UMBC logo
Undergraduate Catalog 2012

Ancient Studies

ANCS 120 (3.00)

Greeks and Romans in the Mediterranean World

The material in this course will bring together the experiences of the Greeks and the Romans as a part of the Mediterranean world. It will emphasize, among other things, the influence of other cultures on the Greeks and Romans, the interrelationship of Greek and Roman culture, and the progress of Romanization as a result of the spread of Roman culture throughout the empire.
   Course ID: 052199
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Culture (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR), Culture (GFR)

ANCS 150 (3.00)

English Word Roots from Latin and Greek

Students study the debt of English to the two major tongues of classical antiquity in the West. The cognate nature of the Indo-European languages is considered in this basic course in English etymology. Students can expect to experience a large increase in their vocabularies, to learn a systematic way of deducing meanings of new words when a dictionary is not available and to develop the vocabulary of a truly liberally educated person.
   Course ID: 052200
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Culture (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR), Culture (GFR)

ANCS 200 (3.00)

Israel and the Ancient Near East

A survey of the cultures of the ancient Near East including Assyria, Persia, and especially the development of ancient Judaism.
   Course ID: 050041
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: JDST 200, RLST 201
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Culture (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR), Culture (GFR)

ANCS 201 (3.00)

The Ancient Greeks

A survey of ancient Greek society including the Aegean Bronze Age, the nature of the polis, the Persian and Peloponnesian wars, life in Athens, Alexander the Great, developments in art and literature, and mythology.
   Course ID: 052201
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Culture (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR), Culture (GFR)

ANCS 202 (3.00)

The Roman World

A survey of ancient Roman society including Rome's march to the empire, the Roman Revolution, Augustus and the creation of the empire, the end of the ancient world, the rise of Christianity, developments in art and literatures, and mythology.
   Course ID: 052203
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: ANCS 202H
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Culture (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR), Culture (GFR)

ANCS 202H (1.00)

The Roman World - Honors

This course is for students who wish to take an honors component in connection with ANCS 202. The student must be enrolled in ANCS 202 to be eligible to take ANCS 202H. Various topics will be looked at in more depth via discussion, class participation and work on the Web.
   Course ID: 052204
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Course Equivalents: ANCS 202

ANCS 203 (3.00)

Earliest Christianity

A survey of the development of early Christianity in the Roman Empire. Topics include the status of foreign religions in the empire, the social world of early Christianity, the attitude of the Roman government toward Christians, persecution and the triumph of Christianity.
   Course ID: 050040
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: RLST 203
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GFR), Culture (GFR)

ANCS 204 (3.00)

Masterpieces of Ancient Literature

A study of the classical and/ or Judeo-Christian traditions in Western literature and, in some cases, their relationship to the writings of the Old Testament. Greek and Latin classics such as Homer's Iliad, Sappho's and Catullus' love poetry, and Virgil's Aeneid, will be read in English translation.
   Course ID: 050039
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: CPLT 203
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Culture (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR), Culture (GFR)

ANCS 210 (3.00)

Classical Mythology

A study of the principal Greek and Roman myths.
   Course ID: 050037
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: RLST 210
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Culture (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR), Culture (GFR)

ANCS 220 (3.00)

Judaism in the Time of Jesus and Hillel

This course surveys the history of Judaism and the Jewish people from the onset of Hellenism through the second Jewish revolt against the occupation by the Roman Empire. This formative period in the history of Judaism, of early Christianity and of Jewish-Christian relations is interpreted in light of extant primary and secondary literary and archaeological sources.
   Course ID: 050038
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: JDST 201, RLST 202
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Culture (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR), Culture (GFR)

ANCS 250 (3.00)

Topics in Ancient Studies

An introductory course to various aspects of the classical world. Topics vary from semester to semester but may include warfare, science, women in the classical world, medicine, athletics and religion. This course is repeatable.
   Course ID: 052206
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Trvl/Stdy France/Switz, Mthd & Mtrl Of Research, The School Of Athens, Burial Pract/Ancient Wld, Ancient Science and Technology, Scientific & Medical Terminology in Greek & Latin, Greek Drama, Death, Desire, and the Hero

ANCS 301 (3.00)

Ancient Civilizations

A study/travel abroad program to an area of classical or Near Eastern civilization relating to the ancient Greek and Roman world or to an archaeological site of a comparative culture. This course is repeatable up to 9 credits or 3 attempts.
   Course ID: 052211
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Cults Of Ancient Greece, Death/Burial-Antiquity, Roman Spain, Ancient Turkey, Greek and Roman Italy, Southern Italy and Sicily, Travel Study 2013: France, Travel Study: Greece
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Culture (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR), Culture (GFR)

ANCS 320 (3.00)

Gender and Women in the Classical World

What do we and can we know about the lives of women in ancient Greece and Italy, and how did women and men interact? In this course, archaeological and written evidence will be examined to reconstruct the activities, status and images of Greek, Etruscan and Roman women and place them within their historical and cultural contexts. Attention will be paid to the way both ancient and modern views about women and men influence our understanding of the past and present.
   Course ID: 050042
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: GWST 330
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Culture (GEP), Writing Intensive, Arts and Humanities (GFR), Culture (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete one course from the following: ANCS course or GWST course or ARCH200 or ARCH201 or HISt453 or HIST455 or HIST456 with a C or better.

ANCS 330 (3.00)

Ancient Science and Technology

This course will survey the birth and development of ancient science and technology. Topics may include scientific reasoning and methodology; mathematics, geometry, and astronomy; anatomy and medicine; construction, engineering, and mechanical technology. Historical background - political, economic, social, cultural, and religious - provides insights into related fields of political science, psychology, and ethical philosophy.
   Course ID: 100244
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: HIST 330
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Culture (GEP)

ANCS 341 (3.00)

Studies in World Literature

A study of selected literary works from a single nation or from several nations, with the focus on a century, movement, genre, theme or individual writer. Topics are announced each semester offered.
   Course ID: 100255
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GFR)

ANCS 350 (3.00)

Topics in Ancient Studies

A study of selected literary works from a single nation or from several nations, with the focus on a century, movement, genre, theme or individual writer. Topics are announced each semester offered. This course is repeatable.
   Course ID: 052216
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Travel/Study Greece, Sci,Math,Tech In Ancient, Topics In Ancient Stud., The Mediterranean, Temples,Churches,Synagog, The Cinema And Antiquity, The Bardic Voice, Ancient Greek Life, Ancient & Modern Britain, Burials In Ancient World, Ancient Studies Intrnshp, Greek Land Warfare, The Hero And The Quest, Rediscovery Of Antiquity, Age Of Perikles, Ancient & Modern Greece, Women And Gender, Judaism: Jesus & Hillel, When Worlds Collide, Greek and Roman History, Myth and Antiquity on Stage and Screen, Museum Studies, Childhood in the Ancient Mediterranean, Classical Art and Museums, Environmental Archeology, Myth and Archaeology, Mobile App Construction, Warfare in the Ancient World, Temp of Art: Hist of Art & Arc

ANCS 351 (3.00)

Topics in Ancient Studies

This course is repeatable up to 12 credits.
   Course ID: 052217
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Aristotle & Verbal Arts, When Worlds Collide

ANCS 370 (3.00)

When Worlds Collide: The Rediscovery of Antiquity

This course surveys the rediscovery of antiquity during the Age of Revolution. Pioneering explorations and early excavations in Europe, Africa, and America are viewed within the context of the late 18th and early 19th centuries. Political revolutions breaking with the past are accompanied by renewed interest in the distant past in colonial America, France, Italy, Spain, Egypt, and Greece, leading to the birth of scientific archaeology and the early development of the discipline of art history.
   Course ID: 100509
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete one 200 level ANCS course or one 200 level ARCH course or one 200 level CPLT course or one 200 level ENGL course or one 200 level HIST course or one 200 level PHIL course or one 300 level ART course with a C or better.

ANCS 397 (1.00 - 6.00)

Internships in Ancient Studies

Students may earn academic credit by arrangement with the Ancient Studies department by working in an approved internship in museum studies, library studies, teaching, and webpage design. Written work, in addition to practical experience, may be required. Variable credit course repeatable up to 12 credits.
   Course ID: 052218
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Field Studies

ANCS 398 (1.00 - 3.00)

Independent Projects in Ancient Studies

Various topics in ancient literature, archaeology and history. Recommended Preparation: Ancient studies major with B average. This course is repeatable.
   Course ID: 052219
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

ANCS 399H (3.00)

Comprehensive Readings in Ancient Studies - Honors

During one semester of the senior year, majors with at least a B average in ancient studies courses may read widely from an extensive list of ancient sources drawn up by the Department of Latin or Greek Literature, Ancient History or Archaeology. The list will be available to students at any time preceding the semester for which credit is given. This course is repeatable.
   Course ID: 052221
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

ANCS 498H (3.00)

Honors Thesis in Ancient Studies I

Research and writing of an honors thesis in ancient studies. ANCS 498H, 499H comprise a two-semester sequence and are part of the departmental honors program. To be taken in senior year. (Further information available from the department.) This course is repeatable.
   Course ID: 052223
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study

ANCS 499H (3.00)

Honors Thesis in Ancient Studies II

Research and writing of an honors thesis in ancient studies. ANCS 498H, 499H comprise a two-semester sequence and are part of the departmental honors program. To be taken in senior year. This course is repeatable.
   Course ID: 052225
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study

Archaeology

ARCH 100 (3.00)

Introduction to Archaeology

An introduction to the methods used by archaeologists to excavate and date material of the ancient cultures of the Near East, Egypt, Greece and Rome.
   Course ID: 052275
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: ARCH 100Y
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Culture (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR), Culture (GFR)

ARCH 100Y (4.00)

Intro To Archaeology

An introduction to the methods used by archaeologists to excavate and date material of the ancient cultures of the Near East, Egypt, Greece and Rome.
   Course ID: 100686
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Course Equivalents: ARCH 100
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Culture (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR), Culture (GFR)

ARCH 120 (3.00)

World Archaeology

An introductory survey of the development of human culture that includes both Old World and New World archaeology. The major objective is to provide students with a worldwide perspective for the study of important cultural innovations.
   Course ID: 052277
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Culture (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR), Culture (GFR)

ARCH 200 (3.00)

Greek Archaeology and Art

The origins and development of the civilization that provides the basis for Western European culture. Architecture, sculpture and other remains will be examined.
   Course ID: 052278
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: ARCH 200H, ARCH 200Y
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Culture (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR), Culture (GFR)

ARCH 200H (1.00)

Greek Archaeology and Art- Honors

This course is for students who wish to take an honors component in connection with ARCH 200. The student must be enrolled in ARCH 200 to be eligible to take ARCH 200H. Various topics will be looked at in more depth via discussion, short papers and work on the Web.
   Course ID: 052279
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: ARCH 200, ARCH 200Y

ARCH 200Y (4.00)

Greek Archaeology and Art

The origins and development of the civilization that provides the basis for Western European culture. Architecture, sculpture and other remains will be examined.
   Course ID: 100687
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Course Equivalents: ARCH 200, ARCH 200H
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Culture (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR), Culture (GFR)

ARCH 201 (3.00)

Roman Archaeology and Art

The cultures of ancient Italy - the Romans and the Etruscans - are considered, using the evidence provided by architectural, sculptural and other remains.
   Course ID: 052280
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: ARCH 201H
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Culture (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR), Culture (GFR)

ARCH 201H (1.00)

Roman Archaeology and Art- Honors

This course is for students who wish to take an honors component in connection with ARCH 201. The student must be enrolled in ARCH 201 to be eligible to take ARCH 201H. Various topics will be looked at in more depth via discussion, short papers and work on the Web.
   Course ID: 052281
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Course Equivalents: ARCH 201

ARCH 250 (3.00)

Topics in Archaeology

An introductory course to various aspects of classical archaeology. Topics will vary. This course is repeatable.
   Course ID: 052282
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Sport/Leisure Anc Greece

ARCH 310 (3.00)

The Archaeology of Ancient Egypt

The way of life of Egypt's people from 4000 B.C.E. until the Roman period, with emphasis upon the architecture, sculpture and painting of the Old, Middle and New Kingdoms.
   Course ID: 052284
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GFR), Culture (GFR)

ARCH 320 (3.00)

The Archaeology of The Land of Israel

A study of the history and cultures of the land of Israel from Neolithic to Roman times as revealed through archaeology and ancient writers.
   Course ID: 052285
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: Must have completed any ARCH course or ANTH 211 or HIST453 or HIST455 or HIST456 and ENGL 100.

ARCH 330 (3.00)

Archaeology of Bronze Age Greece

The history of the Aegean - Crete, Greece and the Cyclades - in the Neolithic and Bronze Ages is studied through archaeological remains. Special emphasis is placed on the Minoan and Mycenean civilizations.
   Course ID: 052286
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Culture (GEP)
   Requirement Group: Must have completed any ARCH course or ANTH 211 or HIST453 or HIST455 or HIST456 and ENGL 100.

ARCH 340 (3.00)

Cities of the Past

This course deals with questions such as what is a city; how did cities develop, and what did they look like in antiquity? Material remains excavated by archaeologists in the countries surrounding the Mediterranean, from the early city-states of the Near East to the sophisticated urban settlements of the Roman Empire, will serve as models to answer these questions.
   Course ID: 052287
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Culture (GEP), Writing Intensive, Arts and Humanities (GFR), Culture (GFR)
   Requirement Group: Must have completed any ARCH course or ANTH 211 or HIST453 or HIST455 or HIST456 and ENGL 100.

ARCH 350 (3.00)

Topics in Archaeology

Topics vary and may include such subjects as Pompeii and ancient burials. Recommended Preparation: One course from the following: any ARCH course, ANTH211 or HIST453 or HIST455 or HIST456. This course is repeatable.
   Course ID: 052288
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Buried By Vesuvius, Cities Of The Past, Maritime Archaeology, Pompeii, Arch Chesapeake Region, Hellenistic Archaeology, Rise Of Civilization, Underwater Archaeology, Arch Of Anct Egypt&Israe, Archeaology & The Bible, Balt/Md Archaeology, Applied Physics In Arch., Environmental Archeology, Museum Studies

ARCH 360 (3.00)

Rise of Civilization

Our understanding of complex societies has been radically altered as a result of excavations in the Near East and Mesoamerica in the past 30 years. This course deals with the archaeological remains of settlements in these two areas, remains that help explain the causes and results of the change from the nomadic life of hunters and gatherers to the settled life of people who live in complex societies.
   Course ID: 052291
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GFR)
   Requirement Group: Must have completed any ARCH course or ANTH 211 or HIST453 or HIST455 or HIST456 and ENGL 100.

ARCH 370 (3.00)

Maritime Archaeology

Analysis of aspects of earlier societies that were connected with seafaring, e.g. trade, shipbuilding, harbors and practices developed by maritime cultures. The focus may be on the ancient Mediterranean, or on other regions, such as the Chesapeake, or on a combination of periods. Case studies will demonstrate methods and theories that archaeologists use to derive meaning from artifacts in their cultural context. Recommended Preparation: One course from the following: any ARCH course or ANTH211 or HIST453 or HIST455 or HIST456.
   Course ID: 052292
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

ARCH 380 (3.00)

Hellenistic Archaeology and Art

The course will examine Hellenistic art, architecture, daily life, urbanization, trade and other connections among principalities of mainland Greece, Egypt, Asia Minor, the Near East and Rome from the late fourth to first centuries B.C.E. Together with material, culture, major intellectual and religious developments will be considered,e.g., Epicureanism, the Greeks and the Jews, the literature of Alexandria and mystery religions. Recommended Preparation: One course from the following: ANCS201 or ARCH200 or ARCH201 or HIST453.
   Course ID: 052293
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

ARCH 397 (1.00 - 6.00)

Field Experience in Archaeology

Archaeological field work. Students may earn academic credit by arrangement with the ancient studies department by working at an approved excavation, museum, laboratory or field school in the United States or abroad. Written work, in addition to practical experience, may be included. Variable credit course repeatable up to 12 credits.
   Course ID: 052294
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Field Studies

ARCH 399 (2.00 - 4.00)

Advanced Readings in Archaeology

Selected readings to broaden and deepen the student's background. Recommended Preparation: Consent of the instructor. Variable credit course repeatable up to 4 credits.
   Course ID: 052295
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

ARCH 404 (3.00)

Seminar in Classical Archaeology

Intensive readings in and discussion of a particular period or problem of ancient civilization. Recommended Preparation: Two archaeology courses and consent of the instructor.
   Course ID: 052296
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Seminar:Ancient Trade, Sem: Ancient Trade, Ancient Trade

ARCH 410 (3.00)

Archaeological Methods and Theory

Methods and theories used in archaeology for reconstructing cultural history and processes of cultural change. Emphasis on historical archaeology in both the Old and New Worlds. Recommended Preparation: One course in ARCH or ANTH, or permission of instructor.
   Course ID: 052297
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

History

HIST 101 (3.00)

American History to 1877

Major topics include colonial America, the American Revolution, the Constitution, the federal period, sectional conflict, and the Civil War and the Reconstruction. Emphasis on differing interpretations of controversial issues.
   Course ID: 054630
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: HIST 101H, HIST 101Y
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 101H (3.00)

American History to 1877 - Honors

   Course ID: 054631
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: HIST 101, HIST 101Y
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 101Y (3.00)

American History To 1877

Major topics include colonial America, the American Revolution, the Constitution, the federal period, sectional conflict, and the Civil War and the Reconstruction. Emphasis on differing interpretations of controversial issues.
   Course ID: 102024
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Course Equivalents: HIST 101, HIST 101H
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 102 (3.00)

American History, 1877 to the Present

Major topics include industrialization, progressivism, World War I, the twenties, the Depression and the New Deal, World War II, the Cold War and post-war America.
   Course ID: 054632
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: HIST 102H, HIST 102Y
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 102H (3.00)

American History: 1877 to the Present - Honors

   Course ID: 054633
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: HIST 102, HIST 102Y
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 102Y (4.00)

American History, 1877 to the Present

Major topics include industrialization, progressivism, World War I, the twenties, the Depression and the New Deal, World War II, the Cold War and post-war America.
   Course ID: 100458
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Course Equivalents: HIST 102, HIST 102H
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 103 (3.00)

East-Asian Civilization

A history of traditional society in East Asia, focusing on China and Japan, but touching also on Korea and Vietnam. This course will introduce the principal elements of East Asian civilization before the intrusion of the West in the 19th century. It also will provide an essential historical perspective to developments in contemporary East Asia.
   Course ID: 054634
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: HIST 103H, HIST 103Y
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 103H (3.00)

East-Asian Civilization

A history of traditional society in East Asia, focusing on China and Japan, but touching also on Korea and Vietnam. This course will introduce the principal elements of East Asian civilization before the intrusion of the West in the 19th century. It also will provide an essential historical perspective to developments in contemporary East Asia.
   Course ID: 100237
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: HIST 103, HIST 103Y
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must be admitted to the Honors College.

HIST 103Y (4.00)

East-Asian Civilization

A history of traditional society in East Asia, focusing on China and Japan, but touching also on Korea and Vietnam. This course will introduce the principal elements of East Asian civilization before the intrusion of the West in the 19th century. It also will provide an essential historical perspective to developments in contemporary East Asia.
   Course ID: 102025
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Course Equivalents: HIST 103, HIST 103H
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 110 (3.00)

Western Civilization to 1700

A survey of Western Civilization from its foundation through the ancient, medieval, and early modern periods. This course will cover the main political, economic, cultural, and religious features and developments of western society. Major topics will include the political and philosophical contributions of the ancient Greeks, the Roman Republic and Empire, the influences of Christianity, Islam, and Judaism, medieval social and cultural structures, the Renaissance, the Reformations, European exploration and contact with other peoples and cultures, and the Scientific Revolution.
   Course ID: 054635
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: HIST 110H
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 110H (3.00)

Western Civilization to 1700 - Honors

A survey of Western Civilization from its foundation through the ancient, medieval, and early modern periods. This course will cover the main political, economic, cultural and religious features and developments of western society. Major topics will include the political and philosophical contributions of the ancient Greeks, the Roman Republic and Empire, the influences of Christianity, Islam, Judaism, medieval social and cultural structures, the Renaissance, the Reformations, European exploration and contact with other peoples and cultures, and the Scientific Revolution.
   Course ID: 100038
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: HIST 110
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must be admitted to the Honors College.

HIST 111 (3.00)

Western Civilization 1700 to the Present

A survey of Western Civilization from the Enlightenment through to the present day. This course will cover the main political, economic, cultural, and social features and developments of the West in the modern era. Major topics will include Absolutism, the Enlightenment, the political revolutions of the eighteenth century, the Industrial Revolution, imperialism, nationalism, fascism, socialism, the World Wars, the Cold War, and globalization.
   Course ID: 054636
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: HIST 111H, HIST 111Y
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 111H (3.00)

Western Civilization 1700 to the Present

A survey of Western Civilization from the Enlightenment through to the present day. This course will cover the main political, economic, cultural, and social features and developments of the West in the modern era. Major topics will include Absolutism, the Enlightenment, the political revolutions of the eighteenth century, the Industrial Revolution, imperialism, nationalism, fascism, socialism, the World Wars, the Cold War, and globalization.
   Course ID: 100238
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: HIST 111, HIST 111Y
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must be admitted to the Honors College.

HIST 111Y (4.00)

Western Civilization 1700 to the Present

A survey of Western Civilization from the Enlightenment through to the present day. This course will cover the main political, economic, cultural, and social features and developments of the West in the modern era. Major topics will include Absolutism, the Enlightenment, the political revolutions of the eighteenth century, the Industrial Revolution, imperialism, nationalism, fascism, socialism, the World Wars, the Cold War, and globalization.
   Course ID: 054637
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Course Equivalents: HIST 111, HIST 111H
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 200 (3.00)

Themes in World History

A history that covers the globe thematically from voyages of discovery, to colonization, cultural contact, empire, slavery, race, nation, migration, technology and the environment. Specific themes to be announced each semester. Recommended to students seeking an international historical perspective on world issues.
   Course ID: 054638
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Film and History, Entrepreneurship in the Early Modern World, Consumption, Don't Buy It, Human Rights, Planets & Worlds, Earth & Home, Asian Diasporas, Global Terrorism, Don't Buy It, Representations of Imperialism
   Course Equivalents: HIST 200Y, HIST 301
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 200Y (4.00)

Themes In World History

A history that covers the globe thematically from voyages of discovery, to colonization, cultural contact, empire, slavery, race, nation, migration, technology and the environment. Specific themes to be announced each semester. Recommended to students seeking an international historical perspective on world issues.
   Course ID: 100222
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Topics: Film and History, Entrepreneurship in the Early Modern World, Human Rights, Don't Buy It, Global Terrorism, Planets and Worlds, Earth and Home
   Course Equivalents: HIST 200, HIST 301
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 201 (3.00)

Introduction to the Study of History

This course introduces student to the strategies, methods and critical thinking skills necessary for the study of history. The class includes instruction on conducting scholarly research, interpreting primary and secondary evidence and the writing of analytical papers. Students are also introduced to issues of historical epistemology, historiography and the ways that the practice of studying and writing history has changed over time.
   Course ID: 054639
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: HIST 201H

HIST 201H (3.00)

Introduction to the Study of History-Honors

This course introduces student to the strategies, methods and critical thinking skills necessary for the study of history. The class includes instruction on conducting scholarly research, interpreting primary and secondary evidence and the writing of analytical papers. Students are also introduced to issues of historical epistemology, historiography and the ways that the practice of studying and writing history has changed over time.
   Course ID: 100217
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: HIST 201

HIST 203 (3.00)

Film & History: Representations ofImperialism in Modern World History

Imperialism represents one of the more brutal chapters in modern history. Its impact on native peoples and societies raises profound moral questions about culpability, collaboration, resistance, and justification of violence on both sides. How do we deal with the memory of such traumatic events in popular culture? How do those popular memories compare with the historical evidence? This course compares representations of imperialism in film history with the treatment of the same events by historians.
   Course ID: 102090
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 204 (3.00)

Don¿t Buy It: The Global History of Commodities

This course looks at how the mass demand for commodities in the late 19th and early 20th centuries changed the way people worked, lived, and saw themselves as they produced and consumed in radically different ways from their parents and grandparents. Long before the Internet, commodities circled the globe, connecting distant places to one another through chains of relationships created to produce, deliver and sell commodities. Commodities also linked people. They connected enslaved African producers to middle-class American consumers, Asian factory workers with Europeans taking beach holidays. Students examine both producers and consumers as they follow the chain of production of certain commodities¿rubber, sugar, corn, bananas, and housing. For their final project, students will produce and show a two-minute mini-documentary on one product in one country.
   Course ID: 102091
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 218 (3.00)

Introduction to African-American History: A Survey

This course offers a broad survey of the history of the African-American experience from the African background to the present.
   Course ID: 050030
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: AFST 206
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 242 (3.00)

Introduction to Contemporary Africa

A survey of contemporary Africa, its geography, peoples and cultural heritage. Economic, cultural, political and social changes on the continent since World War II, including the struggle for independence and the problems of nation-building.
   Course ID: 050027
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: AFST 211
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 243 (3.00)

Introduction to African History

A survey of ancient and medieval kingdoms of Africa, the spread of Islam in Africa, European slave trade, white settler penetration of southern Africa and Arab penetration of East Africa, the colonial conquest, the 20th century and the emergence of nationalist movements seeking independence.
   Course ID: 050026
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: AFST 212
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 255 (3.00)

History of Christianity from its Origins to the Reformation

Hebrew and Greco-Roman background, the life of Christ, the New Testament and development of theology, triumph of the church in the Roman Empire, the medieval church, the reformation and the end of medieval Christendom, and implications of the Reformation for the modern world.
   Course ID: 050150
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: HIST 255H
   Same as Offering: RLST 255
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 255H (3.00)

History of Christianity from its Origins to the Reformation-Honors

   Course ID: 054648
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: HIST 255, RLST 255
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 273 (3.00)

History of the Jews in Modern Times, From the Middle Ages to1917

Political and socioeconomic forces at work in Europe and within the Jewish community during this period. Hassidism and enlightenment, emancipation and reform. The French and Russian revolutions. Jewish existence in Eastern Europe. Zionism and Aliyah.
   Course ID: 050160
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: JDST 273, RLST 273
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 274 (3.00)

Contemporary Jewish History: 1917 to the Present

Jewish civilization in the 20th century with attention to interwar years, the attempted destruction of European Jewry in World War II and the resistance of the Jews. Post-war issues are examined: including the Allies and the United Nations, the emergence of new centers in Europe and Israel, Jews in the former Soviet Union, Jewish identity struggle in America and post-Holocaust thought.
   Course ID: 050147
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: JDST 274, RLST 274
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 300 (3.00)

Introduction to Public History

Public history is an interdisciplinary form of scholarship practiced as public service. Public historians help create historical understanding by sharing authority and inquiry with a variety of partners, including audiences, museum professionals, reservationists, business leaders and others. Public historians are trained, first and foremost, as historians 'to conduct research, to craft interpretations and to write well. However, public historians must also be prepared to work collaboratively with partners for whom an understanding of history can have immediate practical implications. This course provides students with an introduction to the field. Students will explore the history of federal and state sponsorship of museums and historic sites, learn to think critically about the needs and interests of audiences, and explore best practices and ethics for public professionals. Recommended Course Preparation: Must have earned at least a 'C' in one 100 or 200 level SS or AH course.
   Course ID: 100503
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP)

HIST 301 (3.00)

The American City

   Course ID: 054658
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: HIST 200, HIST 200Y
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 302 (3.00)

History of Maryland

   Course ID: 054659
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 303 (3.00)

The Second World War

Origins, nature and impact of World War II. In addition to an examination of the diplomatic and military events, the course also is concerned with the effects of "total war" on the societies involved. Recommended Preparation: Any social science course, junior/senior status or permission of the instructor.
   Course ID: 054660
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 304 (3.00)

United States and the Vietnam War

The course examines the Vietnam War as a discrete historical event and some of the principal historical interpretations of the causes and consequences of the war. Major emphasis is on political and military developments in Vietnam and the gradual expansion of American involvement. Attention also is given to the impact of the war on American politics and society. Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level social science course, junior/senior status or permission of instructor.
   Course ID: 054661
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 306 (3.00)

The First World War

Origins, nature and impact of the First World War. Particular emphasis is placed on the military, diplomatic, social, scientific and technological developments, events of the war years, and how this first total war affected the subsequent history of the United States and Europe. Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level social science course, junior/senior status or permission of the instructor.
   Course ID: 054663
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 308 (3.00)

Perspectives on Childhood and Adolescence

Attitudes toward children and childhood as a stage of life are historically contingent phenomena: They are shaped by the social context within which they exist. This course examines attitudes toward children and children as a social group within various historical settings and among different subcultures in America. We will attempt to understand why these variations occur and how they make sense within our own particular setting. As part of this course, students are encouraged to think critically about their own experieince of and attitudes toward childhood. Recommended Preparation: One lower-level social sciences or humanities course focused on American society or culture.
   Course ID: 050034
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: AMST 384
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 311 (3.00)

American Entrepreneurs: From Christopher Columbus to Steve Jobs

The entrepreneur symbolizes ¿the American way.¿ In this class, we will discuss and define the role of the entrepreneur in American economic development and also examine how entrepreneurs have shaped the lives of everyday Americans throughout our country¿s history. Using several case studies, we will examine how entrepreneurs responded, on the one hand, to market forces and consumer demand and, on the other hand, to the political environment and regulatory frameworks set up over time. Recommended Course Preparation: Any 100 level SS course.
   Course ID: 101988
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 316 (3.00)

Native American History from Contact to 1840

This course surveys the history of Native Americans in North America from first contact with Europeans in the 15th century until the removal of the so-called "Five Civilized Tribes" in the mid-19th century. We will focus on different cultural groups and cross--cultural contact, emphasizing adaptation, as well as resistance. Topics include war, trade, gender relations, consumerism, religion, disease, sexuality, racial identity and environmental change. Recommended Preparation: A 100-level social science course or permission of the instructor.
   Course ID: 054668
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 317 (3.00)

American Political Development

This course examines the development of the American political system through a historical lens. The course uses theories of American political culture and ideology to frame particular policy areas through historical time periods from the early 1800s to the early 2000s.
   Course ID: 100319
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: POLI 317

HIST 318 (3.00)

United States Constitutional History

A survey of Constitutional history from the founding of the English colonies in North America until the present. The class focuses in particular on the Enlightenment and Common Law roots of the United States Constitution, debates over the scope of federal power, the role of slavery and freedom in constitutional debates, and the rising pressure to expand civil rights and responsibilities for all citizens.
   Course ID: 100320
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: POLI 318

HIST 319 (3.00)

Novelty and Nostalgia: The Rise of Modern America, 1877 to 1945

American social, cultural and political life underwent dramatic transformations during the period between the end of the Civil War and the end of World War II. Americans' understanding of freedom, democracy, rights and responsibility evolved in significant ways. Students will seek to understand why the expansion of democracy and freedom is so often met with violent resistance and arrive at a deeper understanding of the experiences and beliefs that shaped everyday life in modern America. Recommended Course Preparation: Any 100 SS course.
   Course ID: 101925
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP)

HIST 321 (3.00)

African-American History to 1865

An in-depth examination of the social, political and economic history of African Americans in the United States from the 1600s to the Civil War era focusing on chattel slavery, the free black community, family, abolitionism, resistance and the Civil War. Recommended preparation: AFST 100 or AFST 206 or junior/senior standing or permission of instructor.
   Course ID: 050008
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Seminar
   Same as Offering: AFST 352

HIST 322 (3.00)

African American History Since 1865

An in-depth examination of the political, social, economic and cultural history of African Americans in the United States from the Reconstruction era following the Civil War up to present. Topics include African Americans and the military, the Great Depression, migrations, urbanization, racism, family, civil rights and current issues. Recommended preparation: AFST100 or AFST206 or junior/senior standing or permission of the instructor
   Course ID: 050011
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: AFST 353
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 323 (3.00)

African American Women's History

This course traces the history of African -American women in the United States, beginning with their ancestors' history in pre-colonial Africa and U.S. slavery to the present. Topics covered include work; family roles; activism; achievements; and bouts with racism, sexism and poverty. Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level Social Science course or 200-level Literature course or junior/senior standing or permission of the instructor
   Course ID: 050010
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: AFST 354, GWST 327
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 325 (3.00)

History of Women in America to 1870

This course examines the changing roles of women in American society from colonial times to 1870 and covers such topics as family, work, rebellion, religion, sexuality, slavery, reform movements and early efforts for women's rights. Emphasis is placed on both the variety of women's experiences and the evolving concerns and position of American women as a group. Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level social science course, junior/senior standing or permission of the instructor.
   Course ID: 050112
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: GWST 325
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 326 (3.00)

History of Women in America Since 1870

A study of the changing roles of women in American society since 1870, focusing on such topics as work, higher education and the professions, social reform, the suffrage movement, war and peace, working-class and immigrant women, birth control and sexual freedom, and the rebirth of feminism. Emphasis is placed on both the variety of women's experiences and the evolving concerns and position of American women as a group. Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level Social Science course or junior/senior status or permission of the instructor.
   Course ID: 050130
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: GWST 326
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 327 (3.00)

Modern Latin American History

This course introduces students to the social, economic, political, and cultural history of Latin America from independence to the early 1980s. The class focuses on the emergence of the modern nation-states in Latin America and the diverse experiences of politicians, peasants, guerrillas, workers, artisans, slaves, and ordinary families that shaped society after colonial rule. The course traces Latin American history both chronologically and thematically by focusing on major events, social movements, and political processes through the lenses of gender, race, class, ethnicity, and sexuality. Recommended Course Preparation: Any 100-level Social Science course.
   Course ID: 100553
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP)

HIST 328 (3.00)

Colonial Latin America

This course will introduce students to the Pre-Columbian background of the Americas, the impact and meanings of European conquest, and the history of three centuries of Spanish and Portuguese rule that followed until independence in the early nineteenth century. The transition from Amerindian civilizations and native rule to European conquest and colonization marked a violent, painful, and complex shift in race and ethnic relations, in religious and cultural life, in ideas about gender, sexuality, and practices related to marriage, and profound economic transformations in the hemisphere. The course will invite students to look at the impact of the conquest from multiple perspectives, to confront our conventional knowledge about the Columbian encounter, and to understand the deeper processes of colonization. Recommended Course Preparation: Any 100-level Social Science course.
   Course ID: 101929
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 330 (3.00)

Ancient Science and Technology

This course will survey the birth and development of ancient science and technology. Topics may include scientific reasoning and methodology; mathematics, geometry, and astronomy; anatomy and medicine; construction, engineering, and mechanical technology. Historical background - political, economic, social, cultural, and religious - provides insights into related fields of political science, psychology, and ethical philosophy.
   Course ID: 100244
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: ANCS 330
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Culture (GEP)

HIST 340 (3.00)

Atlantic Revolutions

This course will examine the revolutions that the spread across the Atlantic World from the mid-18th to the mid-19th century, a period some have called the "Age of Revolutions." The primary focus will be exploring the "successful" revolutions of the era: the rebellion of the thirteen British American colonies, the internal revolution within France, the independence movement that wound up ending slavery in the French island of Saint-Domingue (Haiti), and the numerous wars of independence in Latin America. Given the breadth of topics, the objective is not to gain an exhaustive understanding of any one revolution, but rather to explore the connections between them all.
   Course ID: 101935
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 341 (3.00)

The American Colonies

A history of the American colonies from their founding to 1774, comparing the social and economic development of the West Indies, New England, mainland South and middle colonies. Topics include patterns of settlement, racial and ethnic interaction, labor, religion, family and gender roles, and cultural achievements.
   Course ID: 054705
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP)

HIST 343 (3.00)

Democratizing America, 1815-1850

This course explores the years between 1815 and 1850 - a period of great political and cultural change in American history. While it has typically been identified with the figure of Andrew Jackson, we will look beyond ways in which Americans of all races and classes experienced this turbulent time. Topics to be covered include the transportation and market revolutions, the rise of democratic politics, slavery and anti-slavery, the rise of women's suffrage and other moral reform movements, westward expansion and its impact on Native Americans, and the emergence of sectionalism. Recommended Preparation: Any 100 level Social Science.
   Course ID: 054712
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 344 (3.00)

The American Civil War

A history of the period 1840-1880, including an analysis of the sectional conflict, the events of the war and the era of reconstruction. Recommended Preparation: Any 100 level Social Science.
   Course ID: 054713
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 345 (3.00)

Origins of Modern America, 1877-1920

An analysis of the United States' rapid transition from a largely agricultural society to the world's most diverse urban and industrial economy. Specific topics include America's growth as a world power, the American West and territorial expansion, shaping a post-Reconstruction South, urbanization and the new consumer economy, industrialization, entrepreneurship, innovation, changing gender roles, modern childhood and family life, and politics. Recommended Preparation: Any 100 level Social Science.
   Course ID: 054717
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 346 (3.00)

The United States, 1917 to 1945

An examination of American life and politics in the era of World War I, the 1920s, the Great Depression and World War II. Recommended Preparation: Any 100 level Social Science.
   Course ID: 054718
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 347 (3.00)

The United States Since 1945

An examination of American history from the 1940s through the 1990s. Primary emphasis is given to political, social and economic history. Recommended Preparation: Any 100 level Social Science.
   Course ID: 054719
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 348 (3.00)

American Intelligence: The Revolution to 9/11

This course surveys the history, development, and role of intelligence in international military and foreign affairs, as well as core intelligence functions and terminology to include collection, analysis, dissemination, propaganda, clandestine and covert action, and counterintelligence. Focusing on the U.S. experience, the course examines the U.S. Intelligence Community's origins, operations, and management. The course evaluates component organizations, assesses intelligence contributions to policymaking and warfare, and examines how secrecy in intelligence is reconciled with the openness of the American political and constitutional system. Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level Social Science course.
   Course ID: 100468
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 350 (3.00)

History of Medicine

   Course ID: 054675
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP)

HIST 354 (3.00)

West African History

History of West Africa from the period of the medieval empires through the era of the slave trade, the revolutionary 19th century, colonial rule and independence. Recommended Preparation: AFST211 or AFST212 or HIST242 or HIST243, or permission of instructor.
   Course ID: 050021
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: AFST 312

HIST 355 (3.00)

Selected Topics in History

Topics to be announced each semester offered. Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level social science course, junior/senior status or permission of the instructor. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 054680
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Top:Microcomp & History, Amer. And Their Environ, Top:Hist By The Numbers, Top:Modern Repub China, Top:Movies And Machines, America's Codebreakers, Image Of Women In Film, Top:Technol/Work/Culture, Hist/Image Of Wmn In Flm, Top:Microcomptrs In Hist, Selected Topics In Hist, Top:Image Of Wom.In Film, The Crusades, Hist Of East Asian Relig, American Women And War, Famous American Trials, Topics In History, Top:Microcomp/Historians, Top:US & Ltn Am - 20Th C, Top: Hist Of Life Sci, Top: Hist By Numbers, The First World War, Rise Of American Jewry, Divine Right/Resistance, Blues,Jazz&Afro Amer Mig, Hist Of Amer Intelligenc, Top: Hist Of Terrorism, Top: Women In Film, Top:Hist Of Terrorism, Top: Hist Persp On Relig, The American Environment, Wenches, Wives & Witches, Hst East Asian Art, The Camera At War, Am Intelligence Rev-9/11, Top: Mid East Since 1914, U S In The Atomic Age, Intro To German Studies, Europe 1450-1650, Women In US Bus History, Slctd Tps In History, Native American History, Hist Asians In America, Native Americans, History fo Sexuality in America, 19Th Cent. American West, Wom & Gender US Bus Hist, US Middle East Relations, Top:Micro-Cmptrs/Histrns, Top:History Of Terrorism, Top:US/Latin Amer-20Th C, History By The Numbers, History By Numbers, The Greening Of America, Religious Influences, Before The Info Highway, Community & Values, World War I, Gender, Science & Tech, American Religious Hist, Korean Society Lit&Film, Sexuality In The West, Hist Of East Asian Art, Hst East Asian Religions, Hist Image Women In Film, European Women's History, Constructing the Samurai, Islamic Culture & Society, 570-1560, Terror, Genocide & Human Rights, Modern American Cultural Histo, Major Issues in American Milit, Reading & Rewriting in the 20th Century, Activism/Digital Storytelling, Making of Modern Middle East, Human Rights, Race & Ethnicity in Amer Hist, Intro to Public History, Latin American History, U.S. Environmental History, U.S. and Empire, The Great Migration, Art and Power in Japan Since 1600, Latin Amer. Urban Hist. from Conquest to Cold War, Islamic Culture and Society, Modern Mexico, Entrepreneurs from Chris Columbus to Steve Jobs, Doing It: Case Studies West. Sexuality, Rebels & Revol. in Atlantic World, History of the West, Immigration and Public Health, Immigration and Oral History, Mexican Revolution, Early Modern Women's Voice, History of Sports in Latin America, Art and Power in Japan, Digital History, Commemoration and History

HIST 356 (3.00)

Special Topics in U.S. History

Topics to be announced each semester offered. Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level Social Science course. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 100469
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Written in Stone: Cemeteries in the Community, Modern American Culture

HIST 358 (3.00)

Art and Society in the Renaissance

An analysis of the relationship between the art of the Renaissance and its social and economic background. The course traces the development of Renaissance art, changes in style and content, and the emergence of new art forms. It focuses on the social characteristics of artists and patrons, the organization of the arts, their status and function, and the evolution of an art market.
   Course ID: 054683
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 360 (3.00)

Islam in Africa

This course is presented to provide the student with an introduction and overview of the history of Islam in Africa. This requires a discussion of Islam itself, its origins, philosophical thought, praxis and expansion. We then will turn to a more detailed examination of the penetration of Islam in Africa, eventually concentrating on its sub-Saharan influences. Recommended Preparation: AFST 211 or AFST212 or HIST242 or HIST243.
   Course ID: 050013
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: AFST 314, RLST 314
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 361 (3.00)

The French Revolution

The French Revolution from its origins in feudal, aristrocratic society to the revolutionary wars and Napoleanic era. The European reaction to the revolution is examined as is its relationship to the contemporaneous American Revolution. The decline of Court society and values and their replacement by a democratic society are central issues. Two outstanding historical movies are part of the course. Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level Social Science course or junior/ senior status.
   Course ID: 054685
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 362 (3.00)

Medieval Europe and the Mediterranean World

An introduction to medieval society in Europe and the Mediterranean world from 1000 to 1500 emphasizing cultural, religious, economic and political change. While some medieval authorities saw their world as divided among those who fought (armored knights), worked (peasants in the fields), prayed (bishops and priests), this course also considers how women, Jews, Muslims and foreigners fit into a world ruled and defined for the most part by Christian men. Recommended Preparation: HIST 110, or HIST 111.
   Course ID: 054733
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 363 (3.00)

The Crusades

The Crusades is a study of peace and war in the middle ages. This course will examine medieval society at the time of the crusades, including society in Byzantium and in Islamic territories; we will examine and analyze the development of the idea of crusading, and how the crusades permanently changed the political and social structure of Europe, the Balkans, and the Middle East. Students will read both primary and secondary sources. Recommended Course Preparation: Any 100-level Social Science course (this is the same recommendation for all 300-level History courses)
   Course ID: 101749
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP)

HIST 364 (3.00)

The Rise of Islam

This course explores the origins and development of the culture and society of Islam, a community that today represents over 1.2 billion people. We will examine Islam¿s genesis in central Arabia in the sixth century, its expansion into the Mediterranean basin and east to India, and its main intellectual and philosophical currents. The course ends with the rise of the Ottoman Empire, the Islamic ¿superpower¿ that lasted until the 20th century. Course Preparation: Any 100 or 200 level SS course
   Course ID: 101747
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP)

HIST 365 (3.00)

War in the Modern World

   Course ID: 054686
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 366 (3.00)

Doing It: Case Studies in the History of Western Sexuality

This course will explore how sexuality works in Western history. We will work with the contention that sexuality, along with connected notions of masculinity and femininity, are largely social constructions, and have been the object of intense social scrutiny and political regulation. We will investigate sexual desire and behavior, and sexual and gender ideologies, and will explore how they relate to a variety of topics such as race, marriage, reproduction, same-sex relations, religion, and the politics of state building. Recommended Course Preparation:Any 100 SS or C course
   Course ID: 101930
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: GWST 366

HIST 369 (3.00)

Darwinism: The Evolutionary Perspective

The spread of evolutionary thought in Europe and America, the nature of the Darwinian revolution, its transformation of the biological and social sciences, and its effect in the larger culture. Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level Social Science course or junior/senior standing.
   Course ID: 054687
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 370 (3.00)

History Of The Jews In The United States

The history of the Jews in the United States from the earliest settlements to the present. The course focuses on political, economic, religious and cultural developments, anti-Semitism, and the rise of American Jewry to a position of leadership and responsibility in the world Jewish community. Special emphasis is placed on comparing and contrasting the American-Jewish historical experience with prior Jewish historical experiences in Europe. Recommended Preparation: One course in American or European history.
   Course ID: 050167
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: JDST 370
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 371 (3.00)

History And Film

This course looks at film and history of the 1930s in Nazi Germany, Stalinist Soviet Union and New Deal America. Using films as historical sources, the course will study images, representations and daily life as it was reflected and refracted through popular, entertainment film.
   Course ID: 054688
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GFR), Culture (GFR)

HIST 373 (3.00)

History of the Holocaust

An interdisciplinary examination of the attempted destruction of the Jews of Europe and their culture, as well as the persecution of others on the basis of physical and emotional disabilities, ethnicity, politics, religion and sexual orientation at the hands of the Nazis and their collaborators during WWII. The course will briefly survey the migration of Jews to Europe, the history of anti-Semitism and "scientific" racism, the circumstances in Europe that allowed the rise of the National Socialist movement and the pre-WWII Nazi policies of discrimination. It then will focus on the perpetrators, victims and bystanders of the "Final Solution" and conclude with an analysis of the legacy of the Holocaust. Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level Social Science course or junior/senior status.
   Course ID: 050155
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: HIST 373H, JDST 373H
   Same as Offering: JDST 373
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 373H (3.00)

History of the Holocaust

An interdisciplinary examination of the attempted destruction of the Jews of Europe and their culture, as well as the persecution of others on the basis of physical and emotional disabilities, ethnicity, politics, religion and sexual orientation at the hands of the Nazis and their collaborators during WWII. The course will briefly survey the migration of Jews to Europe, the history of anti-Semitism and "scientific" racism, the circumstances in Europe that allowed the rise of the National Socialist movement and the pre-WWII Nazi policies of discrimination. It then will focus on the perpetrators, victims and bystanders of the "Final Solution" and conclude with an analysis of the legacy of the Holocaust. Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level Social Science course or junior/senior status.
   Course ID: 100340
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: HIST 373, JDST 373
   Same as Offering: JDST 373H
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 374 (3.00)

European Women's History 1200-1750

An examination of the status and roles of women in European society through out the Middle Ages and Early Modern period. Through a mixture of secondary readings, primary sources, and film, this course investigates ideas about women and gender as well as the actions and ideas of women in the past. Topics include women and religion, women and work, women's household and familial roles, women and sexuality, women and politics, and women's education and writings. Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level social science course or junior/senior status
   Course ID: 050135
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: GWST 374
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 375 (3.00)

European Women's History, 1750- Present

Examination of women in European society from the mid-eighteenth century to the present. The course emphasizes women's life experiences within the context of larger historical changes in Europe (including the economy, cultural life, and social movements). Thus, a major goal of the course is to present women's history both as an integral part of European social and cultural history and as a unique subject of historical investigation. Students will learn to think critically about historical arguments and to understand both the difference that gender makes in history and the differences among women's historical experiences. The course will examine how diversity of class, race and nation shaped women's lives by focusing on white aristocratic, middle-class and working- class women, as well as colonized and women of color.
   Course ID: 050123
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: GWST 375
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 376 (3.00)

European Women's History, 1914 - Present

An examination of the role of women in European society from the eve of World War I until the present. Because the approach will be from a political, social, economic and cultural history perspective, readings will include a women's history textbook, primary documents, autobiographical and biographical sketches, historical fiction and scholarly analysis of the role of gender in 20th-century Europe. Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level social science course, 200-level literature course, junior/senior standing.
   Course ID: 050104
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: GWST 376
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 377 (3.00)

The Jewish American Experience in Film

This course explores the experiences of Jews in twentieth century America as portrayed in film through various themes that have helped to shape American Jewish identity. By examining cinematic representations in light of historical background, students will evaluate stereotypes and fictional images presented of Jews. Students will acquire critical movie-viewing skills as well as insight into the contemporary popular Jewish imagination. Recommended Preparation: HIST 102 or JDST274 or JDST370 .
   Course ID: 050169
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: JDST 371
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 378 (3.00)

Eastern Europe Since 1878

   Course ID: 054691
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 380 (3.00)

Women and Gender in Asia

An examination of the role of women and gender in Japan, China and Korea since ancient times. Topics include the influence of gender roles in work, marriage, sexuality and birth control practices. Scholarly analysis, historical fiction and film will be used. Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level social science course .
   Course ID: 050127
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: GWST 380
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Culture (GFR)

HIST 381 (3.00)

From Samurai to "Salariman": Japanese History through Film and Literature

A study of Japanese history from 1600 to the present through the media of film and literature. It also explores the relationship between history and drama, in particular how they can illuminate or conceal basic truths and values of the past. Views of life and modern times, obsessions with honor and suicide, the changing role of women in society, the encounter between Japanese and foreign cultures, and themes of war and pacifism will be investigated. Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level social science course.
   Course ID: 054692
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Culture (GFR)

HIST 382 (3.00)

PACIFIC CROSSINGS: RACE, WAR, AND GENDER IN ASIAN MIGRATIONS

In this course, we will study the transnational history of Asian migrations from the mid-nineteenth century to the present, placing particular focus on Chinese, Japanese, Korean, Filipino, Indian, Vietnamese, and Hmong migrations. We will examine the tumultuous history that both sparked migrations and, at times, tried to prevent them in an effort to understand what was happening in homelands left behind and American destinations, along with the networks of communication and travel that connect them. Recommended course Preparation: Any lower level SS course
   Course ID: 101748
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP)

HIST 383 (3.00)

Japan in the Shogun Age

The history of Tokugawa (1600-1868) or early modern Japan: the age of shogun, samurai, castle-towns, kabuki actors, geisha courtesans and woodblock prints. Emphasis will be placed on the problem of how warriors produced more than two centuries of peace. The course also will investigate the political, economic and cultural patterns that laid the foundation for Japan's emergence as a modern nation. Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level social science course.
   Course ID: 054693
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Culture (GFR)

HIST 385 (3.00)

Contemporary Japan, 1945 to the Present

History of Japan from the end of the World War II to the present: the American occupation, political and constitutional changes, economic recovery and the politics of Japanese capitalism, social changes, education and student radicalism, problems of a postindustrial society and the foreign policy of Japan.
   Course ID: 054694
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 387 (3.00)

Medicine and Health Care in China

This course examines the historical development of modern medicine and health care in modern and contemporary China. Topics include the indigenous medical system, especially acupuncture and pharmacology; the role of Western medical missionaries; the activities and contributions of the Rockefeller Foundation; the legacy of the pre-Communist medical system; health policies of the Communists after 1949; the mass line in medicine; traditional medicine in contemporary China; health care organizations; barefoot doctors and the rural health care network; recent changes and the impact of the Four Modernizations on the health system. Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level social science course, junior/senior standing.
   Course ID: 054696
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Culture (GFR)

HIST 388 (3.00)

Society and Culture in China

This course is a study of Chinese society and culture focusing on the main features of society, cultural developments and currents of thought in traditional and modern times. Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level social science course.
   Course ID: 054697
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Culture (GFR)

HIST 389 (3.00)

Islamic Culture and Society: 570-1560 CE

This course traces the origins and development of the culture and society of Islam, a community that today represents over 1.2 billion people. Beginning with the origin of Islam in the cultural norms and ideal of central Arabia in the late sixth century, the course proceeds to examine the physical expansion of Islam into the Mediterranean basin and east to India, intellectual and philosophical currents, and finally the development of the Ottoman Empire, the Islamic "superpower" that lasted until the 20th century. Particular attention will be paid to cross-culturalinfluences and communication with western Europe, including the reception and assimilation of Islamic philosophical tradition by medieval European universities.
   Course ID: 100187
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 391 (3.00)

Internship in History

Recommended Preparation: Formal application and acceptance by the history department. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 054698
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Field Studies

HIST 400 (1.00 - 3.00)

Special Projects in History

Note: Open to junior/senior history majors with special study projects and at least a B average in history. In extraordinary circumstances, exceptions may be made with permission of the instructor. Variable credit course repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits.
   Course ID: 054702
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study

HIST 401 (3.00)

The American South to 1865

This course explores the history of the American South from the arrival of Europeans until the beginning of the Civil War. We will explore this region as a place where three cultures - Native American, European, and African - intersected, and trace the ways in which they influenced each other, as well as, the role the South played in the history of the American nation as a whole. Recommended Preparation: HIST 101 or HIST102, plus junior/senior status.
   Course ID: 054703
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 402 (3.00)

The American South Since Reconstruction

This course will examine the contours of life in the American South since the end of the Civil War. Given the South's history of segregation, race is central to understanding Southern identity. We will explore life on both sides of the color line, and will consider ways in which racial identity interacted with class and gender to inform economic development, political and social change, and popular culture in the nineteenth and twentieth century South. Recommended Preparation: HIST 101 or HIST102, plus junior/senior status.
   Course ID: 054704
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 405 (3.00)

Comparative Slavery: Africa and the New World

Historical examination and comparison of the emergence of domestic slavery in Africa and chattel slavery in the New World and the Americas. Explores the social conditions that shaped these institutions and that led to overt and covert forms of resistance and slavery's eventual decline. Recommended Preparation: AFST 212 or AFST352 or junior/senior standing
   Course ID: 050017
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: AFST 420

HIST 406 (3.00)

The Atlantic World: The Shared History of Europeans, Africans, and Native Americans

Starting in the 1400s, people around the Atlantic began to interact, using the ocean as their highway. In the process of connecting with each other, Africans, Europeans and Americans transformed themselves and each other, creating new worlds, both in the Americas and at home, for all. The relatively new field of Atlantic history was developed to study these connections and transformations in the early modern period as well as how they changed over time. This course will not concern itself exclusively with one area, nor follow necessarily a chronological path. We will study the making of an Atlantic working class, coerced labor, piracy, maronage, native rebellions and anti-colonial revolutions. Recommended Course Preparation HIST 341.
   Course ID: 100518
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 411 (3.00)

Service Learning in Public History

This is a research intensive course designed to provide students with real-world experience in the development and implementation of a public history project. The course will typically be taught in cooperation with an external partner for whom the class project meets a pressing need. The specific content of the course will vary based on instructor expertise and partner needs. Students in the course will receive intensive training in a marketable skill, such as oral history interviewing, historic site documentation, digital storytelling, program development, or interpretation. They will complete a project on behalf of a local public history organization, building a relevant work history with faculty guidance and supervision. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits or 2 attempts.
   Course ID: 101989
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Public History Practice, Service Learning in Public History
   Requirement Group: You must have completed HIST 201 and HIST 300.

HIST 413 (3.00)

American Revolution

This course will explore the era of the American Revolution. We will examine what many historians call the "long Revolution," from the 1760s until about 1800. The course will emphasize the internal revolution within American society that was sparked by the conflict with Britain. This internal revolution saw different groups of peoples trying to enact conflicting visions of freedom and democracy. As part of this project, we'll try to understand what the Revolution meant to prominent "founding fathers" such as Thomas Jefferson and John Adams as well as what it meant to ordinary people: farmers, artisans, women, slaves, and Indians. Recommended Course Preparation : History 101 or 341 or 340
   Course ID: 101934
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 415 (3.00)

Advanced Public History

This is a seminar style course for students considering graduate study or a career in public history. Public historians produce original interpretations that build bridges between scholarship and everyday life by respecting the ways in which their partners and audiences use history, and by balancing professional authority against community needs. Students will read and discuss texts that explore the history, best practices, and core values of public history. Students will also gain experience in the collaborative methodologies that distinguish public history from other forms of historical professionalism.
   Course ID: 101990
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed HIST201 and either HIST300 or AMST205.

HIST 420 (3.00)

American Political Development

In this course we will explore the changing institutions - which include both the ideas and organizations - that have undergirded America's governing system. The course will provide students with fundamental historical knowledge about key issues in American political and policy history, particularly after 1865. Second, this course will help students explore historiographical debates and scholarly discussions about the factors driving political change. Finally, students will examine the notion and meaning of "American exceptionalism."
   Course ID: 101936
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 422 (3.00)

Seeing and Obscuring: Documenting America in the Modern Era, 1877-1945

For some Americans, the broad transformations that led to the emergence of modern America inspired great optimism and encouraged innovation. For others, changes in American habits and values inspired fear and nostalgia. Interestingly, both reactions can be found underneath a broad cultural trend prevalent during this period: the impulse to define, document, and interpret an authentic American culture. This seminar style American history class will examine this trend, training students to think about the ways in which four specific forms of cultural production --photography, preservation, tourism/spectacle, and documentary film --shaped Americans' collective identity and continue to impact our sense of who we are as a nation. Recommended Course Preparation: HIST 102 OR HIST 319 OR AMST 100.
   Course ID: 101991
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 429 (3.00)

The History of Baltimore

An examination of the growth of Baltimore from the 18th century to the present. Major themes are the evolution of urban government and politics, the development of the urban economy from a commercial port to an industrial center and then to the post-industrial era, the growth of the urban physical plant and its expansion into the metropolitan region in the 20th century, and the changing relationships of Baltimore's socio-economic groups. Recommended Preparation: HIST 101 or HIST102, plus junior/senior status.
   Course ID: 054714
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 435 (3.00)

Twentieth-Century American Foreign Policy

A history of America's relations with other countries since 1919.
   Course ID: 054716
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 445 (3.00)

History of Science to 1700

The story of the growth of scientific knowledge in the West. Topics include views of nature in traditional societies, Babylonian mathematics and astronomy, Egyptian medicine, the work of the ancient Greeks, medieval European and Arabic science, the Copernican revolution, the relationship between religion and science, and the Scientific Revolution. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110 or HIST 111 and junior/senior status.
   Course ID: 054721
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: HIST 445H
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Writing Intensive, Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 445H (3.00)

History of Science to 1700

The story of the growth of scientific knowledge in the West. Topics include views in nature in traditional societies, Babylonian mathematics and astronomy, Egyptioan medicine, the work of the ancient Greeks, medieval European and Arabic science, the Copernican revolution, the relationship between religion and science, and the Scientific Revolution.
   Course ID: 100041
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: HIST 445
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Writing Intensive, Social Sciences (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete HIST100 or HIST110 or HIST111 with a C or better and have Junior/Senior status.

HIST 446 (3.00)

History of Science Since 1700

A survey of the history of Western science since the 18th century, emphasizing the development of various scientific fields within their institutional settings and the professionalization of the role of the scientist. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100, HIST 110, or HIST 111, junior/senior status.
   Course ID: 054722
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Writing Intensive, Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 446H (3.00)

Honors-History of Science Since 1700

A survey of the history of Western science since the 18th century, emphasizing the development of various scientific fields within their institutional settings and the professionalization of the role of the scientist.
   Course ID: 100306
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Writing Intensive, Social Sciences (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete HIST100 or HIST110 or HIST111 with a C or better and have Junior/Senior status.

HIST 447 (3.00)

The Civil Rights Movement

This course explores the African American struggle for full citizenship rights in the United States during the middle years of the twentieth century. It will focus on the individuals and organizations that used litigation, boycott, and nonviolent civil disobedience to desegregate America society during the period 1954 to 1968, when they achieved their greatest legislative and judicial victories. This class will also explore alternative strategies available to African Americans during this period,why nonviolence and desegregation became dominant, and how/why they were challenged as the 1960s came to a close. Recommended Course Preparation: HIST101 or HIST102
   Course ID: 054723
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 450 (3.00)

Social History of American Medicine

The history of American health care, hospitals and ambulatory care facilities, the role of government, public health programs, and social issues such as smoking and abortion.
   Course ID: 050156
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: SOCY 457
   Requirement Group: You must complete one Social Science, Biology, or Chemistry course and your academic standing must be junior.

HIST 453 (3.00)

Ancient Greece

A history of Greece from the earliest times to the death of Alexander. Topics include the Aegean Bronze Age, Greek colonization and the tyrants, Sparta, Athens, the Persian Wars, the classical age and the Peloponnesian War, the rise of Macedonia, and Alexander the Great and his impact. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100, HIST 110, or HIST 111 junior/senior status.
   Course ID: 054726
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 454 (3.00)

Hellenistic World and Rome

   Course ID: 054727
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 455 (3.00)

The Roman Republic

A history of ancient Rome from the earliest times to 31 B.C.E. Topics include Roman imperialism in Italy and the Mediterranean, the conflict of the orders, the Punic Wars and the collapse of the republic. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100, HIST 110, or HIST 111, junior/senior status
   Course ID: 054728
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 456 (3.00)

The Roman Empire

A history of ancient Rome from the Augustan Age to the disintegration of the empire in the West. Topics include the Pax Romana, the military monarchy and anarchy, the reorganization of the empire by Diocletian and Constantine, the rise of Christianity and the final collapse of the empire. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110 or HIST 111, junior/ senior status
   Course ID: 054729
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 457 (3.00)

Byzantine Civilization

Byzantine state, with particular attention to the art, institutions and ideals that shaped its long history. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110 or HIST 111, junior/ senior status.
   Course ID: 054730
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Culture (GFR)

HIST 458 (3.00)

Japan to 1800

The history of Japan from the origins of the Japanese people through the height of Tokugawa rule. Some areas of focus will be an examination through archaeological sources of Japan's beginnings, the transition of Japanese society from courtier to warrior rule during the 11th through 14th centuries and the process of political unification of the 16th century. Recommended Preparation: HIST100 or HIST110 or HIST111, junior/senior status
   Course ID: 054731
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 459 (3.00)

Japan since 1800

Beginning with Japan's early modern past and its forced emergence from isolation, this course will explore Japan's rise as a modern state, its plunge into militarism and war, and its subsequent rapid emergence as one of the world's leading nations. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110 or HIST 111, junior/senior status.
   Course ID: 054732
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 463 (3.00)

Jews, Christians and Muslims in the Middle Ages

This course examines moments of contact and conflict between the three major monotheistic faiths of the medieval period: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. Topics will include an examination of the scriptural foundations of the three faiths and their influence on topics such as law, violence, conversion, ritual, and legend. The course provides an overview of how individuals and leadership within the three faiths interacted with each other. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110, or HIST 111 or JDST 100 or RLST100 or 200-level course, and junior/senior standing.
   Course ID: 050151
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: JDST 463, RLST 463

HIST 465 (3.00)

The Renaissance

A history of Europe from 1300 to 1500 with emphasis on the economy, institutions and culture of the Italian city-state; the movement toward capitalism and the national state; the erosion of the medieval synthesis and the growth of religious heterodoxy. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100, HIST 110, or HIST 111, junior/senior status.
   Course ID: 054734
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 466 (3.00)

The Reformation

The economic and political conditions, the popular movements and the theological controversies that led to the overthrow of the Catholic Church's monopoly of religious loyalties, thereby turning Europeans against one another on a national/religious basis. Attention is focused on the lives and ideas of the leading reformers. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110 or HIST 111, plus junior/senior status.
   Course ID: 050157
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: RLST 466
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 468 (3.00)

The Age of Enlightenment

A study of the major works of the Enlightenment in Western Europe. The literature and philosophy of the Enlightenment are examined within the political and social history of the 18th century. Readings include Voltaire, Rousseau, Hume and Kant. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110, or HIST 111, plus junior/senior status.
   Course ID: 054735
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 470 (3.00)

Tudor and Stuart England: 1485-1714

An introduction to British politics, society, economy, religion and culture during the 16th and 17th centuries. It is under the Tudors that England developed into a strong and relatively wealthy nation state. The country also underwent revolutions in culture (the Renaissance) and religion (the Reformation). The 17th century was a turbulent one, with unemployment and poverty, witchcraft accusations and civil wars affecting the British people. But Britain also was emerging as a colonial naval and trading power, as well as a center of the Scientific Revolution. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110, or HIST 111, plus junior/senior status.
   Course ID: 054736
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 471 (3.00)

Britain in the Industrial Revolution: 1714-1848

An examination of the impact of the Industrial Revolution on British society, with particular reference to the themes of social and economic change, the rise of social classes and class consciousness, early feminism and gender relations, and the genesis of modern party politics. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110 or HIST 111 and junior/senior status.
   Course ID: 054737
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 472 (3.00)

Victorian Britain

An examination of the main social, political and economic trends in Victorian Britain, with particular reference to the themes of parliamentary reform and the genesis of modern party politics, the Irish problem and new imperialism, the condition of the people question, the revival of socialism and the struggle for women's suffrage. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110 or HIST 111 and junior/senior status .
   Course ID: 054738
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 473 (3.00)

Twentieth-Century Britain: The Age of Decline

An examination of the causes and consequences of Britain's 20th-century descent from its preeminent position of the Workshop of the World in the 19th century to its present-day status as the Sick Woman of Europe. Particular attention will be paid to the contemporary debates around the various dimensions of decline, the succession of counter-strategies adopted or canvassed to halt or reverse this process, the impact of the two world wars, and the evolution of domestic social and economic policy. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110 or HIST 111 and junior/senior status.
   Course ID: 054739
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 477 (3.00)

History of China to 1644

Chinese history from ancient times to the mid-17th century, with special attention paid to the development of society, thought, economy and political institutions. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110 or HIST 111, plus junior/ senior status.
   Course ID: 054743
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 478 (3.00)

History of China, 1644 to 1912

Chinese history from the beginning of the Ch'ing dynasty to the founding of the republic in 1912. A study of the disintegration of traditional China and the intrusion of the West. Special emphasis is placed on the re-evaluation of the nature of Western imperialism in China and the rise of Chinese nationalism. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100, HIST 110, or HIST 111, plus junior/senior status.
   Course ID: 054744
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 479 (3.00)

History of China, 1912-1949

From the beginning of the republic to the founding of the communist regime in 1949: the growth of modern Chinese nationalism and anti-imperialism, the struggle for power between the nationalists and Communists, the social and economic revolution, the war with Japan and the American failure in China. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110, or HIST 111, plus junior/senior status.
   Course ID: 054745
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 480 (3.00)

Contemporary China, 1949 to the Present

Chinese history from the founding of the Communist regime in 1949 to the present: ideology and organization of the new regime, the role of the Communist party and the People's Liberation Army, social changes and thought reform, arts and culture, the cultural revolution and the Gang of Four, the Four Modernizations, the democratic movement and China's foreign policy. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110 or HIST111, plus junior/senior status.
   Course ID: 054746
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 481 (3.00)

History of Modern France, 1789-1989

A survey and an analysis of French society and political institutions from the era of the great revolution to its bicentennial anniversary, covering the impact of Napoleon and 19th-century conservatism, as well as the formation of republican regimes in the 20th century. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110, or HIST 111, plus junior/senior status .
   Course ID: 054747
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 483 (3.00)

German History: 1789 to 1914

History of the German states from the French Revolution through national unification, the Bismarckian era and the Wilhelminian era up until the outbreak of World War I. Emphasis is on the struggles between nationalism, conservatism,liberalism and social democracy in the new German empire. Includes a cultural,social and political approach. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110, or HIST 111, plus junior/senior status .
   Course ID: 054749
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 484 (3.00)

German History: 1914 to the Present

History of Germany from World War I, through the Weimar Republic, the Third Reich, the Allied occupation, and the founding and development of the two Germanies. Emphasis is on the development of economic and military strength, political and social upheaval, cultural responses to war and role of Nazism in modern German history. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110, or HIST 111, plus junior/senior status.
   Course ID: 054750
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 485 (3.00)

Russia to 1900

A history of Russia from its origins to the end of the 19th century. Topics covered include Kievan Russia, the rise of Muscovy, the reforms of Peter the Great, the evolution of society under Peter's successors, the "golden age" of Russian culture and industrialization, and the development of the revolutionary movement. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110 or HIST 111, plus junior/senior status .
   Course ID: 054751
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 486 (3.00)

Soviet History on Trial

Students try four important cases in Soviet history and examine the full range of 20th century Russian history: radical socialism and the Russian Revolutions of 1917, the socialist social and cultural experiments of the twenties, the Stalinist Revolution, World War II, the Khrushchev Thaw, Brezhnev-era stagnation, the Gorbachev experiment, the collapse of the Soviet Union, and aftermath. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110 or HIST 111, plus junior/ senior status.
   Course ID: 054752
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 487 (3.00)

Europe, 1815-1914

An examination of European history from the Congress of Vienna, which ended the Napoleonic Wars, until the eve of World War I. Emphasis will be placed on the impact of the Industrial Revolution on social classes, ideologies, gender roles, cultural trends, nation- and empire-building, and international competition in the 19th century. Recommended Preparation: HIST 100 or HIST 110, or HIST 111, plus junior/senior status.
   Course ID: 054753
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 488 (3.00)

Europe, 1914 to the Present

The history of Europe from the outbreak of World War I until the present. Emphasis on the origins and the social and political impact of the two world wars, the Russian Revolution, the rise of fascism in inter-war Europe, and the decline and the division of Europe after 1945, as well as its more recent revival and developing unity. Recommended Preparation: HIST100 or HIST110 or HIST111, plus junior/senior status.
   Course ID: 054754
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

HIST 490 (3.00)

Honors - Selected Topics in History

Topics to be announced each semester offered. Recommended Preparation: Honors College student status and any 100-level Social Science course, junior/senior status. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits or 2 attempts.
   Course ID: 054755
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

HIST 493 (3.00)

Seminar in European History

Special topics course. Intensive study and discussion of the historical literature on a particular issue, problem or period of European history. Topic will be announced in advance by the instructor. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 054758
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Colloquium European Hist, Seminar in Family History

HIST 494 (3.00)

Seminar in World History

Special topics course. Intensive study and discussion of the historical literature on a particular issue, problem or period of world history. Topic will be announced in advance by the instructor. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 054759
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Thinking About Ussr, Hist Of Modern S E Asia, Post Ww II Europe, The Age Of Caesar, Ancient Trade, Christians,Jews,Muslims, Japan's Samurai, Colloquium World History, Gender In 20Th Europe, Reflections On Cold War, City/Society: Edo Japan, Scientific Voyages, Femininity & Masculinity in the Middle Ages, Gender, Ideology and War in 20th Century Europe, Mexican Revolution

HIST 495 (3.00)

Seminar in American History

Special topics course. Intensive study and discussion of the historical literature on a particular issue, problem or period of American history. Topic will be announced in advance by the instructor. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 054760
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Collqm: US During 1920's, Industrial City In Amer, Colloq:, Slavery To Industrialztn, Society In Nyc,1790-1930, Colloquium:Amer History, Heritage Tourism, Colloq: New Polticl Hist, Clqm:Baltimore 1865-1930, Colloq:Hist Of Amer Sci, Histography Of Civil War, The Cold War And After, Public History, Top:Professions In Amer, Pol/Admin Hist Nuc Age, Colloquium In Amer Hist, US And China Relataions, Public Hist/Public Cult, Sci In American Culture, Democracy In Early Amer, Cold War To War On Trrsm, US Sci Tech/Plcy Cld Wr, Slavery Western World, Intro To Public History, Coll:Pol/Admin History, Coll:Technology/Culture, Colloquium: Amer History, Orig Of US Envir Policy, Colloquiem:Amer Hist, American East Asian Rlts, Amer Cities In 20Th Cent, Colloq: Policy History, Practice In Public Hist, Cyberspace And New Media, U.S. China Relations, Cold War To Terror War, Coll:Professions In Amer, Colloq: Polit/Admin Hist, Colloquium: Amer Hist, Amer Hist Thru Biography, Pub History/Pub Culture, The US & E. Asia 20Th C., US And East Asia, Native Americans, Amer Women & Social Mov, Racial Poli Of Black Per, History,Science &Museums, Maryland In History, Relig/Rebel Early Amer, US And East Asia: 20Th C, Public Hist: Oral & Vid, Dutch Colonialism, Archival Administration, 20Th Cent U.S. Politics, Entering The Nuclear Age, Colloq:Stud Of Biography, Clqm: Amer Pol Institute, The Cold War, Cyperspace & New Media, Colloquium, Prac. In Public History, History Of Science&Tech., Oral History, US History & Environment, Progressive Era Reform, Readings In Amer Soc His, 2001 A Space Odyssey, Early Baltimore, Views From Public Hist, History Of Science, Social Justice in the New Nation, Constitutional History, Science, Technology, and Culture, Community History, Rebels & Revolutionaries in Atlantic World, Environment & Baltimore History, Modern American Culture, Asian American History, The Atlantic World, Activism/Digital Storytelling, Music in American History, Gender/Crime in Am Hist Memory, Slavery Abol. Eman. in the US, Civil Rights in America, US Science & Tech Since 1946, US Sci Tec Policy Since 1946, Rebels & Revolutionaries, Chocolate City: Race and Politics in Nation Cap., History and Memory: Nation as imag. landsc, Slavery & Freedom in Atlantic World, Adam Smith meets Uncle Sam: Bus/Econ Pol. Hist, 19th Century U.S., The U.S. in the World, The Arts in the Military, The US Through Foreign Eyes, Civil War in History & Memory

HIST 496 (3.00)

Historical Research

Historical methodology with respect to research, organization and preparation of materials. Written and oral reports and a research paper are required. The course is oriented around a specific topic in American history, to be chosen by individual professor. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 054761
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Myth,Memory & Civil War, Race Ethnicity Amer Migr, US, Colloq:Strctrlsm/Deconst, Historical Research, US In Depression & War, Aviation & Space Flight, United States In Depress, Memory & Commemoration, Maryland's Cities, Towns, U.S. And Vietnam, Race And Ethnicity, Colonial Maryland, Afam Migration/ Jim Crow, The American Revolution, US History & Environment, Whose Amer. Revolution?, Proto-Marxism:17-18Th C., Colloquium:Proto-Marxism, New Deal Culture, History of Science & Tech in American Society, Social Movements in Modern Ame, Catastrophes in American History, 20th Century U.S. History, Research in UMBC's Special Collections, Cold War, Ethnicity, Race, and Am. Immig. Narritiv, Science, Tech. and Society, Modern American Culture, Healthcare in Modern America, Borders and Nationalism, Colonial Londontown, Inventing American Identity, American Borders & Nationalism, Gender/Race in Amer. Pop Cult.
   Attributes: Writing Intensive
   Requirement Group: You must complete HIST 201 with a "C" or better

HIST 497 (3.00)

Historical Research:

Historical methodology with respect to research, organization and preparation of materials. Written and oral reports and a research paper are required. The course is oriented around a specific topic in European and world history, to be chosen by individual professor. Recommended Preparation: junior/senior status or permission of the instructor. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 054762
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: European Renaissance, European Environ History, Europe/Entrepreneurship, Historical Research, 3rd Reich Rmbrd In US, Wmn Wk In Erly Mdn Eurpe, History And Memory, US Imperialism & Japan, Colloq: Modernity, Disease In Modern China, 18Th Century London, Explorers & Exploration, Europe And Discovery, Medicine/Hea Care/China, The Darwinian Revolution, The American Occ. Of Jpn, Enlightenment London, Early Modern European Culture, Business Women Entrepreneurs in the 18th Century, Atomic Intelligence: the Wartime Search for Secr, The History of Diseases in China, Victorian Britain, Entrepreneurs in 18th Cent. London, Japan, Japan and the U.S.: The first Century (1797-1897), Witches & Witchcraft in 16 & 17th Centuries, Entrepreneurs in 18th cent. England, Modern European Culture, The People's War:British Home Front, Borders and Nationalism, British Home Front in WWII, I Spy:Soviet Espionage in the US,1927-1954, Making Modern Europe, Witches and Witchcraft
   Attributes: Writing Intensive
   Requirement Group: You must complete HIST 201 with a "C" or better

HIST 498 (3.00)

Honors Thesis in History I

Research and writing of honors thesis in history. HIST498 and HIST499 comprise a two-semester sequence and are part of the departmental honors program. (For further information on HIST 498 and HIST499 and on the Honors Program in history, inquire at the departmental office.)
   Course ID: 054763
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study

HIST 499 (3.00)

Honors Thesis in History II

Research and writing of honors thesis in history. HIST 498 and HIST499 comprise a two-semester sequence and are part of the departmental honors program. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 054764
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study
   Attributes: Writing Intensive

Latin

LATN 101 (4.00)

Elementary Latin I

Fundamentals of Latin. Students with two years of high school Latin continue their language in LATN 102.
   Course ID: 055059
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Language (GFR)

LATN 102 (4.00)

Elementary Latin II

Continuation of LATN 101.
   Course ID: 055061
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Language (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must have completed LAT N 101 with a C or better or two years high school Latin.

LATN 201 (4.00)

Intermediate Latin

Review and reading selections from Caesar, Nepos, Florus, etc.
   Course ID: 055063
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: 201 Level Language Requirement (GEP), 201-Level Foreign Language (GFR)
   Requirement Group: Must have completed LATN 102 with a C or better or three years of High School Latin

LATN 301 (3.00)

Selections from Roman Historians

Caesar, Sallust, Livy and Tacitus. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.
   Course ID: 055065
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Language (GFR)
   Requirement Group: Must have completed LATN 201 with a C or better. or Equivalent

LATN 302 (3.00)

Roman Comedy

Selections from Plautus and Terence. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.
   Course ID: 055066
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Language (GFR)
   Requirement Group: Must have completed LATN 201 with a C or better. or Equivalent

LATN 311 (3.00)

Roman Poetry: Catullus, Horace

The lyric temper in Roman poetry. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.
   Course ID: 055067
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Language (GFR)
   Requirement Group: Must have completed LATN 201 with a C or better. or Equivalent

LATN 312 (3.00)

Silver Age

Selections from prose and poetry in the era from Tiberius to Hadrian. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.
   Course ID: 055068
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Language (GFR)
   Requirement Group: Must have completed LATN 201 with a C or better. or Equivalent

LATN 321 (3.00)

Prose Composition and Grammatical Review

   Course ID: 055069
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: Must have completed LATN 201 with a C or better. or Equivalent

LATN 331 (3.00)

Tibullus, Propertius, Ovid

Elegy in the age of Augustus. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.
   Course ID: 055070
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Language (GFR)
   Requirement Group: Must have completed LATN 201 with a C or better. or Equivalent

LATN 332 (3.00)

Vergil

Readings in the Eclogues, Georgics and Aeneid. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.
   Course ID: 055071
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Language (GFR)
   Requirement Group: Must have completed LATN 201 with a C or better. or Equivalent

LATN 341 (3.00)

Cicero

The life and writings of Cicero. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.
   Course ID: 055072
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Language (GFR)
   Requirement Group: Must have completed LATN 201 with a C or better. or Equivalent

LATN 383 (3.00)

History of Roman Literature I

Lectures and assigned readings on the development of Roman literature. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.
   Course ID: 055073
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Language (GFR)
   Requirement Group: Must have completed LATN 201 with a C or better. or Equivalent

LATN 384 (3.00)

History of Roman Literature II

Continuation of LATN 383. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.
   Course ID: 055074
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Language (GFR)
   Requirement Group: Must have completed LATN 201 with a C or better. or Equivalent

LATN 390 (3.00)

The Teaching of Latin

Intended for students preparing to teach Latin.
   Course ID: 055075
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

LATN 396 (1.00 - 3.00)

Independent Reading in Latin

Recommended Preparation: LATN 201. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.
   Course ID: 055076
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Language (GFR)

LATN 402 (3.00)

Special Author Seminar

The author to be studied will be assigned by the instructor. Recommended Preparation: LATN 201. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.
   Course ID: 055077
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

Greek

GREK 101 (4.00)

Elementary Greek I

Fundamentals of ancient classical Greek.
   Course ID: 054573
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Language (GFR)

GREK 102 (4.00)

Elementary Greek II

Continuation of GREK 101.
   Course ID: 054575
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Language (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete GREK 101 with a C or better.

GREK 201 (4.00)

Intermediate Greek

Selections from Xenophon, Plato, The Septuagint, the New Testament.
   Course ID: 054579
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: 201 Level Language Requirement (GEP), 201-Level Foreign Language (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete GREK102 with a C or better or Equivalent

GREK 350 (3.00)

Septuagint

Selections from the Greek version of the Old Testament. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.
   Course ID: 050103
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: RLST 352
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Language (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete GREK 201 with a C or better or Equivalent

GREK 351 (3.00)

New Testament Greek

Selections from the New Testament. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.
   Course ID: 050102
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: RLST 351
   Attributes: Language (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete GREK 201 with a C or better or Equivalent

GREK 352 (3.00)

Greek Tragedy and Comedy

Selections from Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides and Aristophanes. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.
   Course ID: 054582
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Language (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete GREK 201 with a C or better or Equivalent

GREK 361 (3.00)

Greek Oratory

Selections from fifth and fourth century B.C.E. orators such as Lysias and Demosthenes. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.
   Course ID: 054583
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Language (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete GREK 201 with a C or better or Equivalent

GREK 362 (3.00)

Selections from Greek Historians

Xenophon, Herodotus and Thucydides. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.
   Course ID: 054584
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Language (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete GREK 201 with a C or better or Equivalent

GREK 371 (3.00)

Homer

Selections from The Iliad and The Odyssey. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.
   Course ID: 054585
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Language (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete GREK 201 with a C or better or Equivalent

GREK 372 (3.00)

Plato

Readings in the literary and political thought of Plato. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.
   Course ID: 054586
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Language (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete GREK 201 with a C or better or Equivalent

GREK 381 (3.00)

History of Greek Literature I

Lectures and assigned readings on the development of Greek literature. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.
   Course ID: 054587
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Language (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete GREK 201 with a C or better or Equivalent

GREK 382 (3.00)

History of Greek Literature II

Continuation of GREK 381. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.
   Course ID: 054588
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Language (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete GREK 201 with a C or better or Equivalent

GREK 395 (1.00 - 3.00)

Independent Reading in Greek

Recommended Preparation: GREK 201.This course is repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.
   Course ID: 054589
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Language (GFR)

GREK 401 (3.00)

Special Author Seminar

The author to be studied will be assigned by the instructor. Recommended Preparation: GREK 201 and permission of department. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 15 credits.
   Course ID: 054590
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture