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Results and Conclusions

 

Initial Planning Assumptions

The base year for the model is Fall 2009.  The Office of Institutional Research provided all student, faculty, and staff data frozen on the 10th day of the Fall 2009 semester.  The Department of Facilities Management provided the existing space inventory based upon the completion of a campus-wide space survey completed in December 2009.

Based upon the Fall 2009 campus-wide space survey, the total existing space on campus was 3,289,422 square feet excluding parking garages.  Of this amount, 1,973,573 was assignable. 

Excluding campus housing, the majority of existing space is devoted to instruction and research.  Space devoted to student life and student services constitute only 13% of the total space; and administrative functions such as financial services, human resources, procurement, police, and facilities management comprise only 12% of the total existing space.

 

Projected Space Need

Two planning scenarios were considered in the development of the 2009 Facilities Master Plan Update:

•     Scenario A – Projected space need based upon a ten year enrollment growth of 10.4%

•     Scenario B – Projected space needed for full build-out of the campus to support 16,000 to 17,000 students

 

Scenario A

The space model was employed to determine the amount of space that would be needed to support one possible enrollment growth scenario.  This scenario assumes the following:

•     Enrollment growth of 2% per year for the first five years and 0% per year for the second five years for a total growth of 10.4% over ten years

•     The enrollment growth applies to both undergraduate and graduate students across all academic programs

•     Current student to faculty ratios will be maintained

•     Current student to professional nonfaculty ratios will be maintained

•     Modest increase in all other full-time and part-time staff positions

•     Current FT Faculty to Graduate Assistants (employed) will be maintained

The space model projected a total need for over 2.5M of net assignable square feet and nearly 4.2M of gross square feet.  Nearly half of the projected space need is to support instruction and research programs; and 49% of the projected space deficit is in support of campus housing and student life programs.

 

Scenario B

The space model was employed to determine the space needed for full build-out of the campus to support 16,000 to 17,000 students.  This scenario assumes the following:

•     The proportion of undergraduate and graduate students will be maintained

•     Current student to faculty ratios will be maintained

•     Current student to professional nonfaculty ratios will be maintained

•     Modest increase in all other full-time and part-time staff positions

•     Current FT Faculty to Graduate Assistants (employed) will be maintained

The space model projected a total need for 3.4M NASF and 5.5M GSF.  As compared to Scenario A, a greater percentage of the projected space need is for campus housing as would be expected with a significant increase in student enrollment.

 

Conclusions

The UMBC Space Model developed in conjunction with the 2009 Facilities Master Plan provides a means of quantitatively analyzing impacts of changes in enrollment projections, programmatic direction, and strategic policy. Reliability of the projections for space needs is dependent upon the quality of the institutional data entered into the model, the degree of thoughtfulness applied to development of assumptions, and the appropriateness of the space standards used.

The Space Model projections appear to be consistent with the space allowances calculated using the state’s guideline application report, supporting its reliability as a planning tool.  One major advantage of the UMBC’s Space Model over the state report is that it provides greater diversity and flexibility to the university. The Space Model is a dynamic and versatile tool that instills confidence that space planning and long-range planning is driven by programmatic requirements.

For the 2009 Facilities Master Plan Update, the Space Model provided valuable space planning data directly employed in the development of the proposed implementation plan and campus build-out plan.  The university was able to extract sufficiently detailed information from the Space Model to inform the scope and size of proposed buildings- and assure the university that it is moving forward in the right direction.