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Undergraduate Catalog 2011

English

Faculty

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Chair

Jessica Berman

Professors

Raphael Falco
Lucille McCarthy

Professor of the Practice

Christopher Corbett

Assistant Professors

Helen Burgess
Lindsay DiCuirci
Jennifer Maher
Jody Shipka
Orianne Smith

Senior Lecturers

Michael Fallon
Robin Farabaugh
Carol Fitzpatrick
Gail Orgelfinger

Lecturers

Ryan Bloom
Brian Dunnigan
Nicole Pekarske
Holly Sneeringer

Editor

Mary Hickernell

Professors Emeriti

J. Leeds Barroll
Joan Korenman

Associate Professors Emeriti

Kenneth Baldwin
William Edinger
Lawrence Lasher

Associate Professor

Jean Fernandez
Piotr Gwiazda
Kathryn McKinley
Michele Osherow

Instructor

Linda R. Harris
Mitzi Mabe
Anthony McGurrin

Director, Writing & Rhetoric

Sally Shivnan

Instructor Emerita

Linda Benson

Courses in this program are listed under ENGL and SPCH.

The program for English majors is designed to provide students with advanced skills in written and oral communication and in the interpretation of texts, as well as with a deepened critical appreciation of literature and other forms of writing. Students in the literature track cultivate the skills of close reading, effective writing and critical analysis. They study British and American literature in their historical development and choose from a wide assortment of seminars and elective courses on topics of special interest. Students in the communication and technology track examine theories of communication and technology, hone expository writing skills, and develop a critical awareness of print and electronic texts. Both tracks prepare students for an exceptionally wide range of careers as well as for the demands of graduate study.

Career and Academic Paths

Many careers are open to English majors. In the Greater Baltimore region alone, UMBC English graduates have succeeded as government administrators, business executives, editors and publishers, technical writers and journalists. Many English graduates teach at the primary, secondary and university levels. In addition, English graduates go into law, medicine, government, social work, public relations, advertising, law enforcement, foreign service and new media design.

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Academic Advising

Students who wish to major in English should declare the major by submitting the Declaration of Major form to the Office of the Registrar or English Department Office. Shortly afterward, students will receive a letter from the department assigning them a faculty advisor. Each semester, after the schedule of classes is published and before the advance registration period, students should make an appointment with their advisor to discuss their program for the upcoming semester and any other academic matters that may have arisen. Students should come to the advising appointment with a preliminary schedule already outlined. Students must have an advisor’s approval to register. Transfer students who are registering for the first time and have not been assigned to an advisor should visit the department office for further information. Please note that interaction with the advisor is an important part of each student’s academic program and that the advisor has the final responsibility for certifying that students have completed the requirements of the major program.


Please note that interaction with the advisor is an important part of each student’s academic program and that the advisor has the final responsibility for certifying that students have completed the requirements of the major program.
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Graduate School Advising

The English major provides excellent preparation for graduate study in literature and related fields, such as journalism, creative writing and publication design. UMBC English majors frequently have gained admission to some of the most rigorous graduate programs in the nation. The English Department encourages its students to consider graduate study. Early in their major programs, interested students should consult with the departmental graduate school placement advisor or with other members of the faculty who can provide information about the variety of graduate programs available and specific admission requirements.

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English Major Requirements

The Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in English consists of a minimum of 39 credits as distributed below. The major offers two tracks: (1) literature and (2) communication and technology. These tracks share a common core of two courses and the same elective requirements.

Additional requirements are listed under the separate tracks.

All courses for the major must be passed with a grade of C or better.

Common Core Courses (6 credits)

ENGL 300 Communication and Technology: Analysis of Texts and Contexts

ENGL 301 Analysis of Literary Language.

NOTE: Students should take these two courses as soon as they declare their major as English. They are considered Gateway courses.


Common Elective Requirements (12 credits)

These electives must be English courses at the 300- or 400-level, although students may, with their advisor’s permission, include one 200-level course as part of this requirement.

Students in either track may use Creative Writing courses to satisfy elective requirements.

NOTE: At least one of the required or elective courses must fulfill the diversity requirement. ENGL 364: Perspectives on Women in Literature and ENGL 369: Race and Ethnicity in U.S. Literature fulfill the diversity requirement. Other courses may fulfill the requirement if they are so marked on the schedule of classes.

LITERATURE TRACK (21 CREDITS)

English majors in the Literature Track develop skills of close reading, critical thinking, and analysis of literary texts. Students also develop an extensive historical knowledge of British and American literature in its cultural and social contexts. Students will be prepared for graduate study in English as well as careers in such fields as education, business, law, journalism, publishing, and public relations.

Required Courses

It is recommended that students complete ENGL 301 in their first semester as a major and prior to taking ENGL 302.

ENGL 302 Literary Methodologies and Research

One 300- or 400-level course from four of the five historical periods. These courses need not be taken in chronological order, and they may be taken concurrently with any other major courses:

A) Medieval and Early Modern

B) Restoration to Romantic

C) Victorian and Modern

D) American Literature to Civil War

E) American Literature from Civil War to Present

Two 400-level Literature courses, one of which must be a seminar (open to juniors as well as seniors).

COMMUNICATION AND TECHNOLOGY TRACK (21 CREDITS)

English majors in the Communication and Technology track examine theories of communication and technology, hone expository writing skills, and develop a critical awareness of print and electronic texts. With these analytical skills, students within the Communication and Technology track prepare for careers in communication, law, publishing, business, and education; as well, this emphasis may enhance the career opportunities available to students majoring in Computer Science, Information Systems, Engineering, and the natural sciences.

Required Courses

It is recommended that students complete ENGL 300 in their first semester as a major and prior to taking ENGL 324.

ENGL 324 Theories of Communication and Technology

One course from each of the following categories:

A) Professional/Technical Communication

ENGL 326, ENGL 379, ENGL 383, ENGL 394

B) Rhetoric/Composition

ENGL 330, ENGL 386, ENGL 391, ENGL 392

C) Media Literacies

ENGL 342, ENGL 344, ENGL 385, ENGL 387

D) Journalism and Creative Nonfiction

ENGL 303, ENGL 380, ENGL 382

Two 400-level Communication and Technology courses, one of which must be a seminar (open to juniors as well as seniors).

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Minor Programs

Students completing one minor may not apply the same elective courses to satisfy requirements for another minor. However, required courses in one minor may be listed as electives in another minor program. This provision allows students to complete more than one minor program without having to take 36 total hours of classes. Students should consult with their English department advisors to identify the minor program(s) best suited to their interests and needs. With the advisor’s permission, up to six credits from the any English minor may be counted as part of the English major.

COMMUNICATION AND TECHNOLOGY MINOR (COMM) (18 CREDITS)

The English department offers a minor in communication and technology for students who wish to explore the theory and practice of communication and new media studies. All courses must be completed with a grade of C or better. No course at the 100 level may be counted for minor credit.

Core courses (9 credits):

Students may elect any three of these four core courses:

  • ENGL 300 Communication and Technology: Analysis of Texts andContexts
  • ENGL 330 Researching Communicative Practices
  • ENGL 385 New Media and Digital Literacies
  • ENGL 387 Web Design and Multimedia Authoring

Elective Courses (9 credits):

Students must select at least one course from List A and at least one course from List B. The third elective may be chosen from either list. In addition, the core course that the student did not select may be taken as an elective.

List A :

  • ENGL 320 Topics in Communication and Technology
  • ENGL 324 Theories of Communication and Technology
  • ENGL 342 Principles and Practices of Visual Literacy
  • ENGL 343 Introduction to Genre Analysis
  • ENGL 353 Rhetorical Theory
  • ENGL 355 Communicative Practices and Play Theory
  • ENGL 383 Science Writing
  • ENGL 386 Adult Literacy Tutoring: Issues and Methods
  • ENGL 407 Language in Society
  • ENGL 442 Seminar in Visual Literacy
  • ENGL 447 Online Voice and Community
  • ENGL 449 Seminar in Genre Analysis
  • ENGL 483 Seminar in Writing in the Sciences
  • ENGL 486 Seminar in Teaching Composition: Theory and Practice
  • ENGL 493 Seminar in Communication and Technology

List B:

  • SPCH 210 Interpersonal Communication
  • ENGL 291 Introduction to Writing Creative Essays
  • ENGL 303 Art of the Essay
  • ENGL 379 Principles and Practices in Technical Communication
  • ENGL 380 Introduction to News Writing
  • ENGL 382 Feature Writing
  • ENGL 391 Advanced Exposition and Argumentation
  • ENGL 392 Tutorial in Writing
  • ENGL 394 Technical Editing
  • ENGL 403 Advanced Art of the Essay

LITERATURE MINOR (LITR) (18 CREDITS)

The English Department offers a minor program in literature, requiring 18 credit hours for completion. The literature minor is intended for students who wish to augment their knowledge of English and American literature while also refining their skills in close reading and critical interpretation of literary texts. The literature minor requirements are listed below. All courses must be completed with a grade of C or better. No course at the 100 level may be counted for minor credit.

Required Core Courses: Six credits of ENGL 250: Introduction to Shakespeare and ENGL 301: Analysis of Literary Language.

Elective Requirement: Twelve additional credits of English courses must be taken, with six of those credits at the 300 or 400 level. At least three of these elective courses must be in literature. With the approval of the minor advisor, one literature course from a department other than English may be counted for minor credit.

MINOR PROGRAM IN WRITING (WRTG)(18 credits - basic minor, 24 credits - extended minor)

The minor in writing at UMBC is open to, and appropriate for, studentsmajoring in any field. The credential earned by completing the minor will document the student’s pursuit of writing skills for admissionscommittees and prospective employers. Both the basic minor and the extended minor share a common four-course core:

  • ENGL 100 Composition
  • ENGL 291 Introduction to Writing Creative Essays
  • ENGL 391 Advanced Exposition and Argumentation
  • ENGL 392 Tutorial in Writing

To complete the basic minor, students must elect any two courses (6 credits) from the writing courses listed below. To complete the extended writing minor, students must elect four courses (12 credits) from within one area below or from approved electives, including ENGL 400: Special Projects. All courses must be completed with a grade of C or better.

Note: No more than two writing minor courses may be taken per semester. Ideally, these courses should be taken in order and at the rate of one per semester. A C average is necessary in all courses applied to the writing minor. Students may begin the minor at any time. With the advisor’s permission, up to six credits from the writing minor may be counted as part of the English major.

A. Journalism

  • ENGL 380 Introduction to News Writing
  • ENGL 382 Feature Writing
  • ENGL 383 Science Writing
  • ENGL 398 Journalism Internship
  • ENGL 480 Seminar in Advanced Journalism
  • ENGL 495* Internship (Journalism)

B. Rhetoric and Communication

  • ENGL 226 English Grammar and Usage
  • ENGL 324 Theories of Communication and Technology
  • ENGL 326 The Structure of English
  • ENGL 386 Adult Literacy Tutoring: Issues and Methods
  • ENGL 395 Writing Internship (Tutoring)
  • ENGL 407 Language in Society
  • ENGL 485 The Teaching of Writing
  • ENGL 488 Seminar in Computer-assisted Writing Instruction
  • ENGL 490 Topics in the English Language
  • ENGL 491 Seminar in Topics in the English Language
  • ENGL 493 Seminar in Rhetoric and Composition
  • ENGL 495* Internship (Rhetoric and Communication Theory)

C. Creative Writing

Courses in creative writing must be taken in the proper sequence unless

permission of the instructor is given.

  • ENGL 271Introduction to Creative Writing - Fiction
  • ENGL 272 Introduction to Creative Writing - Script Writing
  • ENGL 273 Introduction to Creative Writing - Poetry
  • ENGL 371 Creative Writing - Fiction
  • THTR 371 Writing for the Theatre
  • ENGL 373 Creative Writing - Poetry
  • ENGL 375 Masterworks for Creative Writers
  • ENGL 397 Tutorial in Creative Writing
  • ENGL 403 Advanced Creative Writing - Non-Fiction
  • ENGL 471 Advanced Creative Writing - Fiction
  • ENGL 473 Advanced Creative Writing - Poetry
  • ENGL 475 Special Studies in Creative Writing
  • ENGL 495* Internship (Creative Writing)

D. Professional Writing

  • ENGL 226 English Grammar and Usage
  • ENGL 326 The Structure of English
  • ENGL 379 Principles and Practices in Technical Communication
  • ENGL 387 Web Content Development
  • ENGL 393 Technical Writing
  • ENGL 393H Technical Writing with Honors
  • ENGL 394 Technical Editing
  • ENGL 400 Special Projects in English
  • ENGL 407 Language in Society
  • ENGL 490 Advanced Topics in the English Language
  • ENGL 495* Internship (Professional Writing)

* ENGL 495 can only be taken once for the basic minor and twice for the extended minor.

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English Secondary Education Program

The English Department offers special courses and designated sections (followed by E) of standard courses for students whose native language is not English.

  • ENGL 107E
    Grammar Lab I for ESL Students
  • ENGL 108E
    Grammar Lab II for ESL Students
  • ENGL 109E
    Grammar Lab III for ESL Students
  • ENGL 110E
    Composition for ESL Students
  • ENGL 209E
    American Literature for ESL Students
  • ENGL 281E
    Intermediate Exposition for ESL Students
  • ENGL 391E
    Advanced Exposition for ESL Students
  • ENGL 393E
    Technical Writing for ESL Students

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Special Topics

If students have special interest in a particular literary subject, they may be able to explore it through ENGL 400: Special Topics in English. Students will plan their own course of study and determine the number of credit hours (up to four) in consultation with a faculty member who will direct the project and award the grade. Students should discuss their project with the faculty member with whom they would like to work. Students should secure permission from the ENGL 400 course director to register for the agreed-upon number of credits. This course may be repeated for credit, but it may not count as a seminar.

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English as a Second Language (ESL)

The English department offers special courses and designated sections (followed by E) of standard courses for students whose native language is not English.

  • ENGL 107E Grammar Lab I for ESL Students
  • ENGL 108E Grammar Lab II for ESL Students
  • ENGL 109E Grammar Lab III for ESL Students
  • ENGL 110E Composition for ESL Students
  • ENGL 209E American Literature for ESL Students
  • ENGL 281E Intermediate Exposition for ESL Students
  • ENGL 391E Advanced Exposition for ESL Students
  • ENGL 393E Technical Writing for ESL Students
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Honors Program

Participation in the English honors program enables students to complete a large-scale critical, research or creative-writing project. Honors students are chosen on the basis of their grades and their writing ability and should have at least a 3.5 GPA in the major and a 3.0 GPA in non-major courses or a strong faculty recommendation. Candidates for the honors program normally apply to the program director in the late fall of their junior year. With faculty consultation, students will choose their own research projects. Graduates of the program will be honored at commencement, and their honors status will be noted on their transcripts. Further details of the program are available in the English Department office.

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Special Opportunities

The English Department has a program of internships (ENGL 398 and 495) in which students may earn one to eight credits while gaining practical experience in communication and research skills in a real-life work situation. Students work six to eight hours per week for a newspaper, television or radio station, government agency or business. These opportunities are arranged by the English department in cooperation with the sponsoring agency.

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Student Organizations

English Council of Majors The English Council of Majors is a student-run organization that hosts many literary and social events throughout the year, including poetry readings at local coffeehouses, writing workshops by prominent American poets, graduate school information meetings and faculty-student colloquia. Sigma Tau Delta, the National English Honors Society English majors with an outstanding record of academic achievement are invited to join the UMBC chapter of Sigma Tau Delta, the national English honors society. Members of Sigma Tau Delta are eligible for national scholarships, writing awards and publishing internships; the UMBC chapter works closely with the English Council of Majors in organizing literary activities. English majors gain publishing experience by working on Bartleby, UMBC’s literary magazine; The UMBC Review, a journal of student research; and The Retriever, UMBC’s school newspaper, which won first place with special merit in the 1995 Scholastic Press Association Annual College Newspaper Awards.

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