minority students -- will give UMBC's annual Low Lecture, "Reflections on America's Academic Achievement Gap: A 50-Year Perspective," on May 5 at 7:00 p.m. in UMBC's University Center Ballroom.

The lecture will honor the 50th anniversary of the Brown vs. Board of Education decision that desegregated American public schools. From his early participation in the civil rights movement to his groundbreaking work sending young African-Americans into careers in science and technology, Hrabowski has a wealth of personal experience to draw upon for the speech.

Born in 1950 in Birmingham, Alabama, Hrabowski graduated at 19 from Hampton Institute with highest honors in mathematics, and he received his M.A. (mathematics) and Ph.D. (higher education administration/statistics) at 24 from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

Hrabowski serves as a consultant to the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Department of Education, and universities and school systems nationally. He also is a member of numerous corporate and civic boards. Hrabowski's research and publications focus on science and math education, with special emphasis on minority participation and performance.

Hrabowski is co-author of the books, "Overcoming the Odds: Raising Academically Successful African American Young Women," published by Oxford University Press in 2001, and "Beating the Odds, Raising Academically Successful African American Males," published by Oxford University Press in 1998.

The UMBC History department's annual Low Lecture is named for founding faculty member and distinguished African American historian Augustus (Gus) Low. Low was a noted historian of the U.S. civil rights movement era.

Posted by dwinds1

April 23, 2004

Kudos

Theatre Students Receive Awards at Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival
Undergraduate theatre students Jason Roth and Matthew Myer were among the honorees at the Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival. As a result of their performance in the Irene Ryan Evening of Scenes Night, Roth received the Sundance Theater Laboratory Acting Fellowship, the Shakespeare Theater Acting Internship, and was one of two overall winners in the Irene Ryan Acting Scholarship competition. Myers was selected to participate in the Margolis Method Summer Intensive in Minneapolis.

UMBC Ranked in Top 25 of Intel's "Most Unwired College Campuses"
UMBC came in at #23 in a ranking of 100 "Most Unwired College Campuses," conducted by Intel. UMBC is the only Maryland school in the top 25 in the list of colleges with the greatest access to wireless computing and outranked schools such as MIT and Stanford. Indiana University tops the list that was based on the number of wireless hotspots on campus, computer-to-student ratio, and the percentage of campus covered in wireless access. The complete list is available online.

Claudia Morrell, CWIT, Participates in Congressional Briefing
Claudia Morrell, director of the Center for Women and Information Technology, participated in a briefing before members of Congress and their staffs on how technology is being used to provide critical services to women and children. The briefing, held April 5, also addressed current legislation and equity resources that affect the lives of women in areas such as education, job preparation, domestic violence, and eGovernment.

Marjoleine Kars, History, Awarded Mellon Fellowship
Marjoleine Kars, associate professor of history, has been awarded a Mellon Research Fellowship by the John Carter Brown Library at Brown University, a major research institute for the colonial history of North and South America. Kars will be using the award to continue her research on a slave uprising in the 1760s in the Dutch colony of Berbice (now a part of the Republic of Guyana).

Kriste Lindenmeyer, History, Awarded Fulbright Fellowship
Associate professor of history Kriste Lindenmeyer has been awarded a Fulbright Senior Scholar Fellowship. For her fellowship, Lindenmeyer will be teaching at Martin Luther University in Halle, Germany for the 2004-2005 academic year.

Posted by dwinds1

In the News, April 23

President Hrabowski in The Sun
UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski was the subject of "Living and Learning in Black and White," an article about his experiences in segregated schools and the legacy of Brown vs. Board of Education. The article, written by Sun reporter Michael Hill, appeared on April 18.

Emergency Health Services Living Learning Community in The Sun
UMBC's Emergency Health Services (EHS) Living Learning Community (LLC), located in Harbor Hall, was profiled in The Sun's April 18 Education supplement. EHS chair Bruce Walz was quoted along with several student residents of the LLC, all of them future paramedics, fire fighters, EMTs or other emergency first responders.

Roy Meyers, Political Science, in the News
Roy Meyers, associate professor of political science, wrote "Maryland's Counterproductive Constitution," an op-ed that appeared on April 18 in the Washington Post.

Meyers was also quoted in The Sun on April 20 in an article about the results of the Mandel Commission, formed by the governor to find ways to increase efficiency in the Maryland government.

Don Norris, Public Policy and MIPAR, in The Sun
Don Norris, professor of public policy and director of MIPAR, was quoted in "Business Finds Little Fault in the Governor," which appeared in The Sun on April 18.

Norris was also quoted in the April 18 edition of The Sun in an article by Meredith Cohn on the possibility of forming a regional water and sewer authority for the Baltimore metropolitan area.

Christopher Corbett, English, in the Albuquerque Journal
English instructor Christopher Corbett's Orphans Preferred: The Twisted Truth and Lasting Legend of the Pony Express (Random House/Broadway Books division) was reviewed March 28 in the Albuquerque Journal, New Mexico's largest Sunday paper.

Posted by dwinds1

April 16, 2004

In The News, April 16-22

President Hrabowski on WBAL Radio

UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski is scheduled to be a guest on WBAL (1090 AM) Radio's Bruce Elliott Show on April 17 at 9 a.m. The topic of the show will be academic achievement among minority students.

Men's Lacrosse on Comcast SportsNet

The UMBC men's lacrosse team's long-standing community service relationship with "The Ride With Pride" program will be featured on this month's edition of NCAA On Campus.

Produced by Fox Sports News, the show airs locally on Comcast SportsNet (Mid-Atlantic) this Saturday, April 17 at 6:00 p.m., and Sunday, April 18th at 11:30 p.m.

UMBC men's lacrosse just celebrated its tenth anniversary with "The Ride With Pride" program, sponsored by the Maryland Council for Special Equestrians. The team assists trainers in horseback riding activities for special needs children at the Patapsco Horse Center in Ellicott City, Maryland.

Head Coach Don Zimmerman, seniors Jeff Clark, MattGallagher, and Tommy Tittsworth, and junior Joe Cahillare active participants in the program and are featured along with program director Tina Wehland and some very special young people.

Theatre to be Featured on Maryland Public Television

UMBC's Department of Theatre will be featured on Wednesday, April 21 at 7:30 on Maryland Public Television's ArtWorks program. The program will include an interview with Wendy Salkind, professor and chair of theatre, as well as footage of the department's current production, Female Transport.

UMBC Students in The Sun

UMBC graduate student and Shriver Peaceworker Delana Gregg was quoted in a Sun article on student interest in the Iraq war on April 9. Undergraduates Jun Woo Lee, biology, and Jin Chung, information systems, were also quoted in the article.

UMBC Baseball in The Sun

The Sun featured UMBC's newly updated baseball field on April 9 with quotes from head baseball coach John Jancuska and director of athletics Charlie Brown. The project, a collaboration between UMBC and The Baseball Factory, added lights, a new playing surface and a warning track around the entire field.

Tom Schaller, Political Science, Guest Host on WBAL Radio

Tom Schaller, national politics expert, bravely went where few liberals dare to tread as he filled in for conservative talk radio host Rob Douglas on WBAL Radio 1090 AM on April 10. Schaller manned the popular talk show's booth for a full three hours and took calls from across the Baltimore/Washington political spectrum.

Lou Cantori, Political Science, in The Sun

Lou Cantori, an expert on the Middle East and Iraq, was quoted in the April 11 Perspective section articleby Sun writer Michael Hill. Titled "An Irrelevant Date." Cantori was among several experts on Iraq quoted about the impact of the upcoming June 30 transfer of power to the Iraqi interim government.

Jennifer Rouse, Public Policy, in the Trinidad & Tobago Express

Jennifer Rouse, a public policy doctoral student, was featured in the Trinidad & Tobago Express on April 4. Rouse, who has been named director of Trinidad and Tobago's soon-to-be-formed Division of Aging in the Ministry of Social Development, discusses the challenges faced by aging women.

Donald Norris, Public Policy and MIPAR, in The Sun

Donald Norris, professor of public policy and director of MIPAR was quoted in "Busch Slots Bill Called 'Political Poker'," which ran April 9 in The Sun.

Norris was also quoted in April 12's "Assembly Falls Short on Budget Gap."

techcenter@UMBC Companies Featured in Baltimore Business Journal

Scientific Products & Systems, Athena Environmental Sciences, Inc., Next Breath LLC, MetriGenix, Inc., and In Vitro Technologies, Inc., all located in techcenter@UMBC, were featured in an April 9 article in the Baltimore Business Journal about local companies who make tools and provide services to support the biotechnology industry.

bwtech@UMBC in Baltimore Business Journal

The April 9 Baltimore Business Journal featured a story on the new office building British company Grosvenor is building at bwtech@UMBC.

Durrell Callier, Social Work, in The Sun

Freshman social work major Durrell Callier was quoted in The Sun on April 13 in an article on the Baltimore Algebra Project's efforts on behalf of Baltimore City Public Schools. Callier is a member of the Baltimore Algebra Project, a student-led group that tutors middle and high school students.

Mark Croatti, Political Science, in The Business Monthly

Political Science instructor Mark Croatti authored an article on the impact of this year's state legislative session on business that appeared in the April issue of The Business Monthly.

CWIT & Computer Mania Day in The Business Monthly

UMBC's Center for Women and Information Technology (CWIT) and its signature upcoming community outreach/education event, Computer Mania Day, were part of an article by Jennifer Jones of CWIT corporate sponsor AT&T in the April Business Monthly.

New Journal Co-Edited by Donald Norris, Patricia Fletcher, Public Policy, in NSF Digital Government Research Program News Online

The International Journal of Electronic Government Research, a new peer-reviewed journal on digital government co-edited by Donald Norris, professor of public policy and director of MIPAR, and Patricia Fletcher, associate professor of public policy and information systems, was a featured news story at the National Science Foundation's Digital Government Research Program's website.

Posted by dwinds1

Insights In the News, April 16-22, 2004

President Hrabowski on WBAL Radio

UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski is scheduled to be a guest on WBAL (1090 AM) Radio's Bruce Elliott Show on April 17 at 9 a.m. The topic of the show will be academic achievement among minority students.

Men's Lacrosse on Comcast SportsNet

The UMBC men's lacrosse team's long-standing community service relationship with "The Ride With Pride" program will be featured on this month's edition of NCAA On Campus.

Produced by Fox Sports News, the show airs locally on Comcast SportsNet (Mid-Atlantic) this Saturday, April 17 at 6:00 p.m., and Sunday, April 18th at 11:30 p.m.

UMBC men's lacrosse just celebrated its tenth anniversary with "The Ride With Pride" program, sponsored by the Maryland Council for Special Equestrians. The team assists trainers in horseback riding activities for special needs children at the Patapsco Horse Center in Ellicott City, Maryland.

Head Coach Don Zimmerman, seniors Jeff Clark, MattGallagher, and Tommy Tittsworth, and junior Joe Cahillare active participants in the program and are featured along with program director Tina Wehland and some very special young people.

Theatre to be Featured on Maryland Public Television

UMBC's Department of Theatre will be featured on Wednesday, April 21 at 7:30 on Maryland Public Television's ArtWorks program. The program will include an interview with Wendy Salkind, professor and chair of theatre, as well as footage of the department's current production, Female Transport.

UMBC Students in The Sun

UMBC graduate student and Shriver Peaceworker Delana Gregg was quoted in a Sun article on student interest in the Iraq war on April 9. Undergraduates Jun Woo Lee, biology, and Jin Chung, information systems, were also quoted in the article.

UMBC Baseball in The Sun

The Sun featured UMBC's newly updated baseball field on April 9 with quotes from head baseball coach John Jancuska and director of athletics Charlie Brown. The project, a collaboration between UMBC and The Baseball Factory, added lights, a new playing surface and a warning track around the entire field.

Tom Schaller, Political Science, Guest Host on WBAL Radio

Tom Schaller, national politics expert, bravely went where few liberals dare to tread as he filled in for conservative talk radio host Rob Douglas on WBAL Radio 1090 AM on April 10. Schaller manned the popular talk show's booth for a full three hours and took calls from across the Baltimore/Washington political spectrum.

Lou Cantori, Political Science, in The Sun

Lou Cantori, an expert on the Middle East and Iraq, was quoted in the April 11 Perspective section articleby Sun writer Michael Hill. Titled "An Irrelevant Date." Cantori was among several experts on Iraq quoted about the impact of the upcoming June 30 transfer of power to the Iraqi interim government.

Jennifer Rouse, Public Policy, in the Trinidad & Tobago Express

Jennifer Rouse, a public policy doctoral student, was featured in the Trinidad & Tobago Express on April 4. Rouse, who has been named director of Trinidad and Tobago's soon-to-be-formed Division of Aging in the Ministry of Social Development, discusses the challenges faced by aging women.

Donald Norris, Public Policy and MIPAR, in The Sun

Donald Norris, professor of public policy and director of MIPAR was quoted in "Busch Slots Bill Called 'Political Poker'," which ran April 9 in The Sun.

Norris was also quoted in April 12's "Assembly Falls Short on Budget Gap."

techcenter@UMBC Companies Featured in Baltimore Business Journal

Scientific Products & Systems, Athena Environmental Sciences, Inc., Next Breath LLC, MetriGenix, Inc., and In Vitro Technologies, Inc., all located in techcenter@UMBC, were featured in an April 9 article in the Baltimore Business Journal about local companies who make tools and provide services to support the biotechnology industry.

bwtech@UMBC in Baltimore Business Journal

The April 9 Baltimore Business Journal featured a story on the new office building British company Grosvenor is building at bwtech@UMBC.

Durrell Callier, Social Work, in The Sun

Freshman social work major Durrell Callier was quoted in The Sun on April 13 in an article on the Baltimore Algebra Project's efforts on behalf of Baltimore City Public Schools. Callier is a member of the Baltimore Algebra Project, a student-led group that tutors middle and high school students.

Mark Croatti, Political Science, in The Business Monthly

Political Science instructor Mark Croatti authored an article on the impact of this year's state legislative session on business that appeared in the April issue of The Business Monthly.

CWIT & Computer Mania Day in The Business Monthly

UMBC's Center for Women and Information Technology (CWIT) and its signature upcoming community outreach/education event, Computer Mania Day, were part of an article by Jennifer Jones of CWIT corporate sponsor AT&T in the April Business Monthly.

New Journal Co-Edited by Donald Norris, Patricia Fletcher, Public Policy, in NSF Digital Government Research Program News Online

The International Journal of Electronic Government Research, a new peer-reviewed journal on digital government co-edited by Donald Norris, professor of public policy and director of MIPAR, and Patricia Fletcher, associate professor of public policy and information systems, was a featured news story at the National Science Foundation's Digital Government Research Program's website:http://www.diggov.org/news/stories/2004/0404/0404_journal_heyman.jsp

Posted by dwinds1

Kudos, April 16-22

Piot Gwiazda, English, Awarded Mellon Fellowship

Piotr Gwiazda, assistant professor of English, was awarded a Mellon Fellowship from the Harry Ransom Humanities Research Center at The University of Texas at Austin to conduct research on his book project, Merrill's Auden: Poetic Authority in TheChanging Light at Sandover.

Stephanie Jones, Public Policy, Selected for Federal Program

Stephanie Jones, a doctoral student in the Department of Public Policy at UMBC, has been selected by the Department of Health and Human Services to be in the HHS Emerging Leaders Program. Her position will be with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Stephanie, who plans to graduate May 2004, was also the recipient of a Southern Regional Education Board Dissertation Year Fellowship.

UMBC Recognized by National Information Assurance Education and Training Program

UMBC has recently been redesignated a Center of Academic Excellence in Information Assurance Education for 2004-2007 by the National Information Assurance Education and Training Program. The program, administered by the National Security Agency, is designed to reduce vulnerabilities in the national information infrastructure by promoting higher education in information assurance and increasing the numbers of information assurance professionals across disciplines.

Kathleen Jackson, Field Hockey, to Represent UMBC at 2004 NCAA Leadership Conference

Junior Kathleen Jackson is one of 324 student-athletes selected for the 2004 NCAA Leadership Conference being held May 30-June 3 in Lake Buena Vista, Florida. The participants were selected from 1175 nominations from 295 institutions.

Donald Norris, Patricia Fletcher, Public Policy, Editors of New Journal

Donald Norris, professor of public policy and director of MIPAR, and Patricia Fletcher, associate professor of public policy and information systems, were recently named co-editors-in-chief of a new peer-reviewed journal on digital government. The journal, titled the International Journal of Electronic Government Research, will release its inaugural issue in January 2005. It will be published quarterly by Idea Group Publishing. Subscription information and submission guidelines are available online.

Eric Hoffman, Erica Lezan, Residential Life, Present at National Meeting

Two staff members from Residential Life recently gave presentations at the April 2-5 American College Personnel Association annual meeting. Eric Hoffman presented, "Yo Peep This: The Language of Today's College Student" and Erica Lezan presented, "Assessing the Impact of Service-Learning On the Outcomes of Leadership, Citizenship and Appreciation of Diversity."

Posted by dwinds1

April 15, 2004

UMBC Mathematician/Author Awarded Guggenheim Fellowship

Manil Suri, a professor of mathematics at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and author of the critically acclaimed novel "The Death of Vishnu," has been awarded a 2004 Guggenheim Fellowship for exemplary work in the field of fiction writing.

Manil Suri, a professor of mathematics at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and author of the critically acclaimed novel "The Death of Vishnu," has been awarded a 2004 Guggenheim Fellowship for exemplary work in the field of fiction writing.

Suri was among the diverse group of 185 artists, scholars and scientists selected for Guggenheim Fellowships from a field of over 3200 applicants. Results of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation's eightieth annual United States and Canadian competition, with the combined awards totaling nearly $7 million, were announced earlier this month by Foundation president Edward Hirsch.

Suri, a seriously engaged mathematics researcher and teacher, has taught at UMBC since 1983. Suri's fiction was largely unknown, even to his UMBC colleagues, until the publication of an excerpt from "Vishnu" appeared in the February 14, 2000 issue of The New Yorker.

Suri was named a Time magazine "Person to Watch" in 2001, and is currently working on the second novel of a planned trilogy. "The Death of Vishnu," published by W.W. Norton & Company in 2001, garnered rave reviews from critics; including those writing for Publisher's Weekly, The New York Times Book Review, The Washington Post, the Boston Sunday Globe, Booklist, and Library Journal.

About the Guggenheim Fellowship Program:

In a time of decreased funding for individuals in the arts, humanities, and sciences, the Guggenheim Fellowship program has assumed a greatly increased importance and the Foundation is successfully raising funds to enable the appointment of a larger number of Fellows each year. Since 1925 the Foundation has granted more than $230 million in Fellowships to over 15,500 individuals. The full list of year 2004 Fellows is online at http://www.gf.org.

Posted by dwinds1

UMBC Mathematician/Author Awarded Guggenheim Fellowship

Manil Suri, a professor of mathematics at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and author of the critically acclaimed novel "The Death of Vishnu," has been awarded a 2004 Guggenheim Fellowship for exemplary work in the field of fiction writing.

Manil Suri, a professor of mathematics at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and author of the critically acclaimed novel "The Death of Vishnu," has been awarded a 2004 Guggenheim Fellowship for exemplary work in the field of fiction writing.

Suri was among the diverse group of 185 artists, scholars and scientists selected for Guggenheim Fellowships from a field of over 3200 applicants. Results of the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation's eightieth annual United States and Canadian competition, with the combined awards totaling nearly $7 million, were announced earlier this month by Foundation president Edward Hirsch.

Suri, a seriously engaged mathematics researcher and teacher, has taught at UMBC since 1983. Suri's fiction was largely unknown, even to his UMBC colleagues, until the publication of an excerpt from "Vishnu" appeared in the February 14, 2000 issue of The New Yorker.

Suri was named a Time magazine "Person to Watch" in 2001, and is currently working on the second novel of a planned trilogy. "The Death of Vishnu," published by W.W. Norton & Company in 2001, garnered rave reviews from critics; including those writing for Publisher's Weekly, The New York Times Book Review, The Washington Post, the Boston Sunday Globe, Booklist, and Library Journal.

About the Guggenheim Fellowship Program:

In a time of decreased funding for individuals in the arts, humanities, and sciences, the Guggenheim Fellowship program has assumed a greatly increased importance and the Foundation is successfully raising funds to enable the appointment of a larger number of Fellows each year. Since 1925 the Foundation has granted more than $230 million in Fellowships to over 15,500 individuals. The full list of year 2004 Fellows is online at http://www.gf.org.

Posted by dwinds1

April 14, 2004

President Hrabowski's Tribute to Dr. Severino Koh

Be under no illusion. You shall gather to yourself the images you love. As you go, the shapes, the lights, the shadows of the things you have preferred will come to you, yes, inveterately, inevitably as bees to their hive. And there in your mind and spirit they will leave with you their distilled essence, sweet as honey or bitter as gall, and you will grow unto their likeness because their nature will be in you.

As men see the color in the wave, so shall men see in you the thing you have loved most.
Oliver W.S. McCall, The Hand of God

How does one capture the essence of a man? My grandmother would have said that Bino had a "sweet spirit." He loved his family, his work, and life itself.

Our colleague and dear friend, Bino Koh, skillfully led UMBC's College of Engineering in its early years, through the development of its academic programs and its first accreditation. He also played a major role in recruiting a number of our faculty and in integrating the College into the fabric of the University. I was always taken by his passion for engineering and education, his broad international perspective, and his determination to make us the best. He had a sense of enthusiasm about building both the University and the new College of Engineering.

But what made Bino so special - even more than his rich academic and administrative contributions - were his distinctive personal qualities. In fact, a number of colleagues have talked to me about Bino in recent days, and what they all said, in essence, was that he was a genuinely kind person - something I learned firsthand many years ago.

Bino was one of my closest colleagues during our first years at UMBC, in the late 1980s when I was Vice Provost, as we focused on the challenges that students of color and international students faced on our campus. On many occasions, he and I led discussions with our President's Council about these challenges. In fact, our President, the late Michael Hooker, called us his two experts on diversity - I called Bino our expert on humanity.

I continue to remember Bino telling me about growing up in the Philippines - his is the story of poor young boy who overcame the odds and shared with countless others the transforming power of education. He brought the human touch to engineering and to the academic environment, treating every person he met as someone important, especially our students. He was always thinking about what was best for people.

When I think of Bino, I picture his disarming smile and that look of hope in his eyes, and I hear his comforting voice. If I had to give you one statement from him that stands out, it would be when he looked at me and said with great enthusiasm, "We can do this!" He always believed in the power of the human spirit.

Most important, perhaps, he taught us much about the significance of balancing work and family. Indeed, whenever he mentioned his beloved Paz, or his daughters and grandchildren, his face would light up with a great smile and a twinkle in his eyes. You can tell when someone is happy at home, and he was. It was as if he knew something that others might not know - and indeed he did. He knew what it meant to love deeply and to be loved by his family. And that love extended not only across his family, but also across our campus. We were not simply fond and respectful of Bino; we loved Bino, and we always will.

Posted by dwinds1

UMBC Information Systems Professor: e-Filing Still Best Way to Do Taxes

As the tax deadline looms, UMBC information systems professor Stephen H. Holden says that the IRS' e-Filing program is a convenient, secure way for taxpayers to avoid common errors while getting their refunds faster. Holden is also the author of a new study for the IBM Center for the Business of Government that shows how other federal agencies can benefit from the IRS experience in developing e-signature solutions.

As the midnight deadline for filing federal income taxes looms, UMBC information systems assistant professor and electronic government expert Stephen H. Holden says that filing taxes online through the IRS' e-Filing program is a convenient, secure way for taxpayers to avoid common errors while getting their refunds faster.

Holden, who led efforts to improve IRS e-Filing products and features during six years at the IRS before joining the faculty at UMBC, is also the author of a new study for the IBM Center for the Business of Government that shows how other federal agencies can benefit from the IRS' experience in developing e-signature solutions.

"E-filing remains the best way for taxpayers to file their taxes," says Holden. "In many states, taxpayers can file both their federal and state income taxes in one transaction and get their refunds in less than two weeks."

In the new report released by the IBM Center for the Business of Government (www.businessofgovernment.org), entitled Understanding Electronic Signatures: The Key to E-Government, Holden describes how the IRS pioneered the use of electronicsignatures or e-signatures for tax payers filing electronically. According to the report, the increase in e-filing has helped the IRS to reduce the amount of staff time and resources spent on paperwork, allowing them to dedicate more attention to catching tax errors or fraud.

Holden's report shows how last year, the IRS accepted over 52 million e-filed returns - 40 percent of all individual returns that were filed - with well over 70 percent of those e-filed returns being signed electronically. The report notes how this process made the IRS much more efficient, saving an average of $350 per thousand returns.

"E-filing is one of the federal government's longest standing and most successful electronic government programs," says Holden. "If the IRS can do it - with its size, complexity of stakeholder relationships, and general aversion to change - so can other federal agencies."

About Stephen H. Holden

Holden is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Information Systems at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). His research interests include electronic government, information policy, electronic authentication policies and practices, the management of IT in the public sector and electronic democracy.

His research has appeared in IEEE Internet Computing, Public Performance and Management Review, Government Information Quarterly and other journals. He has participated on a National Academy of Sciences study team on electronic authentication, consulted for several federal agencies, and is a contributor to Government Computer News. Prior to his six-year tenure with the IRS working on e-filing and other information technology projects, Holden worked for 10 years at the Office of Management and Budget (OMB).

About the IBM Center for the Business of Government

Through stipends for research, the IBM Center for The Business of Government stimulates research and facilitates discussion on new approaches to improving the effectiveness of government at the federal, state, local, and international levels. For additional information on the IBM Center, visit the Web site at www.businessofgovernment.org.

How to obtain the report:

"Understanding Electronic Signatures: The Key to E-Government" can be obtained free of charge by calling (202) 515-4504 or by downloading a copy at http://www.businessofgovernment.org/main/winners/details/index.asp?GID=146.

Posted by dwinds1

April 13, 2004

Faye Gibbs Named Director of Public Relations at UMBC

Faye Gibbs has been named director of public relations at UMBC. With 20 years of experience developing strategic communications programs, Gibbs has served an extensive roster of public, private and non-profit sector clients including the National Science Foundation, National Cancer Institute, Lucent Technologies and Dow Chemical.

Prior to relocating to Maryland, Gibbs was vice president of Ashley Gibbs Associates, a public relations and marketing firm headquartered in New York City. In addition to developing a nationwide public relations program to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the National Science Foundation (a $5 billion federal agency), her firm played an integral role in the creation and delivery of a comprehensive branding and media outreach program that announced the merger of two international telecommunications giants.

"I began my career at Harvard University and have always had a profound respect for the extraordinary impact institutions of higher learning have on everyone who is associated with them--students, faculty and staff, alike," says Gibbs. "I am truly delighted to join the staff at UMBC, a university that is a leader in so many areas, with so many great stories to tell."

Prior to running her own agency, Gibbs served as Director of Corporate Public Relations and Marketing for MJ Health System, a 15-agency regional healthcare system in New York; was Vice President/Senior Account Supervisor for Tier Communications, also of NY; served as Executive Director for an international foundation that promoted cross-cultural education programs; and established the media/public outreach program for a major initiative sponsored by the National Cancer Institute.

Gibbs succeeds former UMBC news and online information director Charlie Melichar, now director of media relations at Colgate University.

Posted by dwinds1

Manil Suri, Professor of Mathematics and Statistics, Receives Guggenheim Fellowship

Manil Suri, professor of mathematics and statistics at UMBC, has been named a 2004 Guggenheim Fellow for his exemplary work in the field of fiction writing.Suri was one of 184 distinguished scientists, scholars and artists selected to receive a Guggenheim Fellowship from a field more than 3,200 applicants.

After the publication of Suri's first novel, The Death of Vishnu (W.W.Norton & Company, 2001), he was named a Time magazine Person to Watch. His book garnered rave reviews from critics, including those writing forThe New York Times Book Review, the Boston Sunday Globe and Minneapolis Star-Tribune.

A scholar who is seriously engaged in the discipline of mathematics, Suri has taught at UMBC since 1983. His fiction was largely unknown, even to UMBC faculty, until the publication of an excerpt from The Death of Vishnu appeared in a February 2001 issue of The New Yorker.

Posted by dwinds1

April 12, 2004

Mathematics' Manil Suri Receives Guggenheim Fellowship

Manil Suri, professor of mathematics and statistics at UMBC, has been named a 2004 Guggenheim Fellow for his exemplary work in the field of fiction writing.Suri was one of 184 distinguished scientists, scholars and artists selected to receive a Guggenheim Fellowship from a field more than 3,200 applicants.

After the publication of Suri's first novel, The Death of Vishnu (W.W.Norton & Company, 2001), he was named a Time magazine Person to Watch. His book garnered rave reviews from critics, including those writing forThe New York Times Book Review, the Boston Sunday Globe and Minneapolis Star-Tribune.

A scholar who is seriously engaged in the discipline of mathematics, Suri has taught at UMBC since 1983. His fiction was largely unknown, even to UMBC faculty, until the publication of an excerpt from The Death of Vishnu appeared in a February 2001 issue of The New Yorker.

Posted by dwinds1

April 09, 2004

In the News

Tim Brennan, Public Policy, in the Baltimore Sun
On April 3, Tim Brennan, professor of public policy, was quoted in an article by Lorraine Mirabella on the impact that expiring price caps will have on electricity prices.

Tom Schaller, Political Science, in the Washington Post
Assistant professor of political science Tom Schaller wrote an article, "This Time, Bush Could Get the Gore Treatment," that appeared in the April 4 Washington Post. The article discusses the possibility that this year's presidential election could see George W. Bush win the popular vote, but lose the general election through the electoral college process.

Donald Norris, Public Policy and MIPAR, in the Baltimore Sun
Donald Norris, professor of public policy and director of MIPAR, was quoted on April 4 in an article, The Fee State," written by Sun reporter Michael Hill.

techcenter@UMBC in Baltimore Business Journal
The Baltimore Business Journal featured a story about techcenter@UMBC's newest tenant, MetriGenix US, Inc., on April 5.

Alumnus Gib Mason in Baltimore Sun
Alumnus Gib Mason, economics '95 and chief operating officer of Baltimore company 180s, was quoted in a Sun article featuring 180s on April 6. 180s was recently named to the top spot on a list of 100 fastest-growing private companies in U.S. inner cities by the Initiative for a Competitive Inner City, a nonprofit business research organization based in Boston, and Inc. magazine.

UMBC Featured in Daily Record's March 2004 Growth Report
UMBC figures prominently in the Daily Record's March 2004 Growth Report, "Baltimore County: Leverages Strengths, Targets Growth."

*Baltimore County Executive James T. Smith, Jr. mentions the opening of the second building at bwtech@UMBC as a highlight of the coming year in Baltimore County economic growth in "Advantage: Baltimore County" on page 2.
*bwtech@UMBC is featured on page 6 with the story, "Building a Unique Tech Park."
*Also on page 6, UMBC is mentioned in, "Resilient Tech," an article by Penny Lewandowski, Greater Baltimore Technology Council (GBTC) Executive Director.
*In "Land for Opportunity," on page 10, UMBC is mentioned as one of the central locations of biosciences innovation along the I-95 corridor; bwtech@UMBC is mentioned as one of major sites within the Southwest Enterprise Zone for Baltimore County.
*In "Future Focus," beginning on page 4, UMBC is mentioned along with Johns Hopkins University and the University of Maryland, College Park as one of three local institutions whose scientific discoveries have made significant impact; In Vitro Technologies' president Paul Silber is quoted about the benefits techcenter@UMBC has offered his company.

Posted by dwinds1

Kudos

Christoph Irmscher, English, Awarded FellowshipChristoph Irmscher, Professor of English, was awarded the prestigious Rodney G. Dennis Fellowship in the Study of Manuscripts at the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Houghton Library is one of the world's foremost repositories of rare books and manuscripts. The fellowship will enable Christoph Irmscher to study the library's holdings of manuscripts and books by Louis Agassiz, the 19th-century scientist, whose biography he is currently writing for the University Press of Virginia. Irmscher was also selected as one of the participants in the Folger Institute's Spring Faculty Weekend Seminar on "Early Modern Scientific and Intellectual Biography," directed by Professor Steven Shapin (Harvard University), April 2 to April 3, at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, DC.Alumnus Kevin Armstrong Receives Cartography AwardAlumnus Kevin Armstrong, geography, received a cartographic design award in a map competition held t the recent annual conference of the Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice program: Mapping and Analysis for Public Safety. Armstrong's winning entry was a map of access of parolees/probationers to Division of Parole and Probation offices in Baltimore City. Armstrong is employed at the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDA) agency in Greenbelt.Kelly Fahey, Women's Lacrosse, Receives HonorsFreshman Kelly Fahey was named to the honor roll on womenslacrosse.com and was named America East Rookie of the Week for her performance last week. Fahey tallied the game-winning goal with 16 seconds remaining against American to give UMBC its first victory of the season. In addition, she scored three goals in the league opener versus Stony Brook while grabbing eight draw controls.Kelly Fiorani, Women's Lacrosse, Receives Honors from Inside LacrosseSophomore Kelly Fiorani received an honorable mention from Inside Lacrosse for her play last week. Fiorani led the Retrievers in scoring in the America East Conference opener against Stony Brook, where she scored five goals and added two assists.

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Kudos

UMBC Chess Wins "Final Four"
UMBC's chess team celebrated a 3-2 victory over their archrival, the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD), at the prestigious United States Chess Federation's President's Cup in a two-day match (April 3-4) at the Brunswick Plaza in Lindsborg, Kansas.

Christoph Irmscher, English, Awarded Fellowship
Christoph Irmscher, Professor of English, was awarded the prestigious Rodney G. Dennis Fellowship in the Study of Manuscripts at the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Houghton Library is one of the world's foremost repositories of rare books and manuscripts. The fellowship will enable Christoph Irmscher to study the library's holdings of manuscripts and books by Louis Agassiz, the 19th-century scientist, whose biography he is currently writing for the University Press of Virginia.

Irmscher was also selected as one of the participants in the Folger Institute's Spring Faculty Weekend Seminar on "Early Modern Scientific and Intellectual Biography," directed by Professor Steven Shapin (Harvard University), April 2 to April 3, at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, DC.

Alumnus Kevin Armstrong Receives Cartography Award
Alumnus Kevin Armstrong, geography, received a cartographic design award in a map competition held at the recent annual conference of the Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice program: Mapping and Analysis for Public Safety. Armstrong's winning entry was a map of access of parolees/probationers to Division of Parole and Probation offices in Baltimore City. Armstrong is employed at the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDA) agency in Greenbelt.

Kelly Fahey, Women's Lacrosse, Receives Honors
Freshman Kelly Fahey was named to the honor roll on womenslacrosse.com and was named America East Rookie of the Week for her performance last week. Fahey tallied the game-winning goal with 16 seconds remaining against American to give UMBC its first victory of the season. In addition, she scored three goals in the league opener versus Stony Brook while grabbing eight draw controls.

Kelly Fiorani, Women's Lacrosse, Receives Honors from Inside Lacrosse
Sophomore Kelly Fiorani received an honorable mention from Inside Lacrosse for her play last week. Fiorani led the Retrievers in scoring in the America East Conference opener against Stony Brook, where she scored five goals and added two assists.

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Kudos

Christoph Irmscher, English, Awarded Fellowship
Christoph Irmscher, Professor of English, was awarded the prestigious Rodney G. Dennis Fellowship in the Study of Manuscripts at the Houghton Library of Harvard University. Houghton Library is one of the world's foremost repositories of rare books and manuscripts. The fellowship will enable Christoph Irmscher to study the library's holdings of manuscripts and books by Louis Agassiz, the 19th-century scientist, whose biography he is currently writing for the University Press of Virginia.

Irmscher was also selected as one of the participants in the Folger Institute's Spring Faculty Weekend Seminar on "Early Modern Scientific and Intellectual Biography," directed by Professor Steven Shapin (Harvard University), April 2 to April 3, at the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington, DC.

Alumnus Kevin Armstrong Receives Cartography Award
Alumnus Kevin Armstrong, geography, received a cartographic design award in a map competition held at the recent annual conference of the Department of Justice, National Institute of Justice program: Mapping and Analysis for Public Safety. Armstrong's winning entry was a map of access of parolees/probationers to Division of Parole and Probation offices in Baltimore City. Armstrong is employed at the High Intensity Drug Trafficking Areas (HIDA) agency in Greenbelt.

Kelly Fahey, Women's Lacrosse, Receives Honors
Freshman Kelly Fahey was named to the honor roll on womenslacrosse.com and was named America East Rookie of the Week for her performance last week. Fahey tallied the game-winning goal with 16 seconds remaining against American to give UMBC its first victory of the season. In addition, she scored three goals in the league opener versus Stony Brook while grabbing eight draw controls.

Kelly Fiorani, Women's Lacrosse, Receives Honors from Inside Lacrosse
Sophomore Kelly Fiorani received an honorable mention from Inside Lacrosse for her play last week. Fiorani led the Retrievers in scoring in the America East Conference opener against Stony Brook, where she scored five goals and added two assists.

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April 08, 2004

Campus Memorial Service for Richard Neville, Emeritus Dean

The UMBC community is invited to a memorial service for Richard (Dick) Neville on April 26 at 3 p.m. on the 7th Floor of the Albin O. Kuhn Library & Gallery. Neville, who passed away last month, was one of our founding faculty members and played a critical role in the University's development. The service is an opportunity for the campus community to pay tribute to Neville and his numerous accomplishments. The historical significance of his work, which helped to shape UMBC's vision and direction, is of lasting importance to all of us at UMBC.

Neville first joined the UMBC faculty in 1969 as professor and chair of the Department of Education. During his 27-year career at UMBC, he also served as dean of education and dean of arts and sciences, and as senior advisor to the president and provost. He served as acting provost at University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute from 1991 to 1994. In recognition of his outstanding academic leadership and service, he was named dean emeritus at UMBC after he retired in 1995.

Please share information about the memorial service with faculty, staff, alumni and students who might be interested in attending. For more information, please contact Faye Gibbs, director of public relations, at fgibbs@umbc.edu or at 410-455-6380.

Richard Neville obituary in Insights.

Tribute to Richard Neville in Insights.

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UMBC Baseball Set to Debut Lights in Inaugural Night Game on April 13

By Andy Warner, Assistant Director of Athletic Communications

UMBC Athletics, in conjunction with The Baseball Factory, is set to debut the new lighting system installed at the Retrievers' home baseball stadium, The Baseball Factory Field at UMBC, on Tuesday, April 13. The game will mark the Retrievers' first-ever night game at UMBC, with a first pitch scheduled for 7 p.m. against George Mason University.

"We are extremely excited with our partnership with The Baseball Factory Organization," said UMBC Director of Athletics Charles Brown. "UMBC has a long successful history with its baseball program and legendary head coach John Jancuska (27th season with over 575 career wins), developing major leaguers, All-Americans and putting NCAA Division-I caliber programs on the field each year. The Baseball Factory runs a class program and our agreement with them will benefit both UMBC baseball as well as the Baseball Factory."

The 350,000-dollar project includes a new lighting system that features eight poles surrounding the stadium, which highlights the brand new playing surface and warning track around the entire field. Most stadiums in the surrounding states use a six-pole system while The Baseball Factory Field at UMBC will utilize the eight-pole system that features the Musco lighting system, considered as one of the best lighting systems for sports complexes.

In the addition, the Duraturf Service Corporation out of Richmond, Va., has redesigned the Retrievers' playing field and added a warning track around the inside of the entire ball park.

"With the brand new playing surface and lighting system along with future renovations to the dugout, press box and expanded seating, The Baseball Factory Field at UMBC will truly be one of the premier facilities in the region," commented Brown.

A pre-game ceremony will take place prior to the opening game. Brown and members of The Baseball Factory will be on hand for the lighting of the field. The Baseball Factory CEO and Founder Steve Sclafani is scheduled to throw out the first pitch.

"We are very excited to be associated with a class act like UMBC," said Sclafani on the partnership with UMBC. "This is a win-win situation for both organizations to make The Baseball Factory Field at UMBC a top notch facility and bring the great state of Maryland a first-class lighted baseball complex."

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April 01, 2004

Kudos

Thomas Blass, Psychology, Releases New Book
Thomas Blass, professor of psychology, has authored the first-ever biography of one of the most important psychologists of the 20th century, Stanley Milgram. Titled The Man Who Shocked the World: The Life and Legacy of Stanley Milgram (Basic Books), it is a comprehensive biography, presenting both Milgram's life and his scientific achievements.

Milgram was best known for his controversial experiments on obedience to authority, which demonstrated the surprising degree of readiness of normal individuals to obey destructive orders, even when those orders were in conflict with one's moral principles. The ethical controversy stirred up by this research, together with a handful of other studies, led to the governmental regulation of research with human subjects, in the form of Institutional Review Boards (IRBs). Milgram and his work are more widely known today for his studies on the small-world phenomenon, popularly known as "six degrees of separation." A photograph of the book can be seen on Blass's Web site on Milgram's life and work.

Ramachandra Hosmane, Chemistry, Issued Patent
Ramachandra Hosmane, professor of chemistry, was issued a patent entitled "Ring-Expanded Nucleosides and Nucleotides," patent number US 6,677,310 B1, on January 13, 2004. This invention relates to compositions comprising analogues of purine nucleosides containing a ring-expanded heterocyclic ring, in place of purine, and an unmodified or modified sugar residue, pharmaceutically acceptable derivatives of such compositions, as well as methods of use thereof. The patent can be viewed it its entirety on the US Patent and Trademark Office's web site. If you would like more information about patents, trademarks, or copyrights, please call the Office of Technology Development at ext. 5-1414 or visit us in our new location, ECS329.

Lou Cantori, Political Science, Teaches Graduate Seminar at School for Islamic Studies
Lou Cantori, Political Science, taught a graduate seminar titled "Non-liberal Democracy" over Spring Break at the Graduate School of Islamic and Social Sciences in Leesburg, VA. The school, which primarily educates scholars, educators and clerics, is the first Muslim-governed, campus-based institution of Islamic graduate education in the United States.

Alan Price, Visual Arts, Receives Second Prize at Film Festival
Alan Price, associate professor of visual arts, was awarded Jury's Citation Award, second prize, at the 2004 Black Maria Film and Video Festival for his animation, "Overpass."

Jill Johnston-Price, Visual Arts, Receives First Prize at Film Festival
Jill Johnston-Price, adjunct assistant professor of visual arts, was awarded the Grand Jury Award for Best Animation at the 2004 D.C. Independent Film Festival for her animation, "Bludren."

English Faculty to Participate in Enoch Pratt's CityLit Festival
Several faculty members from UMBC's Department of English will be among those reading at the first ever CityLit Festival, to be held on April 17 from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. at the Enoch Pratt Central Branch on Cathedral Street. Instructor Michael Fallon, who is author of the collection History of the Color Black, will read from his poetry in the Poe Room at 10:30 a.m. Piotr Gwiazda, assistant professor, will read from his poetry in the Poe Room at 1:30 p.m. Instructor Rosemary Klein, author of Dark Smoke Burning, will read from her poetry in the Poe Room at 1:40. Chris Corbett, lecturer and faculty advisor for The Retriever Weekly, will read from his award-winning book, Orphans Preferred: The Twisted Truth and Lasting Legacy of the Pony Express, in the Poe Room at 2 p.m.

Play Written by UMBC Undergraduate to Be Performed in May
The Spectator, a play written by UMBC student R. Eric Thomas, an undergraduate majoring in interdisciplinary studies, will be running at Baltimore's new Run of the Mill Theater from May 7-30. At times hilarious and at times tragic, the play focuses on a modern day, 98% white, suburban school, Meadowview, that is dealing with pressure to diversify its curriculum and its community. The diversity committee at the school decides to put on an original musical to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the Brown v. Board of Education decision. The musical--a subject of much ballyhoo months before its premiere--features a cast of singing, dancing high school students. There's only one problem: there are no black students at Meadowview. As the school administrators are divided by the event, scenes from the musical play out in the background--all while two black spectators watch from the audience, and are slowly drawn into the action. The Spectator examines how we view and represent each other as races, and what, if anything, has changed in the last fifty years. For show times and ticket information, please visit the Web site of the Run of the Mill Theater Company.

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Human Resources Announces New Quarterly Staff Recognition Award

UMBC's human resources office has established a new quarterly staff recognition award. The deadline to nominate the first recipient is April 9.

UMBC's human resources office has established a new quarterly staff recognition award. Changes to the previous employee of the month format were made after the Personnel Review and Employee of the Month Committees expressed concern over a lack of participation.

The Personnel Review Committee, Associate Staff Senate and Non-exempt Senate worked together to suggest changes to the award, and after Director of Human Resources Valerie Bell made her recommendations, a proposal was sent to Presidents Council and eventually approved. "I'm very happy with the new award," says Bell, who feels that the quarterly format will give the award more significance. "UMBC staff are outstanding, and I encourage everyone to nominate colleagues they feel are deserving of this honor."

The award includes one significant change: recipients will receive $500, a substantially larger award than the $100 given in the past to employees of the month. Award winners, who will be profiled on the UMBC homepage, also receive a personalized parking space for the quarter, one day of administrative leave and a certificate. They will be invited to a special annual luncheon for quarterly award winners, and their names will also appear on a plaque that will be on view in the Administration lobby.

There is still time to nominate the first recipient of the Quarterly Staff Recognition Award. The deadline for submission of nominations is Friday, April 9. A nomination form is available online.

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In the News

Joseph Tatarewicz, History, on the Marc Steiner Show
Joseph Tatarewicz, associate professor of history, was a guest on WYPR 88.1 FM's Marc Steiner Show on April 1. Tatarewicz and his fellow guests discussed the Bush space initiative and the cancellation of the final servicing mission to the Hubble Space Telescope.

President Hrabowski in the Baltimore Sun
The Baltimore Sun covered President Hrabowski's statement before the State Board of Education in "A Call to Raise the Standards" on March 31.

Warren Cohen, History, in Los Angeles Times
Warren I. Cohen, distinguished university professor of history, reviewed Jonathan Fenby's Chiang Kai-shek: China's Generalissimo and the Nation He Lost for the March 28 Los Angeles Times. The article, "On an Island, With Dreams of the Mainland," is available online only for subscribers.

Tom Schaller, Political Science, in the News
Assistant professor of political science, Tom Schaller was quoted in the March 28 Washington Post article, "Speaker's Strategy Highlights Party Split."

Schaller also participated in a live discussion of this year's presidential campaign on Maryland Public Television's "Direct Connection" on March 29.

He was quoted in a March 21 Tampa Tribune article about the significance of Florida as a "battleground state" in the upcoming presidential election.

Theatre in the Baltimore Sun
The March 25 Baltimore Sun article, "Risks Paying Off for UMBC Theater," detailed UMBC's participation in the upcoming American College Theater Festival. The article discusses Buried, an original puppet production about the casualties of war conceived and directed by Colette Searls, assistant professor of theatre. Buried is the first puppet work to reach the finals in more than 20 years. Sophomore Jason Roth, who will be competing for a second year in the festival's Irene Ryan Acting Scholarship competition, is also mentioned in the article.

Theatre Alumnus Michael Patrick Smith Featured in the Baltimore Sun
"Woody Guthrie Dreams Before Dying," a play starring and written by alumnus Michael Patrick Smith, theatre '99, was featured in the Baltimore Sun on March 25.

techcenter@UMBC in the Baltimore Business Journal
The Baltimore Business Journal published an article on March 24 about techcenter@UMBC's new entrepreneur in residence, David Fink. (Free registration is required for online access to the article.)

Vivian Armor, Alex. Brown Center for Entrepreneurship, in the Baltimore Business Journal
The March 22 issue of the Baltimore Business Journal featured an interview with Vivian Armor, interim director of the Alex. Brown Center for Entrepreneurship. (Free registration is required to view the article online.)

GEST Research Featured in the Baltimore Sun
A study by GEST researchers from UMBC and the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center on the causes of the Dust Bowl droughts of the 1930s was featured in Baltimore Sun article on March 22.

Albin O. Kuhn Library's "Havana" Exhibit Featured in the Baltimore Sun
The Albin O. Kuhn Library's current exhibition, "Havana: The Revolutionary Moment," was featured in the March 23 edition of the Baltimore Sun.

Christopher Corbett, English, in the News
Orphans Preferred: The Twisted Truth and Lasting Legend of the Pony Express, written by English instructor Christopher Corbett, was reviewed in the Salt Lake Tribune on March 21 and the Reno Gazette-Journal on March 22.

Don Norris, Public Policy and MIPAR, in the Baltimore Sun
In the March 21 Baltimore Sun, Don Norris, professor of public policy and director of MIPAR, was quoted in an article on the ongoing legislative standoff in Annapolis based around political parties and personalities.

Lou Cantori, Political Science, in the News
Political Science professor and Middle East expert Lou Cantori was a guest on WYPR 88.1 FM's "Marc Steiner Show" on March 18. Dr. Cantori appeared alongside the foreign news editor of La Paiz, Spain's most prominent newspaper.

On March 17, Cantori was on al-Alam ("The World") TV in Tehren, Iran for 1 1/2 hours along with journalists from Jordan and Cairo, Egypt. Cantori described al-Alam as similar in reputation to al-Jazeera in the Persian Gulf.

Jazzman's in the Daily Record
The March 18 issue of the Daily Record noted a recent award given to Sodexho USA for its Jazzman's Cafe concept and included a photo of UMBC's cafe. The "Hot Concept" award is sponsored by the trade publication Nation's Restaurant News and Tyson's Food, Inc.; UMBC's Jazzman's is one of only five locations in Maryland. (Online access to article for subscribers only.)

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Faye Gibbs Named Director of Public Relations at UMBC

Faye Gibbs has been named director of public relations at UMBC. With 20 years of experience developing strategic communications programs, Gibbs has served an extensive roster of public, private and non-profit sector clients.

Faye Gibbs has been named director of public relations at UMBC. With 20 years of experience developing strategic communications programs, Gibbs has served an extensive roster of public, private and non-profit sector clients including the National Science Foundation, National Cancer Institute, Lucent Technologies and Dow Chemical.

Prior to relocating to Maryland, Gibbs was vice president of Ashley Gibbs Associates, a public relations and marketing firm headquartered in New York City. In addition to developing a nationwide public relations program to celebrate the 50th anniversary of the National Science Foundation (a $5 billion federal agency), her firm played an integral role in the creation and delivery of a comprehensive branding and media outreach program that announced the merger of two international telecommunications giants.

"I began my career at Harvard University and have always had a profound respect for the extraordinary impact institutions of higher learning have on everyone who is associated with them--students, faculty and staff, alike," says Gibbs. "I am truly delighted to join the staff at UMBC, a university that is a leader in so many areas, with so many great stories to tell."

Prior to running her own agency, Gibbs served as Director of Corporate Public Relations and Marketing for MJ Health System, a 15-agency regional healthcare system in New York; was Vice President/Senior Account Supervisor for Tier Communications, also of NY; served as Executive Director for an international foundation that promoted cross-cultural education programs; and established the media/public outreach program for a major initiative sponsored by the National Cancer Institute.

Gibbs succeeds former UMBC news and online information director Charlie Melichar, now director of media relations at Colgate University.

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March 12, 2004

UMBC HEAD MEN'S BASKETBALL COACH RESIGNS

The UMBC Department of Athletics has accepted the resignation of Tom Sullivan as Head Men's Basketball Coach, UMBC Director of Athletics Dr. CharlesBrown announced today.

In nine seasons at UMBC, Sullivan compiled a 106-145 record, becoming just the second coach in the University's basketball history to record 100 victories.During the 1997-98 season, UMBC improved by 8 games to finish at 14-14, and Sullivan was named Big South Conference Coach of the Year. The followingyear, UMBC's first in the Northeast Conference, Sullivan and the Retrievers set a league record for consecutive wins to begin a season (15) and won theconference's regular season title with a 17-3 mark. Sullivan was named Northeast Conference Coach of the Year for the 1998-99 season.

In 2001-02, Sullivan led the Retrievers to amass 20 victories for the first and only time in their 18-year NCAA Division I history.

In Sullivan's final season at UMBC-the Retrievers' first in the America East Conference- UMBC completed the 2003-04 season with a 7-21 record. Sullivan'scareer record stands at 260-270 in 19 seasons as a head coach.

Tom Sullivan provided UMBC Basketball with many fine moments during his tenure here, said Director of Athletics Dr. Charles Brown. We wish him the best of luck in his future endeavors.

I want to thank the University for affording me the opportunity to have coached so many fine student-athletes in my nine years as head coach here at UMBC, Mr. Sullivan said. I am very proud of our successes on the court as well as our excellent graduation rate. It has been a very challenging experience. I hope I leave my players with skills that will serve them well as they go through life. I wish everyone at UMBC, students and administration, every future success.

A decision regarding the search process for Coach Sullivan's successor has not been made at this time. Randy Monroe is currently serving as Acting Head Men'sBasketball Coach.

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March 02, 2004

UMBC Study Highlights Need for Affordable Housing in Maryland

Housing in Maryland is getting increasingly expensive, and many police, firefighters, nurses and teachers can't afford to live in the same neighborhoods they serve, according to a study by graduate students in the UMBC Department of Public Policy presented at a meeting of the Governor's Commission on Housing Policy today.

Housing in Maryland is getting increasingly expensive, and more needs to be done by state and metropolitan county governments to provide adequate, affordable housing for residents - many of them vital service providers like police, firefighters, nurses and teachers - according to a study by graduate students in the UMBC Department of Public Policy presented at a meeting of the Governor's Commission on Housing Policy today.

The new study, Affordable Housing in Metropolitan Maryland: A Policy Analysis, examines the housing market in eight counties that make up Maryland's two urban areas (Montgomery and Prince George's Counties in metropolitan Washington, DC; Baltimore City, Anne Arundel; Baltimore, Carroll, Harford, and Howard Counties in metropolitan Baltimore).

The analysis found that existing county housing policies do not go far enough in making units affordable, and most jurisdictions are not even meeting established goals to increase the number of affordable housing units.

The lack of affordability means that many low-and-moderate income residents are being squeezed out of housing. "Too many service workers, such as teachers, nurses, police and firefighters, cannot afford to live in the jurisdiction where they serve," the study concludes. "The consequences of not acting are grave because the soaring cost of housing is unlikely to abate soon."

The report offers three recommendations for programs that could increase the availability of affordable housing in Maryland:

Increase the Maryland Affordable Housing Trust Fund (MAHT).
This fund, established by the Maryland General Assembly in 1992, provides funds to build affordable housing units. This program is attractive to all jurisdictions because it reduces the housing shortage, a major goal in housing affordability.

Expand loans for first time homebuyers.
The Community Development Administration (CDA) Maryland Mortgage Program provides low-interest loans to first-time low and moderate income homebuyers that lack affordable housing. This program is the best alternative for counties that are already heavily developed, such as Baltimore City, Baltimore, Howard and Montgomery Counties, because it helps families that lack affordable rental housing to purchase homes.

Create additional incentives for the Moderately-Priced Dwelling Units (MPDU) Program.
MPDU programs require developers to sell a specific percentage of newly constructed homes as affordable units. The program is attractive in developing counties because it uses market techniques to produce affordable housing and keeps the county in control of its zoning decisions.

UMBC Public Policy graduate students analyzed affordable housing in the state as part of their Public Policy Capstone seminar, a course where students, working with faculty and outside experts in relevant fields, prepare a policy analysis of a current topic. The study is available online as a PDF file at http://www.umbc.edu/mipar.

About UMBC Public Policy Department:

The UMBC Department of Public Policy provides quality education for a diverse range of highly qualified students who wish to pursue or further a career in a public policy related area. The interdisciplinary program offers both a Master of Public Policy and a Ph.D. in Public Policy.

About Governor's Commission on Housing Policy:

Governor Ehrlich established the Governor's Commission on Housing Policy by Executive Order in March, 2003 to make recommendations to the Governor on actions that can be taken to increase affordable housing in Maryland communities. The Commission is chaired by Victor L. Hoskins, Secretary, Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development.

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March 01, 2004

Legislative Session Update

On February 25, a Senate committee of the Maryland General Assembly will begin to review proposed legislation that links predictable, stable tuition rates to predictable, adequate funding for higher education.

On February 25, a Senate committee of the Maryland General Assembly will begin to review proposed legislation that links predictable, stable tuition rates to predictable, adequate funding for higher education.

Thirty senators led by Senator Brian Frosh have sponsored the Access to Quality in Higher Education Act of 2004, SB 112. Similarly, on the House side, UMBC alumna and House Speaker Pro Tem, Delegate Adrienne Jones with Appropriations Committee Chairman Norman Conway and House Speaker Michael Busch have led thirty colleagues to sponsor the Higher Education Affordability and Access Act of 2004, HB1188.

Both bills address key criteria endorsed by the USM Board of Regents in a resolution which has been widely disseminated to both elected officials and USM advocates:

**Protect the high quality of the UMBC education valued by our students, alumni and their families, through appropriate and more stable funding levels, and

**Provide for affordable access to that quality higher education through reasonable tuition.

We can achieve stable tuition, adequate funding, a valued work force and continued momentum for all that UMBC has achieved with your help. Please contact your representatives and let them know that you value quality and access in Maryland public education.

Write or e-mail your representatives about SB 112 and HB 1188
Take a few minutes now to write, call or e-mail your representatives. Ask them for their support for legislation that protects high quality and affordability. Tell them your UMBC success story, express your pride in Maryland public higher education and ask for their help in sustaining its great strides.

Need to locate your delegate or senator?

Read the February 25 USM testimony to the Senate Budget & Taxation Committee.

For the latest information on the legislative session, visit Voices for UMBC.

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February 16, 2004

Swimming and Diving Gets Ready for Its First-Ever America East Championships

After dominating the East Coast Athletic Conference (ECAC) and Northeast Conference (NEC) for the past several years, the UMBC men's and women's swimming and diving teams prepare to extend that dominance into the America East Conference.

After dominating the East Coast Athletic Conference (ECAC) and Northeast Conference (NEC) for the past several years, the UMBC men's and women's swimming and diving teams prepare to extend that dominance into the America East Conference.

Participating in their first ever championship in the new league on February 20-22, the Retrievers enter the post-season boasting a 12-1 record on both sides, setting a new school record for single-season wins for the men's and women's teams, individually as well as combined.

It's great to have our teams be the one people fear, said Head Coach Chad Cradock. When we come into meets, other teams look at us as the team to beat. It shows that we have gained the respect of the swimming world.

During his three years as head coach at UMBC, Cradock has posted an incredible 62-15 combined record, good for a .805 winning percentage.

This year, the women's only loss came at the hands of East Carolina, while the Retriever men's lone defeat came from a heartbreaking one point loss to state rival Navy. Entering the final event with a 117-109 lead, UMBC generated just four points in the 400 freestyle relay, while the Midshipmen claimed 13 points, and the Retrievers saw themselves on the short end of a 122-121 decision.

I'm upset about the loss to Navy, but that loss helped our men focus and be more competitive, said Cradock. As we went into the rest of the season, that one loss pushed us to win others.

Next week, UMBC will continue to push as they take on new their new league foes at the America East Championships in Orono, Maine. The Retriever men look to get their seventh consecutive conference title (ECAC Champions 1998-2003), while the women go for their third straight and fifth in the last six years (NEC 1999-2000, 2002-2003).

It was great to have both men and women break school records and I am so proud to be working with such dedicated and loyal athletes, said Cradock. They definitely deserved every victory that they have gotten so far, but they remain aggressive and I know they have the drive to win the conference title.

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February 11, 2004

A Note on The Quality and Cost of Education at UMBC

Important questions about the quality and cost of public higher education are being raised nationally and in Maryland in light of the current economy: How good should our public colleges and universities aspire to be? Are these institutions well managed? How should the cost of higher education be shared between state governments and students?

During most of the past 10 years, the State of Maryland has strongly supported UMBC, helping us become a national leader in linking the excitement of research with excellent education across the liberal arts and sciences. In recent years, Newsweek has called UMBC a "powerhouse in Baltimore, offering a topnotch, rigorous education to scholars who don't want to pay for an Ivy," and one of the nation's "Hot Schools." It is clear that students and their families also recognize this quality. Large numbers of top students want to be on our campus. As a result, UMBC's student body has never been larger, better prepared, or more diverse.

As a result of State budget cuts, a 20-percent tuition increase was necessary this year to maintain the quality of education and services our students deserve. Some have asked why a university education is so expensive. The fact is that providing a first-rate education at a research university is both people-intensive and technology-intensive. Our students don't want to be numbers. They want individual attention from faculty, access to advising and mentoring, and opportunities for hands-on experience in up-to-date laboratories, studios, and performance spaces. This is why students come to UMBC, and we are committed to meeting their needs.

Our challenge is to continue to meet our commitments to students during these difficult times while keeping tuition affordable. In recent years, our State support has been cut by $15 million while our enrollment, the number of students living on campus, and research activity have continued to grow. Unlike companies that make cutbacks during a business downturn, we have faced budget reductions at a time when demand for our services has never been stronger. We have cut millions of dollars in administrative personnel and operating expenses, while continuing to invest wisely in instruction and services that support students' academic progress and our growing enrollment, including hiring faculty, building and renovating classroom and laboratory space, expanding computer access, and maintaining library hours.

While we continue to be conservative in administrative spending, we must also invest in areas important to our students' progress. In the coming academic year, we will face increased costs associated with recent enrollment growth, including new faculty positions, growth in academic and student support services, and additional library materials, as well as growing costs for student financial aid, faculty and staff salaries, health insurance and utilities, and debt service on bonds funding new and renovated classroom and laboratory space.

Because State funding is expected to remain flat for the coming year, the Board of Regents approved, and the Governor accepted, an additional tuition increase of 10 percent for undergraduates and 6.5 percent for graduate students beginning in the fall 2004 semester to maintain the quality of services provided at UMBC and other public universities. In the past, the State would support at least half of these necessary budget increases, and the rest would be supported by modest tuition increases. To assist students and families with the challenge of rising tuition, UMBC's financial aid web site (www.umbc.edu/financialaid/faq.html) provides information on financial aid and loan programs. Now is the time to apply for aid for the 2004-2005 school year by visiting www.fafsa.ed.gov and completing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by the February 14 deadline.

What makes the UMBC experience particularly special is that students from all backgrounds have access to a first-rate education. The message from our students and their families is clear: "good enough" is not good enough for public higher education in Maryland. Our students appreciate the excellent education available to them, and they want it to remain affordable. Employers and outstanding graduate and professional schools respect and value degrees from UMBC more than ever. We cannot afford to go backward.

It is encouraging that the Governor's budget provides level funding to the University System of Maryland and an additional $15.9 million in need-based financial aid for higher education statewide at a time when many other agencies continue to face budget reductions. The State's future role in supporting higher education is a key issue under discussion in the current Legislative session. Universities, public officials, and citizens must do even more to ensure predictable funding, access to quality public education, and sound return on higher education investments. It is important that our students and their families participate in this dialogue. Please let our leaders know that the State's support is vital to our ability to continue providing excellent opportunities for students at UMBC. If you would like to receive periodic updates about these issues, please e-mail voicesforumbc@umbc.edu and provide your e-mail address.

Thank you for choosing UMBC and for your continued support.

Freeman A. Hrabowski, III
President

Posted by dwinds1

CWIT Video Wins Medals at International Film and Video Awards

The Center for Women and Information Technology (CWIT) video, "You Can Be Anything," was awarded the prestigious Gold World Medal in the category of Best Original Music/Lyrics and a World Silver Medal for Motivation by the New York Festivals.

The Center for Women and Information Technology (CWIT) video, "You Can Be Anything," was awarded the prestigious Gold World Medal in the category of Best Original Music/Lyrics and a World Silver Medal for Motivation by the New York Festivals. The 2004 International Film & Video Awards were presented in the Hudson Theatre on January 30, and were attended by senior executives from the broadcast and film industry from around the world. Claudia Morrell, CWIT's director and executive producer for the video, and Michael Bacon, who composed the music, accepted the award.

"You Can Be Anything" uses the techniques of music videos and the power of media to portray a wide variety of women, both past and present, working in diverse careers using technology. The music and images are combined in exciting ways that appeal to young people, engage their emotions, capture their attention and convey the message that science and technology are cool, exciting fields for women as well as men. CWIT intends the video to be used by a speaker from the center's speaker's bureau who will discuss informal programs, classes and careers in more detail.

Morrell says the project was the result of collaboration between students, faculty, staff and alumni. "Congratulations go to Video Press' Susan Hannah Hadary and Bill Whiteford '80 for the award submission, as well as their contact with Michael Bacon, the composer. Congratulations also to the Video Project Team, which included Bill Shewbridge, OIT New Media Studio; Dan Bailey, Imaging Research Center; Iohanna Sakellion, graduate student; and Anne Spence, Department of Mechanical Engineering. Thanks also to Joan Korenman, CWIT founding director, for her continuous behind the scenes support; Joan Lawrence; our CWIT scholars and UMBC students; and CWIT External and Internal Board members who helped us to achieve excellence -- including being filmed, providing input and keeping it 'cool.'"

Click here to watch the video: www.umbc.edu/be-anything/.

Posted by dwinds1

February 04, 2004

The California Kids

Seth Davis and Cory McJimson shook off the cold as they entered the RAC Arena on a gray, chilly November afternoon in 2002. The duo had arrived from Californiaand were taking their an official visit to UMBC to see if they wanted to consider continuing their academic and athletic careers 3,000 miles from home.A tough sell, right? Obviously not, because both student-athletes signed National Letters of Intent just a couple of weeks later, and have performed admirably for the Retrievers in the first half of their initial seasons in Baltimore.

Seth Davis and Cory McJimson shook off the cold as they entered the RAC Arena on a gray, chilly November afternoon in 2002. The duo had arrived from Californiaand were taking their an official visit to UMBC to see if they wanted to consider continuing their academic and athletic careers 3,000 miles from home.

A tough sell, right?

Obviously not, because both student-athletes signed National Letters of Intent just a couple of weeks later, and have performed admirably for the Retrievers in the first half of their initial seasons in Baltimore. At press time, Davis has started in all 14 games, and the 6'7" power forward was third in the America East Conference in blocked shots through the midway point of the season. The 6'6" wingman McJimson comes off the bench, but leads UMBC with eleven games in double figures and is the team's leading rebounder at 6.1 per game.

So what made them come to UMBC?

They were both impressed by the campus, the academic program, the coaching staff's outlook and the vision of UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski. But,neither would have left their families, friends, and familiar lifestyle to come east without the other agreeing to make the journey as well.

"We both liked it a lot," said McJimson, who intimated that Davis did some convincing to get him to come. "I felt, 'we can do this together.' I would not have felt comfortable coming here, so far from home, by myself."

The two met on the courts during the spring after their senior seasons in high school. Davis added John Muir High School in Pasadena, California, while McJimson was enrolled at Eisenhower in the town of Rialto, about 30 miles away. Jeff Estis was the head coach at Pierce (Washington) College at the time, and convinced both that a trek north would be beneficial when preparing to enter the ranks of Division I basketball.

When Estis was hired by UMBC Head Coach Tom Sullivan several months later as an assistant coach, he knew immediately the California Kids could be very good players for the Retrievers. Both Cory and Seth came back to Baltimore during the second summer session and have only ventured back to California for Thanksgiving and Christmas for two days at a time. That has not been easy.

"It was fine for the first two or three months," admitted Davis. "Then I really began to miss my family and the lifestyle I enjoyed in California."

"It's really hard," said McJimson. "I've only seen my dad a couple of times in the past two years; before I was used to being around him every day. But I talk to my parents often, and my friends have been great, calling me nearly every day."

Assistant Coach Randy Monroe has been a great asset, as he planted the seeds upon their arrival in Baltimore by inviting the pair to attend services at the NewPsalmist Baptist Church (in Baltimore). The two enjoyed it so much that they decided to join and have attended nearly every Sunday that the team is in town.

"The message that is delivered every Sunday is very powerful, but one that can be put into practice in day-to-day life," said Coach Monroe. "It's great to see young people try to incorporate things other than basketball or the latest rap group into their lives."

"It (worship) keeps us level-headed and grounded-it's helped a lot," said Davis.

Although the duo has been major contributors in their first 14 games as Retrievers, each feels they are not close to having tapped their potential. "Defensively, it's been kind of hard to pick things up," said McJimson. "I'm doing alright, but the breakout game that I have been waiting for hasn't come yet."

"It's more of a mental game now," said Davis. "I am accepting this year as a learning year and am glad that the coaches have been patient with us. I know I have the ability, and eventually, I'll prove that I am a talented Division I basketball player."

Through all the adjustments that McJimson and Davis have had to make, the lone constant over the past two years has been their own relationship.

"I think they both saw the drive to be successful in each other," said Coach Estis. "Although they both had other 'best friends' when they came to (junior) college, the two of the team searched each other out because they were so positive in their energies as to what could accomplish and they bonded together even more when the opportunity to come to UMBC presented itself."

"He can tell me anything and I feel I can tell him anything," said McJimson. "We've been through a lot together in just two years. I consider Seth a brother."

Davis agrees with that assessment of their relationship. "We come from the same environment...The coaches and my teammates have done everything to make usfeel welcome, but I don't know if I could be here without Cory."

Retriever fans should be thankful that the California Kids are now calling Baltimore "home."

Posted by dwinds1

Phoenix Dance Company Performs at UMBC

UMBC's Department of Dance presents the Phoenix Dance Company, known for its radical dance collaborations with UMBC videographers, mechanical engineers, computer programmers and visual artists, in concert February 11 through 14.

UMBC's Department of Dance presents the Phoenix Dance Company, known for its radical dance collaborations with UMBC videographers, mechanical engineers, computer programmers and visual artists, in concert February 11 through 14.

The venerable Phoenix Dance Company, a professional company in residence at UMBC, was founded in 1983. Over the last several years, Phoenix has explored the intersection between art and technology. The company has recently collaborated with Steve Bradley, an intermedia artist who has generated live computer-enhanced video images and a system for generating sounds based on dancers' movements; Tony Farquhar, a mechanical engineer who developed a spunky six-legged dancing robot (Maurice Tomb); Vin Grabill, an MIT-trained videographer; and composer Linda Dusman. Phoenix is co-directed by choreographers Carol Hess and Doug Hamby.

Featured on the program are the following works:

Mobile II by Carol Hess, a dance of visual beauty and complexity, featuring six women with an original score by Neal Woodson. An installation of plexiglass screens becomes a projection surface for video images by Vin Grabill and Carol Hess. Throughout the piece, the dancers perform, re-orient and re-combine clusters of movement in open spaces, behind layers of fabric, and amid sheets of plexiglass and changing projections.

In a new video piece by Carol Hess, dancer Margaret Terry wanders along a dark hallway with many doors, to find herself dancing in unexpected environments. The choreography moves across multiple settings which include a river, a forest, a field, and a city. Sound design is by Timothy Nohe.

Doug Hamby's Interplay, a beautiful and boldly dynamic dance for four women that brings to life Robert Moran's energetic music. In this quartet, the dance enlivens and intertwines the rich physical, temporal and spatial connections between the performers.

Edgewater Park by Doug Hamby, a sensuous duet for two men combining live video images from the dance with images of carnival rides. Beautiful and intriguing video images of the live dance are simultaneously edited by filmmaker, Nick Prevas and projected onto a movie screen that blocks much of the viewer's direct access to the dance, with a sound score by artist Timothy Nohe.

Part One Parting, a solo choreographed by Jeanine Durning and performed by Sandra Lacy, with original electronic music by composer Chris Peck. Structured like a short story, Part One Parting follows a woman who recalls an event in her life over and over again. In this episodic solo, the dream-like sequences reflect the idea of memory and how we remember and re-experience events.

All performances will be held at 8 p.m. in the UMBC Theatre. Tickets are $15 general admission and $7 for students and seniors, available through the box office at 410-455-6240.

Posted by dwinds1

Flat State Funds for Public Universities Spark Focus on Quality and Cost

As the Maryland legislative session begins, public universities face a year of flat State funding, raising important questions about the quality and cost of public higher education.

As the Maryland legislative session begins, public universities face a year of flat State funding, raising important questions about the quality and cost of public higher education.

"During much of the past 10 years, the State of Maryland has invested new resources in UMBC, supporting campus growth in enrollment, student body quality, research grants and facilities," says Mark Behm, vice president for administration and finance. "However, since the economy faltered in 2002, our State support was cut by $15 million."

As a result of these cuts, a 20-percent tuition increase was necessary for the current academic year to maintain the level of service to students, says Behm. Companies usually make cutbacks during a business downturn, he explains, noting that UMBC has managed major budget reductions at a time when demand for services has never been stronger. Behm says that campus leaders cut millions of dollars in administrative personnel and operating expenses, while continuing to make strategic investments to support students' academic progress, growing enrollment, and the infrastructure for research, including hiring faculty, building and renovating classroom and laboratory space, expanding computer access and maintaining library hours.

The Fiscal Year 2005 budget submitted by the Governor includes $65-million in State general funds for UMBC, the same amount as in the current fiscal year. The budget includes a 2.5-percent merit pay fund for University System of Maryland faculty and staff and a 1.6-percent cost of living adjustment for all State employees, which must be approved by the Legislature.

Because State funding is expected to remain flat for the coming year, the Board of Regents approved, and the Governor accepted, an additional tuition increase of 10 percent beginning in the fall 2004 semester. This will support increased costs associated with recent enrollment growth, including new faculty positions, growth in academic and student support services, and additional library materials, as well as growing costs for student financial aid, faculty and staff salaries, health insurance, utilities and debt service on construction bonds.

In the past, notes Behm, the State would support at least half of these necessary budget increases and the rest would be supported by more modest tuition increases.

"Our challenge is to continue to meet our commitments to students, faculty and staff during these difficult times while keeping tuition affordable," says Provost Arthur Johnson. "This means we must continue to be conservative in our spending, while continuing to carefully invest in faculty hiring, advising, academic facilities and technology."

The future role of the State in supporting higher education will be a key policy issue in the Legislative Session. Some bills will seek to establish more predictable funding for higher education, some will propose tuition caps and some will link additional funding for higher education with tuition caps, says Joan Kennedy Cody, director of government and community relations.

"It is clear that our students and their families appreciate the first-rate education available at UMBC and that they want it to remain affordable," notes Cody. "It is important that our voices are heard on these issues." Cody encourages the UMBC community to attend the University's annual Legislative Reception in Annapolis February 18 to communicate the importance of preserving both quality and access at UMBC. For more information and to register online, go to www.umbc.edu/alum/annapolis.

Posted by dwinds1

February 03, 2004

Graduation Application Deadlines - February 13 and 16

Undergraduates should pick up an application for graduation from the Registrar's Office in the Academic Services Bldg. by Monday, February 16. The Undergraduate Commencement Ceremony will be held on Thursday, May 20, at 1 p.m. at the 1st Mariner Arena.

Graduate students should pick up an application for graduation from the Graduate School Office in the Administration Bldg. by Friday, February 13. (For more information, see www.umbc.edu/gradschool/requirements/.) The Graduate School Commencement Ceremony will be held on Wednesday, May 19, at 10 a.m. in the Retriever Activities Center.

Posted by dwinds1

February 02, 2004

2004 Alumni Awards: Submit Nominations by 2/13

The UMBC Alumni Association is seeking nominations for its 2004 Alumni Awards, which will be presented at a ceremony on April 21 in the UniversityCenter Ballroom.

The Alumni Association's Board of Directors has made some significant changes to the award categories and criteria. The awards now represent acombination of professional, personal and community-minded accomplishments and give the opportunity to recognize outstanding alumni fromdifferent academic areas.

Alumna/us of the Year Awards will be given to graduates who have brought distinction to UMBC through personal and professional achievement. An award may be made in each of the following academic areas: Engineering and Information Technology, Humanities, Life Sciences, Social and Behavioral Sciences, Visual and Performing Arts. Also, a Distinguished Service Award will recognize an alumna/alumnus for exceptional service to UMBC, its students and alumni.

For more information and nomination forms, please call Alumni Relations at ext. 5-ALUM or e-mail alum@umbc.edu. Nominations should be submitted by February 13.

Posted by dwinds1

January 08, 2004

A Decade of Learning and Service

In December, the Shriver Center celebrated ten years of service to the UMBC community and beyond. Founded on December 14, 1993, in honor of Sargent and Eunice Kennedy Shriver, the Shriver Center was created to engage the strengths and resources of higher education to find creative solutions to the most pressing of social problems. It has since become a national leader in promoting service-learning, civic engagement, and community-based service delivery.

In December, the Shriver Center celebrated ten years of service to the UMBC community and beyond. Founded on December 14, 1993, in honor of Sargent and Eunice Kennedy Shriver, the Shriver Center was created to engage the strengths and resources of higher education to find creative solutions to the most pressing of social problems. It has since become a national leader in promoting service-learning, civic engagement, and community-based service delivery.

The following are just a few of the Shriver Center's many accomplishments over the last ten years:

*The Choice Programs, which have been administered in the Shriver Center since its opening, have served 15,000 youth from across the state of Maryland during its 15-year history. Choice Programs, which include the Choice Program and Choice Jobs, work directly with young people and their families to provide job skills and reduce delinquency. These programs have now been replicated in California and Connecticut.

*Ninety percent of the Shriver Peaceworker Program's alumni are currently employed full-time and 100 percent continue in careers of public service. More than 80 percent of the participants in this program for returned Peace Corps volunteers came from outside the Baltimore-Washington metropolitan area, but 74 percent continue to live in the area after graduation as they pursue careers in public service.

*Over the last ten years, the Shriver Center has placed over 10,000 undergraduate and graduate students in internships, cooperative education and service-learning opportunities.

Building upon these accomplishments, the Shriver Center continues to expand its services to UMBC and the surrounding community.

*The Shriver Living Learning Center, now in its fourth year, offers 29 undergraduates with interests in public service the opportunity to live together in Erickson Hall. These students commit to performing five hours of community service per week and taking a practicum class that allows them to reflect on their service experience.

*The Shriver Center collaborates with the Department of Biological Sciences, College of Engineering and five Baltimore areas middle schools in the Teaching Enhancement Partnership Project (TEPP), an effort funded by the National Science Foundation. This program, now in its second year, brings UMBC students into classrooms to provide support to teachers in math, science, engineering and technology education.

*In 2001, the Shriver Center initiated the Kauffman Entrepreneur Internship Program, which provides undergraduates with first-hand learning experience in entrepreneurship. Students in the program work in a semester-long internship with start-up or emerging companies, including some located in techcenter@UMBC.

Posted by dwinds1

January 07, 2004

Memorial Service for Professor Joseph Arnold, Department of History

January 6, 2004

To: The UMBC Community

I am deeply saddened to inform the campus that our colleague and friend,Professor Joe Arnold, died on Monday evening.

Like many of you, I was privileged to have had a close professional andpersonal relationship with Joe. I can think of no one during myprofessional career for whom I have had greater respect and deeperaffection. In fact, I had a wonderful conversation with him in my officeimmediately before the holiday break. He told me of his intent to retireand wanted me to know how proud he was of our university, how specialhis experience in the History Department had been, and how much helooked forward to continuing his research here on campus in the KuhnLibrary.

As a university, we are who we are today in large part because of Joeand other pioneers in the UMBC story. As I told him that day in myoffice, he will always be a part of UMBC.

A memorial service will be held on Saturday, January 10, in the 7th floor reception area of the Albin O. Kuhn Library and Gallery. The family will receive friends in the reception area from 9:30 to 11 a.m., with the memorial service to follow from 11 a.m. to 12 p.m. Interment will be at 12:30 p.m. at St. John's Cemetery on St. John's Lane in Ellicott City.

It is fitting that one of Joe's closest colleagues and friends, Professor John Jeffries, Chair of the History Department, has provided the following eloquent tribute.

Freeman Hrabowski

Joe Arnold was a vital and enormously important member of the UMBCfaculty for some three and a half decades. Born in Chicago, Joe grew upon Chicago's North Shore, received his B.A. from Denison University in1959 and his Ph.D. from The Ohio State University in 1968, and taught atSouthern Connecticut State College before coming to UMBC in 1968. Thoughhis interests and learning were remarkably wide-ranging, his primaryfocus as a scholar and teacher was on urban history and the history ofBaltimore and Maryland. His first book, The New Deal in the Suburbs,quickly became and remains the standard account of New Deal communityplanning efforts.

In addition to innumerable scholarly articles, he subsequently publishedbooks on the Flood Control Act of 1936, on the Army Corps of Engineersand the Chesapeake Bay, on Maryland's economic history, and (with EdOrser of American Studies) on the development of Catonsville as a"streetcar suburb" in the late-19th and early-20th centuries. At hisdeath, he remained at work on a major book that will become thedefinitive study of modernizing Baltimore. His teaching and mentoring,especially in his heavily enrolled courses on American urban history andon the history of Baltimore, engaged and gave new insights andperspectives to legions of UMBC undergraduate and graduate students, whoprofited not only from Joe's expertise but also from his kindness andhis manifest love of learning.

Joe served as Acting UMBC Librarian at a critical time, as president ofthe UMBC Faculty-Staff Assembly, as Chair of the Academic Planning andBudget Committee, and in other major departmental and Universitypositions far too numerous to mention. He brought his characteristichumanity, sagacity, sense of responsibility, and good judgment to all ofthose duties, and was instrumental in the development of UMBC. He playedan active and often leading role with a variety of private and publichistorical institutions in the area.

But as Joe's many friends will know, his extraordinary professionalaccomplishments and contributions are but part of the story. Simply, hewas as fine and generous a person as I have known. However big or smallthe task, however inconvenient to him it might have been, he couldalways be counted upon to do whatever he could for friends, for thedepartment, and for the University. He leaves behind his wonderfulfamily--his wife, Mary Jane; their children, Elizabeth, David, and Ben;and their six grandchildren.

All of us who have known Joe Arnold as friend and colleague are much thebetter for it; and UMBC is a far stronger institution for his yearshere.

John Jeffries
Professor and Chair
Department of History

Condolences may be sent to
Mary Jane Arnold
10016 Whitworth Way
Ellicott City, MD 21042

Memorial contributions may be made to the UM Foundation for the UMBC Library Joseph Larkin Arnold Endowment Fund. Please send contributions in care of Tom Beck.

Members of the UMBC Community who wish to share their memories and reflections foran Insights online feature on Professor Arnold can send text to EleanorLewis at elewis@umbc.edu by Friday, January 9.

Posted by dwinds1

January 06, 2004

UMBC Chess Team Takes Second Place in National Championship

UMBC's chess team earned second place at one of the most competitive Pan American Intercollegiate Chess Championships to date. UMBC's first team was edged by its rival team from the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD), which has shared the title with UMBC in the past but never won the championship outright. UMBC team captain Eugene Perelshteyn earned top player honors for his performance on board three.

UMBC's chess team earned second place at one of the most competitive Pan American Intercollegiate Chess Championships to date. UMBC's first team was edged by its rival team from the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD), which has shared the title with UMBC in the past but never won the championship outright. UMBC team captain Eugene Perelshteyn earned top player honors for his performance on board three.

"Colleges across the country are starting to take chess more seriously and that is proven by the tough competition at this year's tournament," said Alan Sherman, director of the UMBC chess program and associate professor of computer science. "Even beyond UMBC and UTD, the perennial powerhouses, teams from Brooklyn College, Miami Dade Community College, Princeton and Duke were very strong. The competition is good for the sport and good for the players."

UMBC and UTD have developed a strong rivalry over the past few years, often tying or barely edging each other for national titles. The two teams will face off again in April at the Final Four of College Chess.

Final scoring had the UTD team with 5.5 points and UMBC's team with 5 points. The decisive match was a head-to-head game between the top teams from UMBC and UTD, which UTD won. In the four-on-four match up, the teams tied on three boards but UMBC lost on the fourth, giving UTD the win.

The top ten teams were: UTD's first team, UMBC's first team, UTD's second team, Miami Dade Community College, Brooklyn College's first team, UMBC's second team, University of Toronto's first team, Catholic University of Peru, MIT, and Princeton.

A total of 36 teams competed in this year's PanAm, representing such schools as Princeton, Stanford, the University of Chicago and Emory. This year's six-round competition was held from December 26-30 at the Embassy Suites in Miami, Florida. The tournament used Swiss-style scoring, which awards one point for a team win, a half-point for a draw and zero points for a loss. The highest possible score was six points.

UMBC's first team included Alex Onischuk, Pawel Blehm, Eugene Perelshteyn and Pascal Charbonneau. They faced off against the University of Toronto's first team (win), Princeton (win), Miami Dade Community College (win), UTD's second team (win), UTD's first team (loss), and the Catholic University of Peru (win) for a total of five points.

UMBC's second team included Bruci Lopez, Beenish Bhatia, Battsetseg Tsagaan, and Thomas Hartwig. The team played Georgia Tech (win), Emory (win), UTD's first team (loss), MIT (win), UTD's second team (loss), and the University of Chicago's first team (win) for a total of four points.

UMBC's third team included Andrew Samuelson, Eddie Tsibulevskiy, Sachin Singhal, Jeremy Hummer and James Kinsman (alternate). They played Montgomery College (win), Brooklyn College's first team (loss), Duke (draw), the University of Toronto's second team (win), the University of Puerto Rico (win) and UTD's second team (loss) for a total of three and a half points.

UMBC's chess coach is Igor Epshteyn.

Posted by dwinds1

December 31, 2003

UMBC Chess Team Takes Second Place in National Championship

Miami, FL - The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) chess team earned second place at one of the most competitive Pan American Intercollegiate Chess Championships to date. UMBC's first team was edged by its rival team from the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD), which has shared the title with UMBC in the past but never won the championship outright. UMBC team captain Eugene Perelshteyn earned top player honors for his performance on board three.

Miami, FL - The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) chess team earned second place at one of the most competitive Pan American Intercollegiate Chess Championships to date. UMBC's first team was edged by its rival team from the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD), which has shared the title with UMBC in the past but never won the championship outright. UMBC team captain Eugene Perelshteyn earned top player honors for his performance on board three.

"Colleges across the country are starting to take chess more seriously and that is proven by the tough competition at this year's tournament," said Alan Sherman, director of the UMBC chess program and associate professor of computer science. "Even beyond UMBC and UTD, the perennial powerhouses, teams from Brooklyn College, Miami Dade Community College, Princeton and Duke were very strong. The competition is good for the sport and good for the players."

UMBC and UTD have developed a strong rivalry over the past few years, often tying or barely edging each other for national titles. The two teams will face off again in April at the Final Four of College Chess.

Final scoring had the UTD team with 5.5 points and UMBC's team with 5 points. The decisive match was a head-to-head game between the top teams from UMBC and UTD, which UTD won. In the four-on-four match up, the teams tied on three boards but UMBC lost on thefourth, giving UTD the win.

The top ten teams were: UTD's first team, UMBC's first team, UTD's second team, Miami Dade Community College, Brooklyn College's first team, UMBC's second team, University of Toronto's first team, CatholicUniversity of Peru, MIT, and Princeton.

A total of 36 teams competed in this year's PanAm, representing such schools as Princeton, Stanford, the University of Chicago and Emory. This year's six-round competition was held from December26-30 at the Embassy Suites in Miami, Florida. The tournament used Swiss-style scoring, which awards one point for a team win, a half-point for a draw and zero points for a loss. The highest possible score was six points.

UMBC's first team included Alex Onischuk, Pawel Blehm, Eugene Perelshteyn and Pascal Charbonneau. They faced off against the University of Toronto's first team (win), Princeton (win), Miami Dade Community College (win), UTD's second team (win), UTD's first team(loss), and the Catholic University of Peru (win) for a total of five points.

UMBC's second team included Bruci Lopez, Beenish Bhatia, Battsetseg Tsagaan, and Thomas Hartwig. The team played Georgia Tech (win), Emory (win), UTD's first team (loss), MIT (win), UTD's second team(loss), and the University of Chicago's first team (win) for a total of four points.

UMBC's third team included Andrew Samuelson, Eddie Tsibulevskiy, Sachin Singhal, Jeremy Hummer and James Kinsman (alternate). They played Montgomery College (win), Brooklyn College's first team (loss), Duke (draw), the University of Toronto's second team (win), the University of Puerto Rico (win) and UTD's second team (loss) for a total of three and a half points.

UMBC's chess coach is Igor Epshteyn.

Posted by dwinds1

December 16, 2003

Record Book, Rivalry at Stake as Nation's Top College Chess Teams Battle for Bragging Rights

One of the fiercest, most closely contested battles for bragging rights in all of college sports will commence Dec. 27 as America's top two chess powerhouses The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) - once again face off as the favorites to win the 2003 Pan American Intercollegiate Team Chess Championship, the World Series of College Chess.

North Carolina vs. Duke. Kansas vs. Oklahoma. Kentucky vs. Louisville. This winter, sports fans across the country are licking their chops in anticipation of the renewal of these classic college basketball rivalries.

Before most of those contests tip off, a lesser-known but equally contentious matchup will get underway on Dec. 27 in Miami.

The battleground is a chessboard instead of the hardwood, but one of the fiercest, most closely contested battles for bragging rights in all of college sports will commence as America's top two chess powerhouses - The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) and the University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) - once again face off as the favorites to win the 2003 Pan American Intercollegiate Team Chess Championship, the World Series of College Chess.

UTD and UMBC are the undisputed top two teams in the nation, and among only a handful of schools nationwide who attract the world's best chess players with full scholarships and hold pep rallies to celebrate victories.

This year's UMBC team has a dual goal: win the title and earn a place in the college chess record book. A UMBC win this year would shatter the University of Toronto's record for overall (1965, 1973, 1974, 1980, 1981, 1982) and most consecutive (the run from '80 to '82) titles or ties for first place.

"Last year UMBC made the Grand Slam of college chess, winning the Pan-Am, the President's Cup, and the National Collegiate Chess League (NCCL)," says Alan Sherman, Director of the Chess Program and Associate Professor of Computer Science at UMBC. "This year, we intend to make chess history with an unprecedented seventh win at the Pan-Am."

Meanwhile, UTD, who lost the past two Pan Ams by a combined margin of just two points, is just as determined to regain the title. And the trash talking has already begun.

Tim Redman, director of the chess program and professor of literary studies at UTD, said in a UTD press release, UMBC no doubt will be favored on the basis of the chess ratings of its players. But we have some excellent new players, and UMBC will be making a big mistake if it takes us too lightly.

UMBC player Pascal "The Frenchman" Charbonneau, for one, doesn't seem intimidated. Well, I can't stop them from dreaming, now can I? says Charbonneau. "In all seriousness, they are a great team, but I believe UMBC will have the upper hand."

No matter which university comes away with the title this year, it will be a victory for and a reaffirmation of the importance of academic sports at public universities. Both UMBC and UTD's chess programs have earned national recognition for celebrating the life of the mind and intellectual achievement while regularly beating strong teams from Harvard, Yale, MIT, and Stanford.

"Our players are winners over the board and in the classroom," says Sherman. UMBC's four top players boast an average chess rating of 2582 and an average GPA of 3.58.

The Pan Am will be held Dec. 27-30 at Embassy Suites near the Miami International Airport.

About UMBC

UMBC, named a 2003 "Hot School" by Kaplan/Newsweek, is a medium-sized, selective, public research university situated on 500 acres between Baltimore and Washington, D.C. With an enrollment of more than 11,000, UMBC has earned national recognition for giving undergraduates early research opportunities and for its programs aimed at increasing the numbers of women and minorities in science and technology fields. The campus is home to the nationally-known Meyerhoff Scholarship Program, the Shriver Center, and a number of major research centers. For additional information about UMBC, please visit the university's web site at www.umbc.edu

About UTD

The University of Texas at Dallas, located at the convergence of Richardson, Plano and Dallas in the heart of the complex of major multinational technology corporations known as the Telecom Corridor, enrolls more than 13,700 students. The school's freshman class traditionally stands at the forefront of Texas state universities in terms of average SAT scores. The university offers a broad assortment of bachelor's, master's and doctoral degree programs. For additional information about UTD, please visit the university's web site at www.utdallas.edu.

Posted by dwinds1

December 09, 2003

UHS HAS FLU VACCINE

Although the manufacturers have run out, University Health Services (UHS) has plenty of flu vaccine left. You can schedule an appointment or walk in to protect yourself against what will reportedly be a severe flu season.

The cost is $10 which can be paid with your campus card or, for students, billed to your student account.

For more information, call (410) 455-2542.

Posted by dwinds1

October 09, 2003

Soccer's Derek McElligott Makes National and Local News

UMBC junior forward Derek McElligott's performance on the soccer field this season has earned him honors from College Soccer News. McElligott leads the South Atlantic region in goals and points (25), and, entering this week, he was second in the country in goals per game at 1.10.

UMBC junior forward Derek McElligott, who has helped UMBC to a 5-1-5 record and a ranking of #8 in the South Atlantic region, was named to College Soccer News' Team of the Week for the week of September 29-October 5.

McElligott scored a pair of goals in each of UMBC's two games last week, a 2-2 tie with visiting Albany and a 3-0 win at Hartford. McElligott added a goal vs. Binghamton and now has 12 goals in 11 games this season and leads the South Atlantic region in goals and points (25).

Entering this week, McElligott was second in the country in goals per game at 1.10, trailing only sophomore Daniel Wasson of Air Force, who has 9 goals in 8 games (1.13 per game). He is tied with two other players in total goals -- Tulsa's Ryan Pore and Michigan's Mychal Turpin each have 11 goals. The UMBC standout was fifth in the country in points per game at 2.30 (11g, 1a).

His 36 career goals is third on UMBC's all-time list, behind Ray Ford's 51 (1977-81) and Giuliano Celenza's 41 (1999-2000). McElligott has seven goals over the last four games. He is a two-time First Team All NEC performer and was the league's Rookie of the Year in 2001.

McElligott will be a featured guest on Fox 45's Sports Unlimited after the Sunday, October 12 Fox news cast at 10 p.m.

Posted by dwinds1

September 16, 2003

UMBC's Response to Hurricane Isabel

UMBC officials continue to keep a close eye on the movement of Hurricane Isabel as it approaches the U.S. East Coast. Current forecasts predict that Isabel could possibly impact the Baltimore-Washington region on Thursday or Friday.

A UMBC emergency response team -- chaired by the Vice President for Student Affairs and the Chief of UMBC Campus Police, and including representatives from the Physical Plant, Campus Police, Office of Residential Life, Office of Institutional Advancement, and numerous offices across campus -- is at work communicating with resident students, readying emergency generators, securing loose items on campus that could create hazards in high winds, preparing in case of flooding, and taking other actions to ensure the safety of UMBC students, faculty, and staff, in the event that the hurricane or other related weather events occur.

Parents or family members with questions or concerns about resident students at UMBC should call the Office of Residential Life at 410-455-2591. To report an emergency or safety hazard, call the UMBC Campus Police at ext. 5-5555 on campus or 410-455-5555 off campus.

A decision on whether to close the campus will not be made until early Thursday morning when officials have a better understanding of how Isabel will impact the Baltimore-Washington region. The University will share initial announcements about campus closings with radio and TV stations; however, for the most current information, please call the UMBC hot line numbers: 410-455-8881/8882/8883/8884/8885 with an on-campus number of 5-8881/8882/8883/8884/8885. Everyone is encouraged to pick one of these numbers at random to reduce the likelihood of inundating one number with calls.

UMBC's safety Web site (www.umbc.edu/safety) includes campus closing/reopening updates, hotline numbers, and links to forecasts and resources on preparedness and emergency procedures from State and Federal officials.

While UMBC's severe weather policy states that we will try to conduct business as usual whenever possible, we highly recommend that parents, students and other members of our campus community monitor the situation closely and use their own judgement and individual discretion in preparing for the potential storm and determining if students should leave campus in advance of the storm.

Posted by dwinds1

September 08, 2003

AT&T Foundation Grants $50,000 to UMBC Center for Women & Information Technology

The AT&T Foundation will donate $50,000 to the University of Maryland, Baltimore County's (UMBC) Center for Women and Information Technology (CWIT) on Sept. 9, as UMBC welcomes a new group of CWIT Scholars -- college students who receive scholarship support to pursue information technology careers -- to campus.

BALTIMORE - The AT&T Foundation will donate $50,000 to the University of Maryland, Baltimore County's (UMBC) Center for Women and Information Technology (CWIT) on Sept. 9, as UMBC welcomes a new group of CWIT Scholars -- college students who receive scholarship support to pursue information technology careers -- to campus.

The grant will support CWIT's educational and community outreach programs that work to bridge the IT gender gap. Annual events like Computer Mania Day connect CWIT Scholars, business leaders and other role models to middle school girls to help spark their interest in computing and technology careers.

The CWIT Scholars Program identifies a limited number of high-achieving high school seniors annually and provides four years of financial and programmatic support to pursue a bachelor's degree at UMBC in an IT-related field. The program is open to both women and men who support women's full involvement in information technology.

"A solid educational foundation for today's workplace must include information technology and computers," said Freeman A. Hrabowski, III, President of UMBC. "UMBC and CWIT are delighted to have this crucial support from a national leader in technology like AT&T as we work together to close the IT gender gap."

"AT&T is proud to support CWIT and its students in pursuing their IT education and career aspirations," said Jennifer Jones, Sales Vice-President - AT&T Business Services. "We recognize the importance of investing in the future of technology directly and indirectly through programs such as these that encourage advancement in information sciences."

In spite of reports that the Internet gender gap is closing, women are still seriously under-represented as developers of IT, and they are often not well served as IT users. Women make up 51 percent of the population and earn more than half of all bachelor-level degrees awarded, but earn only about one-quarter of the bachelor-level computer and information sciences degrees awarded in the U.S. - down from the 1980s when those numbers were in the mid 30's. Business and educators alike are concerned about what this means for long-term growth in the IT industry.

AT&T will present the $50,000 grant to UMBC at 5:30 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 9 in room 312 of the UMBC University Center.

About AT&T Foundation
AT&T is among the world's premier voice and data communications companies, serving consumers, businesses, and government. Public service and social responsibility are traditions deeply embedded at AT&T. The AT&T Foundation (www.att.com/foundation) invests in projects that serve the needs of people in communities throughout the nation, particularly for initiatives that use technology in innovative ways and for programs in which AT&T employees are actively involved as contributors or volunteers.

About CWIT
The Center for Women and Information Technology (CWIT) established at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) in July, 1998, seeks to address and rectify the above-mentioned problems and to enhance our understanding of the relationship between gender and IT. The Center has a four-fold mission: to encourage more women and girls to study computer science and/or information systems and to pursue careers in IT; to enable all women and girls to use IT comfortably and knowledgeably; to assure that the richness and breadth of women's lives and concerns are fully represented and readily available on the Internet; and to foster research concerning the relationship between gender and IT. The Center plans to accomplish its mission through varied initiatives. Three projects already under way are the CWIT Scholars Program, the Speakers Series, and the CWIT web site, which ABCNews.com has called "the best resource on women and technology on the Web."

About AT&T
AT&T (www.att.com) is among the premier voice and data communications companies in the world, serving businesses, consumers, and government. The company runs one of the most sophisticated communications networks in the U.S., backed by the research and development capabilities of AT&T Labs. A leading supplier of data, Internet and managed services for the public and private sectors, AT&T offers outsourcing and consulting to large businesses and government. The company is a market leader in local, long distance and Internet services, as well as transaction-based services like prepaid cards, collect calling and directory assistance. With approximately $37 billion of revenue, AT&T has about 40 million residential customers and 4 million business customers, who depend on AT&T for high-quality communications. AT&T has garnered several awards for outstanding performance and customer service.

Posted by dwinds1

September 04, 2003

Strategic Framework for 2016

Over the past five years, the Planning Leadership Team (PLT) has guided the campus through an evolving strategic planning process that included input from faculty, staff and students. UMBC has established a vision to be known for integrating research, teaching and learning, and civic engagement, as well as a commitment to ranking in the top tier of research universities and building our undergraduate and graduate student bodies. Building on this groundwork, the PLT's new "Strategic Framework for 2016" report includes direction for short-term and long-term planning and budgeting at the University, college, division and department levels.

Over the past five years, the Planning Leadership Team (PLT) has guided the campus through an evolving strategic planning process that included input from faculty, staff and students. UMBC has established a vision to be known for integrating research, teaching and learning, and civic engagement, as well as a commitment to ranking in the top tier of research universities and building our undergraduate and graduate student bodies.

Building on this groundwork, the PLT's new "Strategic Framework for 2016" report includes direction for short-term and long-term planning and budgeting at the University, college, division and department levels. This past week, 150 faculty, staff and students had an opportunity to discuss the report when it was presented at this year's University Retreat, and it is now available for the entire campus community to review.

"Strategic Framework for 2016" includes two major goals:

*To provide a distinctive undergraduate experience, strengthening UMBC's performance as a research university that integrates a high-quality undergraduate education with faculty scholarship and research through a curriculum and set of experiences promoting student engagement, such as seminars, study groups, research opportunities, mentoring, advising, co-curricular learning experiences, and exposure to diversity.

*To continue to build research and graduate education, by pursuing growth in Ph.D.s granted, faculty awards, and federal research grants and contracts in order to strengthen the culture of UMBC as a research university and continue to rank in a prestigious cohort of research universities.

To spur the achievement of those goals, the PLT has established supporting goals and objectives in the areas of undergraduate education; research and graduate education; student body size and composition; faculty size and composition; curriculum and program mix; management, organization and staffing; and relationship with the Baltimore/Washington region.

In addition to the recommendations of campus wide task forces and committees, studies of UMBC's size and development helped to frame the PLT's discussions of UMBC's future. Professor Marilyn Demorest's report on faculty size, composition and allocation of resources provided insight into factors affecting faculty/student ratio. Professor Brad Humphreys' cost benefit analysis of enrollment growth provided a model for understanding when increased enrollment provides financial advantage and when it does not.

To stimulate thinking about the circumstances and strategies that push universities to new levels of distinction and success, the PLT developed profiles of eight "exemplar" institutions: University of Delaware, Georgia Tech, University of California Santa Barbara, University of Pittsburgh, William & Mary, Carnegie Mellon, Drexel and Rensselear. The research helped PLT members understand strategies that have been transformative for other campuses and to incorporate those most applicable to UMBC.

As we face a new economic and political climate, extensive planning is more crucial than ever. "We can't do business as we have been. We need planning to succeed in a turbulent environment," Provost Art Johnson said at the retreat. "But that does not mean we will change our vision or our goals, which are rooted in who we are. We'll just find a different way to achieve them."

You can read "Strategic Framework for 2016" online.

Previous PLT reports are also available on the Provost's Web site.

Posted by dwinds1

Center for Biological Sciences Archives Established at UMBC

Capping nearly three decades of collecting biological sciences archives, UMBC has established an international Center for Biological Sciences Archives (CBSA) in the Special Collections Department of the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery.

Capping nearly three decades of collecting biological sciences archives, UMBC has established an international Center for Biological Sciences Archives (CBSA) in the Special Collections Department of the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery. The CBSA already holds 13 major biological sciences archives and plans to develop and promote these and other holdings in the coming years.

Among the CBSA's holdings are the archives of the American Society for Cell Biology, the Tissue Culture Association (now called the Society for Invitro Biology), Society for Developmental Biology, International Union of Immunological Societies, American Type Culture Collection, the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, American Association of Immunologists, Society for Protozoologists, the Biophysical Society, the Society for Industrial Microbiology, the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute (UMBI), and archives of Keith R. Porter and R.D. Allen.

Also located at UMBC are the Archives of the American Society for Microbiology, which in addition holds the archives of the International Union of Microbiological Studies, the Anne Sayre Collection of Rosalind Franklin materials, and the Rita Colwell papers. Dr. Colwell is director of the National Science Foundation, and already has placed the papers from her tenure as director of the University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute at UMBC.

The mission of the CBSA is to identify, preserve and provide access to manuscripts, personal papers and archives generated by individuals and institutions involved in the biological sciences. In addition, the CBSA will encourage research, scholarship, and publication of writings on the history, policy implimentations, and social and cultural impact of the biological sciences. Public programs concerning the archives will be featured in the future as the archives and its activities are developed.

Provost Arthur Johnson says, "The CBSA will fill a unique niche at UMBC. It fits very well within the campus mission and the bioscience activities we have in place."

For more information, contact Tom Beck.

Posted by dwinds1

August 26, 2003

Parking Update

September 5, 2003

To: UMBC Faculty and Staff

Fr: Mark Behm, Vice President for Administration and Finance

Re: Parking Update

As the fall semester opens, it is important to be prepared for a parking "crunch period," since campus community members tend to come to campus more often and stay longer as they acclimate to the new academic year. The hours between 10 a.m. and 2 p.m. are the busiest. With the addition of classrooms and lecture halls in the newly opened ITE Building, the number of students registered in classes will be larger during the peak period than in previous years.

In order to facilitate traffic flow and assist people in finding spaces, Parking Services' staff and UMBC police officers will monitor lots and direct drivers to open spaces during peak parking times. The new Hilltop Road Parking Lot becomes available on or about September 25 (the opening date has been pushed back due to inclement weather affecting construction) and will provide 474 additional spaces. Overflow parking is available at South Campus, and the UMBC Shuttle will be available to transport faculty and staff to and from the main campus.

This year we must require the use of parking hangers beginning with the very first day of classes. On weekdays, parking will be enforced Monday through Thursday from 7 a.m. to 9 p.m. and on Friday from 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. This will allow us to monitor the requirement that freshmen who live in the residence halls park in the Satellite Lot at South Campus during these periods to maximize the number of spaces available for commuter students, faculty and staff.

Faculty/staff enrolled in the payroll deduction program have received their new parking hangers through their departments and may continue to use their current gate cards. For additional information regarding purchase and distribution of faculty/staff permits and/or gate cards and important information about parking regulations, please visit the Parking Services web site.

If you have any questions or concerns, please call Parking Services at ext. 5-2551, or e-mail parking@umbc.edu.

Posted by dwinds1

August 20, 2003

In the News

Freeman Hrabowski in the Washington Post and Christianity Today
UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski was quoted in Courtland Milloy's Aug. 24 Washington Postcolumn on the 40th anniversary of Dr. Martin Luther King's march on Washington D.C.
www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A40383-2003Aug24.html

President Hrabowski was also quoted in a Christianity Today profile (September 2003) of National Security Adviser Condoleezza Rice.
www.christianitytoday.com/ct/2003/009/1.42.html

Tim Brennan in the Washington Post
Tim Brennan, a professor of public policy and an expert on deregulationof utilities, was part of a Washington Post article examining the recentmassive blackout in the Northeast U.S. and Canada.
www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A37543-2003Aug23_3.html

UMBC Entrepreneurship Programs in the Sun
UMBC's Alex. Brown Center for Science and Technology Entrepreneurship,Idea Lab, CEO Chats and other programs encouraging and teachingentrepreneurship skills to students were part of a Aug. 28 businessarticle in the Baltimore Sun.

UMBC's ongoing competition with 14 other universities for up to $5million in grant money from the Kauffman Foundation to encourageentrepreneurship campus-wide was also mentioned, along with a quote fromfoundation spokeswoman Wendy Guilles.
www.sunspot.net/business/bal-bz.kidbiz28aug28,0,4678326.story?coll=bal-business-headlines

Alumnus Paul Comfort in the Easton Star Democrat
UMBC alum and Queen Anne's County Administrator Paul Comfort '87 was appointed to a new blue ribbon commission to study the structure and efficiency of state government.
www.zwire.com/site/news.cfm?newsid=10049664&BRD=2101&PAG=461&dept_id=392170&rfi=6

UMBC in the Catonsville Times
UMBC's growing resident population is the focus of the article "Commuter School? UMBC freshmen flood into campus housing" in the Catonsville Times on August 27.
http://news.mywebpal.com/news_tool_v2.cfm?pnpID=351&NewsID=485426&CategoryID=11091&show=localnews&om=0

UMBC Chess in Chess Life
UMBC Chess Team Advisor Alan Sherman wrote "UMBC's Speed Spectacular - a Sporting Smash," for the September 2003 issue of Chess Life. The article is not available online.

IMDA Graduate Student Jon Routson in the New York Times
Imaging and Digital Arts graduate student and video artist Jon Routson was mentioned in an August 17 New York Times article on artist Matthew Barney. Greg Allen writes, "And a young Baltimore video artist, Jon Routson, whose work explores bootlegging itself, has tackled Matthew Barney's work head-on. In April at New York's Team Gallery, Mr. Routson showed his "made for TV" version of 'Cremaster 4.' He cut a grainy VHS bootleg of Mr. Barney's 45-minute film down to 22 minutes, dropped in actual commercials, compressed the end credits and even floated ABC's logo inthe lower corner of the screen. The result: a hilarious, smart, and brazen work, which drew critical praise and which may be a sign of things to come."
www.nytimes.com/2003/08/17/arts/design/17ALLE.html?ex=1062202858&ei=1&en=70cc17312d2a7841

Robert Carpenter in the Baltimore Sun
Associate Professor of Economics Robert Carpenter's study of slots was part of an August 20 Baltimore Sun story.
www.sunspot.net/news/local/bal-md.slots20aug20,0,715121.story?coll=bal-local-headlines

Thomas Schaller in Baltimore Magazine
Assistant Professor of Political Science Thomas Schaller profiles political fundraiser Colleen Martin-Lauer in the September issue of Baltimore Magazine. You can read Schaller's article on page 106. Watch for more features by Schaller in future issues of the magazine.

Alumni Omari Ruiz and Avery Smith in the Baltimore Sun
As a member of The Baltimore Collegetown Network, UMBC's key role inkeeping talented young people living and working in Maryland aftercollege graduation is highlighted in an article on the organization in the August 22 Baltimore Sun. The story highlights how 77 percent of UMBC alumni continue to live and work in Maryland and features quotes from two recent graduates who are among that majority: Omari Ruiz '03 and Avery Smith '03.
www.sunspot.net/news/education/bal-te.bz.students22aug22,0,3647317.story?coll=bal-home-headlines

Posted by dwinds1

Men's Soccer to Christen 2003-04 Home Season in adidas Kick-off Classic

UMBC's era in the America East Conference will be kicked off by the men's soccer team, as they host the adidas Kick-Off Classic on Friday, August 29 through Sunday, August 31 at UMBC Soccer Stadium.

UMBC's era in the America East Conference (AEC) will be kicked off by the men's soccer team, as they host the adidas Kick-Off Classic on Friday, August 29 through Sunday, August 31 at UMBC Soccer Stadium. After Robert Morris takes on Lafayette at 2 p.m., the Retrievers entertain Colgate at 4:30 p.m. UMBC faces Lafayette in the tournament's final game on Sunday at 1 p.m.

The women's soccer team will have the distinction of playing the first AEC game, as they host Hartford on Wednesday, September 10. Michelle Salmon's team begins its season on Saturday, August 30, when they host Delaware State at 1 p.m. Field hockey and volleyball also begin play on that weekend. Kristy Hartman's field hockey squad entertains non-league foe Colgate on Saturday, August 30 at noon, while Head Coach Greg Giovannazzi makes his debut with the volleyball team at the Jacksonsville Tournament on Friday and Saturday.

Pete Caringi's men's soccer squad returns nine staters from last year's 11-6-3 team, including leading scorer Derek McElligott (12 goals) and the entire starting defensive unit. But it will be a difficult road for the Retrievers, as they may face as many as three 2002 NCAA qualifiers (George Washington, Old Dominion, and possibly, Loyola) in a four-game span and end the month by taking on AEC foe, Northeastern, a team ranked in the top 30 in the nation by College Soccer News.

For more information on the upcoming season visit www.umbcretrievers.com.

Posted by dwinds1

Kudos

John Rennie Short Appointed to National Screening Committee, Fulbright-Hays Graduate Program
John Rennie Short, professor and chair, Department of Geography and Environmental Systems, has been appointed by the Institute of InternationalEducation Board of Trustees to serve a three-year term on the National Screening Committee of the Fulbright-Hays graduate program. The program allocates grants to U.S. students to enable them to pursue research opportunities with universities overseas.

Alumnus Kevin Griffith Receives Doctoral Dissertation Endowment Award
Kevin Griffith is the recipient of UMBC's Richard E. Wolf, Jr. Doctoral Dissertation Endowment award for 2002-2003. Griffith received his Ph.D. from UMBC's Department of Biological Sciences, Molecular and Cell Biology Program, in January, 2003. After graduation Kevin began postdoctoral training in the laboratory of Dr. Alan Grossman, Department of Biology, M.I.T. in March, 2003.

The criteria for the award are (1) exceptional research productivity and (2) the dissertation research made a significant contribution to a discipline with in the biological sciences. Candidates were nominated by their Doctoral Dissertation Committee after their dissertation was successfully defended. Candidates graduated from either the August, 2002, January, 2003 or May 2003 commencement. An impartial committee of faculty members appointed by the Chair of the Department of Biological Sciences was established to make the selection.

Jason Loviglio, Fellow at the Library of Congress, to Lecture in DC (9/10)
Assistant Professor of American Studies Jason Loviglio is currently J. Franklin Jameson Fellow in American History in the Library of Congress' John W. Kluge Center. He will lecture on "Network Radio and Mass-Mediated Democracy, 1932-1947" at 2:30 p.m. on September 10 at the Library of Congress, room LJ119, on the first floor of the Jefferson Building. For more information, call (202) 707-3302.

Doctoral Student Chevell Thomas Finalist for Service to America Medal
Chevell Thomas, a doctoral student (health policy track) in theDepartment of Public Policy, was a 2003 finalist for the Service to America Medal. Thomas is a health insurance specialist at the Centers for Medicare andMedicaid Services, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.
www.ourpublicservice.org/staff_name3761/staff_name_show.htm?doc_id=184781

Baltimore's Best Award for Kuhn Library
BAROC (Baltimore Art Research and Outreach Consortium) has received BaltimoreMagazine's "Best Baltimore of 2003" award for "Best Online Arts Resource--Maryland ArtSource," the online art database and arts news source (www.marylandartsource.org). BAROC is a consortium of librarians at UMBC, Johns Hopkins University, Walters Art Museum, Maryland Historical Society, Maryland State Department of Education, Maryland Institute College of Art, and Baltimore Museum of Art. Tom Beck is UMBC's representative to BAROC.

Posted by dwinds1

August 10, 2003

Schedule of 9-11 Commemorative Activities at UMBC

A variety of commemorative activities are planned at UMBC to mark the second anniversary of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001.

A variety of commemorative activities are planned at UMBC to mark the second anniversary of the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. Scheduled events include:

8:45 AM
The National Anthem and Taps
Performed by the UMBC Pep Band
Location: Flagpoles in front of Administration Building

11:00 AM
Drumming for World Peace: UMBC 9/11 Commemoration
The Commons, Main Street

The UMBC Community is invited to a day of inter-cultural drumming for global understanding and peace. Share your thoughts in a commemoration of September 11, 2001 at The Commons. Sponsored by the English Language Center, the Intercultural Living Exchange, the Office of Student Life, and Students for Intercultural Exchange.

Expression Boards will be placed on Main Street in The Commons beginning Wednesday, September 10 and will remain up through Friday, September 12. These boards are a chance for the UMBC community to write and creatively express their thoughts, feelings, and emotions on the 9/11 tragedy. Please stop by to read the comments and to add your own.

In addition, the UMBC Study Abroad Fair will be held from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. on the Commons Terrace. Take steps to greater international understanding and find out more about summer, semester and year programs all over the world! For more information, contact the Office of International Education Services at 410-455-2624 or by e-mail at ies@umbc.edu.

Posted by dwinds1

July 18, 2003

UMBC Training Centers Launch Paralegal Program

In its latest new program aimed at fast-growing career fields, UMBC Training Centers announced today the launch of the University's first Paralegal training program, targeting both existing professionals in the legal arena, and those interested in exploring the field and learning more about the law.

In its latest new program aimed at fast-growing career fields, UMBC Training Centers announced today the launch of the University's first Paralegal training program, targeting both existing professionals in the legal arena, and those interested in exploring the field and learning more about the law.

"This is an area that we have been anxious to address for some time, with so many prestigious law firms, and so much governmental and legislative activity based in the region," says Doug Kendzierski, Associate Vice-Provost and President/CEO of UMBC Training Centers.

The Center for Legal Studies (CLS) manages a nationally acclaimed curriculum that boasts over 10,000 graduates in the last twenty-three years. Scott A. Hatch, J.D., President of CLS says, "The quality and effectiveness of any paralegal program should be measured not only by its reputation, but by the opportunity for on-the-job-experience, the satisfaction of the employers that hire these individuals, and the assurance of a solid delivery provider. We cover all of these bases in our offering through UMBC."

Law-related careers rank among the rapid-risers in the US economy, with the US Bureau of Labor Statistics projecting an increase of 62 percent in paralegal employment by 2008, the sixth largest occupation growth rate resulting in 74,000 new paralegal hires. Paralegal salaries currently average in the mid to high 30's in the region, with projected averages near $45,000 by 2005.

Class sections are forming now and slated to begin in September, with more to be scheduled throughout the year. The six-weekend course is taught by local attorneys, and includes 84 hours of intensive training, all required texts and materials, and a voluntary internship opportunity for the top quarter of each graduating class.

Students will be trained to assist trial attorneys, interview witnesses, investigate complex fact patterns, research the law, and assist in preparing cases for courtroom litigation. The instruction is practice-oriented and focuses on those areas of the law in which paralegals are in highest demand.

For more information on these programs, contact UMBC Training Centers at (410) 594-2282, or visit their paralegal training website at www.continuinged.umbc.edu/paralegal.

About UMBC Training Centers, LLC
The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), a regional leader in workforce development, established UMBC Training Centers, LLC as its continuing education and industry training operation, addressing critical regional employment priorities through responsive programming in areas such as Professional Engineering, BioTechnology/Regulatory Affairs, Federal Regulation Compliance, Professional Human Resource Management, Certified Financial Planning, LSAT/GMAT/GRE Test Preparation, PMI Project Management Certification, Certified Professional Bookkeeping, Call Center Management and a full range of industry-standard computer certification programs.

In partnership with such renowned organizations as The College for Financial Planning, the Project Management Institute, the HIPAA Academy, the Society for Human Resources Management, Microsoft, Oracle and Sun Microsystems, the LLC offers the finest content available in the marketplace, while maintaining the University's reputation for affordable programming. Programs include instructor-led and web-based training, with part-time, full-time, evening, weekend and weekday class schedules, and customized contract training available.

About The Center for Legal Studies
The Center for Legal Studies, in partnership with over 600 colleges and universities around the world, has been dedicated to the instruction and preparation of students to work as full-time, part-time, or freelance paralegals, legal secretaries, legal investigations, mediators, legal nurse consultants, and victim advocates since 1980. For more information, call 1-800-522-7737 or visit www.legalstudies.com.

Posted by dwinds1

July 16, 2003

Library Catalog and Some Services Unavailable 7/31-8/4

In order to bring the UM at Baltimore Health Sciences and Human Services Library into the University System of Maryland shared library automation system, that system will be shut down from noon on Thursday, July 31 through 8 a.m. on Monday, August 4. This means that the following services will be unavailable:

o Online Catalog (catalogUSMAI)
o "My Account" information
o Hold Requests
o Renewals
o Return receipts
o Collection of overdue fines and billings

The Library will keep its regular hours during this system outage; circulation of materials and other functions will be achieved manually. Check out of materials will require a valid campus ID and an additional picture ID during this outage.

For further information, call ext. 5-2346 or e-mail aok@umbc.edu.

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July 15, 2003

UMBC Training Centers, ICMI Launch Call Center Training Partnership

As the remarkable response to the National Do Not Call Registry has shown, American consumers are serious about wanting companies to respect their wishes when it comes to calling them at home. But what about the other side of the equation - when consumers pick up the phone to call a company with a question about a bill, a problem with installing new software, or a change in a reservation?

A new partnership between UMBC Training Centers, LLC, and the Annapolis-based Incoming Call Management Institute (ICMI), two of the region's top names in workforce and call center training, will kick off in September with customized classes providing a new standard of training for agents and managers in the growing call center business.

As the remarkable response to the National Do Not Call Registry has shown, American consumers are serious about wanting companies to respect their wishes when it comes to calling them at home. But what about the other side of the equation - when consumers pick up the phone to call a company with a question about a bill, a problem with installing new software, or a change in a reservation?

A new partnership between UMBC Training Centers, LLC, and the Annapolis-based Incoming Call Management Institute (ICMI), two of the region's top names in workforce and call center training, will kick off in September with customized classes providing a new standard of training for agents and managers in the growing call center business.

"The only thing consumers appreciate less than an unwanted telemarketing call is poor customer service or being stuck on hold when they're making a call to a company with a question or problem," says Doug Kendzierski, President/CEO of UMBC Training Centers, and an Associate Vice-Provost in UMBC's Division of Professional Education & Training.

"Unfortunately, there's no national list or program to mandate customer service standards for incoming call centers," Kendzierski says. "But now, by teaming with ICMI for our new call center training courses, we hope to not only increase consumer satisfaction, but also offer paths to fast-track careers in a rapidly growing industry while continuing to improve its image nationwide."

"We are very excited to be working with such a top-ranked, established educational leader as UMBC," says Brad Cleveland, President and CEO of ICMI. "ICMI's goal is the advancement of our industry, and combined with UMBC's mission of advancing the region's workforce, we are confident that this partnership will result in unparalleled educational opportunities."

The call center industry has grown rapidly in the Mid-Atlantic. According to Customer Interface's 2000 survey, our region leads the country with 23.5% of the estimated 78,000 domestic call centers in existence. "Organizations such as ADP, BGE, the Social Security Administration, and T. Rowe Price are just a few that operate high-volume call centers in the Baltimore metropolitan area," notes Kendzierski.

Although an increasing number of consumers go online when they need help with a product or service, a recent study by Jupiter Media Metrix found that 33 percent of retail Web sites either took more than 3 days or failed to respond to customer inquiries. Other industry surveys have shown that consumers still rely on the phone when they need quick service or answers to a question.

Telemanagement Search (TMS) estimates that the current base of 7 million call center agents employed will grow at an annual rate of 20%, with salaries on the rise as well. "Recent research indicates average salaries for line supervisors are at $30,000, with managers averaging in the low 60's, and directors averaging almost $93,000," says Kendzierski. "This is a great fast-track career opportunity for everyone from high school graduates, to graduate-schooled business students."

But like any growth industry, Kendzierski emphasizes the need for the concurrent rise of high-quality education programs that groom an emerging workforce for productivity and performance mapped to the precise business objectives of the operation. "Successful training not only provides for individual advancement opportunities, but serves to boost the image of this sector as professional realm of employment," he says.

Cleveland emphasized that the call center industry requires very specialized knowledge and skills. "Business-as-usual won't cut it, because what worked a few years go, won't necessarily serve today's environment," he says. "Call Center environments have become more sophisticated and complex as we face multi-channels dealing with more complex transactions from a customer who is savvier than ever."

For more information on these programs, contact UMBC Training Centers at (410) 594-2282, or visit the Call Center training website at www.continuinged.umbc.edu/callcenter.

About UMBC Training Centers, LLC
The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), a regional leader in workforce development, established UMBC Training Centers, LLC as its continuing education and industry training operation, addressing critical regional employment priorities through responsive programming in areas such as Professional Engineering, BioTechnology/Regulatory Affairs, Federal Regulation Compliance, Professional Human Resource Management, Certified Financial Planning, LSAT/GMAT/GRE Test Preparation, PMI Project Management Certification, Certified Professional Bookkeeping, Paralegal and a full range of industry-standard computer certification programs.

In partnership with such renowned organizations as The College for Financial Planning, the Project Management Institute, the HIPAA Academy, the Society for Human Resources Management, Microsoft, Oracle and Sun Microsystems, the LLC offers the finest content available in the marketplace, while maintaining the University's reputation for affordable programming. Programs include instructor-led and web-based training, with part-time, full-time, evening, weekend and weekday class schedules, and customized contract training available.

About ICMI
Established in 1985, Incoming Calls Management Institute (ICMI) is recognized as the premier resource on call center management training and services. ICMI was the first company in the world to offer training seminars on call center management and operations, including "Essential Skills and Knowledge for Effective Incoming Call Center Management," attended by more than 55,000 call center professionals to date. ICMI has consulted to organizations in more than 20 countries, offering applied business expertise based on "real-life" hands-on experience of the company's executive team.

With global membership reaching over 40 countries, ICMI Membership provides unparalleled support in helping call center managers improve the effectiveness and efficiency of their operations. ICMI's President and CEO, Brad Cleveland, is co-author of the industry?s acclaimed "how-to" textbook, Call Center Management on Fast Forward, and is among the most sought after key note speakers and experts in the call center industry.

Posted by dwinds1

July 10, 2003

Maxine Cote '82, Former Director of Advisement

Maxine Marie Cote, former director of advisement and one of the "building blocks of UMBC," died on June 29. After graduating from UMBC in 1982, Cote was appointed to the position of assistant to the dean of humanities. She eventually became director of advisement until her retirement in 1993. In the position of Director, she devised a centralized advisement system, many elements of which are still in use today. Charles "Tot" Woolston, retired vice provost, remembers Cote's many contributions.

By Charles "Tot" Woolston, Vice Provost, Retired

Maxine Marie Cote, former director of advisement at UMBC, died on June 29. Maxine -- universally known as "Max" -- came to UMBC as an older student in a very young university. She had a wry sense of humor, a sharp intellect, and an extraordinary amount of common sense which made her a respected counselor to students and faculty alike. She majored in philosophy, and when her department started a self-paced logic program, she was the natural head tutor, for she was a patient and gifted teacher.

After graduating in 1982, she was appointed to the position of assistant to the dean of humanities. She eventually became director of advisement until her retirement in 1993. In the position of director, she devised a centralized advisement system, many elements of which are still in use today.

Her knowledge of UMBC's rules and regulations and especially of the general requirements (through several iterations) was legendary. If there was ever any doubt about a regulation or when it took effect, there was only one solution -- call Max. Faculty, staff, and students deferred to her personal knowledge of past and present regulations. Her answers often included the effective date of the rule and why it was passed. She left a codified rule book when she retired, but it wasn't the same as getting her detailed explanation.

She was a caring and careful advisor. She believed that student success was directly tied to preparation and planning. She developed advisement manuals and conducted training sessions for advisors. She hired and trained faculty to be summer orientation advisors and assisted many academic departments in developing their advising systems. Additionally, she was instrumental in implementing a program with Baltimore City to bring strong seniors from Walbrook and Edmondson High Schools to UMBC to take courses.

Maxine Cote was one of the building blocks on which the foundation of UMBC rests. She was a proud alumnus and an important person in the growth and development of this campus. Two of her three children, Patricia and Glenn, are UMBC alumni. She is also survived by her husband Henry, son John and 7 grandchildren.

Posted by dwinds1

July 07, 2003

Evelyn Barker, Associate Professor Emerita of Philosophy

Evelyn Barker, associate professor emerita of philosophy, passed away on Wednesday, June 25. Dr. Barker, who retired in 1992, was a charter member of the philosophy faculty and played a critical role in UMBC's development. Stephen Braude, John Titchner and Gary Rupert reflect on Barker's contributions.

Evelyn Barker, associate professor emerita of philosophy and longtime champion of UMBC, passed away on Wednesday, June 25.

Dr. Barker, who retired in 1992, was a charter member of the philosophy faculty. Through her contributions to the University and to the Department of Philosophy, she played a critical role in the development of the University, including serving on many important University committees. She was instrumental in developing the Master of Arts in Applied and Professional Ethics, and was responsible for launching the careers of several philosophers.

Even after her retirement, Dr. Barker played an active role in the life of the philosophy department, taking a special interest in new and junior faculty."She was a wise counselor and advisor to a young chair, was the authorial member of the committee initiating the Honors Program, and an original member of the Graduate Faculty in Applied and Professional Ethics," says John Titchener, former philosophy chair and associate professor emeritus. "She cared about philosophy and UMBC in a way which inspired those of us privileged to know her."

The former Evelyn Masi was born in Franklin, Massachusetts in 1927. She graduated summa cum laude from Wheaton College in 1948, obtained an M.A. from Vassar College in 1949, and received both the M.A. and the Ph.D. in philosophy from Harvard University in 1956. She married fellow philosopher Stephen F. Barker in 1961. During her teaching and scholarly career, Dr. Barker also held posts at Smith College and Mount Holyoke College. She authored numerous books and articles, ranging in scope from logic to the ethics of health care. Her work was noted for its rigor and clarity.

Stephen Braude, chair of the Department of Philosophy, says, "Evelyn Barker had been my colleague and my friend since my arrival at UMBC in 1971. She was a perceptive and admirably feisty philosophical interlocutor, a dedicated and generous member of the UMBC community, and a valued personal friend. My colleagues and I dedicated our conference room to Evelyn to honor her contributions to the university and to express our deep affection and respect for her.

"We were surprised and dismayed when Evelyn informed us, a couple of months ago, that she was too ill to attend one of our guest lectures," Braude says. "Now we're all greatly saddened by her passing, and I know we will all miss her penetrating insights, quick wit, and warm, vital presence."

Gary Rupert, associate director of alumni relations, adds, "Evelyn was one of the true gems of UMBC. She loved the university, she loved the students and she loved her colleagues. She epitomized this place - she really cared! The University, and a great many of us, lost a dear friend."

A memorial mass for Barker will be held in Baltimore on Thursday, September 25 at 7 p.m. in the Lady Chapel of the Cathedral of Mary Our Queen, 5200 North Charles Street. (The Lady Chapel is at the west end of the building, behind the main altar) A reception will follow in the parish hall.

Members of the campus community have asked how they can honor Dr. Barker. A generous supporter of the University, she established The Evelyn M. Barker Endowment to provide financial support for the Department of Philosophy, as well as an annual award to a philosophy major who is going on to graduate studies in the field. To contribute to the Evelyn Barker Endowment, please make checks payable to UM Foundation and mail to Gary Rupert at the Alumni House, UMBC, 1000 Hilltop Circle, Baltimore, MD 21250.

Condolences may be sent to Stephen Barker, 4003 Keswick Road Baltimore, MD 21211-2228. Survivors also include her sons, Charles and George, and a brother and a sister.

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Doug Hamby Dance Performs at Dance Place

On July 19 and 20, Doug Hamby Dance will perform its annual concert at Dance Place in Washington, D.C. The program includes premieres of Edgewater Park and Vial.

Fluid and languid, Aaron Jackson and Chip Scuderi slide, tumble, and splash their way across the silent room, following UMBC dance professor Doug Hamby's choreography. In Edgewater Park, these two talented dancers bring to life rides in an amusement park -- water slides, roller coasters and carousels. Carefully recorded and mixed, the images of the two men are woven together to create very different perspectives of the freefall and motion that accompanies each ride.

A curtain separates the dancers from the audience, who will watch the performance on a projection screen placed in the middle of the stage. Only patches of fabric removed from the curtain panels let the audience know that the dance is being performed live. Videographer Nick Prevas intertwines Jackson and Scuderi's movements on the large screen, at times fading one in and the other out, and other times capturing one moment of the two together and freezing it.

On July 19 and 20, Doug Hamby Dance will perform its annual concert at Dance Place in Washington, D.C. In addition to the premiere of Edgewater Park, the program includes the premiere of the memory-based Vial and the Washington, DC premiere of Short'nin Bread Variations, about a three-year old boy's kitchen mischief. Also on the program are the World Cup Soccer-inspired Opus `98; Interplay; and Women at Work.

Hamby is excited about all of the pieces scheduled to be performed, but Edgewater Park makes the eyes of this charismatic and talented dancer/choreographer burn a little brighter. "Technology is a conduit used to manipulate the perception of the audience," he remarks. "They see the dance through the eyes of the mixer." In this piece, Hamby is collaborating with UMBC visual arts professor Tim Nohe. "The challenging thing about collaboration is that you don't realize how much control you've relinquished."

Women at Work, a dance Hamby created in 1983, interprets a short story by D.H. Lawrence about fighting sexual harassment in the workplace. This is a piece featuring Emily Gibbs, Ali Linthicum, Allyson Gebken, and Margaret Terry, and is designed to show the empowerment of women. Dancing to frantic music, frenzied and rushed, yet languorous and smooth at the same time, these women are evocative, sensual and completely in control.

"A dance to me is a celebration," Hamby says, "and this is definitely a celebration."

Tickets are $18 general admission, $14 for Dance Place members, seniors, students and artists, and $6 for children and teens (17 and under). The concert begins at 8 p.m., on the 19th, and 7 p.m., on the 20th. Dance Place is located at 3225 8th Street N.E., Washington, D.C. Tickets may be purchased through the Dance Place box office at (202) 269-1600 or online at www.danceplace.org.

- Jennifer Leigh Gibson

Posted by dwinds1

July 03, 2003

Testing Insights

Posted by dwinds1

July 02, 2003

Kudos

Cross Country Squads Complete Recruiting Class for 2003
UMBC head cross country coach Murray Davis announced that 11 freshmen (five men and six women) will compete for the Retrievers this coming fall.

Mike Brady (Monsignor Donovan/Toms River, NJ), Isaac Matthews (Oxon Hill/Oxon Hill, MD), Peter Ramdial (Bowie/Bowie, MD), Shawn Shokry (Hanover Park/Florham Park), and J.J. Wetzel (Archbishop Spalding/Crofton, MD) will join the men's squad. Kathleen Galan (Highland Regional/Sicklerville, NJ), Morgan Little (C. Milton Wright/Bel Air, MD), Jazzmon Morgan (Toms River/Toms River, NJ), Britta Nelson (Havre de Grace/Havre de Grace, MD), Desireee Tubb (Kingsway Regional/Swedesboro, NJ) and Francine Ward (Byram Hills/Pleasantville, NY) will compete on the women's squad.

"I'm very pleased with this incoming class," said Davis. "All of them are outstanding student-athletes, and will help us become extremely competitive in the America East Conference." For more Retriever news, go to www.umbcretrievers.com.

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Kudos

Three Members of UMBC Community are Innovator of the Year Finalists
Three UMBC community members are among the 25 finalists in The Daily Record's second annual "Innovator of the Year Awards" competition. They are:

Govind Rao, Professor and Chair, Chemical and Biochemical EngineeringWilliam F. Geritz III, BDMetric, Inc. (techcenter@UMBC tenant)David Bach, Scientific Products and Systems Inc. (techcenter@UMBC tenant)

The Innovator competition recognizes Maryland residents and companies who have introduced innovations that have had positive effects on their businesses, industries or communities. The 25 winners and one top winner will be honored at an awards dinner at the Wyndham Hotel in downtown Baltimore on September 17.

Philosophers on Parade
Over the past several months, members of the philosophy department have been busy publishing and presenting papers. Associate Professor Susan Dwyer spoke on "Moral Responsibility and Moral Development" at Georgetown University in April, and a copy of this paper appeared in The Monist (April, 2003). At a July conference on Culture and the Innate Mind at the University of Sheffield, she gave two presentations: "Moral Competence and Moral Relativism," and "How Good is the 'Linguistic Analogy'?" In August, she will be speaking at a meeting in Lund, Sweden, of the International Association of Social Philosophy and Philosophy of Law. Her talk will be "Prospects for a Universal Morality in a Diverse World."

Assistant Professor Joseph Berkowitz, on research leave this semester, has given nine presentations of three papers in various locations throughout the U.K., Holland, and Germany. The papers are "Newcomb's Problem: A Dilemma for Bayesian Decision Makers," "A Relational Modal Interpretation of Quantum Mechanics" (co-authored with Meir Hemmo), and "The Ergodic Hierarchy, Decay of Correlations and Chaos" (co-authored with R. Frigg and F. Kronz).

Professor and department chair Stephen Braude published two books recently. The first is a revised edition of ESP and Psychokinesis: A Philosophical Examination (Brown Walker Press). The second is Immortal Remains: The Evidence for Life After Death (Rowman & Littlefield). An article of his, "The Nature and Significance of Dissociation," is due to appear in J. Radden's (ed), Companion to the Philosophy of Psychiatry (Oxford University Press). But it was beaten into print by a translation of the paper into Serbian, which appeared in the journal Pedagogic Reality, published by the University of Novi Sad.

Like his aforementioned colleagues, Braude has also been lecturing overseas. In April he spoke on "Synchronicity, Super Psi, and Survival" at the University of Edinburgh, and "Postmortem Survival: The State of the Debate" at Glasgow University. Then in June, he presented two talks in Novi Sad, Serbia. The first, "Multiple Personality and Dissociation: A Philosophical Approach," was given to the Faculty of Medicine at the University of Novi Sad. The second, "Multiple Personality and Moral Responsibility," was presented to the Novi Sad Faculty of Management. (Before that second lecture, Prof. Braude was named Honored Professor of Philosophy at the Faculty of Management.)

Back in the U.S., in July, Prof. Braude gave three lectures at the Rhine Research Center in Durham, NC: "Psi and the Physical World," "Taking Physical Mediumship Seriously," and "Mental Mediumship."

Anne Brodsky Reading (8/4)
Assistant Professor of Psychology Anne Brodsky reads from her new book, With All Our Strength: The Revolutionary Association of Women in Afghanistan, on August 4 at 7 p.m., Black Planet Bookstore, 1621 Fleet Street in Baltimore. For more information call (410) 537-5005.

CWIT Web Site One of Baltimore's Best
The Center for Women and Technology's Web site (www.umbc.edu/cwit)was named Best Web Site by Baltimore Magazine (August 2003, page 183): "Named the best resource for women and technology on the Web by ABCNews.com correspondent Dianne Lynch, The Center for Women and Information Technology Web site isn't flashy. It isn't filled with complex graphics or colorful pop-ups. However, this site, produced by Joan Korenman and her staff out of the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, does what so few Web sites manage to do: It communicates clearly. CWIT ranks as one of the most comprehensive sites for information on IT and it provides a message board for women hoping to join the field."

New Book by Robert Deluty
Associate Professor of Psychology and Presidential Teaching Professor Robert Deluty has published a new book of essays and poetry, The Long and Short of It (Gateway Press, July 2003). The book is available in the UMBC Bookstore and in selected stores in the Baltimore/Washington area.

Public Policy Doctoral Student Stephanie Jones Receives Fellowship
The Department of Public Policy is pleased to announce that Stephanie Jones, a doctoral student, was offered the Southern Regional Education Board's Dissertation Fellowship. In addition to a stipend, the fellowship includes funding to participate in the fall SREB conference, Compact for Faculty Diversity Institute of Teaching. At the conference, Jones will present a piece of her dissertation research, and have opportunities to meet hiring university officials for a potential fall 2004 faculty appointment.

Public Policy Doctoral Student Yael Harris Goldwater Co-winner of Research Award; Susanne Dragun Receives Honorable Mention
Yael Harris Goldwater was the Co-Winner of the 2003 Laurence G. Branch Doctoral Student Research Award. Susanne Dragun was one of three honorable mentions. There were 64 applicants nationally. The award is sponsored by the Gerontological Health Section of the American Public Health Association. Larry Branch, nationally recognized in the field of gerontology, founded the award to recognize doctoral student research in the field of aging.

Praise for Curtis Menyuk's Paper in Tech Trends
The editor of the National Security Agency's Tech Trends magazine recently referred to Curtis Menyuk's paper, "The Future of the Network is Optical," as setting a new "Gold Standard" for such articles due to its readability and technical depth.

William Semancik, chief of the Laboratory for Telecommunications Sciences, praised Menyuk for his outstanding contributions to the paper and "for his sustained, continuous and important contributions to the development of theoretical concepts and models that aid in the understanding of fundamental characteristics in optical fiber based transmission systems.

Kuhn Library Gallery and the Center for Art and Visual Culture, Receive AAM Awards
The Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery received first prize in the American Association of Museums' (AAM) 2003 Museum Publications Design Competition, Exhibition Catalogues category (Institutions with Budgets Under $500,000), for "Typographically Speaking: The Art of Matthew Carter," designed by visual arts professor Margaret "Peggy" Re. "Typographically Speaking" was curated by Re and organized by the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery under the direction of Cynthia Wayne, curator of exhibitions.

The Center for Art and Visual Culture (CAVC) received an honorable mention in the CD-ROM category (Institutions with Budgets Under $500,000), for "Fred Wilson: Objects and Installations, 1979-2000." The CD-ROM was designed by William-John Tudor, CAVC exhibition and technology designer, and recent visual arts graduates Rebecca Flanders and Celina Kim. The Wilson exhibition was curated by Maurice Berger, curator, CAVC.

The annual AAM competition, which acknowledges excellence in the graphic design of museum publications, is the only national juried event involving publications produced by museums of all kinds and sizes. This year's contest drew nearly 1000 entries. A selection of the winners was displayed at AAM's annual meeting in May, and the results will be featured in the July/August 2003 issue of AAM's national magazine, Museum News, and on AAM's Web site at www.aam-us.org.

Ph.D. Candidate Jennifer Rouse Coordinates First Aging Policy for Trinidad/Tabago
Jennifer Rouse, Master of Policy Sciences '01 and a doctoral candidate in the Policy Sciences Graduate Program, has accepted a position as director of the Division of Aging under the Ministry of Social Development for Trinidad and Tobago. As part of its function, the newly created Division of Aging will coordinate the implementation of Trinidad and Tobago's first national aging policy. Rouse's doctoral dissertation research is a case study of aging policy in Trinidad and Tobago. She begins her new position in August.

Cross Country Squads Complete Recruiting Class for 2003
UMBC head cross country coach Murray Davis announced that 11 freshmen (five men and six women) will compete for the Retrievers this coming fall.

Mike Brady (Monsignor Donovan/Toms River, NJ), Isaac Matthews (Oxon Hill/Oxon Hill, MD), Peter Ramdial (Bowie/Bowie, MD), Shawn Shokry (Hanover Park/Florham Park), and J.J. Wetzel (Archbishop Spalding/Crofton, MD) will join the men's squad. Kathleen Galan (Highland Regional/Sicklerville, NJ), Morgan Little (C. Milton Wright/Bel Air, MD), Jazzmon Morgan (Toms River/Toms River, NJ), Britta Nelson (Havre de Grace/Havre de Grace, MD), Desireee Tubb (Kingsway Regional/Swedesboro, NJ) and Francine Ward (Byram Hills/Pleasantville, NY) will compete on the women's squad.

"I'm very pleased with this incoming class," said Davis. "All of them are outstanding student-athletes, and will help us become extremely competitive in the America East Conference." For more Retriever news, go to www.umbcretrievers.com.

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PeopleSoft Peer Mentors Now on Call

Now that PeopleSoft has "gone live," the first users of the system are taking what they've been learning in training and putting it to use back at their desks. As with any change, there are some feelings of fear and trepidation as PeopleSoft becomes a part of the way we do business at UMBC. Peer mentors are a much-welcomed first line of support for new PeopleSoft users.

Now that PeopleSoft has "gone live," the first users of the system are taking what they've been learning in training and putting it to use back at their desks. As with any change, there are some feelings of fear and trepidation as PeopleSoft becomes a part of the way we do business at UMBC.

"I'm scared to death!" was just one of the concerned comments from a new PeopleSoft user. Fortunately, the group has a safety net in PeopleSoft Peer Mentors -- a much-welcomed first line of support for new PeopleSoft users.

"Trust me, we all are," replied UMBC CIO Jack Suess, who, along with OIT, Human Resources and Finance staff, have been working overtime to get PeopleSoft off the ground. "There's a lot of angst. It'll take patience and perseverance on everyone's part until we can shake the kinks out."

Peer mentors actually have two different roles. Over the last few months, mentors were trained and helped put the system through it paces, in order to offer constructive criticism and identify issues to provide better training. The second role is to answer questions or help refer users to a contact in OIT, Human Resources or Finance, or, for less time-sensitive questions, the online support form. (Training for all users will be available throughout the summer.)

Administrators hope the peer mentors will provide some relief during an understandably stressful time. "One support hotline would not be enough," says Nancy Young, a member of the Delta Initiative Committee and director of Residential Life. "We've been able to make a number of 'fixes' through peer mentor feedback. They've made an incredibly positive difference to the process."

Peer mentors like Cathy Kafer, administrative assistant in the Department of Theatre, say that OIT and others have been listening well to feedback and making good progress with needed changes. Kafer indicates that patience will be important to the success of the project. "It's ultimately been positive, but it will take time to get there. It's always that way with change.

"This is powerful accounting software that some people aren't accustomed to and a lot of people don't feel they have the computer skills to use it," Kafer adds. "However, once you get the skills behind you it's user friendly. I think it's awesome, but there will be kinks."

Tim Sparklin, peer mentor and research services administrator in the Dean's Office, College of Arts and Sciences, agrees that PeopleSoft becomes easier to use with experience. "The reason I became a peer mentor was two-fold: one, to be on the forefront of this revolutionary project for UMBC but more importantly to be a resource on campus to assist in its implementation. As one of the first to be trained to use PeopleSoft, I got easily confused and am still. But, by repeating tasks, using the system and practice, practice, practice, comfort levels and user-friendliness will increase. Spending the time, finding the patience and maintaining the support of each other (especially in these days) is important to the success of working at UMBC and with using PeopleSoft."

Click here for a list of PeopleSoft Peer Mentors. For more information on PeopleSoft, go to www.umbc.edu/peoplesoft.

Posted by dwinds1

In the News

Freeman Hrabowski in the Baltimore Sun and the New York Times
President Freeman Hrabowski's oped, "Elevating Minorities," appeared in the Baltimore Sun on June 29. He was quoted in a June 29 New York Times article on affirmative action.
www.sunspot.net/news/opinion/oped/bal-op.court29jun29,0,7251739.story
www.nytimes.com/2003/06/29/weekinreview/29WINT.html?ex=1057464000&en=

Lou Cantori in the News
Professor of Political Science Lou Cantori's oped, "The Quagmire in Iraq," was published in the Baltimore Sun on June 30.
www.sunspot.net/news/opinion/oped/bal-op.military30jun30,0,6194037.story?coll=bal-oped-headlines

He was also a guest on WBAL Radio June 30 and on WYPR's Marc Steiner Show July 2.

Posted by dwinds1

In the News

Chris Corbett on NPR (8/16)
English faculty member Chris Corbett will discuss his forthcoming book, Orphans Preferred: The Twisted Truth and Lasting Legend of the Pony Express, on National Public Radio's "Weekend Edition" this Saturday, August 16. In Baltimore, WYPR (88.1 FM) broadcasts "Weekend Edition" from 8 to 10 a.m. For more information on NPR, please visit WYPR's Web site.

Tom Schaller in the Baltimore Sun
Assistant Professor of Political Science Tom Schaller's OpEd, "Authenticity's/sp/electricity," appeared in the Baltimore Sun on August 10.
www.sunspot.net/news/opinion/oped/bal-pe.dean10aug10,0,5745451.story?coll=bal-oped-headlines

UMBC Student Bernadette Hanlon in the Baltimore Sun
Bernadette Hanlon's OpEd, " 'Park tax' would help restore neighborhood green spaces," appeared in the Baltimore Sun on August 13.
www.sunspot.net/news/opinion/oped/bal-op.diary13aug13,0,6282452.story?coll=bal-oped-headlines

BDMetrics and Sphere in Baltimore Business Journal
BD Metrics and Sphere, techcenter@UMBC tenants, were featured in the Baltimore Business Journal on August 11.
www.bizjournals.com/baltimore/stories/2003/08/11/newscolumn6.html?t=printable

Anne Brodsky on Democracy Now
On August 7, Assistant Professor of Psychology Anne Brodsky was a guest on Democracy Now, with Amy Goodman. Brodsky is the author of With All Our Strength: The Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan. For more information or to listen to the interview, go to www.democracynow.org/article.pl?sid=03/08/07/1431259

Symmes Gardner in the Baltimore Sun
Work by Symmes Gardner, director of the Center for Art and Visual Culture, was included in Glenn McNatt's favorable review of the Artscape Juried Exhibition in the Baltimore Sun on July 25.
www.sunspot.net/features/lifestyle/bal-to.art25jul25,0,3247122.story?coll=bal-artslife-today

Chris Corbett in Booklist
Gilbert Taylor of Booklist gives high praise to English department faculty Chris Corbett's forthcoming release, Orphans Preferred: The Twisted Truth and Lasting Legend of the Pony Express. Taylor writes, "If MBAs existed in 1860, they'd have advised Russell, Majors & Waddell that their business plan for a cross-contintental courier service was a loser. But the firm's folly was the Old West's gain, created one of its most myth-encrusted mirages - the fabled Pony Express. In Corbett's discerning hands, the saga splits in two. The first part is his rollicking account of the Express, in which Corbett wryly picks his way through the embellishments that surround its short year-and-a-half existence. The second part ambles through the afterlife of the Pony Express as entertainment, accumulating Corbett's gallery of newspaper hacks, cheap novelists, showman Buffalo Bill, filmmakers, and local history antiquarians who peddled truths and fabrications about it. It makes for fun reading as Corbett handicaps which writer was a jolly liar, who was a conscientious chronicler, or what old timer's memories of his days on horseback have a smidgen of believability. The book is great entertainment in and of itself, but buffs of the West will virtually gallop to the checkout line."

Kriste Lindenmeyer in Newhouse News Service
Associate Professor of History Kriste Lindenmeyer was quoted in a July 7 Newhouse News Service story on the popularity of an anonymous Internet essay about childhood nostalgia.
www.newhouse.com//archive/melendez070703.html

techcenter@UMBC in the Baltimore Business Journal
On July 28, the Baltimore Business Journal noted that BD Metrics Inc., one of the Baltimore area's more promising software startups, is the newest tenant at techcenter@UMBC.
www.bizjournals.com/baltimore/stories/2003/07/28/daily30.html?t=printable

Lou Cantori in Salon and on Fox 45 News
Professor of Political Science Lou Cantori was quoted in a July 18 Salon article on the U.S. occupation in Iraq. The full text is available to subscribers only.
www.salon.com/news/feature/2003/07/18/pre_war/index_np.html

Cantori was also interviewed about the current situation in Iraq on Fox 45 News July 22.

Doug Hamby Dance Review in the Washington Post
Doug Hamby Dance's recent Dance Place concert was reviewed by the Washington Post on July 22.
www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A26000-2003Jul21.html

Jaclyn Pavelec and Janet McGlynn in the Daily Record
"Social entrepreneurship: Profits for progress," co-written by Jaclyn Pavelec, CEO of Bokk Tech, a techcenter@UMBC Student Idea Lab company, and Janet McGlynn, UMBC director of communication and outreach, appeared in the Daily Record on July 11. The online article is available to subscribers only.
www.mddailyrecord.com/pub/4_9_friday/saturdaycolumns/143554-1.html

Anne Brodsky on the Marc Steiner Show
Assistant Professor of Psychology Anne Brodsky discussed her new book, With All Our Strength: The Revolutionary Association of the Women of Afghanistan, on WYPR's Marc Steiner Show on July 14.

Wallace McMillan's Lighthouse Project in the Virginia Pilot
On July 12, the Virginia Pilot featured Assistant Professor of Physics Wallace McMillan's global climate research at a former lighthouse off Virginia Beach.
(Note "continuation" link at top of the page)
http://epilot.hamptonroads.com/Repository/getFiles.asp?Style=OliveXLib:ArticleToMailGif&Type=text/html&Path=VirginianPilot/2003/07/12&ID=Ar02000&ChunkNum=0

techcenter@UMBC in the Baltimore Business Journal
"As the Baltimore region angles for a bigger slice of the life sciences pie -- long the domain of Montgomery County and its 'DNA Alley' -- the University of Maryland, Baltimore County's technology incubator continues to emerge as a cradle for promising startups," said Robert Terry, the Baltimore Business Journal, in the July 14 feature, "UMBC tech incubator booming." The article features Executive Director, UMBC Research Park Corp. Ellen Hemmerly.
http://baltimore.bizjournals.com/baltimore/stories/2003/07/07/story7.html

Lou Cantori on "Newshour with Jim Lehrer"
On July 8, Professor of Political Science Lou Cantori was a guest on PBS's "Newshour with Jim Lehrer." Cantori discussed the situation facing U.S. forces in postwar Iraq.
www.pbs.org/newshour/bb/middle_east/july-dec03/iraq_07-08-03.html

Ellen Hemmerly in the Daily Record and the Baltimore Business Journal
Ellen Hemmerly, executive director, techcenter@umbc, was interviewed for the June 20 Daily Record article, "Partnerships provide small biotechs with a big brother."
www.mddailyrecord.com/cgi-bin/udt/im.display.printable?client.id=mddailyrecord&story.id=142731

Hemmerly was also featured in the Baltimore Business Journal's "UMBC tech incubator booming" on July 7.
http://baltimore.bizjournals.com/baltimore/stories/2003/07/07/story7.html?t=printable

Lou Cantori in the News
Professor of Political Science Lou Cantori's oped, "The Quagmire in Iraq," was published in the Baltimore Sun on June 30.
www.sunspot.net/news/opinion/oped/bal-op.military30jun30,0,6194037.story?coll=bal-oped-headlines

He was also a guest on WBAL Radio June 30 and on WYPR's Marc Steiner Show July 2.

Posted by dwinds1

July 01, 2003

Katie Rokus has been named Assistant Women's Basketball Coach

Katie Rokus, who enjoyed a successful academic and athletic career at University of South Carolina Aiken, is UMBC's new assistant women's basketball coach.

Katie Rokus has been named assistant women's basketball coach at UMBC. Rokus, who earned a communications degree from the University of South Carolina Aiken this past May, will be heavily involved in all areas of the Retrievers' program. The St. Johns College High School (Washington D.C.) product was a guard for the Lady Pacers from 1999 through 2003 and was originally recruited by Stern, who coached at Aiken from 1998 through 2002.

"Katie will be a tremendous addition to our program," said Head Coach Phil Stern. "She is extremely bright, and obviously knows our system very well, which will help greatly since we will have so many new players this season. She will also be involved in recruiting and the daily operation of our office."

Rokus enjoyed a tremendous combination of academic and athletic success at Division II Aiken, and as a result, was named the school's outstanding senior student at convocation. Rokus, who completed her academic career with a 3.88 grade point average, also wrote for the Pacer Times newspaper and created a running, behind-the-scenes commentary through the basketball team's Web page.

A captain this past season, Aiken went a combined 78-38 during her four-year tenure. In 2001-2002, the Lady Pacers made their first-ever NCAA Tournament appearance and captured the school's first Peach Belt Conference Regular Season Championship.

Rokus was also the salutatorian of her senior class at St. Johns College High School, where she played basketball and soccer. Her team compiled a record of 107-21, including a #16 national ranking her senior season.

"I am thrilled to be reunited with coach Stern and Assistant Coach Beth Wandyes," Rokus said. "I look forward to being a part of all of the great things that we are going to accomplish over the next few years."

Posted by dwinds1

Katie Rokus has been named Assistant Women's Basketball Coach

Katie Rokus, who enjoyed a successful academic and athletic career at University of South Carolina Aiken, is UMBC's new assistant women's basketball coach.

Katie Rokus has been named assistant women's basketball coach at UMBC. Rokus, who earned a communications degree from the University of South Carolina Aiken this past May, will be heavily involved in all areas of the Retrievers' program. The St. Johns College High School (Washington D.C.) product was a guard for the Lady Pacers from 1999 through 2003 and was originally recruited by Stern, who coached at Aiken from 1998 through 2002.

"Katie will be a tremendous addition to our program," said Head Coach Phil Stern. "She is extremely bright, and obviously knows our system very well, which will help greatly since we will have so many new players this season. She will also be involved in recruiting and the daily operation of our office."

Rokus enjoyed a tremendous combination of academic and athletic success at Division II Aiken, and as a result, was named the school's outstanding senior student at convocation. Rokus, who completed her academic career with a 3.88 grade point average, also wrote for the Pacer Times newspaper and created a running, behind-the-scenes commentary through the basketball team's Web page.

A captain this past season, Aiken went a combined 78-38 during her four-year tenure. In 2001-2002, the Lady Pacers made their first-ever NCAA Tournament appearance and captured the school's first Peach Belt Conference Regular Season Championship.

Rokus was also the salutatorian of her senior class at St. Johns College High School, where she played basketball and soccer. Her team compiled a record of 107-21, including a #16 national ranking her senior season.

"I am thrilled to be reunited with coach Stern and Assistant Coach Beth Wandyes," Rokus said. "I look forward to being a part of all of the great things that we are going to accomplish over the next few years."

Posted by dwinds1

Katie Rokus has been named Assistant Women's Basketball Coach

Katie Rokus, who enjoyed a successful academic and athletic career at University of South Carolina Aiken, is UMBC's new assistant women's basketball coach.

Katie Rokus has been named assistant women's basketball coach at UMBC. Rokus, who earned a communications degree from the University of South Carolina Aiken this past May, will be heavily involved in all areas of the Retrievers' program. The St. Johns College High School (Washington D.C.) product was a guard for the Lady Pacers from 1999 through 2003 and was originally recruited by Stern, who coached at Aiken from 1998 through 2002.

"Katie will be a tremendous addition to our program," said Head Coach Phil Stern. "She is extremely bright, and obviously knows our system very well, which will help greatly since we will have so many new players this season. She will also be involved in recruiting and the daily operation of our office."

Rokus enjoyed a tremendous combination of academic and athletic success at Division II Aiken, and as a result, was named the school's outstanding senior student at convocation. Rokus, who completed her academic career with a 3.88 grade point average, also wrote for the Pacer Times newspaper and created a running, behind-the-scenes commentary through the basketball team's Web page.

A captain this past season, Aiken went a combined 78-38 during her four-year tenure. In 2001-2002, the Lady Pacers made their first-ever NCAA Tournament appearance and captured the school's first Peach Belt Conference Regular Season Championship.

Rokus was also the salutatorian of her senior class at St. Johns College High School, where she played basketball and soccer. Her team compiled a record of 107-21, including a #16 national ranking her senior season.

"I am thrilled to be reunited with coach Stern and Assistant Coach Beth Wandyes," Rokus said. "I look forward to being a part of all of the great things that we are going to accomplish over the next few years."

Posted by dwinds1

June 23, 2003

UMBC Chosen for Kauffman Campuses Initiative

The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) is among 15 U.S. universities to receive a $50,000 planning grant from the Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation to take part in the Kauffman Campuses Initiative, a new program aimed at making entrepreneurship education a common and accessible campus-wide opportunity.

The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) is among 15 universities across the country to receive a $50,000 planning grant from the Kansas City-based Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation to take part in the Foundation's Kauffman Campuses Initiative, a new program aimed at making entrepreneurship education a common and accessible campus-wide opportunity.

The new Kauffman program builds on the emerging trend among colleges and universities to expand entrepreneurship education beyond business schools so that entrepreneurship training and experiences are available across departments and to students in diverse disciplines.

"At UMBC, we are firm believers in the potential of entrepreneurship education," said UMBC president Freeman A. Hrabowski, III. "The Kauffman Campuses Initiative is a perfect fit with UMBC's emphasis on giving our students across all academic disciplines access to entrepreneurship courses and programs. We look forward to presenting our ideas in December for the next stage of the Initiative."

UMBC will use the $50,000 planning grant to help fund development of a proposal to be presented in December for the next stage of the Kauffman Campuses Initiative. The Foundation will award five to seven challenge grants of up to $5 million by year's end to universities that best demonstrate their abilities to make entrepreneurship a common and accessible experience for all students; infuse entrepreneurship into the campus culture; adopt a unique, innovative and potentially break-away approach; provide the support of top university leadership; and position themselves to serve as a model for other colleges and universities.

UMBC's previous efforts to expand student and faculty entrepreneurship have earned the support of prominent Baltimore business leaders. Mayo Shattuck, III, President and CEO of Constellation Energy Group, is chair of UMBC's Alex. Brown Center for Science and Technology Entrepreneurship Advisory Board.

"I'm delighted to see UMBC recognized by the Kauffman Foundation for its innovative entrepreneurship programs," said Shattuck. "I look forward to taking part in developing programs and curricula that will help UMBC continue to emerge as a national leader in entrepreneurship education."

UMBC established the Alex. Brown Center for Science and Technology Entrepreneurship in 2000 through a million-dollar gift from The Alex. Brown Foundation. Since its inception, UMBC has worked closely with the Baltimore business community towards the vision of creating one of the leading university centers for science and technology entrepreneurism.

Posted by dwinds1

June 12, 2003

Lana Khvalina Named First Team At-Large Verizon Academic All America

UMBC tennis standout Lana Khvalina was named First Team At-Large Verizon Academic All America, it was announced by the College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA). She is UMBC's 13th Academic All American in the last two years, the highest figure in any two-year period in school history.

UMBC tennis standout Lana Khvalina was named First Team At-Large Verizon Academic All America, it was announced by the College Sports Information Directors of America (CoSIDA).

Khvalina was the lone sophomore in the country named to the teamincludes the sports of crew, fencing, field hockey golf, gymnastics, icehockey, lacrosse, rifle, skiing, swimming, tennis, men's volleyball,water polo, and wrestling.

Khvalina, who maintains a 4.0 GPA in political science and is a member of UMBC's Student-Athlete Advisory Council, becomes UMBC'sthird First Team Academic All American. Cross Country's Jen Ecker (2001) and tennis' Oscar Lopez (1999) also earned those honors. Khvalina is UMBC's thirteenth Academic All American in the last two years, the highest figure in any two-year period in school history.

On the court, Khvalina just earned All Northeast Conference honors at #5singles, after compiling a record of 16-3 at that position for thefive-time league champions. She also played #1 doubles this season, compiling a 12-6 record and earning All NEC honors with partner Tia Kaasalainen. For her career, Khvalina is a remarkable 36-6 in singles competition.

Posted by dwinds1

The Class of 2003

Meet some of UMBC's outstanding graduates!

Read about some of UMBC's outstanding graduates at www.umbc.edu/newsevents/Commencement/profiles03/.

Posted by dwinds1

Retriever Signs Pro-Baseball Contract

UMBC junior lefthanded pitcher Joe Wilson signed a professional contract with the Philadelphia Phillies. Wilson was selected in the 13th round by the Philadelphia Phillies in the June 2003 Major League Baseball Draft. Wilson, the 385th overall selection, was the 11th pick by the Phillies.

UMBC junior lefthanded pitcher Joe Wilson signed a professional contract with the Philadelphia Phillies. Wilson was selected in the 13th round by the Philadelphia Phillies in the June 2003 Major League Baseball Draft. Wilson, the 385th overall selection, was the 11th pick by the Phillies.

Wilson enjoyed his finest campaign in 2002 as a sophomore, going 9-3 with a 2.26 ERA. He earned First Team All Northeast Conference honors that season. This past year, Wilson went 4-6 and fanned 57 batters in 61.0 innings, while finishing with 6 complete-games. San Diego Padres' reliever Jay Witasick and Milwaukee Brewers starting lefthander Wayne Franklin are two former Retrievers who are now in the majors.

"We are extremely happy for Joe," said UMBC head coach John Jancuska. "He has worked extremely hard since arriving at UMBC and really has improved tremendously over the last couple of years. We wish him the best of luck with the Phillies."

Posted by dwinds1

UMBC to Co-Host BioParks 2003 Conference

UMBC is co-hosting BioParks 2003, an international conference highlighting the importance of Maryland's four research universities in the state's biotechnology industry to be held June 20 and 21 in downtown Baltimore.

Maryland Governor Robert Ehrlich and Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley are among the invited speakers at BioParks 2003, an international conference highlighting the importance of Maryland's four research universities in the state's biotechnology industry to be held June 20 and 21 in downtown Baltimore.

Economic development and research park leaders from across North America and as far away as Europe will join federal, state, University System of Maryland, Johns Hopkins University and city officials for a day and a half of talks, tours of research/tech parks and strategy sessions. Prominent guest speakers include: Bruce P. Mehlman, Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Technology Policy, Bureau of Technology Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce; and Matt Zuga, Managing Director of Legg Mason's Life Sciences Investment Banking Group.

Some of Maryland's top names in economic development and education will be there, including State Department of Business and Economic Development Secretary Aris Melissaratos, University System of Maryland Chancellor William Kirwan, and the presidents of Baltimore's four research universities (UMBC, Johns Hopkins, University of Maryland Baltimore and University of Maryland, College Park.)

Maryland's powerful combination of an established biotech industry and research universities in close proximity to key federal agencies and labs (NIH, FDA, etc.) is fueling national and international interest in the Baltimore-Washington region as a prime biotech business location.

A recent comprehensive study by the Brookings Institution's Center on Urban and Metropolitan Policy entitled "Signs of Life: The Growth of Biotechnology Centers in the U.S." described the Baltimore-Washington region as one of four 'biotechnology centers' on the rise. The DC-based think-tank ranked the region alongside Philadelphia-Wilmington, New York and LA as part of the top nine U.S. metro areas with above-average levels of biotech research and commercialization.

BioParks 2003 leads up to the world's biggest biotechnology conference -- the Biotechnology Industry Organization's (BIO) Annual Convention to be held June 22-25 in Washington DC -- making for a bustling week for the Baltimore/Washington region's biotech industry.

Last year's BIO Convention drew more than 15,000 participants from 52 countries, including more than 1,000 exhibitors and speakers and nearly 400 journalists. BIO participants discussed everything from science and medicine to business development, ethics and religion.

BioParks 2003 is sponsored by the Association of University Research Parks (AURP) and the Council of Biotechnology Centers (CBC), which both have ties to the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). Ellen Hemmerly, executive director of bwtech@UMBC, the University's research and tech park, is also president of AURP. Tony Moreira, vice provost for academic affairs at UMBC, is chair of CBC. Hemmerly and Moreira worked extensively behind the scenes to bring the influential conference to Baltimore this year.

"Hosting BioParks 2003 is a great opportunity for Baltimore," said Hemmerly. "I look forward to spreading the word about not just bwtech@UMBC, but all of Baltimore's excellent existing and planned research parks. I'm personally excited to learn more about Johns Hopkins' planned East Baltimore Biotechnology Park and UMB's Baltimore Health Sciences Research Park located in West Baltimore."

Hemmerly and Moreira will be joined by other officials from area universities, including William Brody, president of Johns Hopkins and UMBC president Freeman Hrabowski. Research park officials from as far away as St. Louis' Emerging Technology Center will offer a perspective on national trends and case studies for biotech parks.

The event will be hosted by UMBC, Johns Hopkins University, the University of Maryland Baltimore, University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute and the University of Maryland, College Park. The conference is sponsored in conjunction with the City of Baltimore, Baltimore Development Corporation, Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development, Maryland Technology Development Corporation (TEDCO) and the Greater Baltimore Technology Council.

Posted by dwinds1

June 11, 2003

UMBC Training Centers, LLC Expands HIPAA Services through Partnership with Accumentor

Legal compliance, not behavioral change, has been the focus of many HIPAA Privacy Standards educational programs, made necessary by the April 14, 2003 deadline for HIPAA compliance. In addition, significant numbers of smaller providers remain non-compliant due to a lack of reliable resources, or triage remediation concentrating on the HIPAA compliance team, but not extending to awareness among their larger workforce.

Legal compliance, not behavioral change, has been the focus of many HIPAA Privacy Standards educational programs, made necessary by the April 14, 2003 deadline for HIPAA compliance. In addition, significant numbers of smaller providers remain non-compliant due to a lack of reliable resources, or triage remediation concentrating on the HIPAA compliance team, but not extending to awareness among their larger workforce.

These realities have prompted UMBC's workforce development company to expand its HIPAA solutions beyond the existing intensive, professional certification program, to a much shorter and but effective overview course that is conveniently available as an online HIPAA Privacy Essentials module. UMBC Training Centers, LLC, will partner with Accumentor, an Annapolis-based provider of HIPAA content nationally recognized for outstanding content and delivery systems, for this initiative.

The aggressive compliance deadline has driven a plethora of training activities, but the impact on daily workplace behavior change has been modest. Clearly, there is a need for learning experiences that drive substantive change, consistent with the goals of the regulations. This need will intensify as the enforcement of the Office for Civil Rights and the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, along with the general case law increases,,says Richard Hughen, principal of Accumentor.

The UMBC- Accumentor partnership will ensure an effective learning continuum, across a spectrum that now ranges from general awareness for employees of any healthcare organization, to advanced certification for compliance officers and implementation team members through the HIPAA Academy network, explains Doug Kendzierski, Associate Vice-Provost with UMBC's Division of Professional Education. Our goals in expanding to this partnership are simple: deliver great content that will satisfy every organization's obligation to create awareness; make the education convenient via a nimble and reliable online delivery system; and keep it very affordable

Kendzierski, who also serves as President/CEO of UMBC Training Centers, LLC, notes that the same partnership is developing additional programs designed to address the October Security Rule deadline, and future deadlines involving identifiers and transaction requirements, and is anxious to partner with local healthcare organizations with a need for customized HIPAA training solutions.

The new, HIPAA Privacy Essentials overview is currently available on an open-entry, open-exit basis for $65 per enrollee, or even more affordably on a volume-license basis for organizations with many employees to train. Kendzierski estimates that the typical enrollee can complete the program in 30-60 minutes. The course is designed to orient healthcare workers to the HIPAA Act, its component elements, the particular importance of HIPAA Privacy, and how the Privacy Rule fits within the larger construct of the Act. It ensures an understanding of the main requirements of the Privacy Rule, and illustrates the implications of applying the Privacy Rule in terms of behavior changes necessary in the workplace. A companion publication, HIPAA Privacy Reference Manual is also available for purchase, as a go-to desktop reference. Course details and online registration information are available at www.continuinged.umbc.edu/hipaa, or by calling UMBC Training Centers at (410) 594-2282.

About UMBC Training Centers, LLC
The University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC), a regional leader in workforce development, established UMBC Training Centers, LLC as its continuing education and industry training operation, addressing critical regional employment priorities through responsive programming in areas such as Professional Engineering, BioTechnology/Regulatory Affairs, Federal Regulation Compliance, Professional Human Resource Management, Certified Financial Planning, LSAT/GMAT/GRE Test Preparation, PMI Project Management Certification, Certified Professional Bookkeeping and a full range of industry-standard computer certification programs. In partnership with such renowned organizations as The College for Financial Planning, the Project Management Institute, the HIPAA Academy, the Society for Human Resources Management, Microsoft, Oracle and Sun Microsystems, the LLC offers the finest content available in the marketplace, while maintaining the University's reputation for affordable programming. Programs include instructor-led and web-based training, with part-time, full-time, evening, weekend and weekday class schedules, and customized contract training available.

About Accumentor
Accumentor is a leading provider of turnkey learning and performance support solutions for health care professionals. The company's focus is health, safety, quality assurance and regulatory compliance. Accumentor tools improve patient care by increasing quality and compliance, reducing errors, and lowering institutional & individual risk and liability. Accumentor solutions reduce costs associated with training delivery, administration, litigation and non-compliance.

Posted by dwinds1

June 06, 2003

Student Career Development

In addition to being a great resume builder, a career-related summer job helps you make contacts, can lead to a full-time job, and enables you to put what you learn in the classroom to the test. The Career Development Center (CDC) has some ideas to help you find that rewarding summer job experience.

By Melisa Steffans, Assistant Director, Career Development Center

In addition to being a great resume builder, a career-related summer job helps you make contacts, can lead to a full-time job, and enables you to put what you learn in the classroom to the test. The Career Development Center (CDC) has some ideas to help you find that rewarding summer job experience.

Impress employers by your initiative in seeking the best job to prepare you for future career opportunities. Even if you don't need the extra money, look into volunteering your skills to help build your resume!

Keep in mind that most job seekers will have a degree and many will have experience -- you don't want to be left out. In addition to being a great resume builder, a career-related summer job helps you make contacts, can lead to a full-time job, and enables you to put what you learn in the classroom to the test.

The Career Development Center (CDC) has some ideas to help you find that rewarding summer job experience:

1. Begin your self assessment
What do you like to do? What are you good at doing? What do you look for in a job? Let the CDC help you determine your interests, skills and values so you can begin identifying careers that would fit best.

2. Identify a position
Now that you know what you want to do, the next step is finding the perfect job. There are many ways to go about a job search. You might want to start in the Career Resource Center (CRC) in MP 212 with the Summer Job Binders containing up-to-date job listings. Then, from the CDC Web site, you can search job banks by clicking on "students" and then "career Web sites." Internet job banks are a great resource especially if you are interested in relocating.

Another tool is the newspaper, where you to search local want ads (don't forget about searching large city newspapers online or in the library). And finally, one of the best ways to find out about jobs is through networking with people you already know in the field.

3. Conduct thorough research
Utilize the CRC to help you research position descriptions, company information and industry news. This information can help you write a targeted resume and demonstrate your preparedness during the interview. Job shadowing and informational interviewing are also great ways to learn about a particular work environment and career, while building networking skills and making great contacts.

4. Develop a cover letter and resume
With your research complete you are prepared to write an outstanding cover letter and resume. Don't forget to target both documents to the specific company and position for which you are applying. Make an appointment with a Career Specialist for your cover letter and resume critique today!

5. Apply for the job
This step is very important. Make sure you read the application thoroughly and fill out or answer every question completely, honestly and accurately.

6. Practice for the interview
This is often one of the most intimidating phases of the job search process, but it does not have to be. Take advantage of your friends at the CDC. Let us help you fine-tune your interviewing skills. Sign up for a mock interview today and be on your way to learning how to impress recruiters.

7. Start your new job!
Congratulations! You have accepted the job and you are on your way to developing your career. Remember to honor your job commitments and enjoy your new position!

For more information, contact the CDC at (410) 455-2216, Math/Psychology 204careers@umbc.edu. Visit the CDC Web site at www.careers.umbc.edu.

Posted by dwinds1

June 05, 2003

UMBC Chosen for Kauffman Campuses Initiative

UMBC is among 15 universities across the country to receive a $50,000 planning grant from the Kansas City-based Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation to take part in the Foundation's Kauffman Campuses Initiative, a new program aimed at making entrepreneurship education a common and accessible campus-wide opportunity.

UMBC is among 15 universities across the country to receive a $50,000 planning grant from the Kansas City-based Ewing Marion Kauffman Foundation to take part in the Foundation's Kauffman Campuses Initiative, a new program aimed at making entrepreneurship education a common and accessible campus-wide opportunity.

The new Kauffman program builds on the emerging trend among colleges and universities to expand entrepreneurship education beyond business schools so that entrepreneurship training and experiences are available across departments and to students in diverse disciplines.

"At UMBC, we are firm believers in the potential of entrepreneurship education," said UMBC President Freeman A. Hrabowski, III. "The Kauffman Campuses Initiative is a perfect fit with UMBC's emphasis on giving our students across all academic disciplines access to entrepreneurship courses and programs. We look forward to presenting our ideas in December for the next stage of the Initiative."

UMBC will use the $50,000 planning grant to help fund development of a proposal to be presented in December for the next stage of the Kauffman Campuses Initiative. The Foundation will award five to seven challenge grants of up to $5 million by year's end to universities that best demonstrate their abilities to make entrepreneurship a common and accessible experience for all students; infuse entrepreneurship into the campus culture; adopt a unique, innovative and potentially break-away approach; provide the support of top university leadership; and position themselves to serve as a model for other colleges and universities.

UMBC's previous efforts to expand student and faculty entrepreneurship have earned the support of prominent Baltimore business leaders. Mayo Shattuck, III, President and CEO of Constellation Energy Group, is chair of UMBC's Alex. Brown Center for Science and Technology Entrepreneurship Advisory Board.

"I'm delighted to see UMBC recognized by the Kauffman Foundation for its innovative entrepreneurship programs," said Shattuck. "I look forward to taking part in developing programs and curricula that will help UMBC continue to emerge as a national leader in entrepreneurship education."

UMBC established the Alex. Brown Center for Science and Technology Entrepreneurship in 2000 through a million-dollar gift from The Alex. Brown Foundation. Since its inception, UMBC has worked closely with the Baltimore business community towards the vision of creating one of the leading university centers for science and technology entrepreneurism.

Posted by dwinds1

Ceil Nedeloff: The Voice of Telecommunications

Director of Telecommunications George Vitak remembers colleague Ceil Nedeloff, who worked in the Telecommunications office from 1966 to 1992. Nedeloff died on April 16, 2003.

Director of Telecommunications George Vitak remembers colleague Ceil Nedeloff, who worked in the Telecommunications office from 1966 to 1992. Nedeloff died on April 16, 2003.

I was asked to become involved in campus voice operations 17 years ago. My acceptance of that charge sent me to the basement area of Central Plant, down a dimly lit stairwell, through even a less illuminated hallway, past storage drums of something, to the entrance to a room--a well lit office definitely out of place with the surroundings. The sole occupantCeil Nedeloff.

To my surprise, there actually was an embodiment of the voice that resolved problems with those funny new telephones named after a place in Italy. A friendly person, unpretentious, one who knew how to get the task completed, someone who truly understood the words customer service. I, of course, was the new boss and I knew unequivocally how we were going to establish a regimen, a routine, to streamline the operation. Ceil smiled and informed me that no two days would ever be the same in my newly chosen profession. Sure!

Seventeen years later, I've had 6,205 days of never ending change and excitement. Ceil had an innate wisdom, a very down to earth style, that were simply marvelous. She quickly became a coworker, a mentor, a friend.

Ceil was at UMBC on opening day in 1966, as the campus operator, seated at a traditional switchboard, headset on, completing calls by actually plugging a cord into the correct circuit. Her handwritten log shows the first outbound call she handleda call to Rockville from extension 245, by an assistant professor in the English department named Larry Lasher.

As the call volume grew, another switchboard was added, student operators joined the staff, the process became automated with on-premise Centrex, the campus moved into the independence of the PBX realm. Ceil was there for the changes, and played a part in all things voice. While her operator days were relatively short, there were always questions or requests being called in. Ceil was the voice on that other end of the line and nearly all knew that voice during their time at UMBC. Few, if any, were not well served when they called and more than a few friendships developed over the years.

Ceil was old Bell (Atlantic) and knew how The Telephone Company actually worked. One of her duties was the review of monthly phone charges. A commercial telephone bill, ours weighs 3.7 pounds, and the associated Customer Service Record, another 1 pound, is a compilation of acronyms, abbreviations, technical terms and incantations. In the late 1980's, the University hired an auditing firm to review, and recoup, the accumulated overcharges commonly associated with that billing process. Some of the campuses enjoyed a significant windfall that year. UMBC had to settle for 63 cents. This was Ceil's world and, far beyond the billing, if something was needed from Bell Atlantic, a phone call, or visit, to an old Bell friend, produced an amazingly quick response. UMBC was well served when it came to telecommunications.

I imagine there are still a few at UMBC who share fond memories of this lovely, charming person. I have a personal favorite concerning her reaction to a fire alarm at 2 a.m. while we were away for ROLM training in 1987. I suspect there are numerous others. Moving into telecommunications was a big challenge for me that turned out to be a lot easier because of the person in that basement room. I became much wiser by simply listening. We became a department in 1989 and Ceil was there. She helped me hire our first employee, an old Bell technician, and saw the department beginning to take on form and substance as additional staff were hired and new responsibilities were added.

Ceil retired at the end of 1992. She loved family life and I'm happy that she had the opportunity to have those years of enjoyment. I hope her decision to leave her UMBC family was made easier by what she saw developing. Her legacy, the telephone office that for most of UMBC's history consisted of one staff member known mainly as a voice on the phone, had reached fruition. Time may have silenced that voice but the results of Ceil's efforts continue to grow and prosper.

Ceil's voice shall remain strong in the department's memory, recalled with unfailing appreciation, respect and gratitude. We shall never forget our heritage and the one voice that was there on day one and throughout the decades that defined UMBC.

Photo caption: Ceil Nedeloff (second from left) and colleagues mark 10 years of service at UMBC. Also pictured in the photo, taken in 1977, are Phil Martin, Doris Maygers, Julie Enos, Kay Keafawver, Sue Kemp (Thompson), and Simmona Simmons-Hodo.

Posted by dwinds1

PeopleSoft at UMBC Reaches a Major Milestone

Every project has to start somewhere, and what better place than 0001.That's the number assigned to a requisition - the first recognition to makeits way through the PeopleSoft system.

Every project has to start somewhere, and what better place than 0001.That's the number assigned to a requisition - the first recognition to makeits way through the PeopleSoft system. Starting with FY 04 requisitions,which departments will continue to submit using paper until latesummer/early fall when online requisitons will be rolled out to the campus,the Procurement Office is entering each requisition into the system as ifthey were the individual departments. This will allow Procurement to besure that the system works, become "experts" on requisition entry and beable to train and assist departments as they come online with requisitionentry.

On the surface it doesn't seem like much, a single requisition. However, tocreate a requisition the Finance module must have a list of valid accountnumbers, security established as to who can request and approverequisitions, and the general ledger configured to pre-encumber the amount.

"This is a major milestone for the PeopleSoft project at UMBC," said ClolitaWilliams, assistant vice president for Administrative Services. "As we headtoward 'Go Live' on July 1, it is very encouraging to not only see thesystem working to know that we will be successful. We will get thisfunctionality out to the departments as quickly as we can."

Procurement is a function within the finance module of the new PeopleSoftsystem. Phase I of training on finance and human resources modules have beengoing on since May 19 and will continue through June 30. Approximately 150end-users are involved in Phase I of training.

For more information on PeopleSoft at UMBC, go to www.umbc.edu/peoplesoft.

Posted by dwinds1

June 02, 2003

Baltimore to Host International Biotech Research Park Convention

Maryland Governor Robert Ehrlich and Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley are among the invited speakers at BioParks 2003, an international conference highlighting the importance of Maryland's four research universities in the state's biotechnology industry to be held June 20 and 21 in downtown Baltimore.

Maryland Governor Robert Ehrlich and Baltimore Mayor Martin O'Malley are among the invited speakers at BioParks 2003, an international conference highlighting the importance of Maryland's four research universities in the state's biotechnology industry to be held June 20 and 21 in downtown Baltimore.

Economic development and research park leaders from across North America and as far away as Europe will join federal, state, University System of Maryland, Johns Hopkins University and city officials for a day and a half of talks, tours of research/tech parks and strategy sessions. Prominent guest speakers include: Bruce P. Mehlman, Assistant Secretary of Commerce for Technology Policy, Bureau of Technology Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce; and Matt Zuga, Managing Director of Legg Mason's Life Sciences Investment Banking Group.

Some of Maryland's top names in economic development and education will be there, including State Department of Business and Economic Development Secretary Aris Melissaratos, University System of Maryland Chancellor William Kirwan, and the presidents of Baltimore's four research universities (UMBC, Johns Hopkins, University of Maryland Baltimore and University of Maryland, College Park.)

Maryland's powerful combination of an established biotech industry and research universities in close proximity to key federal agencies and labs (NIH, FDA, etc.) is fueling national and international interest in the Baltimore-Washington region as a prime biotech business location.

A recent comprehensive study by the Brookings Institution's Center on Urban and Metropolitan Policy entitled "Signs of Life: The Growth of Biotechnology Centers in the U.S." described the Baltimore-Washington region as one of four 'biotechnology centers' on the rise. The DC-based think-tank ranked the region alongside Philadelphia-Wilmington, New York and LA as part of the top nine U.S. metro areas with above-average levels of biotech research and commercialization.

BioParks 2003 leads up to the world's biggest biotechnology conference -- the Biotechnology Industry Organization's (BIO) Annual Convention to be held June 22-25 in Washington DC -- making for a bustling week for the Baltimore/Washington region's biotech industry.

Last year's BIO Convention drew more than 15,000 participants from 52 countries, including more than 1,000 exhibitors and speakers and nearly 400 journalists. BIO participants discussed everything from science and medicine to business development, ethics and religion.

BioParks 2003 is sponsored by the Association of University Research Parks (AURP) and the Council of Biotechnology Centers (CBC), which both have ties to the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC). Ellen Hemmerly, executive director of bwtech@UMBC, the University's research and tech park, is also president of AURP. Tony Moreira, vice provost for academic affairs at UMBC, is chair of CBC. Hemmerly and Moreira worked extensively behind the scenes to bring the influential conference to Baltimore this year.

"Hosting BioParks 2003 is a great opportunity for Baltimore," said Hemmerly. "I look forward to spreading the word about not just bwtech@UMBC, but all of Baltimore's excellent existing and planned research parks. I'm personally excited to learn more about Johns Hopkins' planned East Baltimore Biotechnology Park and UMB's Baltimore Health Sciences Research Park located in West Baltimore."

Hemmerly and Moreira will be joined by other officials from area universities, including William Brody, president of Johns Hopkins and UMBC president Freeman Hrabowski. Research park officials from as far away as St. Louis' Emerging Technology Center will offer a perspective on national trends and case studies for biotech parks.

The event will be hosted by UMBC, Johns Hopkins University, the University of Maryland Baltimore, University of Maryland Biotechnology Institute and the University of Maryland, College Park. The conference is sponsored in conjunction with the City of Baltimore, Baltimore Development Corporation, Maryland Department of Business and Economic Development, Maryland Technology Development Corporation (TEDCO) and the Greater Baltimore Technology Council.

Posted by dwinds1

June 01, 2003

Katie Rokus Named Assistant Women's Basketball Coach

Katie Rokus, who enjoyed a successful academic and athletic career at University of South Carolina Aiken, is UMBC's new assistant women's basketball coach.

Katie Rokus has been named assistant women's basketball coach at UMBC. Rokus, who earned a communications degree from the University of South Carolina Aiken this past May, will be heavily involved in all areas of the Retrievers' program. The St. Johns College High School (Washington D.C.) product was a guard for the Lady Pacers from 1999 through 2003 and was originally recruited by Stern, who coached at Aiken from 1998 through 2002.

"Katie will be a tremendous addition to our program," said Head Coach Phil Stern. "She is extremely bright, and obviously knows our system very well, which will help greatly since we will have so many new players this season. She will also be involved in recruiting and the daily operation of our office."

Rokus enjoyed a tremendous combination of academic and athletic success at Division II Aiken, and as a result, was named the school's outstanding senior student at convocation. Rokus, who completed her academic career with a 3.88 grade point average, also wrote for the Pacer Times newspaper and created a running, behind-the-scenes commentary through the basketball team's Web page.

A captain this past season, Aiken went a combined 78-38 during her four-year tenure. In 2001-2002, the Lady Pacers made their first-ever NCAA Tournament appearance and captured the school's first Peach Belt Conference Regular Season Championship.

Rokus was also the salutatorian of her senior class at St. Johns College High School, where she played basketball and soccer. Her team compiled a record of 107-21, including a #16 national ranking her senior season.

"I am thrilled to be reunited with coach Stern and Assistant Coach Beth Wandyes," Rokus said. "I look forward to being a part of all of the great things that we are going to accomplish over the next few years."

Posted by dwinds1

May 13, 2003

Commencement Regalia Update

Please note that due to an unexpected delay from the vendor, regalia for faculty and staff will not be available for pick up at the Bookstore until Friday, May 16. We apologize for any inconvenience this may cause and thank you for your patience.

Posted by dwinds1

May 09, 2003

Retriever Third Baseman Kristie Pickeral Named NEC Softball Player of the Year

UMBC third baseman Kristie Pickeral, last year's NEC Rookie of the Year, was voted by league head coaches as the 2003 NEC Player of the Year. The sophomore standout was dominant in league play, batting .507 with 17 runs, 37 hits, five doubles, seven home runs, 32 runs batted in and a .863 slugging percentage, while also posting a .977 fielding percentage from her post at third base. On the season, she tops the NEC in hits (74) and RBIs (56), ranks third in batting average (.396) and home runs (11) and is tied for fourth in runs scored (33).

UMBC third baseman Kristie Pickeral, last year's NEC Rookie of the Year, was voted by league head coaches as the 2003 NEC Player of the Year.

After being named NEC Rookie of the Year in 2002, Pickeral didn't waste any time in making the jump to NEC Player of the Year in 2003. The sophomore standout was dominant in league play, batting .507 with 17 runs, 37 hits, five doubles, seven home runs, 32 runs batted in and a .863 slugging percentage, while also posting a .977 fielding percentage from her post at third base. On the season, Pickeral topped the NEC in hits (74) and RBIs (56), ranks third in batting average (.396) and home runs (11) and is tied for fourth in runs scored (33).

In addition to Piceral, the all-conference first team includes her Retriever teammate, junior outfielder Lauren Hebb. In her first year at UMBC, Hebb is currently batting .382 overall and .400 in NEC action, while leading the league in runs scored (59), home runs (15) and total bases (125). She also ranks second in the conference in hits (65) and runs batted in (50).

The Northeast Conference second team includes four Retrievers. Senior shortstop Lisa Boone -- a four-time all-conference selection -- making her first appearance on the postseason team at an infield position. She was named all-NEC first team the last two years and all-NEC second team during her rookie campaign, all in the outfield. Boone is batting .332 and currently ranks third in the league in hits (63) and runs scored (38), while also tallying 12 doubles, three triples, two home runs and 24 RBI on the year.

Senior outfielder Abbie Kahn, junior utility player Sarah Crowell and freshman pitcher Lauren Nicholson all make their first appearance on the all-conference team. Kahn is hitting .318 overall and .356 in league play, while recording 24 runs, 57 hits, 14 doubles, two home runs and 34 runs batted in. Crowell is batting at a .324 clip with 23 runs, 45 hits, three doubles, one home run and 19 runs batted in. Nicholson was dominant in NEC action from the mound, going 10-0 with a 2.16 ERA and 18-7 overall with a 2.13 ERA.

Posted by dwinds1

May 08, 2003

Retriever Jen Dragoni Named NEC Women's Lacrosse Player of the Year

Retriever junior attacker Jen Dragoni was selected the Northeast Conference Women's Lacrosse Player of the Year in a vote by league head coaches. Dragoni was the offensive catalyst for UMBC this season, as she led the Retrievers in goals, assists and scoring. Freshman Kelly Fiorani, who claimed the Rookie of the Year Award, ranked second on the squad in goals, assists and scoring.

UMBC junior attacker Jen Dragoni was selected the Northeast Conference Women's Lacrosse Player of the Year in a vote by league head coaches. The high-scoring Dragoni led the Retrievers to a share of the NEC regular season title this spring, as well as the #2 seed in this weekend's NEC Tournament. UMBC freshman midfielder Kelly Fiorani claimed the Rookie of the Year award.

Dragoni, a two-time all-conference honoree, becomes just the third Retriever to earn NEC Player of the Year accolades, joining former UMBC greats Heather Kormanik (98) and Jamie Gerhart (02). Dragoni was the offensive catalyst for UMBC this season, as she led the Retrievers in goals (34/2.13 game), assists (19/1.19 game) and scoring (53 points/3.31 game).

More impressively, Dragoni boosted her scoring average to 4.00 points per game in NEC action this year. Her offensive production also helped UMBC average a league-best 12.81 goals per game, which ranks fourth nationally in the latest NCAA statistics. Dragoni, who was named 2002 NEC Tournament MVP, will be a key factor as UMBC looks to defend its conference title at this year's NEC Tournament.

Fiorani makes it back-to-back Rookie of the Year winners for UMBC (teammate Stephanie Crouch took home the hardware last season). Fiorani teamed with Dragoni to give the Retrievers a potent scoring tandem, as she ranked second on the squad in goals (32/2.00 game), assists (10/0.63 game) and scoring (42 points/2.63 game). Fiorani earned NEC Rookie of the Week honors once this season after registering a hat trick in a victory over in-state rival Mount St. Mary's in mid-March.

Three other Retrievers join Dragoni as first team honorees. Senior midfielder Stephanie Allen, a two-time all-NEC selection, is once again among Division I's top draw control specialists this year. In the latest NCAA statistics, Allen ranks third nationally in draw controls (68/4.25 game). Teaming with Allen in a loaded UMBC midfield is senior Lauren Traber, also a two-time honoree. Traber ranks third on the squad in scoring (35 points/28 g/7 a), while also contributing 53 ground balls and 16 turnovers caused. Rounding out the Retrievers' first team contingent is junior defender Emily Sawyer, who emerged as one of the team's top defenders this spring, while also adding four goals on the offensive end.

Posted by dwinds1

Anthony Adams, Randy Monroe Named AFLAC National Assistant Coaches of the Year

Assistant Men's Soccer Coach Anthony Adams and Assistant Men's Basketball Coach Randy Monroe have been named AFLAC National Assistant Coaches of the Year. Adams and Monroe are two of only 27 Division I coaches nationwide to receive the honor.

Assistant Men's Soccer Coach Anthony Adams and Assistant Men's Basketball Coach Randy Monroe have been named AFLAC National Assistant Coaches of the Year. Adams and Monroe are two of only 27 Division I coaches nationwide to receive the honor. Winners were selected from a field of more than 350,000 coaches across the nation.

A panel of judges from Scholastic Coach and Athletic Director magazine, the nation's leading publication for the team athletic marketplace, made the selections. The criteria in the second annual AFLAC National Assistant Coach of the Year program allowed for coaches to win based on longevity, expertise, contributions to the school and community, and special achievements throughout their careers. The selections were based on nominations made by head coaches, athletic administators, past and current student-athletes, fans and the Board members.

Adams, a 1997 UMBC graduate and four-year letterwinner in men's soccer, has assisted Head Men's Soccer Coach Pete Caringi for the past six seasons. The Retrievers have captured two regular season NEC titles and made one NCAA appearance in that span. The Baltimore native has also been recognized as one of the nation's top assistant soccer coaches by CollegeSoccerNews.com.

"I am very thankful to Coach Caringi, (Director of Athletics) Dr. Charles Brown and AFLAC to have the opportunity to win this award," said Adams. "It is always nice to be recognized."

"This is a well-deserved award," said Coach Caringi. "Anthony is very dedicated and loyal, and, as an assistant coach, those qualities are very important in any program."

Monroe has been at UMBC for nine seasons and has helped Head Coach Tom Sullivan build the Retrievers into a perennial league contender and a three-time Battle of Baltimore champion. The Philadelphia native and former basketball standout at Cheyney University ('82) is very involved with UMBC's Community Service program.

"I am extremely happy to receive this honor," said Monroe. "To be named along with people the quality of a (Maryland Assistant Men's Basketball Coach) Dave Dickerson, and our own Anthony Adams, is quite an honor."

"Randy's steadfast loyalty to the players, along with his personal integrity, are the attributes that made him deserving of this honor," said Coach Sullivan. "On the practice courts and in the community, he is a role model to the student-athletes."

"AFLAC is pleased to sponsor the AFLAC National Assistant Coach of the Year Program," Joe Kuechenmeister, AFLAC senior vice president, stated. "Assistant coaches are the unsung heroes of American sport. So many of us were positively affected by our participation in sports that we wanted to pay tribute to these hard-working, under-recognized coaches who do so much to improve the young people that they work with."

"We were extremely impressed with the quality of the nominees," Bruce Weber, publisher of Scholastic Coach and Athletic Director commented. "The majority of the nominations were prepared in great detail. The nominators obviously felt very deeply about the assistant coaches they were recommending."

AFLAC is one of the world's leading providers of insurance at the worksite and insures more than 40 million people worldwide.

Posted by dwinds1

May 06, 2003

PeopleSoft Orientation Sessions Extended Through May 20

Due to high demand, the "Introduction to PeopleSoft" orientation sessions have been extended through Tuesday, May 20.

Untitled Document

PeopleSoft Orientation Schedule


Introduction to PeopleSoft sessions are limited to 12 users and will last one hour.
Register Online

Tues. April 29, 2:30 p.m., ECS 122A
Wed., April 30, 11 a.m., ECS 122A
Thur., May 1, 9:30 a.m., ECS 122A

Tues., May 6, 10 a.m., ACIV 219
Wed., May 7, 2 p.m., ACIV 219
Thur.., May 8, 10 a.m., ACIV 219

Tues., May 13, 2 p.m., ACIV 219
Wed., May 14, 10 a.m., ACIV 219
Thur., May 15, 2 p.m., ACIV 219

Tues., May 20, 10 a.m., ACIV 219

If less than three (3) people have registered for a workshop 48 hours before it meets, OIT will either cancel or reschedule the workshop and notify registered users.

PeopleSoft Orientation Sessions Extended, Division Training Coordinators Announced

Due to high demand, the Introduction to PeopleSoft orientation sessions have been extended through Tuesday, May 20.

While these are not formal training sessions on any finance, procurement or HR functions, participants have found them to be helpful in becoming more familiar with general PeopleSoft features like how to login, set "favorites" (or shortcuts) and navigate to key content.

More than 93 percent of participants have rated the sessions as excellent or good, and anonymous responses to a post-workshop survey have included the following:

I most liked the hands-on nature of the demo.

It was easy to follow

It finally gave me a chance to see the screens that will be used.

The workshops include a hands-on demonstration of 1-2 generic tasks in the new human resources and financial systems, as well as PeopleSoft's own online navigation tutorial that participants can use and refer to before core functional training begins in mid-May.

In addition to helping end users, supervisors may find the orientation sessions helpful as a way to gain insight into what their staff will be learning and doing. To register online for the hour-long sessions, visit www.umbc.edu/training.

In related news, each division has identified a training and support coordinator who is working with the Delta Initiative to help shape the PeopleSoft training plan. The training and support coordinators are:

Administrative Affairs
Clolita Williams (5-2772 or cwilliam@umbc.edu)

Arts and Sciences
Janie Stevenson (5-3228 or jstevens@umbc.edu)

College of Engineering
Jim Milani (5-3556 or milani@umbc.edu)

Graduate School
Patty Keys (5-3578 or pkeys1@umbc.edu)

President and OIA
Sandy Campbell (5-6878 or campbell@umbc.edu)

Provost
Bill Hoffman (5-6517 or whoffman@chpdm.umbc.edu)

Student Affairs
Deb Moriarty (5-3797 or moriarty@umbc.edu)

As reported in the March 20 Issue of Insights Online, each divisional training and support coordinator will be helping to

Make sure the right people are identified for training;
Work within the division to provide backup and support, if necessary, when people are out for training;
Identify peer mentors within the division for early training;
Work with OIT to reschedule training, if necessary;
Keep the division head apprised of progress in training people; and
Provide feedback on training back to the Delta Steering Committee.

- John Fritz

Posted by dwinds1

In the News

SunSpot Chat with Alumnus James Mathias
On May 21, the Baltimore Sun's SunSpot hosted a live chat with alumnus James Mathias '74, the mayor of Ocean City, Maryland.
www.sunspot.net/travel/custom/bayandbeach/bal-artslifechat-mathias,0,1788388.htmlstory?coll=bal%2Dhome%2Dextra

techcenter@UMBC Company in the Baltimore Business Journal
Optyxx, a techcenter@UMBC company, was mentioned in a May 19 Baltimore Business Journal article.
www.bizjournals.com/baltimore/stories/2003/05/19/daily35.html

Tom Cronin in Science Now
Professor of Biological Sciences Tom Cronin was quoted in the article, "Sea Travelers See Better" in the May 13 issue of Science Now.
http://sciencenow.sciencemag.org/cgi/content/full/2003/513/4

Computer Mania Day in the Baltimore Sun
On May 4, the Baltimore Sun featured UMBC's first Computer Mania Day.
www.sunspot.net/news/local/bal-md.computer04may04.story

Posted by dwinds1

May Arts Events

Take a break from studying or grading exams and support the arts at UMBC! Many of the events are free; all are open to the public.

Looking for something to do besides study or grade exams? Take a break and attend some of the visual and performing arts events happening this month.

Continuing through May 31
The Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents "100 Years of Camera Work." Camera Work, the great quarterly journal dedicated to photography, criticism, and modernist art, is the central focus of the exhibition "100 Years of Camera Work." Published between 1903 and 1917 by Alfred Stieglitz, the journal was one of the stellar achievements of 20th century American culture, and contributed greatly to establishing photography as a high art. "100 Years of Camera Work" celebrates the impact that the journal had by exhibiting UMBC's entire holding in a very rare public display of an exceedingly rare publication. In recognition of the powerful influence that Camera Work had upon the development of Modernism in photography, 20th century art photographs made following 1917 have been selected from UMBC's Photography Collections to complement the exhibition.

The Gallery is open Monday through Friday, 12 noon to 4:30 pm, on Thursday until 8 pm, and Saturday 1 - 5 pm. Admission is free. Read a Insights feature on the exhibition here. For more information call (410) 455-2270 or visit the online press release.

May 12
The Department of Music presents the Percussion/African Drumming Ensemble under the direction of Barry Dove. Free admission. 8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. For more information, call (410) 455-MUSC.

May 14
The Department of Music presents the UMBC New Music Emsemble. Free admission. 8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. For more information, call (410) 455-MUSC.

May 14 - June 14
The Center for Art and Visual Culture presents the Senior Exit Exhibition, which reflects the interdisciplinary orientation and the technological focus of the Department of Visual Arts. The exhibition provides an opportunity for graduating seniors to display their work within a professional setting prior to exiting the university. An opening reception will be held on Thursday, May 15 from 5 to 7 pm. Admission to the exhibition and reception is free. The Center for Art and Visual Culture (formerly known as the Fine Arts Gallery) is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 am to 5 pm and is located in the Fine Arts Building. For more information call (410) 455-3188.

Posted by dwinds1

April 25, 2003

UMBC Training Responds to Demand for Microsoft .NET Application Development Skills

The UMBC Computer Certification Training Center (CCTC) has launched a new "Microsoft Certified Application Developer (MCAD)" program in response to an increasing need for IT professionals trained in Microsoft's recently released .NET application development platform.

The UMBC Computer Certification Training Center (CCTC), an operating division of UMBC Training Centers, LLC, the University's commercial workforce development operation, has launched a new "Microsoft Certified Application Developer (MCAD)" program in response to an increasing need for IT professionals trained in Microsoft's recently released .NET application development platform.

"This program and credential are really most appropriate for the professional interested in the back-end, production-side of the software development cycle," says Doug Kendzierski, President/CEO of UMBC's training companies, and an Associate Vice-Provost at UMBC.

Microsoft's website promotes the credential comparably, emphasizing the certification for individuals interested in "developing, testing, deploying, and maintaining department-level applications, components, Web or desktop clients, or database and network services using Microsoft tools and technologies."

"Windows and Web-based applications remain the current and future standard of programming," says Kendzierski. "As the economy rebounds, the number of shops re-investing in this latest evolution of the Visual Studio products is going to explode exponentially. Even during these slower economic times, development shops simply can't find enough programmers with .NET experience, and it is literally crippling these organizations' ability to respond to task orders."

The MCAD sequence at UMBC is structured as three modules, which can be taken together or independently, much like CCTC's MCSE (Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer) offering. The total program length is 168 hours, making it one of the longer and more intensive offerings at the UMBC Center.

Kendzierski justifies the length as "necessary to truly validate the transfer of knowledge with these sophisticated tools. CCTC clients coming out of here with the MCAD certification will possess hardcore proof that they know their stuff in a market desperate for these skill-sets, and these same individuals will be in very high-demand."

Additional coverage within the UMBC MCAD program includes ADO.NET, ASP.NET, XML Web Services, and building COM+ applications using Microsoft .NET Enterprise Services. The non-credit training program is designed for current developers with Visual Basic experience, and includes such amenities as Microsoft Official Courseware (MOC), retake privileges, VUE exam vouchers, and Transcender simulation exam licenses.

Initial sections of the MCAD program will begin in late Spring 2003, and registrations are currently being accepted.

About UMBC Training Centers:

The UMBC Computer Certification Training Center (CCTC) is a Microsoft Certified Partner, Sun Authorized Education Center, and a member of the Oracle Workforce Development Initiative. In addition, CCTC is a CIW Authorized Training Partner, Discreet Training Center, CompTIA Partner, VUE & Prometric Authorized Testing Center, and an Approved Transcender Training Partner.

A national leader in technology education, UMBC established the CCTC to deliver technology training and industry-standard certification programs for individuals, businesses, government agencies and organizations in the Baltimore-Washington corridor. The UMBC CCTC is located at 3108 Lord Baltimore Drive, Executive Park West in the Windsor Mill Business Community of Baltimore County, just off Exit 17/18 of the Baltimore Beltway. The Center offers instructor-led and web-based training programs, with part-time, full-time, evening, weekend and weekday classes. For further information on any IT training programs at UMBC, contact (410) 594-2282, or visit the training website at www.umbc.edu/cctc.

Posted by dwinds1

UMBC Training Centers Responds to Demand for Microsoft .NET Application Development Skills

The UMBC Computer Certification Training Center (CCTC) has launched a new Microsoft Certified Application Developer (MCAD) program in response to an increasing need for IT professionals trained in Microsoft's recently released .NET application development platform.

The UMBC Computer Certification Training Center (CCTC), an operating division of UMBC Training Centers, LLC, the University's commercial workforce development operation, has launched a new "Microsoft Certified Application Developer (MCAD)" program in response to an increasing need for IT professionals trained in Microsoft's recently released .NET application development platform.

"This program and credential are really most appropriate for the professional interested in the back-end, production-side of the software development cycle," says Doug Kendzierski, President/CEO of UMBC's training companies, and an Associate Vice-Provost at UMBC.

Microsoft's website promotes the credential comparably, emphasizing the certification for individuals interested in "developing, testing, deploying, and maintaining department-level applications, components, Web or desktop clients, or database and network services using Microsoft tools and technologies."

"Windows and Web-based applications remain the current and future standard of programming," says Kendzierski. "As the economy rebounds, the number of shops re-investing in this latest evolution of the Visual Studio products is going to explode exponentially. Even during these slower economic times, development shops simply can't find enough programmers with .NET experience, and it is literally crippling these organizations' ability to respond to task orders."

The MCAD sequence at UMBC is structured as three modules, which can be taken together or independently, much like CCTC's MCSE (Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer) offering. The total program length is 168 hours, making it one of the longer and more intensive offerings at the UMBC Center.

Kendzierski justifies the length as "necessary to truly validate the transfer of knowledge with these sophisticated tools. CCTC clients coming out of here with the MCAD certification will possess hardcore proof that they know their stuff in a market desperate for these skill-sets, and these same individuals will be in very high-demand."

Additional coverage within the UMBC MCAD program includes ADO.NET, ASP.NET, XML Web Services, and building COM+ applications using Microsoft .NET Enterprise Services. The non-credit training program is designed for current developers with Visual Basic experience, and includes such amenities as Microsoft Official Courseware (MOC), retake privileges, VUE exam vouchers, and Transcender simulation exam licenses.

Initial sections of the MCAD program will begin in late Spring 2003, and registrations are currently being accepted.

About UMBC Training Centers:

The UMBC Computer Certification Training Center (CCTC) is a Microsoft Certified Partner, Sun Authorized Education Center, and a member of the Oracle Workforce Development Initiative. In addition, CCTC is a CIW Authorized Training Partner, Discreet Training Center, CompTIA Partner, VUE & Prometric Authorized Testing Center, and an Approved Transcender Training Partner.

A national leader in technology education, UMBC established the CCTC to deliver technology training and industry-standard certification programs for individuals, businesses, government agencies and organizations in the Baltimore-Washington corridor. The UMBC CCTC is located at 3108 Lord Baltimore Drive, Executive Park West in the Windsor Mill Business Community of Baltimore County, just off Exit 17/18 of the Baltimore Beltway. The Center offers instructor-led and web-based training programs, with part-time, full-time, evening, weekend and weekday classes. For further information on any IT training programs at UMBC, contact (410) 594-2282, or visit the training website at www.umbc.edu/cctc.

Posted by dwinds1

UMBC Champs to Challenge Ivy League Rivals in Speed Chess Spectacular

UMBC's top chess brains will shift their sport into high gear as they challenge elite players from MIT, Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Stanford, and Duke for $2,000 in prize money in the 2003 UMBC Speed Chess Spectacular from 11 am to 2 pm on May 1 on Main Street inside the UMBC Commons.

UMBC's top chess brains will shift their sport into high gear as they challenge elite players from MIT, Harvard, Yale, Princeton, Stanford, and Duke for $2,000 in prize money in the 2003 UMBC Speed Chess Spectacular from 11 am to 2 pm on May 1 on Main Street inside the UMBC Commons.

The speed chess, 16-player, knockout event format promises a dramatic contrast to the slower, quieter pace of traditional tournament chess, where players agonize for minutes between each move and the atmosphere is as tense and silent at the 18th hole at the Masters.

"Speed chess is a really exciting format since each player has just five minutes to complete the entire game," says Alan Sherman, UMBC Chess Team faculty advisor and a professor of computer science at UMBC. "There's often more than five minutes between single moves in traditional tournaments, so this will be some fast and furious chess," says Sherman.

The UMBC Speed Chess Spectacular will be made even more exciting by move-by-move sports commentary by "Those Sports Guys," Paul Mittermeier and Steve Stofberg of WJFK 1300 AM "The Jock," the hosts of Baltimore's top sports radio show.

In addition to the inevitable trash talking, spectators can also enjoy entertainment by members of the UMBC Dance Team and will be able to see each move computer-projected onto the Commons' big-screen TV.

Selected by invitation, the competitors include top chess players from the UMBC Chess Teams, other universities, and the Mid-Atlantic region. UMBC players include International Grandmasters Alex "The Great" Wojtkiewicz, Pawel "The Polish Magician" Blehm, Alex "The Surgeon" Sherzer, as well as Pascal "The Frenchman" Charbonneau,William "The Exterminator" Morrison, John "The Maryland Malice" Rouleau,and Battsetseg "The Mongolian Terror" Tsagaan. A small number of "wildcard" slots will be available at the event to the highest-rated playerswho show up by 10:45am.

In addition to bragging rights, prize money is up for grabs as the final four players will receive $1,000, $500, $250, and $250, respectively.

For more information: See www.umbc.edu/chess, email ChessClub@umbc.edu,or call (410) 455-8499. Players seeking invitations must contact Dr.Alan T. Sherman, sherman@umbc.edu, (410) 455-2666.

Posted by dwinds1

UMBC Training Centers Responds to Demand for Microsoft .NET Application Development Skills

The UMBC Computer Certification Training Center (CCTC) has launched a new Microsoft Certified Application Developer (MCAD) program in response to an increasing need for IT professionals trained in Microsoft's recently released .NET application development platform.

The UMBC Computer Certification Training Center (CCTC), an operating division of UMBC Training Centers, LLC, the University's commercial workforce development operation, has launched a new "Microsoft Certified Application Developer (MCAD)" program in response to an increasing need for IT professionals trained in Microsoft's recently released .NET application development platform.

"This program and credential are really most appropriate for the professional interested in the back-end, production-side of the software development cycle," says Doug Kendzierski, President/CEO of UMBC's training companies, and an Associate Vice-Provost at UMBC.

Microsoft's website promotes the credential comparably, emphasizing the certification for individuals interested in "developing, testing, deploying, and maintaining department-level applications, components, Web or desktop clients, or database and network services using Microsoft tools and technologies."

"Windows and Web-based applications remain the current and future standard of programming," says Kendzierski. "As the economy rebounds, the number of shops re-investing in this latest evolution of the Visual Studio products is going to explode exponentially. Even during these slower economic times, development shops simply can't find enough programmers with .NET experience, and it is literally crippling these organizations' ability to respond to task orders."

The MCAD sequence at UMBC is structured as three modules, which can be taken together or independently, much like CCTC's MCSE (Microsoft Certified Systems Engineer) offering. The total program length is 168 hours, making it one of the longer and more intensive offerings at the UMBC Center.

Kendzierski justifies the length as "necessary to truly validate the transfer of knowledge with these sophisticated tools. CCTC clients coming out of here with the MCAD certification will possess hardcore proof that they know their stuff in a market desperate for these skill-sets, and these same individuals will be in very high-demand."

Additional coverage within the UMBC MCAD program includes ADO.NET, ASP.NET, XML Web Services, and building COM+ applications using Microsoft .NET Enterprise Services. The non-credit training program is designed for current developers with Visual Basic experience, and includes such amenities as Microsoft Official Courseware (MOC), retake privileges, VUE exam vouchers, and Transcender simulation exam licenses.

Initial sections of the MCAD program will begin in late Spring 2003, and registrations are currently being accepted.

About UMBC Training Centers:

The UMBC Computer Certification Training Center (CCTC) is a Microsoft Certified Partner, Sun Authorized Education Center, and a member of the Oracle Workforce Development Initiative. In addition, CCTC is a CIW Authorized Training Partner, Discreet Training Center, CompTIA Partner, VUE & Prometric Authorized Testing Center, and an Approved Transcender Training Partner.

A national leader in technology education, UMBC established the CCTC to deliver technology training and industry-standard certification programs for individuals, businesses, government agencies and organizations in the Baltimore-Washington corridor. The UMBC CCTC is located at 3108 Lord Baltimore Drive, Executive Park West in the Windsor Mill Business Community of Baltimore County, just off Exit 17/18 of the Baltimore Beltway. The Center offers instructor-led and web-based training programs, with part-time, full-time, evening, weekend and weekday classes. For further information on any IT training programs at UMBC, contact (410) 594-2282, or visit the training website at www.umbc.edu/cctc.

Posted by dwinds1

April 19, 2003

PeopleSoft Training Plans

As the PeopleSoft project prepares to launch new human resources and financial services on July 1, user training plans are starting to emerge.

PeopleSoft Training Plans

Spring Training Timeline
Early April Finance & HR Staff training begins (through implementation)
System training begins
Mid April Introduction to PeopleSoft sessions begin
End of April Peer mentor training begins*
Mid May to End of July In-depth training for employees with financial responsibilities*
Early June to Mid July In-depth training for employees with HR responsibilities*
July 1 Go Live
* OIT will work with training coordinators in each division to schedule training (see below)

As thePeopleSoft project prepares to launch new human resources and financial serviceson July 1, usertraining plans are starting to emerge. For example:

Currently, the Delta Steering Committee estimates about 400 employees will trainand work with at least one of seven PeopleSoft touchpoints related to finance,procurement and human resources. These include:

Finance
-
General ledger andfinancial reporting
-
Grant proposals

Procurement
-
PCard reallocation
-
Receivers
-
Requisitions

HumanResources
-
Timesheets/entry
-
Payroll
-
New hires

Currently, the Delta Project'sFinance Module Advisory Committee (MAC) is working with divisions to identifywho needs PeopleSoft training. The HR MAC will be conducting a similar survey.

Because the PeopleSoft implementation is so broad, the Delta Steering Committeeis establishing a divisional model to coordinate end-user training and support.By March 31, each division will appoint a training coordinator who will

oHelp make surethe right people are identified for training;
oWork within thedivision to provide backup and support, if necessary, when people areoutfor training;
oIdentify peermentors within the division for early training;
o
Work with OIT toreschedule training, if necessary;
o
Keep thedivision head apprised of progress in training people; and
o
Provide feedbackon training back to the Delta Steering Committee

In addition, each division will identify peer trainers who can assist withfollow up support. Once identified, these division peer mentors will be amongthe first cohort to receive PeopleSoft training near the end of April. Thenumber of peer trainers may vary with the size of each division, but each onewill be supported by the Delta team as well as OIT's New Media Learning &Developmentunit. In addition to helping respond to user questions, perhaps on acampus-wide PeopleSoft listserve, peer trainers will also work closely with eachdivision's training coordinator to help identify issues or concerns to the DeltaSteering Committee.

The Delta Steering Committee has hired Donna Meek, a PeopleSoft trainingconsultant with seven years experience, including one year with the most recentversion (8) that UMBC will be implementing. Her clients have included AirCanada, the US Mint, Bell Atlantic, Honda America, Capital One, and Freddie Mac.After working at her alma mater Penn State as a grants and contract analystsheearned a bachelor's degree in accounting in 1983 and her teaching certificationin secondary English in 1990Meek taught in a local high school on a part-timebasis for five years. She then began her PeopleSoft financials consultingpractice which has included creating documentation and developing courses forPeopleSoft General Ledger, Accounts Payable, Purchasing, nVision, Query, CostManagement, Budgets, Projects, eExpense, and eProcurement. She started at UMBCon March 17 and will be developing an overall training plan as well assupporting documentation and workshops.

To help get the campus oriented to the new system, Introduction to PeopleSoftgeneral orientation sessions will likely begin in mid-April. While these are notformal training sessions on any finance, procurement or HR functions, theyshould help the campus become more familiar with general PeopleSoft featureslike how to login, set personal preferences and navigate to key content. Thiswill be useful for prospective users as well as managers and supervisors. Lookfor an orientation session schedule the first week of April atwww.umbc.edu/peoplesoft andwww.umbc.edu/training.

Since the ramp-up for training is intense, all OIT training workshops currentlyscheduled after April 1 have been cancelled. OIT's training coordinator, Marie Toomes (x53679 or marie@umbc.edu),will schedule refresher courses on Windows basics, using email or the Web fordepartments who feel this would help them be more efficient with a Web-basedsystem like PeopleSoft. But for the next 4-6 months, most of OIT's trainingefforts will be focused on PeopleSoft.

Whilethe breadth of PeopleSoft use almost dictates a divisional model of usersupport, I also think this approach reflects UMBC's day-to-day business culturevery well, says Jack Suess, UMBC's chief information officer and theDelta Project's director.

For moreinformation on PeopleSoft, visitwww.umbc.edu/peoplesoft.

Posted by dwinds1

April 18, 2003

Experts to Debate Health Impact of Baltimore's Air

A panel of expert researchers from NASA and UMBC will discuss the science, public policy, economic and health issues affecting the air we breathe in Baltimore at the 2003 Mosaic Roundtable at UMBC, an annual panel discussion sponsored by UMBC's Interdisciplinary Studies Program. The roundtable, "Air Quality and Human Health in Baltimore," will be held Wednesday, April 23, 2003, from 1 to 3 p.m. in Room 312 of UMBC's University Center. This event is free and open to the public.

How are code red days determined? What is a code purple day? How does the Baltimore area?s poor air quality affect our health? What are the sources of Baltimore's pollutants? What are the costs and benefits of environmental regulation? Is there a relationship between asthma attacks in children and high ozone days?

These and other questions about the science, public policy, economics and health issues affecting the air we breathe in Baltimore will be addressed in the Mosaic Roundtable at UMBC, an annual panel discussion sponsored by UMBC's Interdisciplinary Studies Program.

The roundtable, titled "Air Quality and Human Health in Baltimore," will be held Wednesday, April 23, 2003, from 1 to 3 p.m. in Room 312 of UMBC's University Center. This event is free and open to the public.

This year's panel is made up of UMBC faculty and Baltimore area researchers, including:

"Regional air quality managers in Maryland have to worry not only about locally generated pollution, but also pollution from the Midwest carried here by weather patterns and possibly some natural sources," says Hoff. "We're doing the science to determine where these substances come from to help regulators protect Marylanders' health."

For more information on the 2003 Mosaic Roundtable, please call (410) 455-2004 or visit http://www.umbc.edu/mosaic.

Posted by dwinds1

April 14, 2003

Highly Selective National Award Supports Outstanding Undergraduate Research at UMBC

UMBC is one of only 13 institutions nationwide to receive the prestigious Beckman Scholars Award given by the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation to support undergraduate research in the sciences.

UMBC is one of only 13 institutions nationwide to receive the prestigious Beckman Scholars Award given by the Arnold and Mabel Beckman Foundation to support undergraduate research in the sciences. Carnegie Mellon, Macalester College, New York University, the University of Arizona, the University of California-San Diego, and William and Mary are among the other award recipients.

The Beckman Scholars Program provides outstanding undergraduates with research stipends and opportunities for sustained, in-depth, faculty-mentored undergraduate laboratory research experiences in chemistry and biological sciences. A maximum of five UMBC students will be named Beckman Scholars over the next three years. As a capstone to their experiences, they will present their research at the Beckman Scholars Annual Research Symposium in Irvine, California.

Institutions considered for the Beckman Award were invited to apply based on extremely selective criteria, including a significant level of research support, grants, and awards from major federal and private organizations and evidence of students' active participation at the National Conference on Undergraduate Research.

Support for undergraduate research at UMBC is extensive. Many undergraduates already work with faculty on their research; a number of undergraduates are co-authors of papers published in leading academic journals. UMBC young scientists are involved in a range of programs, including the BCURE (Breast Cancer Undergraduate Research Experience) Program, funded by the Department of Defense; the EMBARC (Experiences in Molecular Biology Academic Research Careers) Program, funded by the National Science Foundation; the Howard Hughes Medical Institute Scholars Program; and the Minority Access to Research Careers Program and Summer Biomedical Training Program, funded by the National Institutes of Health and the National Institute of General Medical Sciences.

Additionally, UMBC's Annual Undergraduate Research and Creative Achievement Day showcases students' work in all disciplines. This year's event, which takes place on Wednesday, April 30, 2003, features a day of oral presentations, poster sessions, and artistic exhibits and performances. Read more about the 2003-03 Undergraduate Research Award Scholars here.

Posted by dwinds1

PeopleSoft Update

When asked why new business systems don't reach their full potential, business leaders overwhelmingly give one answer - the change was not well managed. This is why UMBC has launched a Change Management process, which will work in concert with the introduction of PeopleSoft and Human Resource systems on campus.

When asked why new business systems don't reach their full potential, business leaders overwhelmingly give one answer - the change was not well managed. The technology was capable, but not enough attention was paid to how users would interact with the system and how it would change the way they do their jobs. This is why UMBC has launched a Change Management process, which will work in concert with the introduction of PeopleSoft and Human Resource systems on campus. The process was launched on February 25 with a workshop attended primarily by prospective users of the systems, as well as managers and faculty.

Nearly seventy members of the campus community participated in the February 25 workshop, where they were given an introduction to PeopleSoft and an opportunity to share their thoughts about how they feel the change will affect how people do business and work together at UMBC. The session focused on the Human Resources and Finance components of the system, providing answers to four basic questions: What is it? When will it happen? What's in it for me? Who's going to help me learn and use it? Video clips of all the presentations are available online at www.umbc.edu/peoplesoft/video.htm

Presentations were followed by an interactive survey (similar to the "Ask the Audience" feature on "Who Wants to be a Millionaire?"), which posed 52 questions about how UMBC has handled change in the past, how prepared people feel for the change, and how supported they feel as they take on the change.

A smaller group of about thirty "Change Partners" spent the next two days analyzing the results of the poll with the goal of identifying trends and making recommendations about how best to move forward with the implementation of PeopleSoft. The group identified several points which came across clearly:

- The systems we are currently using no longer do an effective job (90% agreed)
- PeopleSoft will greatly change the way we do business (97% agreed)
- Implementation of this change will be complex (61% agreed)
- We (UMBC) do a good job of communicating change to all levels (52% disagree)
- Change projects are on time and on budget because management closely monitors them (67% disagree)
- I support the benefit that UMBC will achieve by implementing this change even it if means I have to do things differently (100% agreed)

While summarizing the data, the group drew from personal experiences to provide context to the figures. They shared their feelings on the importance of personal contact with end-users, specific information about training timelines and formats, the importance of backup support during training, as well as understanding, appreciation and support from managers.

The sessions were pulled together by the PeopleSoft Change Management Team, responsible for thinking broadly about how such a large-scale change will affect the entire campus -- from frequent users to those who are indirectly impacted by the system. This group will continue to rely on the Change Partners to help guide the change process. Additional change events are planned in April for supervisors of PeopleSoft users, department directors and faculty researchers.

Members of the Change Management Team are: Lisa Akchin (Associate VP, Marketing and Public Relations), Linda Brown (Associate Director, MIPAR), Carlo DiClemente (Chair, Department of Psychology), Gerhard Friedrich (Executive Director, RWD), John Fritz (Director, New Media Learning and Development), Charlie Melichar (Director, News and Information), Kathy Raab (Executive Assistant, Office of the President), Jack Suess (Chief Information Officer), and Nancy Young (Director, Residential Life).

Information on the change process, including frequently asked questions, a list of "who's who," and upcoming events is now online at www.umbc.edu/peoplesoft. The site will continue to grow as questions are posed, events are scheduled and members of the community share their experiences working with the system.

If you have any questions/comments or would like to become more involved in the change process, contact Lisa Akchin at akchin@umbc.edu.

For information on training, see a new article by John Fritz, articledirector of New Media Learning and Development.

Posted by dwinds1

April 11, 2003

PeopleSoft Orientation Sessions Begin April 22

To help get the campus oriented to PeopleSoft, the Office of Information Technology is offering general "Introduction to PeopleSoft" sessions starting Tuesday, April 22.

By John Fritz, Director of New Media Learning and Development

Orientation Schedule


Each session can accomodate 12 participants in ECS 025 and will last one hour. Register online to reserve a place.

Tuesday, April 22

Using Internet Explorer (optional), 9:30 a.m.
Introduction to PeopleSoft, 11 a.m.
Introduction to PeopleSoft, 1 p.m.
Introduction to PeopleSoft, 2:30 p.m.

Wednesday, April 23

Using Internet Explorer (optional), 9:30 a.m.
Introduction to PeopleSoft (11 a.m.)

Thursday, April 24

Using Internet Explorer (optional), 1 p.m.
Introduction to PeopleSoft, 2:30 p.m.

Friday, April 25

Using Internet Explorer (optional), 9:30 a.m.
Introduction to PeopleSoft, 11 a.m.

Depending on demand, OIT will schedule and announce more sessions at www.umbc.edu/training.

To help get the campus oriented to PeopleSoft, the Office of Information Technology is offering general "Introduction to PeopleSoft" sessions starting Tuesday, April 22.

While these are not formal training sessions on any finance, procurement or HR functions, they should help the campus become more familiar with general PeopleSoft features like how to login, set "favorites" (or shortcuts) and navigate to key content.

The workshops are appropriate for those with direct human resources, procurement and finance responsiblities as well as managers and supervisors. The sessions will include a demonstration of 1-2 generic tasks in the new human resources and financial systems, as well as PeopleSoft's own online navigation tutorial that participants can use and refer to before core functional training begins in mid May.

Each day an orientation session is scheduled, OIT will also be providing optional hands-on training in using Internet Explorer (IE), which is required for using PeopleSoft. The IE workshops will cover how to find and launch the web browser, subtle differences between IE and Netscape, and generally how to enter and view a Web site.

To register online for either workshop, visit www.umbc.edu/training. For more information on Peoplesoft visit www.umbc.edu/peoplesoft/questions.htm.

Related Article

PeopleSoft Training Plans (Insights Online, March 20, 2003)

Posted by dwinds1

April 09, 2003

Cell Therapy Firm Cognate Therapeutics Moves to UMBC Incubator

Cognate Therapeutics, Inc., a biotech company formed by the state-supported venture fund Toucan Capital, is the newest tenant at techcenter@UMBC, the University of Maryland, Baltimore County's on-campus incubator for emerging and start-up tech companies. Cognate finalized a lease on 14,000 square-feet of office and lab space in late 2002 and is now fully operational.

Cognate Therapeutics, Inc., a biotech company formed by the state-supported venture fund Toucan Capital, is the newest tenant at techcenter@UMBC, the University of Maryland, Baltimore County's on-campus incubator for emerging and start-up tech companies. Cognate finalized a lease on 14,000 square-feet of office and lab space in late 2002 and is now fully operational.

Cognate Therapeutics is focused on regenerative medicine, in particular the repair and regeneration of tissues and organs through the use of cellular therapeutics. Cognate currently provides development services such as GMP manufacturing, preclinical animal studies and quality management.

Cognate also provides clinical and regulatory development for the cellular therapies being developed by the Toucan family of companies including Layton BioSciences, Theradigm and Vesta Therapeutics. These companies' core technologies rely on using stem cells and other cell types to address major tissue engineering markets, such as stroke, spinal cord injury, liver failure and potentially other organ and tissue regeneration applications.

Cognate Therapeutics has key financial support from Toucan II, a $120 million venture capital fund that works closely with the Maryland Technology Development Corporation (TEDCO) and the state's Department of Business and Economic Development. Toucan II is the second venture fund for Bethesda-based Toucan Capital Corp., the small business investment company (SBIC) set up by the two state agencies to specialize in early stage investments.

"We're excited to be at UMBC," said Dr. Alan Smith, Chief Operating Officer of Cognate. "We now have a prime business location to go along with our strong financial support from Toucan. Add our core technology to the mix and we think that's a successful combination."

Smith and Cognate CEO, Dr. Annemarie Moseley, have over 30 years of combined experience in the biotech industry. Prior to starting Cognate, Moseley and Smith both worked at Osiris Therapeutics, Inc., where they served as CEO and COO respectively. Linda Powers, Chairman of Cognate, is an experienced venture capitalist and one of two managing directors of Toucan Capital. Cognate employs 15 people at the techcenter@UMBC location and 15 at its Sunnyvale, CA, location.

"UMBC is delighted to welcome Cognate Therapeutics to our tech center," said UMBC President Freeman Hrabowski. "Combining the talent and experience of Drs. Moseley and Smith, the expertise and innovation of our faculty, and the support of TEDCO and DBED is a very positive development for Maryland's biotech industry."

Philip Singerman, TEDCO's executive director, said "On behalf of the State, TEDCO managed the process of selecting Toucan Capital to receive a $4 million investment by DBED. Toucan's commitment to the State of Maryland is reflected in its investment and creation of Cognate, a central element in their bioscience strategy, and its placement of the company at the UMBC Tech Center."

"Cognate Therapeutics is the type of tenant company we look for at UMBC," said Ellen Hemmerly, executive director of the UMBC Research Park Corporation. "They have experienced leadership, a solid business plan, a strong financial base from Toucan Capital, and biomedic