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September 29, 2011

Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture presents Image Transfer: Pictures in a Remix Culture

October 6 - December 10, 2011

Contact: Thomas Moore
Director of Arts Management
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

Note: This release is available as a pdf file.

Lisa Oppenheim. The Sun is Always Setting Somewhere Else… 2006. Looped slide projection of 15 slides, 35mm Kodak Ektagraphic Slide Projector. Courtesy of the artist and Harris Lieberman Gallery, New York.UMBC's Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture (CADVC) presents the exhibition Image Transfer: Pictures in a Remix Culture, curated by Sara Krajewski and co-organized by Independent Curators International and the Henry Art Gallery, on display from October 6 through December 10.

Image Transfer: Pictures in a Remix Culture spotlights evolving attitudes toward the appropriation, recuperation, and repurposing of extant photographic imagery. Artists, as both producers and consumers in today's vast image economy, freely adopt and adapt materials from myriad sources. Images culled from the Internet, magazines, newspapers, advertisements, television, films, personal and public archives, studio walls, and from other works of art are all fair game. Image Transfer brings together artists who divert commonplace, even ubiquitous, visual materials into new territories of formal and idiomatic expression.

This exhibition proposes that these artists mark the progression of intuitive practices that are thoroughly at ease with today's hyper-fluid circulation of images. In our digital age of fair use and open source, these attitudes demonstrate how far traditional notions of the authority and primacy of source materials have shifted toward a fluent rethinking of the way we value and interact with images. Image Transfer will explore several questions. How are artists using clipped, copied, grabbed, or downloaded images, and what do such artistic positions relate to the viewer vis-a-vis the work? How do such synthesized images operate in visual culture? Do these works critique our media-saturated age or are they only symptomatic of it? What can these processes and these composite images tell us about the state of photography today?

Concentrating on a dozen artists, Image Transfer will include photography, painting, drawing, collage, projection, and installation. Growing out of the legacies of Pop, Conceptual Art, the Pictures Generation, experimental film, and avant-garde design, the exhibiting artists employ tactics of transferring, accumulating, and recombining existing images to construct new images, objects, and situations. Notably the techniques of cut-and-paste, re-photography, double exposure, and other object-oriented studio practices commingle with photocopying, scanning, and the commands of editing software. Artists who work across these multiple platforms reflect a systemic evolution that broadly parallels aspects of DJ culture, television and film production, and the DIY movement. The proliferating phenomena of remixes, mash-ups, montage, and collage (and the technologies that enable them) inform an alternative perspective for contemplating developments in visual art in resonance with wide-ranging cultural trends.Artists featured in the exhibition include Sean Dack, Karl Haendel, Jordan Kantor, Matt Keegan, Carter Mull, Lisa Oppenheim, Marlo Pascual, Amanda Ross-Ho, Sara VanDerBeek, Siebren Versteeg, Erika Vogt and Kelley Walker.

An opening reception will be held on Thursday, October 6 from 5 to 7 pm, and the exhibition will open for regular hours on Friday, October 7.

On Tuesday, December 6 from 4 to 5 pm, artist Sara VanDerBeek will present a public talk on her work.

Marlo Pascual. Untitled. 2009. Digital C-print, wood. 8 x 4 ft. Unique. Courtesy of the artist and Casey Kaplan, New York. Photo: Cary Whittier. Collection of Dr. Paul Marks, Toronto, CanadaImage Transfer: Pictures in a Remix Culture is curated by Sara Krajewski and is a traveling exhibition co-organized by the Henry Art Gallery, Seattle, and Independent Curators International (ICI), New York, and circulated by ICI. Core funding for the exhibition is provided by The Boeing Company, the Paul G. Allen Family Foundation, ArtsFund, 4Culture/King County Lodging Tax, and the Seattle Office of Arts & Cultural Affairs. Support to ICI for the exhibition and tour is provided by The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation, The Andy Warhol Foundation for the Visual Arts, The Cowles Charitable Trust, the ICI Board of Trustees, and ICI Benefactors Barbara and John Robinson.

About the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture
The Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture is dedicated to the study of contemporary art and visual culture, critical theory, art and cultural history, and the relationship between society and the arts. The CADVC serves as a forum for students, faculty, and the general public for the discussion of important aesthetic and social issues of the day. Disciplines represented include painting, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, photography, digital art, video, film, television, design, architecture, advertising, and installation and performance art.

Since 1989, the CADVC has incorporated a number of public programs into its exhibition programming schedule to further impact the communities it serves. Symposia, lecture series, conferences, film series, visiting artist series, and residencies have all been fundamental in an effort to create an ongoing dialogue about contemporary art and culture. The Center has also initiated a number of projects with Baltimore and surrounding schools to integrate the contemporary artist and their concerns into the classroom. These projects take place on-site at both middle schools and high schools and are team taught by the instructors at these schools, professional artists, and students from the CADVC's Internship Program.

The Center produces one to two exhibition catalogues each year. Each document is fully illustrated and contains critical essays on the given subject by a variety of distinguished professionals in the field. Recent publications include Postmodernism: A Virtual Discussion and Paul Rand: Modernist Design. These books and catalogues are published and are distributed internationally through Distributed Art Publishers.

Since 1992, the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture has actively pursued the organization of exhibitions that contain the aesthetic, theoretical, and educational potential to reach both a national and international audience. Over the years, the CADVC has traveled these exhibition projects to a broad spectrum of museums, professional non-profit galleries, and universities national and internationally. Recent traveling exhibitions include:

- For All the World to See: Visual Culture and the Struggle for Civil Rights (2010)
- White: Whiteness and Race in Contemporary Art (2003)
- Fred Wilson: Objects and Installations (2001)
- Adrian Piper: A Retrospective (1999)
- Bruno Monguzzi: A Designer's Perspective (1998)
- Minimal Politics (1997)
- Kate Millett, Sculpture: The First 38 Years (1997)

Beyond the scope of these traveling exhibitions, the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture also undertakes projects such as the Joseph Beuys Tree Partnership. As part of the educational mission of the CADVC, one graduate thesis exhibition and one undergraduate senior exhibition are presented each year. This multi-faceted focus for presenting exhibitions, projects and scholarly research publications focused on contemporary art and cultural issues positions the Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture in a unique position within the mid-Atlantic region.

Hours
Mon/Tue/Wed/Fri: 12 pm - 4:30 pm
Thursday: 12 pm - 8 pm
Sat/Sun: 1 pm - 5 pm

Sean Dack. Untitled (Beach). 2008. C-print. 30 x 44 1/2 in. Courtesy of the artist and Fredric Snitzer Gallery, Miami, Florida.

Telephone
Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture: 410-455-3188

Public Information
UMBC Arts & Culture Calendar: http://www.umbc.edu/arts

Images for Media
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/
Images show in this release:
- Lisa Oppenheim. The Sun is Always Setting Somewhere Else... 2006. Looped slide projection of 15 slides, 35mm Kodak Ektagraphic Slide Projector. Courtesy of the artist and Harris Lieberman Gallery, New York.
- Marlo Pascual. Untitled. 2009. Digital C-print, wood. 8 x 4 ft. Unique. Courtesy of the artist and Casey Kaplan, New York. Photo: Cary Whittier. Collection of Dr. Paul Marks, Toronto, Canada.
- Sean Dack. Untitled (Beach). 2008. C-print. 30 x 44 1/2 in. Courtesy of the artist and Fredric Snitzer Gallery, Miami, Florida.
- Carter Mull. Horseradish, New York Times April 1, 2010. 2010. Ink on paper. 16 3/4 x 21 3/4 in. Courtesy of the artist and Marc Foxx Gallery.

Directions
UMBC is located approximately 10 minutes from downtown Baltimore and 20 minutes from I-495.
The CADVC is located on the ground floor of UMBC's Fine Arts Building. Daytime metered visitor parking is available in the Walker Avenue Garage. Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/
- From I-95 between Baltimore and Washington, take exit 47B. Follow Route 166 toward Catonsville. Turn right on Hilltop Circle and proceed to public parking.
- From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and left on Hilltop Road. Turn right on Hilltop Circle and proceed to public parking.

Carter Mull. Horseradish, New York Times April 1, 2010. 2010. Ink on paper. 16 3/4 x 21 3/4 in. Courtesy of the artist and Marc Foxx Gallery.

Posted by tmoore at September 29, 2011 8:50 PM