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July 3, 2012

DoIT News Moving to myUMBC Groups

As of today, the DoIT News will be published through the DoIT Group on myUMBC, which in turn feeds the new DoIT site at doit.umbc.edu. As such, we will no longer be maintaining this Movable Type blog. However, it will remain for archive purposes.

FYI to DoIT Group members:

How do I post a new blog in myUMBC groups?

If you have questions, please contact the Technology Support Center (TSC) located on the first floor of the library next to the RLC or call 410.455.3838.

Posted by fritz at 9:19 AM | TrackBack

July 6, 2006

Collier Jones to Speak at UK Portal Conference

Collier Jones, OIT's Portal Architect, has been invited to speak at "Portals and Portlets 2006" which runs from July 17-19 in Edinburgh, Scotland.

He will give a half-day talk on customizing the uPortal user experience, and he'll preview the new features and functionality he is helping to develop for the next version of uPortal (uPortal 3) coming out later this year. The conference is sponsored by the National e-Science Centre (NeSC).

In June, Collier presented several sessions at the JA-SIG 2006 Summer Conference in Vancouver, British Columbia. His presentations included:

- Content Management and User Interface Customization in uPortal
A look at managing content and customizing the uportal interface.

-One Tab, Two Tabs, Red Tabs, Blue Tabs
An overview of design strategies and the process for the new myUMBC

-uPortal 3 User Experience Requirements
A group discussion on the features and functionality needed in the next version of uPortal

-Ask the Experts Panel
Fielded questions from the audience on various uportal-related topics.

Posted by at 1:41 PM

August 25, 2005

OIT Pilots Use of Blogs & Wikis in Blackboard

This year, OIT is piloting a third-party Blackboard extension (or "Building Block") that provides blogs (diary-like web journals) and wikis (group developed websites) contained in Blackboard courses or communities and only visible to enrolled members. Developed by a company called Learning Objects, their "Campus Pack" building block is a set of tools that are designed to foster greater communication between and among Blackboard users.

Bob Armstrong
Bob Armstrong
Teams LX gives Blackboard instructors or managers a powerful way to assign, manage, and assess group projects consisting of web sites jointly built by more than one person (also known as "wikis"). More Information.

Journal LX enables users to create, share and comment on blogs within a Blackboard course or community. More Information.

Backpack LX is a dynamic blog and web site builder that permits students and instructors to create and showcase journals and web sites in a central location of the course or community.

OIT will be evaluating the Campus Pack suite of tools during the 2005-06 academic year, and invites instructors/managers and students/members of Blackboard sites to give us feedback on the product. For help or feedback, contact Bob Armstrong (rarmstro@umbc.edu or 410.455.3885). You may also want to see the Team LX and Journal LX help sheets on the UMBC Blackboard Help Tab.

FYI: To see how colleges and universities are using collaborative tools like blogs and wikis in the classroom, see the June 24, 2005 Chronicle of Higher Education special section "Ten Techniques to Change Your Teaching" (login required to view the issue online, or visit the New Media Learning & Development office in ECS 101). Sample articles include the following:

THESE LESSONS CLICK: Thanks to his students' remote-control devices, a biology instructor at the College of Lake County, Ill., can measure the class's comprehension instantly.

C3PO 4 EE101: Electrical engineering students at Montana State University have a lot of knowledge to navigate, and so do their robots.

PIXEL PERFECT: A University of Denver art-history professor exchanges the slide projector for more flexible digital technology.

CUT! Education students at the University of Texas at Austin are learning to tell stories through laptop-produced videos.

CRUDE BEHAVIOR: Computer simulation turns students at the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School into oil executives in a tense negotiation.

AMERICAS ONLINE: Videoconferencing allows students at the University of Maryland and the Mexico City campus of the Monterrey Institute of Technology to model a joint business venture.

FACE TO FACE: Thanks to video over IP, the Virginia Community College System can affordably offer an education course team-taught in several linked locations.

A BUILDING TOOL: Three-dimensional software helps students at Carleton College design an environmentally friendly house.
CAN YOU HEAR ME NOW? Students in an online constitutional-law class from Concord University listen up and write back.

PEN IN HAND: Tablet PC's allow an English professor at CUNY's College of Staten Island to mark up papers the old-fashioned way -- but in a new-fashioned way.

Posted by fritz at 12:11 AM

August 23, 2005

New Campus Web Architect

Jackie Ward
Jackie Ward
Jackie Ward has been hired as UMBC's first ever Campus Web Architect. Working in OIT's New Media Learning & Development unit, Jackie will have lead responsibility for the end-user experience of UMBC's web site and campus web portal. As such, she will manage the top-level organization, navigation, usability and content management policies of the university's main Web site and portal, informed by Web steering and advisory committees consisting of selected campus departments or stakeholders.

Jackie will also serve as the primary support staff member for departmental web developers to provide guidance, training and support that improves their sites.

Before coming to UMBC, Jackie was a web architect for University of Maryland University College where she worked in the Marketing and Information Technology departments. She maintained various web sites, managed the university's intranet and helped launch the MyUMUC staff and student PeopleSoft portal. She also taught journalism online for UMUC.

Jackie can be reached at 410.455.3679 or jward@umbc.edu. Her office is located in ECS 101b.

Posted by fritz at 4:00 PM