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November 2012 Archives

Job: Literacy and ELLs at University of Delaware


University of Delaware School of Education
College of Education and Human Development
Assistant or Associate Professor in Literacy with a focus on English Language Learners

The University of Delaware’s School of Education in the College of Education and Human
Development is seeking applicants for a tenure track faculty position at the rank of Assistant or
Associate Professor in the area of Literacy with a focus on English Language Learners.
Applicants should have an earned doctorate in education or a related field with a focus on
literacy and ELL students, and should be well informed about evidence-based instructional
practices for these students, including practices that minimize the risks for literacy-related
problems.

Qualifications
The incumbent will develop and conduct an externally-funded research program in collaboration
with other faculty in the College and School on topics of national importance for ELL students,
including those at risk for literacy problems. Applicants should have an earned doctorate in
education in literacy or a related field with a focus on the education of ELL students. Experience teaching culturally and linguistically diverse ELL students using evidence-based literacy practices in K-12 settings is highly desirable.

Responsibilities
The successful applicant will provide programmatic leadership for our MA program in TESL
and for infusing our Elementary Teacher Education program with competencies for teaching
ELL students. The incumbent’s responsibilities include teaching undergraduate and graduate
courses; engaging in a nationally visible program of research; participating in service activities
designed to advance the mission of the University, College, and School; and supervising
graduate students in our MA and PhD programs.

Background
Founded as a small private academy in 1743, the University of Delaware received its charter
from the State of Delaware in 1833 and was designated one of the nation’s historic Land Grant
colleges in 1867. Today, UD is a Land Grant, Sea Grant, and Space Grant institution and is also classified by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching as a research university with very high research activity—a designation accorded to less than three percent of U.S. colleges and universities.

UD is a publicly-supported, privately-governed institution. The College of Education and Human
Development is one of seven colleges at the University. It consists of two departments (School of Education and Human Development and Family Studies) and offers degree programs at the
bachelor, master’s and doctoral levels. The College also has four centers and numerous institutes (http://www.cehd.udel.edu/programs-centers/centers/) that afford opportunities for professional collaboration.

Under the leadership of Dr. Lynn Okagaki, the College has prepared a new strategic plan. The
College is in the fortunate position of having a growing faculty pool; the College is searching for
four positions this year.

All teacher education programs are nationally recognized by the appropriate specialty program
association. In addition, the teacher education unit is nationally accredited by the National
Association for the Accreditation of Teacher Education.

The University and the College are committed to creating an educational community that is
intellectually, ethnically, culturally, and socially diverse enriched by the contributions and full
participation of persons from many different backgrounds.

To apply
Submit a curriculum vitae and a letter of interest describing qualifications, experience, and
research interests online at www.udel.edu/udjobs.

In addition, three references from individuals who can specifically comment upon your research
expertise, teaching ability, and relevant experiences should be sent to:
Dr. Charles MacArthur, Search Committee Chair
Professor, School of Education (macarthu@udel.edu)
University of Delaware, Newark, DE 1916
(302) 831-4572

Deadline to Apply: The Search Committee will begin review of applications on December 15,
2012.

The University of Delaware is an Equal Opportunity Employer that encourages applications from
all groups, especially Minority Group Members and Women.

13th Annual Graduate Symposium - Purdue Univ.

The School of Languages and Cultures at Purdue University is excited to announce the upcoming graduate symposium themed "Humanities and Social Change: How Literature Impacts Class, Gender and Identity." Submissions in all areas of Literary and Cultural studies are welcome.

Full details can be found at http://www.cla.purdue.edu/slc/main/news/13th%20Annual%20Graduate%20Symposium%20Poster.pdf

Position: Teachers College, Columbia University

Position: The TESOL and Applied Linguistics Programs at Teachers College, Columbia University are seeking a scholar with demonstrated research interests and teaching experience in PreK-12 second language (L2) education. We are particularly interested in individuals whose area of research is content and language integration, addressing concerns such as pedagogical strategies in mainstream classrooms, the relationship between mainstream content learning, core standards, and L2 learning, the collaboration between ESL teachers and content-area teachers (e.g., science teachers), ESL teaching in the content areas, and ESL training of content teachers.

Responsibilities: Teach graduate courses in some of the following broad areas: PreK-12 L2 pedagogy, L2 teacher observation and supervision, L2 classroom-based research, L2 curriculum design, materials development, and L2 literacy. Supervise PreK-12 student teachers, advise masters and doctoral students, and collaborate with teachers in schools. Play an active role in program administrative and development activities. Provide substantive leadership in PreK-12 L2 education.

Qualifications: Earned doctorate in TESOL or Applied Linguistics; evidence of scholarly accomplishment in PreK-12 L2 education; a record of successful experience working with PreK-12 L2 teachers and students; service to the field of TESOL and Applied Linguistics.

To apply: Email a cover letter specifying how you would fit the position, a CV, a two-page statement of your research agenda for the next three years, a copy of three relesvant publications, and three letters of reference to Professor Hansun Zhang Waring at tesolsearch@tc.columbia.edu. The subject line should include your (the applicant’s) first and last name.

Review of applications will begin on November 30, 2012, and will continue until the search is completed.

Teachers College as an institution has long been committed to a policy of equal opportunity in employment. In offering higher education in the discipline area of TESOL, the College is committed to providing expanding employment opportunities to minorities, women and the disabled in its own activities and in society. Candidates whose qualifications and experiences are directly relevant to College priorities (e.g., urban and minority concerns) may be considered for the higher rank than advertised.

Tenure-track faculty position in Spanish - Antioch College

Antioch College seeks applications for a tenure-track appointment in Spanish for the 2013-2014 academic year. Applicants must have native or near-native command of Spanish, and a Ph.D. in Second Language Acquisition or Spanish Language Pedagogy. Experience teaching in proficiency based programs is highly desired. The successful applicant will be expected to teach classes of all undergraduate levels in Spanish language and culture face to face and online.

Full details:
http://careers.insidehighered.com/antioch-college/tenure-track-faculty-position-spanish/job/452032

LLC at National Women's Studies Association Conference

Davis.jpg

LLC Cohort 14 students Emerald L. Christopher and Latasha Eley with Angela Davis at the 2012 National Women's Studies Association Conference in Oakland, CA

CFP: Strangeness, In Context: Investigating the Outlandish, the Uncertain, and the Simply Bizarre

The University of Georgia English Graduate Organization Conference
March 23-24, 2013

Where is the line between the dainty and the horrifying in Edith Wharton's works? Between the earnest and the fantastic in Frank Zappa's? What is the effect of an expected reflexivity in Christopher Nolan's? How do different methods of communication–verbal, physical, visual–affect notions of strangeness and acceptability? When is “bizarre” art a perfectly appropriate rendering of life, and the “usual” stunningly inadequate?

The ways we interpret that which gives us pause say as much about us as they do about the work we're interpreting, or the artist responsible for its creation. Indeed, being a participant in an artistic endeavor often means having to navigate a world whose nature reveals an underlying–or unsettling–strangeness. Whether our reaction is to flee or to linger, we are forced to somehow classify people, places, and things that resist study. And behind our study are often unstable notions of the concrete, whether in the form of physical locations or intangible facts. Our conference will consider instability across multiple genres. We hope to explore the intersections of the strange and normal; of the extreme and the commonplace; of the outlandish and the merely landish; of things ghoulish and not.

Other topics might include, but should in no way be limited to:
–Where and how do certainty and instability interact?
–What role does uncertainty play in the extraction or creation of meaning?
–To what extent does a “strange” work establish its own context?
–When does genre fiction eclipse its boundaries; when do those boundaries nourish?
–What is the difference between the strange and the absurd?
–How do notions of entertainment and art affect those differences?

We seek participants from across the humanities. Interdisciplinary and creative writing submissions are heartily encouraged. Please submit panel or paper proposals of no more than 300 words to wangoed@uga.edu by Monday, December 10.

Spaces and Silences The 2nd Annual Georgetown University English Graduate Student Association Conference

Georgetown University February 9, 2013
Deadline for Proposals: November 30, 20112

We invite you to join us as we explore the possibilities located within the spaces and silences of cultural production. Spaces and silences appear as gaps in traditional canons, voices that are not disseminated, or groups who simply choose not to speak or be present. Formally, spaces and silences may manifest as poetic pauses, textual gaps, or even missing words.

How else might we explore the cultural work of spaces and silences? How does absence assert its presence? What productive conversations can form around or within gaps? Can silence work to assert agency?

We are pleased to announce our keynote speaker, George Washington English Professor Robert McRuer. We look forward to discussion that engages students from all humanities disciplines, and we encourage proposals that investigate topics from philosophical, historical, art historical, theological, literary, and/or women’s and gender studies perspectives. Themes and questions we may consider:

-Aesthetics
-Commodity culture(s)
-Critical race studies
-Culture of academia/pedagogy
-Disability studies
-Embodiment
-Ethics of representation
-Feminist studies
-Film studies
-Genre
-Hierarchies of power
-Historical periodization
-Human rights
-Postcolonialism
-Questions of canonization
-Queer theory

You will have 15 minutes to present your project. Speakers will be organized in panels, with question-and-answer sessions following each panel. This is an all-day event; breakfast and lunch will be provided.

Proposals (200-400 words) should be e-mailed to Annalisa Adams (aa956@georgetown.edu) no later than 12 midnight on November 30, 2012. Please e-mail proposals as Word documents or PDFs.

Co-Director, Institute for Study of Adult Literacy & Goodling Institute

Position Available: Senior Research Assistant or Associate
Beginning: July 1, 2013

Appointment conditions:
This is a fixed-term, multi-year appointment. Full University benefits
apply. Penn State has a strong commitment to the diversity of its
workforce. We encourage applications from individuals of diverse
backgrounds.

Responsibilities:
Serving as Co-Director for Institute Administration, this position directs
the Institutes’ externally funded projects, builds and maintains
professional relationships with various state and national literacy
groups, manages administrative tasks related to the Institutes including
the management of personnel, and provides relevant service to the field of
adult and family literacy and adult basic education (ABE).

Required qualifications:
· Earned masters or doctorate in education, program
administration, or a closely related field;
· Practical experience working in adult literacy, family literacy,
or ABE;
· Knowledge of adult literacy, family literacy, and/or ABE
research, legislation, and other relevant issues; Experience working with
state or national adult literacy, family literacy, and/or ABE governmental
offices and organizations;
· Experience writing and submitting external funded proposals;
· Experience managing and directing externally funded projects;
· Experience in supervising personnel;
· Experience in and evidence of a commitment to working
collegially and with individuals from diverse backgrounds.

Penn State http://www.psu.edu is a comprehensive,
multi-campus research university serving all regions of the Commonwealth,
as well as the nation and the world in instruction, research, and service
roles that require responsiveness to and support from society's public and
private sectors. As a land-grant university, Penn State has responsibility
for providing a wide array of programs in the professional and technical
disciplines, as well as a balanced offering of undergraduate and graduate
programs in the arts and sciences. Penn State shares with other major
research universities the traditional responsibilities to discover,
develop, preserve, and disseminate knowledge.

The College of Education http://www.ed.psu.edu
at Penn State was established in 1923 to deepen and extend knowledge about
the formation and utilization of human capabilities. It offers resident
degree programs at the undergraduate and graduate levels as well as an
extensive outreach effort aimed at continuing professional development for
educators at distant locations. The College's research program is also
extensive; College faculty members secured over $46 million in external
support during the past three years from a wide range of national and
state government agencies, private foundations, and corporations. The
College's location within a large, research oriented, land-grant
university provides numerous opportunities for studying education from
multidisciplinary perspectives in the context of a university-wide
commitment to making life better for all citizens.

The College houses four academic departments: Curriculum and Instruction;
Education Policy Studies; Educational Psychology, Counseling, and Special
Education; and Learning and Performance Systems. The departments offer
seven undergraduate majors to more than 2,500 students and 12 graduate
programs, under authority of the Graduate School, to nearly 1,000
students. Recent surveys rank the Penn State College of Education among
the top colleges, schools, and departments of education in the United
States.

Institute for the Study of Adult Literacy and Goodling Institute for
Research in Family Literacy:
Founded in 1985, the Institute for the Study of Adult Literacy (ISAL) in
the Penn State College of Education seeks to advance the field of literacy
through collaborative research, development, outreach, and leadership to
improve practice, expanding access to high quality education and enriching
the lives of individuals and families. ISAL’s initiatives have focused on
the contexts of the family, workplace, and health. ISAL staff assist
providers with program design and delivery, customized instructional
materials and assessment development, professional development, and
program evaluations.

Also housed within the College of Education, the Goodling Institute for
Research in Family Literacy provides national leadership that promotes the
value of family literacy and supports program improvement through research
and its application to practice and professional development. Since its
founding in 2001, the Goodling Institute has focused on research,
professional development, and policy. The Institute works collaboratively
with the Institute for the Study of Adult Literacy and the National Center
for Family Literacy (NCFL).

Application procedures:
Applicants must submit a letter of application documenting qualifications
for the position, a current résumé or curriculum vitae, copies of official
graduate transcripts (where appropriate), copies of three scholarly
publications or other professional writing samples (if available), and
contact information for at least three references (name, mail and e-mail
addresses, telephone numbers). Applications received by December 1, 2012,
are assured full consideration; however, applications will be received
until the position is filled.

Electronic submission of all materials is strongly preferred. Send application materials to mrf2@psu.edu. Those who do not have access to electronic mail can direct hardcopy of application materials to:
Dr. Esther Prins
GI/ISAL Co-Director Search Chair
c/o Mary Frank
405 Keller Building
University Park, PA 16802

This job announcement is also available in alternate format. Employment
will require successful completion of background check(s) in accordance
with University policies. Penn State is committed to affirmative action,
equal opportunity, and the diversity of its workforce.

CFP: At the Mercy of the Masses? Popular Culture and Academia

Popular culture makes up a large part of our society, from bestsellers, graphic novels and video games, to social media and wildly popular television series and movies. Critical scholars have viewed popular culture as an area of negotiation, in which meaning is both constructed and contested. This conference seeks to address these and other complexities in the study of popular culture.

For this interdisciplinary conference, the graduate students of the School of Languages, Literatures, and Cultures at the University of Maryland invite papers that examine and/or challenge the role of popular culture within society, history, literature, and the classroom. Papers that deal with popular culture during all historical periods and from all theoretical perspectives and departments are welcome. We especially encourage panel submissions. All abstracts and papers must be written in English. Please send abstracts of 250 words by December 20th to sllcgradconference@gmail.com.

Possible topics include but are not limited to:
(Re)Defining popular culture, subculture, and mass culture
The politics and ideologies of popular culture
Popular culture through the centuries: A historical perspective
Popular culture and Cultural Studies: Challenging the parameter
Literature these days: The success of crime, romance, and fantasy
Popular but frowned upon: The two sides of pop music
Popular Culture and sociolinguistics
Popular culture and its audience
Popular culture and identity formation
Popular culture in the context of cultural globalization
Teaching popular culture
Popular culture and the electronic age
Love, Sex, Drugs, and Rock’n’Roll: Top themes of popular culture
Pop culture within popular culture