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Undergraduate Catalog 2011

First Year Seminar

FYS 101A (3.00)

The Divine Comedy

   Course ID: 054404
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)

FYS 101B (3.00)

Understanding Human Beings

Human beings appear to be rather special creatures: we are mammals who form and live in very complex societies; we paint, write poetry and make art; we go to war; we are capable of a dazzling array of emotions; we make discoveries about the world; we invent technology to change the world and we spend a lot of time thinking about ourselves and about the meaning of our lives. By reading and talking about material in evolutionary theory and genetics, in psychology, philosophy and literary theory, we will survey the different ways in which scholars and scientists have tried to understand and explain human beings. This course will be particularly focused on how these different perspectives are related to one another and on the question of whether one perspective is superior to the others.
   Course ID: 054405
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)

FYS 101C (3.00)

Beethoven's Music and Cultural Legacy

Few figures in Western musical history have possessed such an enduring fascination as Beethoven. This course will have tree main aims: firstly, that of attaining a greater understanding of Beethoven's music through close listening of representative works from all three periods of his artistic output. Secondly, it is hoped that these efforts will lead to a deeper understanding of the notion of abstract music. Thirdly, this course will focus on the heritage of Beethoven's entire cultural setting, the Golden Age of German culture, and its role in propagating a 'spiritual' form of cultural enlightenment.
   Course ID: 054406
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)

FYS 101D (3.00)

Turning to One Another: Beliefs and Behaviors

This course is oriented toward exploration of questions that are both personal and global in their orientation. What do I believe about others? What is the relationship I want with the earth? When and where do I experience sacred? Conversations will occur around topics such as these to expand and inform our understanding of how our beliefs and behaviors have the power to transform.
   Course ID: 054407
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)

FYS 101E (3.00)

Living and Dying in Ancient Athens: An Archaeologist's Point of View

This course introduces students to the data and interpretational methods used by archaeologists to reconstruct life in a Classical city. The subject matter dealt with includes the topics childhood, daily life, religious and political activities and burial customs. However, this broad range of subjects covers only the second half of the fifth century BCE, often known as the Golden Age of Athens or the Age of Perikles. Students will focus on reconstructing the built environment of the city, the evidence for the way that both public and private space was used and how Athenians viewed their own city. They will study the effects that status and gender had on the inhabitants of the city and the different interpretations that are reached when only written sources are used.
   Course ID: 054408
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)

FYS 101F (3.00)

What Makes a Community?

What makes a community? All of us belong to at least one, and we talk about the importance of 'community' all the time, but what does that mean? In this course, we will explore of the notion of 'community' as an ideal in Western thought and as it has been put into practice in a range of circumstances from communes to neighbor organizations. The seminar will begin by delving into the many definitions of community, looking at the ways that thinkers have tried to imagine just how and why 'community' matters. We will the follow the notion of community through four major examples taken from the realms of politics, literature, anthropology and sociology. We will see how well our critical terms coincide with real world efforts to construct community and how those examples can show us both the difficulties and benefits of working to build it.
   Course ID: 054409
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)

FYS 101G (3.00)

Political Rhetoric in the Media Age

   Course ID: 054410
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)

FYS 101I (3.00)

Science Versus Religion: The Battlefield of Evolution

There is no argument more classic than that over the superiority of science versus religion. This debate has sparked controversy for centuries on many issues, but has been most prominent in the discussion of evolution. Did Darwin empty the churches of Europe? Does the theory of evolution point to a world without purpose? Is evolution an atheists' religion? Should "creation science" be taught in state schools? With both sides deeply entrenched in their perspectives, little dialogue has actually taken place. This interdisciplinary course provides such a dialogue. With readings spanning history, biology, sociology, theology and philosophy, we explore the origins of modern science, the synergy and split of Church and science, the emergence of modern evolutionary theory, and rise of a Creationist response. We will trace the debate from the philosophy of Aristotle and Plato to a polarized present day society of pluralism, post-modernism and fundamentalism. The goal of the course is not to resolve the debate on Evolution, nor to produce a uniform viewpoint in the class, but to require individual students to explore the origin, construction, and impact of both religion and science.
   Course ID: 054411
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)

FYS 101J (3.00)

The Internet and the Humanities

What, if anything, does the Internet have to offer people interested in the humanities-in literature, history, philosophy or the arts? This seminar will address these questions by introducing a variety of technological tools. Students will learn how to find and participate in humanities-oriented email and discussion forums or listservs, make effective use of search engines and other information tools, uncover and evaluate the rapidly growing humanities resources online, and create their own humanities-focused webpages. We will also consider some important issues raised by these technological developments: the promise and problems of virtual communities, identity construction, censorship and privacy, the implications of hypertext in fiction and non-fiction, the cyborg, plagiarism, and the future of books and libraries. This course is intended primarily for students planning to major in the humanities.
   Course ID: 054412
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)

FYS 101K (3.00)

Becoming American: Immigrant Narratives in Contemporary Society

This course is designed to introduce the life courses, problems and changing attitudes that different groups of immigrants and their children have faced while acculturating to US society. Readings of case studies and studying documentary films will be used to study immigrants' motivations to come to the US, how they have dealt with family, societal conflict, and the work sphere, and what strategies of adaptation they have developed. Class discussions will focus on the self-image and identities of the immigrants, their image of the US and role of ethnic solidarity, what aspects of their heritage culture they are passing down from generation to generation, the role of language, and other values related to class, race, and gender. Responses to class stratification, racism, and sexism will be addressed.
   Course ID: 054413
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)

FYS 101L (3.00)

Mulit-Cultural Perspectives on September 11

This course is based in interdisciplinary approaches to the study of culture, in which problems are investigated using historical, literary, artistic, sociological, and anthropological methods. Interpreting contemporary American culture through the lenses of race, class, gender, religion, and nationality, this course is part of a wider conversation in the humanities and social sciences about the ways in which historical narratives are shaped by the social identities of their authors, subjects, and audiences. Within moments of the September 11th attacks, the events were rapidly being interpreted within the available paradigms of historical precedent. This course seeks to identify the strengths and weaknesses of those paradigms, and to understand how competing paradigms are framed, circulated, and ultimately, discarded. Americans live in a world where they must reconcile the realities of cultural differences with unified notions of America and American identity. This tension has become particularly acute in the post-9/11 era. This course navigates that complicated terrain, not only by introducing students to the dramatically different communities that make up our nation, but by directly addressing the interrelationships and tensions that characterize the workings of our culturally diverse democracy and by examining the ways that the events of September 11th have created new opportunities for unity and exacerbating old-sometimes ancient-hostilities and fears.
   Course ID: 054414
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GFR)

FYS 101M (3.00)

Technological Disasters and Their Causes

The steamship Titanic, space shuttle Challenger, and Tacoma Narrows Bridge are disasters that should not have happened. Were they caused by inevitable random failure of technology or by human disregard for known engineering facts? This course will examine how engineering, science, mathematical modeling, and numerical computations relate to human actions in technological disasters. We will study several examples of recent history and try to understand how these tragedies resulted from human failure to correctly apply engineering and mathematical principles and/or to communicate properly. These disasters and others will be analyzed for their
   Course ID: 054415
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GFR)

FYS 101N (3.00)

Intermedia: Poetics of Everyday Life

What is an artistic experience? Does art exist in our daily lives? Do artists possess special talents or can anyone experience creativity? Artists of the last half of the 20th century pursued an art form that stimulated the intellect without requiring expensive materials, or time consuming crafts. Intermedia artists appreciated unusual takes on ordinary experiences and created public performances out of them. These artists worked in poetry, music, film, photography, painting, theater and dance creating one interdisciplinary art form they called Intermedia. This course will make use of a collection of Intermedia art objects, poetry, prints, books and time-based media held within the Albin O. Kuhn Special Collections Library
   Course ID: 054416
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GFR)

FYS 101O (3.00)

The Pursuit of Wisdom in Everyday Life: Montaigne's Essays in Postmodern Times

Akin to Shakespeare, his younger contemporary across the English Channel, French author Michel de Montaigne continues to give much pleasure to audiences some four hundred years after the first publication of his three books of Essays. Many of the topics he discusses are relevant to the present. We also find ourselves at a period in time when access to knowledge is expanding, and we are more in touch with other cultures. In Montaigne's time it was the Latin culture and works of the Greeks. Today, it is looking at the multicultural framework of our world and our relationship to, for example, the Middle East, Asia, Africa, and Europe, and applying our personal and cultural biases in such a way to define self while appreciating the words and life experiences of another. How is "truth" discovered and conveyed when various viewpoints and knowledge intersect in ways in which we are less than comfortable, or under circumstances that produce outcomes in which we can find no merit and/or run contrary to our "personal truth"?
   Course ID: 054417
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GFR)

FYS 101P (3.00)

Arts, Humanities, or Sciences: Which Road to Reality?

   Course ID: 054418
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)

FYS 101Q (3.00)

Building a Culture of Peace: What Would It Take?

Building a Culture of Peace will engage students in investigating the diverse meanings and methods operating in the study and practice of peace. The course will include an interdisciplinary exploration of primary texts, key terms, major theories and methods, and a guest presentation. There will also be individualized research opportunities for students that will result in critical and creative essays across a range of interrelated topics and build toward an overall course learning portfolio.
   Course ID: 100173
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP)

FYS 101R (3.00)

Sustainability in American Culture

This course explores the concept of sustainability, and how it is presented in popular American culture. We will examine cultural conversations and beliefs about the environment and about pressing environmental challenges, investigating how attitudes toward these issues get presented, debated, and constructed in American culture, through such media as books, movies, television, poetry, art, and news stories. Students will be expected to critically analyze readings and viewings, to discuss and reflect upon their own environmental attitudes and experiences, and to produce creative writing, digital stories, research presentations, and a final essay exploring an issue of their choice related to sustainability in American culture.
   Course ID: 100370
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP)

FYS 101S (3.00)

Creating Stories about Times of Change

This course explores common themes in both adolescence and aging, stages in life that can transform a person's sense of identity. In intergenerational teams, students will explore changes in their identities by producing video stories together that will focus on common threads, shared insights and lessons about growth. The narrative collaboration will offer opportunities for empathy and broadening of perspective, and participants will gain wisdom about creating identity in times of change.
   Course ID: 100561
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP)

FYS 101T (3.00)

Discussing Classics

Epictetus, Second Century AD: ¿Some things are up to us and some are not up to us. Our opinions are up to us, our impulses, desires, aversions ¿ in short, whatever is our doing. Our bodies are not up to us, nor are our possessions, our reputations, or our public offices, or, that is, whatever is not our own doing. The things that are up to us are by nature free, unhindered, and unimpeded; the things that are not up to us are weak, enslaved, hindered, not our own. So remember, if you think that things naturally enslaved are free or that things not your own are your own, you will be thwarted, miserable, and upset, and will blame both gods and men. But if you think that only what is yours is yours, and that what is not your own is, just as it is, not your own, then no one will ever coerce you, no one will hinder you, you will blame no one, you will not accuse anyone, you will not do a single thing unwillingly, you will have no enemies, and no one will harm you, because you will not be harmed at all.¿ First paragraph of the first reading of Discussing Classics.The objectives of this class are twofold: To discuss excerpts of twenty classics (such as The Handbook of Epictetus) and to develop discussion skills. To that end, each reading is preceded by a short piece pointing out its relation to some aspect of discussion groups.
   Course ID: 100691
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP)

FYS 101U (3.00)

But is it Art? Filmmakers, Art, and the Artist

What is art? What is an artist? Filmmakers have frequently explored these questions in documentaries and fictional narratives. This course will view several films about artists in an inquiry into what is art and what it means to be an artist in our society. The purpose of the course is to formulate answers about art and the artist, and to expand awareness of the multiplicity and diversity of what those two terms can mean. The films presented will cover a wide range artists and artistic genres.
   Course ID: 100692
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP)

FYS 101V (3.00)

Perspectives on the Heroic Journey

What makes someone heroic? What happens when heroes fall? From ancient myth to modern films such as The Matrix and Harry Potter, the story of the ordinary man or woman who is called to an extraordinary journey has been told in a thousand different ways. At the heart of our fascination with the heroic story is the belief that in each of us lies untapped potential to change the world, that we possess a latent power that only needs a call to action. What if we viewed our journeys through higher education as a call to heroic adventures? Through the lenses of science (are we "hardwired" for heroic behavior?), psychology, mythology (ancient Greek heroes such as Odysseus), philosophy (do heroes have a stronger ethical impetus?), theology, and the arts, we will explore how the heroic journey is a necessary step in the construction of one¿s identity in order to answer the question, "who am I, and what am I called to do in the world?"
   Course ID: 101895
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP)

FYS 102A (3.00)

Images of Madness

This course reviews Academy Award winning films depicting mental illness to consider the influence of motion pictures on the public perception of social issues, policies, and services. We will analyze films using a historical framework and with assigned readings that address cultural stereotypes, societal attitudes, and the public's response toward people with mental illness.
   Course ID: 054420
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

FYS 102B (3.00)

Seeking Truth and Justice: Human Rights Today

Defining, defending and spreading human rights has become an important social, political and cultural project around the world. Although governments are charged with promoting this project, it is often governments that violate rights. Unfortunately, recent years have seen too many cases of governments systematically abusing the rights of groups and individuals. In this class we will read about how people in different contexts have organized 'truth commissions' in their attempts to stop governments from committing violence against people, determine who is responsible for committing these crimes, establish how justice can be achieved, and recommend how these actions can be prevented in the future.
   Course ID: 054421
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

FYS 102C (3.00)

Diversity, Ethics and Social Justice in the Context of Schooling

We will explore and mediate the tensions that exist in current reform efforts as schools endeavor to meet the needs of diverse students. This course will use an inquiry-based approach to examine federal and local policies and how they impact students, schools and society.
   Course ID: 054422
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

FYS 102D (3.00)

Investigating Everyday Problems and Their Current IT Solutions

   Course ID: 054423
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

FYS 102E (3.00)

What Should Government Do? Exploring the Interplay of Economics and Philosophy

The purpose of the course is to enhance their understanding of a very important dimension of the modern world--the scope and limits of government, particularly with respect to the exercise of personal values and the market. The readings and discussion in the class are designed to enhance understanding of society and its ethical aspirations, including but not limited to the roles of and interactions among the market, the state, and law. We focus both on philosophical and economics frameworks for assessing these issues. Our purpose is to go beyond politics and self-interest, to apply principles from economics and moral philosophy on policy questions. Our goal is not to provide answers, but to understand what facts and values go into forming our judgments about the question 'what should government do?'
   Course ID: 054424
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

FYS 102F (3.00)

Contrasting Visions of Society

This course will be based on reading four influential works which set forth contrasting visions of society. These are Adam Smith's Wealth of Nations, Plato's Republic, Marx and Engels' Communist Manifesto, and Max Weber's Protestant Ethic and the Spirit of Capitalism which set forth contrasting visions of society. It will aim to develop an understanding of each of these texts and the contrasts between the visions of society.
   Course ID: 054425
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

FYS 102G (3.00)

Sexuality, Health and Human Rights

Who has the right to access scientific information about individuals' sexuality and sexual health? What privacy rights do people have in their sexual relationships? Who controls when and if one has children? In the last decade, scholars and advocacy organizations have been asking such questions that link sexuality, health, and human rights. Increasingly, these linkages are made by human rights advocates, those marginalized by their gender and/or sexuality, feminists, and professionals in the health and family planning fields. Students will become sensitized to issues that have become increasingly important to the international community in the areas of sexuality, health, and human rights. They will also become familiar with steps in the social science research process, including background literature review, survey construction, data collection and analysis and reporting of findings.
   Course ID: 054426
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

FYS 102I (3.00)

The United States and Iran Since World War II

   Course ID: 054427
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

FYS 102J (3.00)

France Under German Occupation: Collaboration, Resistance, Survival.

   Course ID: 054428
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

FYS 102K (3.00)

Passive-Aggressive Behavior

This semester long course will provide information about the developmental pathways to passive aggressive (P/A) behavior, or to a passive aggressive personality as well as identifying five distinct and increasingly pathological levels of passive aggressive behavior. The course will help students distinguish between situational and pathological passive aggression and identify specific reasons why people use passive aggressive behaviors. Passive aggression will be examined across the lifespan and in four distinct contexts; home, school, marriage and extended family. Students will learn the different ways that passive aggressive behavior is exhibited across these settings.
   Course ID: 100373
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP)

FYS 102L (3.00)

Banned Books: An American Contradiction

This course explores the paradox of living in a society which constitutionally protects freedom of speech and of the press, yet assumes a ?right? to ban written words which are not acceptable to individuals and/or groups in an effort to conform to their political, social, sexual, or religious beliefs. The use of censorship to silence important or controversial ideas and truths is not unique to the United States. It has existed since humanity could put ?pen to paper,? continuing unabated through the centuries. The focus of this course is to examine the banning of books in the U.S., historically and today. What is it about words that is so frightening, repugnant, or threatening? And how does it happen that, in spite of a government built on freedom of speech and press, we are willing and sometimes able to suppress written words which we judge to be harmful? We will analyze the books and the paradox which constitute banned books.
   Course ID: 100174
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP)

FYS 102M (3.00)

Conflict Resolution Education: Handling Conflict Constructively

A key component to successful and meaningful educational experiences is related to conflict resolution education. This course introduces students to the broad field of CRE (including social and emotional learning, anti-bullying programs, peer mediation, negotiation processes, expressive arts, restorative justice programs, and bias awareness programs). The course provides students with examples of programs and encourages them to consider how they can support and utilize these programs first in their personal lives, and then as future leaders. Throughout the course there are opportunities for reflection about how the principles of CRE apply on an individual level in one's life. There are many applications for CRE across careers from the business world to public service
   Course ID: 100372
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP)

FYS 102N (3.00)

Exploring Mixed Identities

The aim of this course is to move beyond prevalent monoracial discourses by examining identities and experiences from a mixed race/mixed ethnicity perspective. This course explores many topics such as the history of racialization, processes of othering, acceptance and the politics of claiming, the role of education in racial formation (and vice versa), interracial dating, white and non-white mixed identities, transnational and transracial adoptions, and hybridity. This course will be interactive and discussion based.
   Course ID: 100562
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

FYS 102O (3.00)

H.E.A.L.T.H.: How Environment, Access and Legislation Transform Health

H.E.A.L.T.H. will assist students in gaining an understanding of the psycho-social aspects and issues of health. Students will explore health care organizations, professions and issues through the interdisciplinary lens of sociology, psychology, public health, and health administration and policy. The course will involve students in a mix of interactive, experiential, and seminar based learning. Topics will include the impact of poverty, socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity and gender on access to healthcare; facets of health care including mental health, nutrition and related diseases (e.g., diabetes, obesity); and resources to address health related gaps and disparities.
   Course ID: 100563
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

FYS 102P (3.00)

Creativity, Innovation, and Invention

This course is for undergraduate students of all majors to explore the invention process from the germination of an idea to the development of a prototype in order to solve problems that address everyday needs. The purpose of the course is to inspire creativity and motivate students to invent, and supply them with the minimum expertise necessary to design, market, and protect an invention. Students will work in 'active-learning' I-teams that will assume responsibility for tasks that are important to the development and success of their invention. Students will essentially act as the divisions of a company that are all working toward a common purpose.
   Course ID: 100564
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP)

FYS 102Q (3.00)

History under the Microscope

What does the foundation of the modern state of Israel have in common with the miracle of bloody hosts? Why do farmers rotate crops? What was the main cause of American casualties in World War I? This course aims at providing a new perspective on different times and historical episodes, by revisiting them through the eyes of some of the most important players in human history and prehistory: microbes. Based on a discussion section format, the course will analyze several historical events and the role played by specific microbes or microbial communities in the political, societal, economic and environmental changes that took place. In each case study, the analysis will revolve on the specific nature of the microbe and its actions, but the focus will be on the historical background surrounding the event and the secondary factors and triggers that brought microbes into the limelight.
   Course ID: 100693
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP)

FYS 102R (3.00)

Learning About, With, and From Students with Intellectual & Developmental Disabilities

This interdisciplinary seminar is designed to offer a comprehensive exploration of intellectual and developmental disabilities across a number of academic disciplines. While assisting UMBC students in gaining a multidisciplinary understanding of intellectual/development disabilities, this course will provide a unique and substantive college-based experience for a cohort of non-degree seeking college-aged students with disabilities who are enrolled as participants in a new program called UMBC SUCCESS. Full-time UMBC students will explore the theoretical underpinnings of a range of intellectual and development disabilities, along with the practical application of these theories, from multidisciplinary perspectives delivered by faculty from Sociology, Psychology, Visual Arts, Education, Theater, Information Systems, and Dance (among others). Activities, grounded in these theories, then will be used as a framework for interactive and experiential engagement with the UMBC SUCCESS students so that all course participants can learn about, with, and from each other.
   Course ID: 100704
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP)

FYS 102S (3.00)

The Deaf Community and Its Culture

Through lectures, directed readings, attendance at deaf community events, and student research presentations, this course will introduce students the American Deaf Community, their unique culture, history and language. This course will also highlight significant impacts that American education systems, laws, and technologies have had on the Deaf Community¿s social status. The course will have several guest speakers, both Deaf and hearing, who will explore specific topics in depth such as CODA, Deaf Education, Interpreting, and Audism.
   Course ID: 100694
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP)

FYS 102T (3.00)

International Migrations and the National Debate

This course examines the continuous flux of immigrants arriving in the United States and contributing to American culture. Analysis will be done from a socio-historical perspective and a focus on the process of cultural assimilation of the new comers to American Society around issues of class, race and gender of the immigrants as well as the context of incorporation into the host society. This particular perspective of the analysis will allow students to reflect on past experiences, to compare, and evaluate present challenges of immigration issues today. The course analyzes the different populations that have contributed in the past and the ones that are contributing now to create the specific cultural diversity of the United States.
   Course ID: 100690
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP)

FYS 102U (3.00)

Poverty Amidst Plenty: The Economics of American Poverty

Poverty is not an oft-quoted word in USA. Nonetheless, the phenomenon is worth exploring especially in the backdrop of the Great Recession that US has recently experienced. With continuing unemployment and increasing costs of living, more and more families have to choose between necessities like health care, child care, and even food. This seminar will examine the nature and extent of poverty in the U.S., its causes and consequences, and the poverty alleviation measures adopted through government programs and policies.
   Course ID: 101896
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP)

FYS 102V (3.00)

Life and Death in a Police State

What is it like to live in a police state, which rules by instilling fear? What is it like when a totalitarian government exerts control over most aspects of your life? How does it feel when you live in constant anxiety of saying or doing the wrong thing and facing possible arrest, or worse? To answer these questions, we will examine the two most prominent examples of such a regime¿Hitler¿s Germany and Stalin¿s Soviet Union. We will learn how they came to power, what their objectives were, how they functioned, and how some people embraced them and others suffered under constant repression and terror. Gathering all the information acquired during the semester, we will conclude with a crucial question: could it happen here?
   Course ID: 101897
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP)

FYS 102W (3.00)

Race, Science, and Society

This course critically examines the practice and process of science through the lens of race and culture. Explores the conflicts, challenges, and societal implications of science in culturally pluralistic contexts.
   Course ID: 101898
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP)

FYS 102X (3.00)

Transformational Technologies

Technologies shape the way humans interact with their environment. This course will explore innovations in transportation, navigation, agriculture, industry, medicine, human safety, communication and quality of life that have been made possible by technologies. Students will reflect on the impacts of technologies in these areas to examine the change in trajectory of society as a result of the innovations, and students will consider examples of societies that do not use the technologies, either by circumstance or by choice. Discussions will include the positive and negative effects of technologies on the environment and on societies.
   Course ID: 101899
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

FYS 102Y (3.00)

Imaginations and Expectations: Creating Contemporary Childhoods

We encourage children to pursue their dreams. How do we both cultivate and constrain this exploration? This course examines the contradictions, complexities, and possibilities of contemporary childhoods across multiple contexts (e.g., geospatial, curricular, and sociocultural). The class will include discussions and analyses that address experiences in, representations of, and spaces for children. Within the class, we will explore a range of media sources, artifacts, and field sites. Students of all majors who are committed to active and thoughtful participation are welcomed.
   Course ID: 101954
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP)

FYS 102Z (3.00)

Need for Fantasy

This course will focus on critical analysis of culture, social customs and beliefs, functions of society and behavior in groups. The reading will include the novel Need for Magic by Joseph Swope, Ph.D. and three overviews of principles of social psychology, prejudice, attraction, and social phenomena.
   Course ID: 101955
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP)

FYS 103A (3.00)

Computation as an Experimental Tool

The course introduces students to the ubiquity of mathematics and its applications in the modern world. Covered topics such as chaos, fractals and automata theory are used to model various natural and scientific phenomena - in fact, they are inherent in nature itself. Prerequisite: A suitable score on the LRC algebra placement exam or a GEP mathematics course is required.
   Course ID: 054430
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Mathematics (GEP), Mathematics (GFR)

FYS 103B (3.00)

Paradigms and Paradoxes: An Attempt to Understand the Universe

There are at least two kinds of scientific activities: acquiring and generating data, and inquiring and generating general modes of understanding. The latter activities will dominate this course. The course contents include discussions of some remarkable features of the universe: the class discussions will require no more scientific background than gained from high school chemistry and mathematics.
   Course ID: 054431
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)

FYS 103C (3.00)

Issues in Biotechnology

Through directed readings, class discussions, and student presentations, this seminar will focus on understanding these various aspects of modern biotechnology with an emphasis on its scientific basis. Practical demonstrations and visits to UMBC labs using biotechnological techniques will be an important part of the course to illustrate how the methods theoretically discussed in class are actually done.
   Course ID: 054432
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)

FYS 103D (3.00)

Global Warming

   Course ID: 054433
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)

FYS 103E (3.00)

Physics Through the Decades

In this course, we will study some of the greatest ideas in modern physics. These ideas have been used to describe nature on the scale of the universe (10 meters) down to the smallest size where the concept of a length remains valid (10 meters). Since this journey parallels the history of modem physics, particular emphasis will be placed upon the evolution of the science of measurement and the way in which developments in physics have led to our present-day understanding of the nature of the universe.
   Course ID: 054434
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GFR)

FYS 103F (3.00)

Thinking with Visualization

Knowledge may be power, but too much information can be more like the uncontrolled force of a runaway freight train. Understanding the flood of available data is one of the key challenges of our time. Visualizing the data makes the flood more manageable. This course will look at solving real-world problems by applying visualization techniques based on the workings of the human perceptual system. Spotlight application areas include epidemiology, weather, social networks, fluid flow, bioinformatics, surgical planning, and national security. Students will analyze the effectiveness of visual representations and construct their own visualizations.
   Course ID: 054435
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GFR)

FYS 103G (3.00)

Living as Well-Informed & Engaged Individuals in an Ongoing Age of Irrationality

At the beginning of the 21st century, so much of our experience is governed by modern science and technology. However, so much of the information that we are bombarded with everyday is bogus. How do we distinguish the real from the unreal? Our ability to do this will critically affect the decisions we make in life, both professional and personal. Thus, even non-scientists have an obligation to understand the workings and the results of the scientific process. We will explore the ways that scientists evaluate their work and come to a common, if tentative, understanding. Current and historical examples of conflicts between rational (scientific) and irrational (fundamentalist religious, ideological) approaches to understanding the world will be investigated.
   Course ID: 054436
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GFR)

FYS 103I (3.00)

Dynamics of Problem Solving

   Course ID: 054437
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Mathematics (GEP), Mathematics (GFR)

FYS 103J (3.00)

Exploring Examples from Mathematical Biology

   Course ID: 054438
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Mathematics (GEP), Mathematics (GFR)

FYS 103K (3.00)

Chasing Lightening: Sferics, Tweeks, and Whistlers

   Course ID: 054439
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)

FYS 103L (3.00)

What is the World made of?

A historical approach will be used to explore how the concept of matter developed from the ideas of ancient Greek philosophers through the modern concepts of elements, atoms, and molecules to our current view of elementary particles and how the matter of the universe evolved since the Big Bang. The development of practical materials will also be studied from the use of native metals and early pottery to modern materials engineering and ultimately the atomic-level control of nanomaterials. Although the unifying theme of the course is science history, substantial excursions will be made into the relevant areas of physics, chemistry, and materials science, especially when discussing current understanding and practice.
   Course ID: 100175
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP)

FYS 103M (3.00)

Crimebusting with Math and Stat

Statistical and mathematical concepts often become key aspects in solving crimes, in successfully prosecuting criminals, and in courtroom arguments in employment discrimination, anti-trust litigation, contested election, disputed paternity, and compliance with environmental regulations. In this class, many real life case studies will be used as a springboard to the discussion of statistical and mathematical methods used in fighting crime. Students will watch selected episodes from the popular CBS prime-time TV crime series NUMB3RS, and the companion book by Devlin and Lorden will be used as a guide for class discussion. Students must have a Math Placement score of Math 150 or higher or taken an equivalent course.
   Course ID: 100371
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Mathematics (GEP)

FYS 103N (3.00)

Monitoring Global Environmental Change with NASA Satellite Imagery

The course will provide students with an opportunity for early exposure to the Earth Sciences by learning how earth satellite monitoring is currently utilized in environmental and societal applications. The course structure will be a combination of in-class lectures, directed web-based hands-on activities, and student presentations, and will be taught at a computer lab on campus. In-class time will be divided evenly between lectures and hands-on computer exercises. The course curriculum will primarily rely on NASA imagery and tools to teach 1) basic earth system science principles, climate variability and atmospheric chemistry and 2) Environmental and societal implications of climate change, stratospheric ozone depletion, and air pollution.
   Course ID: 100479
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP)

FYS 103O (3.00)

Microbes, Humans, and History: How Microorganisms have Shaped World History

Microorganisms have been on Earth far longer than humans. Bacteria, viruses, and other microbes have caused many devastating diseases, often changing the nature of society and influencing politics as well as the outcome of wars. Yet, microorganisms have also provided untold benefits to human societies. This First Year Seminar will focus on the various ways our human history has been influenced by microorganisms. Through a variety of formats, students will focus on exploring the impact of microorganisms and their interrelationships with humans from an historical perspective.
   Course ID: 100695
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP)

FYS 104 (3.00)

First Year Seminar (C)

   Course ID: 054440
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Exploration Thru Film
   Attributes: Culture (GFR)

FYS 104A (3.00)

Intercultural Exploration through Film

This course is closely linked to the intercultural focus of the MLL major. Individual films will serve as case studies to examine the ways in which conflict may arise between cultures as well as to explore the development of intercultural competence. Through a careful examination of individual films as text, the course will focus on, among other issues, the function of verbal and nonverbal communication in multicultural settings. American students live in a society that everyday becomes more diverse and complex. For example, a recent article reports that the Asian and Hispanic population in the United States will triple by 2050 and, by that date, the United States will be the second largest Spanish-speaking country in the world. This clearly indicates that students will experience intercultural conflict in their own lives, often without the tools to deal with the many bewildering issues that emerge from such encounters. Students will be asked to reflect on films that offer rich examples of intercultural conflict.
   Course ID: 054441
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Culture (GFR)

FYS 104B (3.00)

Stereotypes: How We Deal With Differences

Stereotypes-national, ethnic, racial and religious-have existed for millennia and are found in every part of the globe. Groups of one kind or another often develop certain, commonly held perceptions of other groups that resists contrary evidence suggested by reason or experience. Many conflicts in today's world involve stereotypical views of others and tend to make difficult problems even more complicated and harder to solve. In this course we will see how stereotyping works by studying the American stereotype of the French, as well as the French perception of Americans.
   Course ID: 054442
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Culture (GFR)

FYS 104C (3.00)

The Italians

Italy has attracted people of many nationalities for centuries. Visitors continue to be seduced by its beauty and charm, and by the richness of its culture. However, few get to know the real nature of the Italians, themselves. This course offers a cultural perspective of the Italian people, as revealed through their literature, journalism, film, and music. Topics to be discussed include,among others,regional differences, social structures, daily living, attitudes toward law and government, and the sense of malaise and alienation in today's economy. Information about Italy's historical background will also be provided, especially as to how it still influences the country and its people.
   Course ID: 100471
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Culture (GFR)

FYS 104D (3.00)

Paris: The Happy Years

Looking back nostalgically after the horrible slaughter of World War I, the French called the period before the war la Belle Epoque the beautiful era, the happy years. Those thirty or so years saw not only peace, but an explosion of artistic achievements, remarkable technological innovations, and a pleasurable way of life that produced the Paris of legend. Modern art, new literary movements, stunning advances in science and medicine, the Eiffel Tower, the Statue of Liberty, and much more came from this era. But was it uniformly happy? Beneath the glittering surface lay problems that plague us to this day, such as unpopular military actions far from home, political demagoguery, yellow journalism, toxic bigotry, the tension between church and state, and widespread poverty. We will explore both sides of this momentous period, with Paris as our focus.
   Course ID: 100636
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP)

FYS 105A (3.00)

The Voice of an Engaged Citizen: Vote, Advocate, Volunteer,Respond, Act...How?

Often we take for granted that we live in a democracy, and we pay too little attention to exercising our responsibilities in maintaining our nation's ideals and principles. Given the challenges that we obviously face in this new millennium, a renewed sense of the importance of citizenship and personal responsibility is urgently required of us all. How can the individual's role in decision-making be practiced and enhanced? How have individuals made a difference throughout history? What is different or the same about the past and present? This course will address these and related questions and issues with a focus on how the Internet is used as a medium for finding information about citizenship and for advocating and practicing citizenly conduct.
   Course ID: 054444
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Intermedia: Poetics

FYS 105B (3.00)

The Ethics of Living in an Information Age Society

This course merges concepts from a number of disciplines- philosophy, sociology, information systems, and public policy- to take a broad look at ethics and the different major philosophies which inform ethical behavior. The course comprises readings of the major ethical traditions, e.g., the Babylonian code, the Vedas, and the European and ancient Greek philosophers, a foundation in information science and information technology intended to provide a starting point for discussion of ethical issues in today's society, and discussion of the major social implications that have arisen as we have made a transition to an information society.
   Course ID: 054445
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Intermedia: Poetics

FYS 105C (3.00)

Fermat, Uncle Petro and Pi

The international bestsellers Fermat's Enigma (non-fiction) and Uncle Petros and Goldbach's Conjecture (fiction), the cult film Pi, the Oscar-winner A Beautiful Mind, and the Pulitizer-winning Broadway play Proof are all recent examples of popular works wherein mathematicians and their research have played a prominent role. This course will provide a perspective on contemporary mathematics by examining the actual mathematics behind these and other selected works. Our goal will be to understand and gain proficiency in how technical subjects can be made accessible to a non-technical student. It is clear that many students are not given the opportunity to understand mathematics as it relates to other disciplines. Mathematics (and, by extension, science and technology) plays an increasingly influential role in all spheres of the modern world, including art and culture. This course helps students to understand and appreciate the interaction between these diverse areas.
   Course ID: 054446
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Intermedia: Poetics

FYS 106 (3.00)

Diversity and Pluralism: An Interdisciplinary Perspective (SS/C)

   Course ID: 054447
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

FYS 106A (3.00)

Diversity and Pluralism: An Interdisciplinary Perspective

Issues of diversity and pluralism are of utmost importance in the US and abroad. In this course we will look specifically at diversity in terms of both social identity and social conflict. We will focus on the areas of race, class, gender, and sexual orientation. We will explore how each of these areas is socially constructed rather than being based in biology or natural laws. We will examine the dynamics of privilege and systematic oppression. Through this exploration, we will address ways in which our society can change in order to come closer to the American ideals of equality and democracy.
   Course ID: 054448
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

FYS 106B (3.00)

Vienna 1900

The title of this course is the term often used to describe the period of remarkable intellectual life and artistic creativity spanning roughly forty years?from 1880 to 1920. In this time, Vienna was the cultural capital of the western world. We will study this period and the people who made it famous. We will consider how Vienna flourished in its golden age, and we will identify the seeds of its gradual decline and eventual disintegration, which took place from 1920 to 1938. Finally, we will consider possible lessons to be drawn for our place and time.
   Course ID: 100230
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

FYS 106C (3.00)

Latin America and the United States in the World Today

The focus of this course will be on Latin America and the United States today. The interdiciplinary content will include historical analysis (including selections from The Open Veins of Latin America, the book President Chavez gave to President Obama), political commentary, journalistic texts, literature, films and visual art.
   Course ID: 100263
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

FYS 107 (3.00)

First Year Seminar (AH/C)

   Course ID: 054449
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Happy Birthday, Quixote
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GFR), Culture (GFR)

FYS 107A (3.00)

Happy Birthday, Don Quixote!

The course will primarily work with standard techniques of literary analysis to explore (and question) aspects of Hispanic cultural identity - how Hispanic cultures represents themselves to themselves and others - at different times and in different places, with special attention to elements that run counter to the 'establishment' view. The range of the course over time and space is very wide, but instead of reaching overarching, oversimplified conclusions, the course will, through its focus on individual works, seek to encourage the students' appreciation of specific literary and artistic achievements and critical awareness of issues involved in forging cultural identities.
   Course ID: 054450
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Culture (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR), Culture (GFR)

FYS 107C (3.00)

Love's Philosophy

Love is fundamental; it is treated as an elemental force, a psychological construct, a human emotion, a creative power and a biochemical state among other representations. This course will examine love through its development the Western cultural tradition while also reaching across disciplinary lines to understand poetic, philosophical, literary, scientific, and other descriptions of love. Love's Philosophy takes as its foundation the three forms of love outlined in ancient Greek philosophy: erotic love, love of friendship, and selfless love for another.
   Course ID: 101817
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Culture (GEP)