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Undergraduate Catalog 2011

Geog and Environmental Systems

GES 102 (3.00)

Human Geography

Study of the distribution of human activities and the causes and consequences of these distributions, including population, resources, economic activity, urban and rural settlements and cultural phenomena.
   Course ID: 051313
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: GES 102Y
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

GES 102Y (4.00)

Human Geography

Study of the distribution of human activities and the causes and consequences of these distributions, including population, resources, economic activity, urban and rural settlements and cultural phenomena.
   Course ID: 054543
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Course Equivalents: GES 102
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

GES 105 (3.00)

World Regional Geography

A survey of world regions illustrating the interaction of physical and cultural processes. These processes are examined in the context of problems confronting different cultures in contrasting environments. The course deals with regional stresses and conflicts and their geographic implications.
   Course ID: 051149
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

GES 110 (3.00)

Physical Geography

Study of the principles and processes of climate, earth materials, landforms, soils and vegetation that give logic to their integrated patterns of world distribution.
   Course ID: 051203
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: GES 110Y
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)

GES 110Y (4.00)

Physical Geography

Study of the principles and processes of climate, earth materials, landforms, soils and vegetation that give logic to their integrated patterns of world distribution.
   Course ID: 054544
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Course Equivalents: GES 110
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)

GES 111 (3.00)

Principles of Geology

An introduction to the structure, composition, historical evolution and surface features of the earth. Topics include the geologic time scale and radiometric dating; major groups of rocks and minerals; sedimentation and stratigraphy; plate tectonics, seismicity, volcanism, mountain-building and geologic structures; weathering and soil formation; and sculpture of the land by surficial processes.
   Course ID: 051363
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)

GES 120 (3.00)

Environmental Science and Conservation

An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of how the earth and the earth's ecosystems work, how they are interconnected, and how humans utilize and impact natural resource systems. Environmental problems and solutions are examined and natural resource conservation strategies and policies are reviewed. Topics covered in the course include ecosystem processes, climate and climate change, biodiversity and endangered species, land degradation and deforestation, human population growth, agriculture, and water and soil resources.
   Course ID: 051115
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: GES 120H, GES 120Y
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)

GES 120H (3.00)

Introduction to Environmental Conservation - Honors

An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of how the earth and the earth's ecosystems work, how they are interconnected, and how humans utilize and impact natural resource systems. Environmental problems and solutions are examined and natural resource conservation strategies and policies are reviewed. Topics covered in the course include ecosystem processes, climate and climate change, biodiversity and endangered species, land degradation and deforestation, human population growth, agriculture, and water and soil resources.
   Course ID: 051150
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: GES 120, GES 120Y
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)

GES 120Y (4.00)

Environmental Science and Conservation

An introduction to the interdisciplinary study of how the earth and the earth's ecosystems work, how they are interconnected, and how humans utilize and impact natural resource systems. Environmental problems and solutions are examined and natural resource conservation strategies and policies are reviewed. Topics covered in the course include ecosystem processes, climate and climate change, biodiversity and endangered species, land degradation and deforestation, human population growth, agriculture, and water and soil resources.
   Course ID: 054545
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Course Equivalents: GES 120, GES 120H
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)

GES 220 (4.00)

Lab and Field Techniques for Environmental Science

Students enrolled in this course will gain experience in field sampling, laboratory procedures and data analysis. Exercises will involve field and laboratory work with some combination of water, soils, vegetation, landforms and atmospheric phenomena. Students will work in teams, and each will develop a final research project for presentation at the end of the semester. This is a required course for students majoring in environmental science or environmental studies.
   Course ID: 051156
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Science Plus Lab (GEP), Science Plus Lab (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must have completed GES120 with a grade of C or better. In addition, you must have completed BIOL100 or BIOL101 or BIOL141 or CHEM101 with a grade of C or better or be concurrently enrolled in BIOL141 or CHEM101.

GES 286 (4.00)

Exploring the Environment: A Geo-Spatial Perspective

This course is designed to introduce students to various technical tools that are currently being used in geography and environmental fields today. GIS, Remote Sensing, GPS and Cartography are discussed in the course. The course covers, among other topics, a basic understanding of how GPS systems function and how they integrate with GIS. The course also provides students a basic understanding of how GPS systems function and how they integrate with GIS. The course also provides students a basic understanding of GIS software and concepts including raster and vector models. Students learn basic map fundamentals such as scale, map interpretation, and projections along with how remote sensing is used in mapping and GIS. The Lab portion of the course provides hands-on examples of different topical areas covered in lecture and how each integrates using real-world examples.
   Course ID: 054546
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Attributes: Science Plus Lab (GEP), Science Plus Lab (GFR)

GES 302 (3.00)

Selective Topics in Geography

This course is provided to allow flexibility in offering work not found elsewhere in the course offerings. The topic will be announced prior to the semester when it will be offered. Recommended Preparation: Three credits in a GES course or permission of instructor. Some topics will require additional prerequisites
   Course ID: 051316
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Environmental Sociology, Gender & The Environment, Population Geography, Conservation Biology, Oceanography, Selected Topics In Ges, Environmental Policy, Watershed and Science Manageme, Geography of Latin America, Cultural Ecology: Nat Res Man, Arctic Geography, Physical Regions of the US, Natural Resource Management, Global Ind: Change Landscape, Change Context-Chesapeake Bay, Natural Hazards

GES 304 (3.00)

Community Research

This course will involve undergraduate students in a team-based project to generate field research findings useful to a government or non-profit client/partner. The policy areas to be researched will include environment, health, housing, poverty, and urban development, among others. Team participants will include teaching and research faculty and staff, advanced graduate students, and a Sondheim Program-based Peaceworker. Undergraduates will contribute to the research design and to the preparation of the research findings, and will conduct extensive field research. They will build practical research skills and engage with members of local communities.
   Course ID: 100236
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: AMST 304, POLI 304, PUB 304

GES 305 (3.00)

Landscape Ecology

Landscape ecology is a new, integrative, discipline that explores the spatial patterning of ecological processes across the living landscape. This course introduces the fundamentals of ecology within a landscape context and then applies these concepts as tools for sustainable management of landscape structure and function at local, regional and global scales.
   Course ID: 051257
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed (GES110 or GES120) and (GES308 or GES313 or BIOL142) with a grade of C or better.

GES 307 (3.00)

Conservation Biology

This course focuses on the biology that underlies conservation problems and the challenges we face as a society. This course will introduce some of the literature, controversies, and promising methodologies used in Conservation Biology. Objectivity and sound research design are essential for scientific progress, thus a major emphasis will be on carefully evaluating each issue in a rigorous, scientific context. Specific goals of the course are: 1) To introduce the principal concepts and methodologies of Conservation Biology, 2) To enrich understanding of the scientific contributions necessary for solving conservation problems, 3) To foster understanding of the process of science in general, and as applied in conservation contexts, 4) To further develop analytical and communication skills, thereby improving the ability to contribute to creating solutions. Classes will consist of lectures and discussion on particular issues and readings.
   Course ID: 054547
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed Bio 141 with a grade of C or better.

GES 308 (3.00)

Ecology

Students enrolled in this course will explore the interactions between the environment and organisms as individuals, populations, communities and ecosystems. Major topics include adaptive strategies of organisms, population dynamics, species interactions, community structure and function, biodiversity and productivity. This is a background course for students majoring in environmental science or environmental studies.
   Course ID: 054548
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete BIOL100 or BIOL100H or BIOL101 or BIOL141 or BIOL141H with a grade of C or better.

GES 310 (3.00)

Geomorphology

Study of weathering and the soil mantle, the development of hillslopes, stream valleys and river plains, and the significance of structural differences and climatic variation on geomorphic processes and landscape changes.
   Course ID: 051003
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: GES 110

GES 311 (3.00)

Weather and Climate

This course offers an introduction to the physical processes that control weather and climate. Topics covered include the mechanics of atmospheric behavior, weather systems, the global distribution of climates and their causes, as well as various topics related to climatology.
   Course ID: 051004
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: GES 110

GES 313 (3.00)

Biogeography

Study of the physical, biological and cultural factors that influence the changing distributions of plants and animals over the earth.
   Course ID: 051364
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete GES 110 or GES 120 with a C or better.

GES 314 (3.00)

Geography of Soils

Study of the properties, distribution and development of soils, soil formation and classification, soil organisms and organic matter, and soil surveys.
   Course ID: 051207
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: GES 110 or 111

GES 317 (3.00)

Water Quality

An introduction to basic physical, chemical and biological characteristics of natural waters, focusing on the sources and pathways by which contaminants enter aquatic systems and the impacts of water pollution on aquatic ecology and human health. Topics discussed also include drinking-water standards, wastewater treatment, point and non-point source contamination, and methods for prevention or remediation of contamination. The course concentrates most heavily on surface water quality, but some attention will be devoted to groundwater quality. Students are encouraged to complete CHEM 101 prior to enrolling in this course.
   Course ID: 051317
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: GES 110

GES 318 (3.00)

Natural Environment of the Chesapeake Bay

An introduction to the geology, circulation, geochemistry and ecology of Maryland's most important natural resource and one of the world's largest estuaries. In bringing together these aspects of the study of the Chesapeake Bay, we will try to understand how an estuarine system evolves under natural conditions and how the system may be affected by human activities.
   Course ID: 051258
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: GES 110

GES 319 (3.00)

Watershed Science & Management

An introduction to watershed structure and function with particular emphasis on principles of hydrology, geomorphology, ecology and their application to the management of watersheds. Students will explore how these fundamental dimensions help shape management responses to environmental challenges in the context of past, current, and future legal and political frameworks.
   Course ID: 100527
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete GES 110 or GES 120 with a C or better.

GES 325 (3.00)

Historical Geography

An introductory course on the salient aspects of historical geography, focus on landscape evolution and regional changes of cultural phenomena. Emphasis is on development of North America, with contrasts of Latin American and non-Western landscapes.
   Course ID: 051208
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: GES 102 or GES 105 or GES 110 or GES 120 or GES 286 or junior

GES 326 (3.00)

American Conservation Thought

An exploration of the major ideas and events of American conservation history from European colonization through to the modern environmental movement. The course focuses upon changing attitutdes towards nature, wildlife, and natural resources and also covers the evolution of federal policy regarding the establishment and management of national parks, forests and wilderness areas. In addition, we will review and analyze some of the major environmental and resource controversies of the last 100 years.
   Course ID: 051158
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Writing Intensive, Social Sciences (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete GES 102 or GES 105 or GES 110 or GES 120 with a C or better or have a Junior standing.

GES 327 (3.00)

Cultural Ecology

This course investigates the relationship between humans and their physical environment and the role that technology plays in this evolving relationship. We examine the interdependence of social organization, technology, and the environment using a case study approach from different cultures with particular emphasis upon the Amazon region of South America. The course also explores social and cultural changes arising from technological innovations and the impacts of expanding economic frontiers upon indigenous population.
   Course ID: 051054
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Culture (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete GES 102 or GES 105 or GES 110 or GES 120 or ANTH 211

GES 328 (3.00)

Environmental Policy

This class examines the environmental policy process by studying how conflicting economic, social, and political interests and values compete for influence and exert power in the formulation and implementation of environmental policy. We look at the ways in which various stakeholders, including business interests, environmental interest groups, and local, national, and international governance institutions interact in defining environmental problems and formulating solutions. The class also examines the role that environmental science helps to define, and settle, debates of environmental policy, and the trade-offs between scientific expertise and political and economic concerns in policy formulation. Policies to be studied include climate change mitigation, wilderness preservation, urban land-use policy, water and air quality standards, and agricultural policy. The class draws on case studies from North American and developing country contexts.
   Course ID: 100358
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: GES 102 or GES 120.

GES 329 (3.00)

Geography of Disease and Health

The application of geographical concepts and techniques to health-related problems; origins and diffusion of diseases; physical, biological, cultural and policy factors in disease and mortality; location of social service facilities and ability of health and social systems to respond to society's needs.
   Course ID: 050101
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Geog Of Disease & Health
   Same as Offering: HAPP 329
   Attributes: Writing Intensive, Social Sciences (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete GES102 or three credits of HAPP with a minimum grade of C.

GES 330 (3.00)

Geography of Economic Development

Study of patterns of economic development issues around the world with an emphasis on causes and solutions. Focus on the role of agriculture, manufacturing and service provision in the development process. Case studies of specific regions. Recommended Preparation: permission of the instructor.
   Course ID: 051006
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: GES 102 or junior stand

GES 333 (3.00)

Water Resources

This course examines the distribution and abundance of water resources, the nature of water supply systems, the uses of water in modern society, and the impact of human activities on water quality and water availability. Environmental, social and economic implications of water resource management decisions will be considered.
   Course ID: 051055
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete GES 102 or GES 105 or GES 110 or GES 120 with a C or better or have a Junior standing.

GES 337 (3.00)

Natural Resource Management

Natural resource management (NRM) can be defined as the set of principles and practices that guide the human use of natural resources in ways that address the importance of sustaining those resources for (1) their overall ecosystem role and (2) for the health and productivity of future generations. This course offers an overview of NRM, tracing the history of evolution from traditional to ecosystem-based NRM. Problems resulting from the misuse and mismanagement of natural resources and challenges presented by management at varying spatial scales are also examined. The class will review the latest forms of NRM (integrated, adaptive, equitable, participatory/community-based, and sustainable) and case studies┬┐from the Chesapeake watershed to international contexts┬┐will be used to explore political, socio-economic, cultural and ecological realities that influence NRM strategies. A common thread throughout will be discussion of the complex relationship between environmental policy and NRM.
   Course ID: 101810
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete GES110 or GES120 or GES102.

GES 341 (3.00)

Urban Geography

This course will enhance students' understandings of how cities work (or do not work), and will introduce the students to tools used by urban geographers to study urban places. Topical foci will include transportation, racial and economic segregation, planning, the changing form and function of cities, and social and environmental justice. In-class lectures, discussions and exercises will teach the students to apply the theory learned in the classroom to real-world applications.
   Course ID: 051056
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: GES 102 or junior stand

GES 342 (3.00)

Metropolitan Baltimore

Analysis of the functions, structure, development and planning problems of the metropolitan area.
   Course ID: 051259
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You Must complete GES 102 or GES 105 or GES 120

GES 363 (3.00)

World Regions: Contemporary International Issues

A geographical perspective on contemporary international issues, including territorial and resource disputes, migration and immigration, environment and regional economic development, and social and political conflict. Case studies of regional issues. Recommended Preparation: GES 102 or GES 105 or three credits in a GES course.
   Course ID: 054550
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

GES 381 (4.00)

Remote Sensing

This course includes interpretation of imagery, such as aerial photos, b/w IR, color IR, Radar, Thermal IR and various satellite system images. Special emphasis is given to acquisition of data through the use of photogrammetric techniques and visual interpretation. Topical applications include forestry, urbanization, geology and landforms, water resources, agriculture and land use. The course usually includes a one-hour aerial flight project.
   Course ID: 051160
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete GES102 or GES110 or GES120 or GES286

GES 383 (4.00)

Statistical and Thematic Cartography

This course examines various ways to portray quantitative and qualitative information using thematic maps. Emphasis is on data processing, map design and construction. The computer is used to aid in data processing and map development; however, no previous experience with computers is necessary. Recommended Preparation: GES 286 or permission of instructor.
   Course ID: 051118
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture

GES 386 (4.00)

Introduction to Geographic Information Systems

An overview of the essential characteristics, development and application of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Students will become familiar with the specialized concepts and methods related to the compilation and manipulation of spatial data, and they will apply those concepts and methods in a laboratory setting.
   Course ID: 051262
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed GES286 with a grade of C or better.

GES 387 (3.00)

Applications for Geographis Information Systems

A course designed for nonmajors and working professionals. An introduction and survey of the principal concepts, data structures, data management, system implementation components and design of applications using spatial data technologies. To be stressed are the underlying structure of spatial systems in combination with practical laboratory skills in developing technical competency with state-of-the-practice software tools. Laboratory skills development will attend to Web-based techniques for data access, analysis and formatting output of results. Recommended Preparation: Three credits in geography and environmental systems or consent of instructor.
   Course ID: 051211
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

GES 400 (3.00 - 4.00)

Selected Topics In Geography

This course is provided to allow flexibility in offering advanced work not found elsewhere in the course offerings. The topic will be announced prior to the semester when it will be offered. Permission of instructor required.
   Course ID: 051163
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Severe Storms, Population Geography, Arctic Geography, Negot Of Water Res Disp, Forest Ecology, Geog Appr for Watershed Analysis, Environmental Scientific Practice & Environ Policy, Cities and Environmental Issues, Anthropogenic Biomes: Global E, Cities and Environmental Issue, Spatial Data Analysis, Environmental Science & Policy, Cultural Ecology: Nat Res Mgmt, Conservation & Restoration Ecology, Global Environmental Change, Cons Dev Tropics, Water, Res Man, Conflict Res., Con Dev Tropics, Ecology and Management of Riparian Ecosystems
   Course Equivalents: GES 400H

GES 400H (3.00 - 4.00)

Honors Selected Topics In Geography

This course is provided to allow flexibility in offering advanced work not found elsewhere in the course offerings. The topic will be announced prior to the semester when it will be offered. Permission of instructor required.
   Course ID: 100118
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Severe Storms, Population Geography, Arctic Geography, Negot Of Water Res Disp, Forest Ecology, Geog Appr for Watershed Analys, Cities and Environmental Issue
   Course Equivalents: GES 400

GES 404 (4.00)

Forest Ecology

A field-intensive course emphasizing forested landscape ecosystems and plant species of the Mid-Atlantic. Our challenge is to understand ecosystems, their physical and biotic characteristics, their relationship to one another in the field, successional trends, and selected aspects of their functioning. This course will stress forest species, and especially (1) field identification and characteristic habitats, (2) establishment ecology, (3) competitive and mutualistic relationships, (4) occurrence and diversity related to habitat conditions, (5) establishment and occurrence in relatively undisturbed (by humans) and disturbed environments, and (6) genetic and non genetic variation of populations, as well as adaptation to specific environments.
   Course ID: 100252
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete GES308 or GES313 or BIOL142.

GES 405 (4.00)

Applied Landscape Ecology

This course applies the tools of landscape ecology, including GIS, remote sensing, aerial photography and landscape classification, to explore the spatial patterning of ecological processes across landscapes at different scales. Hands-on lab and field exercises will develop understanding and skills necessary for students to plan and conduct their own investigations of landscape pattern, process, and change in local and regional landscapes in collaboration with the instructor. Prerequisite: GES 305 and 386 or permission of instructor.
   Course ID: 051365
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed GES305 and GES386 with a grade of C or better.

GES 406 (4.00)

Aquatic Ecology

Students enrolled in this course will gain a thorough knowledge of the local aquatic biota and their habitats. Emphasis in this lab-based course will be placed on the interaction between physical, chemical and biological processes occurring in aquatic ecosystems. Students will learn how to collect, analyze and interpret ecological information collected from streams and rivers.
   Course ID: 051164
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed GES308 or BIOL142 with a grade of C or better.

GES 408 (4.00)

Field Ecology

Students enrolled in this course will gain an appreciation for the modern scope of scientific inquiry in the field of ecology. A major goal is for the students to become familiar with how organisms interact with one another and their natural environment by understanding the structure and function of different types of local ecosystems. Students will learn field collection techniques, as well as how to organize, analyze and present and interpret ecological information.
   Course ID: 054552
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete GES308 or BIOL301 or BIOl142 with a C or better.

GES 411 (3.00)

Fluvial Morphology

Study of the formation and development of landforms that are produced by riverine processes. Human activities on flood plains are included. Recommended Preparation: competency in algebra and simple trigonometry.
   Course ID: 051212
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete GES 310 with a C or better.

GES 412 (3.00)

Biogeochemical Cycles and the Global Environment

This course explores the chemistry and cycling of elements across the Earth's surface and atmosphere, with special emphasis on human-induced changes in biogeochemistry that are driving global warming, ocean acidification, acid rain, ozone depletion, water pollution; and nutrient saturation of freshwater, estuarine and coastal environments. The basic biogeochemical processes will be introduced and then integrated to explain the global cycles of water, carbon, nitrogen, phosphorus and sulfur and how these are changed by human activities.
   Course ID: 054553
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed (GES110 or GES111 or GES120) and (GES308 or BIOL301 or BIOL142) and CHEM 102 with a grade of C or better.

GES 413 (3.00)

Seminar in Biogeography

Advanced and topical themes in biogeography.
   Course ID: 051264
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete GES 313 with a grade of C or better.

GES 415 (3.00)

Climate Change

This course deals with the question of climate change and variability. Topics covered include changes in climate in different time scales (geologic, historic and the present), environmental evidence of climate change, factors controlling climate variations, and the use of computer models in reconstructing past climates and predicting climate changes.
   Course ID: 051213
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete GES 311 with a grade of C or better.

GES 416 (4.00)

Hydrology

Study of the occurrence and movement of water on and beneath the land surface. All phases of the hydrologic cycle are discussed, with particular emphasis on factors that control runoff, flood frequency, measurement and prediction of streamflow, and applications of hydrologic data in environmental planning. Principles of groundwater flow and the influence of geology on both groundwater and surface water also are included. Experience in the use of microcomputers for problem-solving is recommended.
   Course ID: 051165
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Requirement Group: GES 110 or GES 111 and either GES 310 or GES 311 or GES 317 or GES 333; MATH 151 and either STAT121 or 350 or 355

GES 419 (3.00)

Watershed Analysis & Modeling

This course will involve application of Geographic Information Systems in the analysis of water resources and watershed condition. Beginning with an introduction to the ArcHydro and TauDEM data models, students will explore digital mapping of water resources information, terrain analysis using digital elevation models, and delineation of river and watershed networks. Through integration of time-series and geospatial data students will be exposed to hydrologic principles of hydrologic modeling.
   Course ID: 100253
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed GES 386 and one of the following: GES 319 or GES 411 or GES 416 with a grade of C or better.

GES 424 (3.00)

Environmental Justice

This course is designed to engage students with the theoretical debates, case studies, and real-world practice of environmental justice (EJ). EJ concerns the grassroots activism of communities who live with environmental inequities and the study of the distribution of environmental benefits and burdens across diverse communities. The course focuses particularly on US-based EJ issues related to human health. The course will include a field methods component.
   Course ID: 101811
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete GES286 or GES326 or GES328 or GES329 or GES337 or GES341 or GES342 or HAPP329 or GWST200.

GES 428 (3.00)

Scientific Practice and Environmental Policy

This course studies the relationship between science and environmental policy. Class examines the social process by which scientific consensus emerges and the ways in which environmental policy is affected by the practices of scientists. We will also explore how unsettled scientific disputes inform concrete policy making goals, and how the policy-making process, in turn, shapes scientific research. Intersections of science and policy that we will explore include: climate science and climate change policy; ecosystem science and conservation policy; and the role of citizen science and lay expertise in resolving policy disputes.
   Course ID: 100485
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: GES 328 or GES 307 or GES 308 or GES 310 or GES 311 or GES 313 or GES 319 or GES 326 or GES 327 or GES 329 or GES 330 or GES 341 or GES 342 or GES 363

GES 429 (3.00)

Seminar in Geography of Disease and Health

Current issues in the geographic distribution of disease and health and location/allocation of health care services. Methods of analysis, including computer applications of statistics and information storage, retrieval and mapping.
   Course ID: 050100
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: HAPP 429
   Requirement Group: Open only to GES, HAPP and POSI majors. Must have completed GES 329 or have senior/graduate standing.

GES 432 (3.00)

Seminar in Natural Resources and Environmental Conservation

Advanced study of natural resource problems and policies, strategies for environmental conservation and future resource landscapes.
   Course ID: 051008
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete GES 307 or GES 308 or GES 310 or GES 311 or GES 313 or GES 314 or GES 319 or GES 326 or GES 327 or GES 328 or GES 329 or GES 363 or GES 428 or GES 434 or GES 462 with a C or better.

GES 433 (3.00)

Sustainability, Land Use and Natural Resources

This seminar class will examine the theory and practice of sustainability as applied to renewable natural resources. Examples and case studies will be drawn from the land-use systems involved with agriculture, forestry, fisheries, recreation and nature conservation. This will be done in an international context, comparing and contrasting sustainability issues in developed and developing countries.
   Course ID: 051214
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete GES 307 or GES 308 or GES 310 or GES 311 or GES 313 or GES 314 or GES 319 or GES 326 or GES 327 or GES 328 or GES 329 or GES 330 or GES 341 or GES 342 or GES 363 with a C or better.

GES 434 (3.00)

Wildlife Policy and the Endangered Special Act

The course will focus on the history of natural resource policies and wildlife laws intended to protect wildlife in the United States, with particular attention to threatened and endangered species. We use this history to analyze what many consider to be the most controversial environmental law, the 1973 Endangered Species Act (ESA). A case study approach is utilized to investigate the conflicts that have arisen in response to specific efforts to protect threatened and endangered species. The course combines science, policy and legal history, philosophy and contemporary and regional politics in an integrative approach to the problem of endangered species in the U.S. We will also discuss worldwide efforts to protect biodiversity such as the 1975 Convention of the International Trade of Endangered Species of Wild Fauna and Flora (CITES) and the 1992 Convention on Biological Diversity.
   Course ID: 054554
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete GES 307 or GES 308 or GES 313 or GES 326 or GES 327 or GES 328 or GES 428 or GES 432 or GES 433 or GES 462 with a C or better.

GES 435 (3.00)

Global Patterns of Production and Trade

This course focuses on analysis of the factors responsible for the location of industry and how these factors have contributed to the globalization of production and world trade. Course includes case studies of industries and regions of production.
   Course ID: 051009
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete GES 326 or GES 328 or GES 329 or GES 330 or GES 341 or GES 342 or GES 363 with a C better

GES 436 (3.00)

Global Enviromental Change

This course explores international dimensions of environmental issues. We examine the global dimensions of emerging economic, cultural, and political processes and their effects on issues of conservation, pollution, and natural resource management. We will explore the ways in which environmental degradation is closely linked with issues of economic development and the implications of these linkages for addressing environmental issues. We will also examine transnational actors such as finance capital, international NGOs, global corporations, and international governance bodies such as the United Nations, and their various roles in producing, and responding to, environmental problems. Specific environmental issues that will be covered include climate change, food security, water provisioning, environmental security, population growth, waste management, and urban growth.
   Course ID: 100530
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete GES 328 or GES 326 with a C or better.

GES 442 (3.00)

Seminar in Metropolitan Baltimore

Advanced study of the social and economic geography of Baltimore City and surrounding counties. Course will include data analysis and field research. Recommended Preparation: GES 341 or 342
   Course ID: 051265
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

GES 451 (3.00)

Urban Sustainability

Students will apply previously gained knowledge about urban human-environment interactions to a specific research question related to sustainability in urban landscapes. Readings and in-class discussion will apply the concept of sustainability to contextualize environmental issues facing urban places, including urban development and energy consumption, land-use change, climate change and water resources.
   Course ID: 051266
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete GES 307 or GES 308 or GES 311 or GES 310 or GES 313 or GES 319 or GES 326 or GES 327 or GES 328 or GES 329 or GES 330 or GES 341 or GES 342 or GES 363 with a C or better

GES 462 (3.00)

GIS and Human-Environmental Systems

This course will focus on the use of GIS in analyzing social and environmental systems that constitute complex human-environmental systems. Students will develop their spatial analysis skills, focusing on environmental processes and social contexts. Specific dimensions of environmental and social sustainability such as land use, transportation, economic development, environmental justice, etc. will be explored in detail.
   Course ID: 051267
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete GES 386 with a grade of C or better

GES 480 (4.00)

Advanced Cartographic Applications

Practical applications in the design and construction of maps, graphics and other visual materials, using computer-based cartography in a production atmosphere. Emphasis is on design and production of publishable quality graphics. Often, full-color atlases, team developed maps and interactive presentations are produced and distributed to the public. Students should plan to spend a considerable amount of time weekly in the computer laboratory.
   Course ID: 051168
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete GES 383 with a C or better.

GES 481 (3.00)

Digital Image Processing for Environmental Applications

This course covers the use of digital image processing techniques for extracting information about the earth's surficial environments from satellite remote sensing images. Lectures will cover the theory, and laboratory exercises will provide hands-on experience in the use of computers and software for image acquisition, processing, visualization,enhancement and classification applied to multispectral satellite data. Environmental applications include wetlands delineation, forestry inventory and assessments, land use and urban sprawl analysis.
   Course ID: 051119
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed GES 381 with a grade of C or better.

GES 482 (3.00)

Cartographic Internship

Students will be selected by the director of cartographic services to assist as unpaid interns for 10 hours per week in the cartographic activities of the department. The interns participate directly in cartographic production and in managing the office of cartographic services.
   Course ID: 051120
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study

GES 483 (3.00)

GIS Internship

Students will be selected by the director of GIS services to assist as unpaid interns for 10 hours per week in the GIS activities of the department or in an outside agency, with approval from the department for the type of work in which the student is to be engaged.
   Course ID: 051010
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study

GES 485 (3.00)

Field Research in Geography

Students in this course gain hands-on experience with field methods for landscape ecology, including sampling, mapping and spatial analysis of soils, vegetation, soil organisms, stream hydrology and land use patterns in local landscapes using GIS, GPS, imagery and other techniques. The class will meet one session each week and six full-day Saturday sessions; scheduling to be arranged. Students will work in teams and prepare final projects that will be presented as scientific posters and on the Web.
   Course ID: 051121
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed GES386 and one of the following: GES 304-319 or GES 404-419 with a grade of C or better.

GES 486 (3.00)

Advanced Applications in Geographic Information Systems

This course focuses on the methods for analyzing spatial data and provides an in-depth examination of technical aspects in spatial data handling,spatial pattern analysis, advanced raster processing, and dynamics GIS modeling. Students become familiar with advanced concepts, methods, and applications of Geographic Information Systems (GIS).
   Course ID: 051011
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete GES 386 with a grade of C or better

GES 488 (3.00)

Spatial Data Analysis and GIS Applications

This course covers a broad range of spatial analysis from basic data statistics to advanced computational techniques. The goal of this course is to introduce student to various quantitative methods used in geographical data and applications. This course will teach students to understand these concepts and to be able to apply them in geographical problems. The research topics will cover urban pattern analysis, health care, socioeconomic data, and crime data analysis. Students will have the opportunities to work on GIS application examples and cases.
   Course ID: 100573
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete GES 386.

GES 491 (1.00 - 3.00)

Independent Study in Geography and Environmental Systems

Independent reading and field experience, supervised by a member of the department faculty. For students of advanced standing who have substantially completed major requirements and desire to study independently an aspect of the discipline not covered by regular course offerings. The student must make an arrangement with a faculty member prior to registration. Permission of instructor required.
   Course ID: 051216
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study
   Course Equivalents: GES 491H

GES 491H (1.00 - 3.00)

Independent Study in Geography and Environmental Systems

Independent reading and field experience, supervised by a member of the department faculty. For students of advanced standing who have substantially completed major requirements and desire to study independently an aspect of the discipline not covered by regular course offerings. The student must make an arrangement with a faculty member prior to registration. Permission of instructor required.
   Course ID: 100117
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study
   Course Equivalents: GES 491

GES 497 (2.00 - 3.00)

Research Internship

Upon application, students are selected by the department to intern in faculty mentored research. During the internship, the students participate in a directed readings program and meet periodically to discuss the activities in which they are engaged. GES 498
   Course ID: 051325
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study

GES 498 (3.00)

Geography & Environmental Systems Internship

Upon application, students are selected by the department to intern in the offices of public agencies, private companies or non-profit organizations. During the internship, the students participate in a directed readings program and meet periodically to discuss the activities in which they are engaged. Permission of instructor required.
   Course ID: 051217
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study

GES 499 (3.00)

Honors Thesis

Majors wishing to graduate with departmental honors must complete an honors thesis. The topic and scope of the thesis research project are to be determined in consultation with the student's faculty advisor. Recommended Preparation: Senior standing, minimum cumulative GPA of 3.25 and departmental GPA of 3.5, completion of at least one 400-level course in a topic area related to the thesis research and permission of the student.
   Course ID: 051169
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture