UMBC logo
Undergraduate Catalog 2012

Biology

BIOL 100 (4.00)

Concepts of Biology

A broad overview of contemporary biological science. Major areas include the biochemistry of energy transformation, cell structure and function, Mendelian, molecular and population genetics, development and differentiation, plant and animal physiology, evolution, and ecology.
   Course ID: 052466
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Course Equivalents: BIOL 141, BIOL 141H
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)

BIOL 100L (2.00)

Concepts of Experimental Biology

The laboratory exercises are designed to provide the student experience with essential laboratory equipment and techniques.
   Course ID: 052468
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00, Lab Component (must be paired with S course) (GEP), Lab Component (must be paired with S course) (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 100 with a grade of C or better or have BIOL 141 or BIOL 142 as a co-requisite or pre-requisite.

BIOL 101 (3.00)

Concepts Of Biology

A broad overview of contemporary biological science. Major areas include the biochemistry of energy transformation, cell structure and function, Mendelian, molecular and population genetics, development and differentiation, plant and animal physiology, evolution, and ecology. This introductory Biology course is designed for non-majors and may not be used towards the BIOL, BIOC or BINF degrees. Prerequisite: High School Biology and Chemistry
   Course ID: 100369
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)

BIOL 106 (3.00)

The Human Organism

This course is designed to introduce the non-science student to science and its methods and provide a basic understanding of some body functions and dysfunctions. Topics include genes and DNA, cells and cancer, immune system and HIV, metabolism and nutrition, muscles and exercise, nervous system and drugs, etc.
   Course ID: 052473
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)

BIOL 107 (3.00)

Biology of Cancer

A major killer disease in Western countries will be examined from the biological perspective. This course will evaluate current epidemiologic, clinical and experimental research and assess the relative importance of environmental and genetic factors as they relate to the causes and prevention of this disease. Particular emphasis will be given to unraveling the links between dietary and nutritional factors and this "disease of affluence". Recommended Preparation: Some background in the natural sciences, preferably one year in both high school biology and chemistry
   Course ID: 052474
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GFR)

BIOL 108 (3.00)

Biology of Heart Disease

This course will develop, from a biological perspective, the nature of heart disease and the complex connections between environmental factors and this life-threatening illness. We specifically will consider the current, often conflicting, evidence that links dietary factors with the onset of the disease.
   Course ID: 052475
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GFR)

BIOL 109 (3.00)

Life: Introduction to Modern Biology

This is a lab-driven course designed to fulfill the university graduation requirement of a science lab. Topics covered will include basic biological concepts such as the nature of DNA, heredity, human genetics and the process of mutation, as well as modern issues such as forensic analysis of DNA and blood, the biology behind cancer and genetic diseases, and others as determined by current events and interest. The course includes a 75-minute lecture and 180-minute lab.
   Course ID: 052476
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00, Science Plus Lab (GEP), Science Plus Lab (GFR)

BIOL 123 (3.00)

Human Genetics

A course designed for non--biology majors. Topics will include the fundamental rules of heredity, gene structure and function, human genetic diseases and genetic engineering. Particular emphasis will be placed on the application of the new genetic technology to the human condition.
   Course ID: 052477
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)

BIOL 123L (1.00)

Basics Genetic Laboratory

   Course ID: 052478
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Attributes: Lab Component (must be paired with S course) (GEP), Lab Component (must be paired with S course) (GFR)

BIOL 141 (4.00)

Foundations of Biology: Cells, Energy and Organisms

This course for majors provides a broad overview of contemporary biological concepts. Major topics include structure and synthesis of nucleic acids and proteins, molecular genetics, prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell structure and function, biochemistry of energy transformation, and animal and plant development and physiology. This course is designed to prepare students for upper level biology core and elective courses. It is one of two introductory courses (BIOL 141 & 142) designed for BIOL, BIOC and BINF majors.
   Course ID: 100315
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Course Equivalents: BIOL 100, BIOL 141H
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must have completed MATH 150 or MATH 151 or MATH 155 or equivalent with a `C' or better, or have Math test placement into MATH 151.

BIOL 141H (4.00)

Foundations of Biology: Cells, Energy and Organisms - Honors

This course for majors provides a broad overview of contemporary biological concepts. Major topics include structure and synthesis of nucleic acids and proteins, molecular genetics, prokaryotic and eukaryotic cell structure and function, biochemistry of energy transformation, and animal and plant development and physiology. This course is designed to prepare students for upper level biology core and elective courses. It is one of two introductory courses (BIOL 141 & 142) designed exclusively for BIOL, BIOC and BINF majors; either course can be taken first.
   Course ID: 100339
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Course Equivalents: BIOL 100, BIOL 141
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete MATH 150 or MATH 155 or MATH 151 with a C grade or better or be concurrently enrolled in MATH 150 or MATH 155 or score 5 on the Math Placement Test or have AP credit for MATH 150 or MATH 151.

BIOL 142 (4.00)

Foundations of Biology: Ecology and Evolution

This course provides a broad overview of contemporary biological concepts. Major topics include fundamental concepts in ecology and evolution and emphasizes the fundamental interrelationship between these two fields of study. Concepts in evolution include a general description of the diversity of life, a review of Mendelian genetics, the causes and consequences of speciation, natural selection and genetic drift. Concepts in ecology will focus on ecological and evolutionary factors that govern population growth and regulation, species distributions, community and ecosystem ecology. This course is designed to prepare students for upper level biology core and elective courses. It is one of two introductory courses (BIOL 141 & 142) designed for BIOL, BIOC and BINF majors.
   Course ID: 100316
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Course Equivalents: BIOL 301
   Requirement Group: You must complete BIOL141 and either MATH150 or MATH151 or MATH155 or equivalent with a C or better or have MATH test placement into MATH151.

BIOL 233 (3.00)

Nutrition and Health

Basic principles of normal human nutrition. Topics include: nutrient classification; digestion, assimilation, and metabolic functions of the major nutrients; energy balance; metabolic regulation; dietary guidelines and standards; nutrient composition of foods and diet selection; nutritional considerations in pregnancy, childhood, adulthood, and later years. This course provides an introduction to nutrition for students pursuing careers in health-related fields. (Spring and Summer)
   Course ID: 052483
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete BIOL100 or BIOL100H or BIOL101 or BIOL141 or BIOL141H and CHEM 102 or CHEM102H or CHEM124 all of which has to have a grade of C or better

BIOL 251 (3.00)

Human Anatomy and Physiology I

The first semester of a two-semester lecture course covering the structure and function of the organs of the human body. An integrated approach permits concurrent presentation of the anatomy and physiology of each organ system.
   Course ID: 052484
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete BIOL100 or BIOL100H or BIOL101 or BIOL141 or BIOL141H and CHEM 102 or CHEM102H or CHEM124 all of which has to have a grade of C or better

BIOL 251L (1.00)

Human Anatomy and Physiology I Laboratory

Laboratory course to accompany BIOL 251. The laboratory includes dissections, work with skeletons, models of body parts and experimental studies of physiological processes. Required for most allied health programs.
   Course ID: 052485
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory
   Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00, Lab Component (must be paired with S course) (GEP), Lab Component (must be paired with S course) (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete BIOL251 or CHEM124L or CHEM102L with a grade of C or better. BIOL251 can be taken concurrently with BIOL251L

BIOL 252 (3.00)

Human Anatomy and Physiology II

Continuation of BIOL 251. (Spring)
   Course ID: 052486
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 251 with a grade of C or better.

BIOL 252L (1.00)

Human Anatomy and Physiology II Laboratory.

Continuation of BIOL 251L.
   Course ID: 052487
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory
   Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00, Lab Component (must be paired with S course) (GEP), Lab Component (must be paired with S course) (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 251L with a grade of C or better.

BIOL 275 (3.00)

Microbiology

Introductory course describing the fundamental properties of micro-organisms and viruses and their relationships to other life forms. Topics include the structure and function of bacteria, mode of action of antibiotics, genetics of bacteria and the role of bacteria in disease. The structure, replication and pathology of viruses are discussed, including the response of hosts to viral infection and the fundamental concepts of the immune response.
   Course ID: 052488
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete BIOL 100 or BIOL 100H or BIOL 101 or BIOL 141 or BIOL 141H with a "C" or better.

BIOL 275L (2.00)

Microbiology Laboratory

This laboratory course consists of a series of exercises designed to familiarize the student with microbiological techniques. Experiments are performed in basic bacteriology, applied bacteriology, virology and immunology. Students will be expected to work independently, spending brief periods of time other than the scheduled lab period collecting data.
   Course ID: 052489
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00, Lab Component (must be paired with S course) (GEP), Lab Component (must be paired with S course) (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL275 with a "C" or be concurrently enrolled in BIOL275.

BIOL 295 (3.00)

Introduction to Bioinformatics and Computational Biology

This is an introductory course to the field of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, an emerging interdisciplinary field dealing with the application of computing methods in biology. The course will provide a brief introduction to contemporary molecular biology and evolutionary theory. It will introduce the concept of bioinformatics, its applications and its career opportunities. Applying a question-answer approach, it will then explore some of the main problems faced by biology in the last decades, such as genome sequencing and annotation, sequence-based search, structure or function prediction, and some of the computational methods and answers provided by the emerging field of Bioinformatics. Lecture content will be complemented with paper discussion sessions and home-based lab assignments. No prior programming/biology skills required. The course is intended for a multi-disciplinary audience with an emphasis on BINF, CMSC, BIOL, MATH, STAT and IS majors. Pre-requisite: MATH 151 or equivalent.
   Course ID: 100281
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: BIOL 313
   Requirement Group: You must have completed MATH151 with a "C" or better.

BIOL 300L (2.00)

Experimental Biology Laboratory

An upper level course of experiments designed to give students the essential laboratory and critical thinking skills in experimental design, implementation and analysis that every biologist should know. This knowledge base is required for succeeding in further BIOL laboratory courses and for working in a research laboratory. Required of all BIOL majors and a prerequisite for all upper level BIOL laboratory courses.
   Course ID: 100317
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory
   Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00
   Requirement Group: You must have completed CHEM102 or CHEM102H, and CHEM 102L, and BIOL 302. You must have completed either MATH 150 or MATH 151 or MATH 155, or have equivalent AP credit, or have Math test placement into MATH 151. All prerequisites must have a C or better.

BIOL 301 (3.00)

Ecology and Evolution

An introduction to the processes of evolution, the outcomes of evolution, and the field of ecology. Processes of evolution include understanding natural selection, genetic drift, molecular evolution and general evolution theory. Outcomes of evolution includes speciation hybridization, building phylogenetic trees, and using trees to understand the diversity of life, especially vertebrate evolution. Ecology topics include population growth and regulation, competition, predator/prey interactions, symbiosis, community structure and food webs, and energy flow and nutrient cylcing within ecosystems.
   Course ID: 052493
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: BIOL 142
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL100 or 100H or BIOL141 or 141H with a grade of C or better.

BIOL 302 (4.00)

Molecular and General Genetics

Modern principles of heredity have been established through studies at the molecular, cellular and organismic levels. The course includes fundamental information on the structure of a gene, its expression and organization as deduced from analysis of viral and prokaryotic systems, the transmission of genetic material in eukaryotic systems, the interaction of genes in populations and the application of fundamental genetic principles to problems of human heredity.
   Course ID: 052494
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete BIOL100 /100H or BIOL141/141H; and BIOL142/142H; and MATH150 or 151 or 155, or have equivalent AP credit or MATH placement into MATH 151. You must complete or concurrently enrolled in CHEM102, CHEM102H or CHEM124. All with a C or better

BIOL 302L (2.00)

Molecular and General Genetics Laboratory

A laboratory course designed to illustrate fundamental genetic principles by experimentation. Such principles include the nature of genetic material, transfer of genetic information in prokaryotic and eukaryotic systems, organization and regulation of gene expression, Mendel's rules of heredity, linkage and crossing over, and genetic variation. Students will be expected to work independently, spending periods of time outside the scheduled lab period collecting data.
   Course ID: 052495
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00, Lab Component (must be paired with S course) (GEP), Lab Component (must be paired with S course) (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete BIOL300L and BIOL302 with a grade of a C or better

BIOL 303 (4.00)

Cell Biology

A modern treatment of cell structure and function, with emphasis on the molecular architecture, biochemistry and regulatory mechanisms common to all cells. Topics include membrane structure, function and transport; molecular mechanisms of energy metabolism and its associated organelles; the structural and molecular basis for the expression of genetic information; the organelles involved in the regulation of cell shape and motility; and selected cell functions, growth, reproduction and their control. This course is designed for students interested in the biological sciences, biochemistry and the allied health professions.
   Course ID: 052496
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete BIOL302 & CHEM102 &(MATH150 or151 or 155)or have equivalent AP credit, or have Math test placement into MATH 151. All prerequisites must be completed with a "C" or better.

BIOL 303L (2.00)

Cell Biology Laboratory

A course of laboratory experiments introducing students to the principles of experimental design and the analysis and interpretation of data in modern cell biology. Emphasis is placed on investigative approaches, critical thinking, and mathematical and writing skills important to practicing scientists. Experiments using the techniques of spectrophotometry, oxygen polarography, chromatography and tissue culture will be performed. This course is designed for students majoring in the biological sciences.
   Course ID: 052498
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory
   Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00
   Requirement Group: You must complete BIOL 100L or BIOL 300L and BIOL 303 with a C or better.

BIOL 304 (3.00)

Plant Biology

A modern treatment of the basic physiology and development of plants. Topics include special features of plant cell structure, patterns of growth and development, chloroplast development, photosynthesis, seed development, hormonal regulation, light regulation, phytochrome and photo-morphogenesis.
   Course ID: 052499
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete BIOL 303 with a grade of "C" or better

BIOL 304L (2.00)

Plant Biology Laboratory

A course of laboratory experiments designed to enhance student abilities in experimental design, hypothesis testing, and analysis and interpretation of data using plant systems. Students are required to present and interpret experimental results in oral and written form. An introduction to reading and understanding of primary scientific literature is presented. Experiments include photosynthesis, water relations, growth regulator effects and host-pathogen interactions.
   Course ID: 052500
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00
   Requirement Group: You must complete BIOL300L or BIOL303L and BIOL304 with a grade of C or better. BIOL304 can be taken concurrently.

BIOL 305 (3.00)

Comparative Animal Physiology

Functional features of whole organisms and their component organs and organ systems will be studied. Emphasis will be on ways in which diverse organisms at various phylogenetic levels perform similar functions. Examples of topics include osmoregulation, gas exchange, control systems, sensors, effectors, brain and behavior.
   Course ID: 052501
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 303 In addition, you must be concurrently enrolled PHYS112 or 122 or have completed those courses in a previous semester with a C or better.

BIOL 305L (2.00)

Comparative Animal Physiology Laboratory

A laboratory designed to study experimentally selected organismic functions discussed in BIOL 305.
   Course ID: 052502
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00
   Requirement Group: You must complete BIOL300L or BIOL303L and BIOL305 with a grade of C or better. BIOL305 can be taken concurrently.

BIOL 306 (4.00)

Molecular Biology

This is an intermediate level course in molecular biology of prokaryotes, eukaryotes and their viruses. It will cover the principles governing the molecular mechanisms that occur in living cells including regulatory mechanisms. Topics will include the processing of genetic information through the central dogma (transcription, RNA processing and translation), DNA replication, mutation and DNA repair, and genomics. Recommended Course Preparation CHEM 351 and CHEM 352.
   Course ID: 101750
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 302 and BIOL 303 with a grade of 'C' or better.

BIOL 306L (2.00)

Projects in Molecular Biology

In this course students will conduct an open-ended investigation to discover the function of a gene. During the course of the investigation you will learn the basic techniques used to isolate a gene, move it into a suitable host organism, modify it and determine its function. All projects will give students experience with cell culture, cloning, PCR, DNA sequencing and computer-based DNA sequence analysis.
   Course ID: 100499
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory
   Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00
   Requirement Group: You must complete Biol 300L and Biol 302 and Biol 303 with a C or better.

BIOL 312L (2.00)

Modeling in the Life Sciences

Humans possess a superior ability to generate new knowledge by creating and manipulating abstract models of the world and by extrapolating from past experiences. This natural ability reaches its full potential when it is enhanced with the tools of experimental design, mathematics, logic, and computer simulation. BIOL 312L will be offered as a practical guide to creating and using models in the context of life sciences laboratory research. It will include classroom lectures, activities and computer applications intended to illustrate and implement the five basic elements of modeling: experimental design, data acquisition, analysis, model formulation, and simulation. Through the course, students will address a minimum of four concrete biological problems by defining key physical quantities to be measured, applying data visualization techniques to uncover trends, drawing statistically valid inferences, formulating algebraic and analytical models, and performing computer simulations.
   Course ID: 100628
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory
   Requirement Group: BIOL 300L, STAT 350 or MATH 151 or MATH 155 with a grade of 'C' or better.

BIOL 313 (3.00)

Introduction to Bioinformatics and Computational Biology

This is an introductory course to the field of Bioinformatics and Computational Biology, an emerging interdisciplinary field dealing with the application of computing methods in biology. The course will provide a brief introduction to contemporary molecular biology and evolutionary theory. It will introduce the concept of bioinformatics, its applications and its career opportunities. Applying a question-answer approach, it will then explore some of the main problems faced by biology in the last decades (such as genome sequencing and annotation or sequence-based search) and it will analyze in depth some of the computational methods provided by the emerging field of Bioinformatics. Lecture content will be complemented with home based assignments. No prior programming skills or biology knowledge are strictly required, but students are expected to have basic knowledge in either molecular biology or algorithmic techniques, and to acquire complementary knowledge within the course. The course is intended for a multidisciplinary audience with an emphasis on BINF, CMSC, BIOL, MATH, STAT and IS majors.
   Course ID: 100232
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: BIOL 295
   Requirement Group: You must complete MATH151 or MATH151H with a grade of C or better.

BIOL 316L (2.00)

Phage Hunters Genome Analysis

In Phage Hunters Genome Analysis, participants will utilize state of the art computer programs to annotate complete bacteriophage genome sequences generated in Genetics Lab ¿ Phage Hunters Edition (BIOL 302L), and identify the unknown bacteriophages. The course includes a large degree of self-paced investigative work. Recommended Course Preparation: CMSC 104 and/or BIOL 313
   Course ID: 101846
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory
   Requirement Group: You must complete BIOL 302 and 300L with a C or better

BIOL 340L (2.00)

Developmental Biology Laboratory

This is a laboratory course designed to give students exposure to the different techniques and organisms commonly used in Cell and Developmental Biology research. We will be working with a variety of embryos, such as Drosophila, zebrafish, C. elegans, chicken, and axolotl. The major concepts that we will focus on include: gene regulation, both at the nucleotide level and at the chromatin level; pattern formation and cell-signaling; cell migration and cell-cell adhesion; and cell fate determination. The laboratory exercises will allow students to observe normal early embryonic development as well as experimentally manipulate embryos at different stages of early development. By comparing and contrasting these two situations, along with class discussions, students will further their understanding of many of the basic cellular and developmental processes seen in multicellular organisms.
   Course ID: 052509
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory
   Requirement Group: You must complete BIOL300L or BIOL303L and BIOL303 with a grade of 'C' or better.

BIOL 390 (1.00 - 3.00)

Introduction to the Honors University for Transfer Students in the Life Sciences

   Course ID: 052516
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

BIOL 395 (2.00)

MARC U*STAR Writing in the Sciences

Students in this course will examine and produce the basic forms of professional writing encountered in science careers. They will critique the work of their peers, and learn to analyze scientific literature. Specific assignments include writing review articles, CVs and personal statements for graduate school and funding agencies. This course does not fulfill Writing Intensive (WI) requirements.
   Course ID: 100096
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

BIOL 396 (2.00)

Undergraduate Teaching Assistantship

This service-learning course is designed for undergraduate teaching assistants in biology courses. Students must be recommended in writing by the faculty member teaching the course and be approved by the department. Student work must be performed in a course taught by a full-time member of the Biological Sciences department faculty and must have a significant learning component. To qualify, students must have a minimum 3.50 GPA in all biology courses taken (including repeated biology courses). In addition to their teaching responsibilities, students will attend a mandatory weekly session on effective teaching methods taught by a member of the biology faculty. P/F grading only, one credit will be earned for the mandatory weekly session and one credit for the teaching and teaching preparation hours of qualified work during an academic semester. A maximum of eight credits of BIOL 396 is allowed. Successful completion of the course for which they will be a teaching assistant and permission of the instructor are required. Recommended Preparation: Passing the course in which they will serve as a teaching assistant. Variable credit course repeatable up to 8 credits.
   Course ID: 052517
   Consent: Instructor Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

BIOL 397 (1.00)

Ethics and Integrity in Scientific Research

Individuals involved in contemporary scientific research have ethical responsibilities for their conduct. The goal of this course is to provide students considering a career in scientific research with a framework for establishing appropriate scientific integrity. A variety of relevant topics will be discussed,including fraud and misconduct, peer review, obligations and rights of students and mentors, ethical conduct in animal and human experimentation, ownership of data, reagents, intellectual property, authorship and conflict of interest. This course is repeatable up to 12 credits.
   Course ID: 052518
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Ethics/Integ Scient Res, Scientific Writing, Scientific Writing: Art of Abstracts & Application

BIOL 398 (1.00 - 4.00)

Co-op Internship in the Biological Sciences

This course is designed for UMBC degree-seeking students who are employed outside of the university as volunteers or for compensation, provided the following criteria are met. The work must be performed at an institution, agency or company that is a participating employer in UMBC's Cooperative Education Program; and the work performed by the student must have a significant learning component in the biological sciences as judged by the biology internship coordinator in consultation with the faculty of the Department of Biological Sciences. P/F credit only, earned at the rate of one credit for every 50 hours of qualified work during an academic session. Recommended Preparation: 45 total credits earned, including BIOL302. Variable credit course repeatable up to 4 credits.
   Course ID: 052520
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Field Studies

BIOL 399 (1.00 - 3.00)

Tutorial Projects in Biological Sciences

Independent studies carried out with the supervision of a faculty member. Recommended Preparation: Upper-class standing. Variable credit course repeatable up to 6 credits.
   Course ID: 052521
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study

BIOL 405 (4.00)

Advanced Topics in Comparative Physiology

This course takes a comparative approach to the study of how various selective pressures have resulted in the evolution of specific solutions to physiological problems. These solutions are viewed within the context of the fundamental limitations of biological evolution that are set by the physical and chemical properties of matter. The specific topic will change from semester to semester. Representative topics might include vision, temperature regulation and thermal tolerance, renal physiology or cognitive neurophysiology. Most of the material covered will be from original research reports that will be evaluated critically by each student. Recommended Preparation: BIOL 305, CHEM 351 and MATH 151. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 052522
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Adv Animal Physiology, Advanced Topics In Comp

BIOL 410 (4.00)

Modeling in the Life Sciences

Humans possess a superior ability to generate new knowledge by extrapolating from past experiences and creating and manipulating abstract models. This natural ability reaches its full potential when it is enhanced with the scientific tools of experimental design, mathematics, logic, and computer simulation. BIOL 412 will be offered as an introduction to the science (and art) of creating and using quantitative models. It will include classroom lectures, activities and computer-based exercises intended to illustrate and implement the five basic elements of scientific modeling: experimental design, data acquisition and analysis, model formulation, and simulation. The primary objective of this course will be to engage students in an environment structured to use quantitative models to solve practical problems in biology and biochemistry. This course will not have as objectives to teach formal mathematics, computer programming, or computer science.
   Course ID: 102053
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete BIOL 142 and CHEM 101 and [STAT 350 or MATH 151 or MATH 155]

BIOL 411 (4.00)

Bacterial Physiology

The combined approaches of bacterial genetics, molecular biology and biochemistry are applied to the study of bacterial physiological processes. An emphasis is placed on examining adaptation strategies used by bacteria upon encountering alterations in environment. Topics include mechanisms of transcriptional, translational and post-translational control; regulation of carbon and nitrogen metabolism; biosynthesis; energy transduction; signal transduction systems; and bacterial development.
   Course ID: 052523
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 302 and BIOL 303 with a grade of 'C' or better.

BIOL 412 (4.00)

Microbial Systems and Synthetic Biology

This advanced course analyzes principles and current topics in bacterial physiology, genetics, and metabolism. The study of microorganisms as a complex system will be considered in the context of the transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome. Topics will include regulatory networks used for complex metabolic processes, how microbes sense their surroundings, mechanisms microbes use to survive in extreme environments, and biotechnological applications of studying microbial systems.
   Course ID: 102009
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: BIOL 612
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 302 and BIOL 303 with a grade of 'C' or better.

BIOL 414 (4.00)

Eukaryotics Genetics and Molecular Biology

Genetics and molecular biology of lower and higher eukaryotes and their viruses. The course will focus on the maintenance and expression of genetic material as it relates to cell growth and development. It will cover current topics in the molecular genetics of several lower and higher eukaryotes at an advanced level, including mechanisms of genetic control that operate at the level of DNA replication, transcription and translation. Topics to include the molecular basis of phenomena such as gene amplification, global control of transcription initiation, protein sorting and secretion, control of yeast mating type as a model for development, the origin of antigen diversity, oncogenesis, pattern formation in Drosophila and sex determination in mammals.
   Course ID: 052524
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Writing Intensive
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 302 and BIOL 303 with a grade of 'C' or better.

BIOL 418 (4.00)

Human Molecular Biology

The approaches of molecular biology and modern cell biology as applied to the study of both normal and diseased human states. Where appropriate, the analysis of other model mammalian experimental systems may be included. The course will involve the critical reading and discussion of relevant research literature and the preparation of one or more papers on specific issues or topics. The precise topics covered in any one semester will depend on the interest of the faculty and students, and with current developments in the field. Possible topics include: the molecular and cellular basis for human diseases, human molecular genetics, the human genome and proteomic project, human genetic therapy and human evolution. Recommended Preparation: BIOL 302 and 303. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 052527
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

BIOL 420 (4.00)

Advanced Topics in Cell Biology

Contemporary problems of structure and function at the cellular level through a critical examination of current literature. The course includes both lecture material, with an emphasis on the experimental basis of current knowledge, and presentations by students of oral and written reports on selected topics. The area covered in any semester varies according to recent developments in the field and according to the interests of the students and faculty. The list of available areas includes structure and function of biomembranes; composition, structure and replication of chromosomes; assembly, growth and reproduction of cytoplasmicorganelles; cellular growth and division; regulation of cellular function; nuclear-cytoplasmic interactions; cytoskeletal structure and assembly. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 052528
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Epigenetics, Small RNAs in Gene Regulation, Virology, Cellular Aging
   Attributes: Writing Intensive
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 303 with a grade of 'C' or better.

BIOL 422L (4.00)

Microscopy in the Biological Sciences

Theory and practice of the study of biological materials, using a variety of contemporary microscopic techniques. These include scanning and transmission electron microscopy and laser confocal scanning light microscopy. Specimens will be prepared for examination by each of these instruments; both group and individual projects will be pursued to develop confidence in applying the many specimen preparation procedures available and use of the appropriate instrumentation. Procedures required for production of finished micrographs are included. Recommended Preparation: BIOL 303 with a grade of "C" or better.
   Course ID: 052529
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture

BIOL 425 (4.00)

Immunology

This course pursues in depth the rapidly expanding areas of cellular, humoral and tumor immunology. Following a brief overview of the immune system's response to exogenous antigen, the course concentrates on such topics as antibody production and structure, lymphocyte subpopulations, cell-cell interactions, cell-mediated immune responses, cell surface alloantigens, histocompatibility immungenetics,transplantation and tumor immunology. The exact content of the course varies from year to year depending on the status of research in the field.
   Course ID: 052532
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 302 and BIOL 303 with a grade of 'C' or better.

BIOL 426 (4.00)

Approaches to Molecular Biology

This course will analyze, with class discussions and reading of scientific literature, the various methods used to study the molecular biology of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. It will include such topics as restriction mapping, DNA sequencing,cloning strategies and vectors, library construction and screening, probing the sequence organization of DNA and genes, and other current topics relevant to the regulation of the expression of genetic information.
   Course ID: 052533
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Writing Intensive
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 302 and BIOL 303 with a grade of 'C' or better.

BIOL 428 (4.00)

Computer Applications in Molecular Biology

This course is designed as an introduction for biology and biochemistry students to the use of applications software in the analysis of DNA, RNA and protein sequence data. Topics will include operating systems; telecommunications with off campus database; and specific software packages for general and analytical treatment of DNA, RNA and protein sequence data. Some elementary programming will be included.
   Course ID: 052535
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 302 and BIOL 303 with a grade of 'C' or better.

BIOL 430 (4.00)

Biological Chemistry

An introductory course describing the essential principles of biochemistry. Topics include the structure and characterization of biological macromolecules, the energetics and thermodynamics of coupled biological reactions, and enzymology. The most important metabolic pathways are described, emphasizing their cellular compartmentalization, integration and control.
   Course ID: 052536
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 303 and CHEM 352 with a grade of C or better.

BIOL 434 (4.00)

Microbial Molecular Genetics

The approaches of microbial genetics, molecular biology and biochemistry are combined for the study of the molecular mechanisms regulating gene expression in bacteria. Emphasis is placed on critical reading of research literature.
   Course ID: 052539
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL302 and BIOL303 and CHEM 351 with a grade of C or better.

BIOL 442 (3.00)

Developmental Biology

A lecture course that considers the two major aspects of animal development: the means by which, starting with a fertilized egg, progeny cells progressively differentiate from their precursors and one another to produce the ultimate diversity of the multicellular organism; and the processes by which this increasingly complex population of cells is synthesized into a single integrated organism.
   Course ID: 052544
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 302 and BIOL 303 with a grade of 'C' or better.

BIOL 443 (4.00)

Advanced Topics in Developmental Biology

Designed to emphasize cellular, molecular and biochemical aspects of basic developmental questions, this course introduces the student to modern approaches to determination, differentiation and morpho-genesis. Experimental design and analysis of data are emphasized. Possible topics include molecular and cellular aspects of gametogenesis, fertilization, embryogenesis and continuous development in the adult; mechanisms of intra- and intercellular communication; and pattern formation and positional information. Developmental model systems using unicellular organisms are considered. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 052545
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Writing Intensive
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 442 with a grade of 'C' or better.

BIOL 444 (4.00)

Development and Cancer

This course will explore at the molecular level the interface between animal development and cancer. Through a combination of didactic lectures, reading of the primary scientific literature, and in-class presentations students will explore the latest advances in understanding how the processes that govern normal cell growth and differentiation become altered in cancer. Topics will include signaling mechanisms, stem cell biology, and cell cycle control.
   Course ID: 052546
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 302 and BIOL 303 with a grade of 'C' or better.

BIOL 445 (4.00)

Signal Transduction

This course will examine some of the methods by which the reception of signals from the environment leads to the changes in gene and protein activity in responding cells that constitute a biological response. Signal transduction in the context of developmental biology and neurobiology will be the main area of study. Six to eight topics will be emphasized through critical reading, analysis and presentation of original articles from primary literature. The use of genetic, molecular and biochemical techniques to address questions in the field of signal transduction will be examined.
   Course ID: 052547
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Writing Intensive
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 302 and BIOL 303 with a grade of 'C' or better.

BIOL 451 (4.00)

Neurobiology

Covers nervous system function at the cellular level, ionic mechanisms underlying electrical activity in nerve cells, the physiology of synapses, transduction and integration of sensory information, activity in populations of neurons, the specification of neuronal connections, and trophic and plastic properties of nerve cells.
   Course ID: 052548
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Writing Intensive
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 305 with a grade of C or better.

BIOL 453 (4.00)

Physiological Bases of Behavior

Studies of important adaptation behavioral patterns and their physiological bases. The course begins with some basic principles of the study of animal behavior followed by special topics such as sexual behavior, feeding, prey capture and predator evasion.
   Course ID: 052550
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Writing Intensive
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 305 with a grade of C or better.

BIOL 454 (4.00)

Vision Science

This course will focus in depth on visual systems of animals and humans. Coverage will span the range of modern research from the biochemistry and physiology of the photoreceptors to the ecology, evolution and functional optimization of visual systems. Topics include visual pigments, biochemical basis of phototransduction, visual processing and organization of visual centers of the brain, eyes, optical arrays, visual evolution and ecology.
   Course ID: 052551
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Writing Intensive
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 305 with a grade of C or better.

BIOL 456 (4.00)

Plant Molecular Biology

This course is focused on exploring the molecular mechanisms underlying plant physiology and development, and it is designed to foster interactive learning. Following a brief review of some important principles and techniques inmolecular biology, this course pursues, in depth, such topics as meristems, flower and embryo development, signal transduction of environmental cues, hormonal regulation of gene expression, pathogenic and symbiotic plant microbe interactions, and other current topics. Molecular genetic approaches using model systems are stressed throughout the course.
   Course ID: 052553
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Writing Intensive
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 303 with a grade of 'C' or better.

BIOL 457 (4.00)

Physiology of Marine and Estuarine Animals.

A study of the physiological specializations demanded by marine/estuarine environments, including physiological mechanisms for coping with stresses imposed by extremes of temperature, salinity, aerial exposure and low oxygen concentrations; sensory physiology, including visual, chemical and mechanical modalities; exogenous and endogenous rhythms related to tidal or diel cycles; and bioluminescence. The course includes one or more trips to field laboratories.
   Course ID: 052554
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 305 with a grade of C or better.

BIOL 463 (4.00)

Theoretical and Quantitative Biology

A course in probability and advanced biostatistics. Topics will include the elementary mathematical techniques used in biology and medicine, the relationships among probability distributions used in standard statistical tests, univariate linear and nonlinear analysis, correlation matrices, multivariate analysis and path analysis, cluster analysis, and discriminant and principal component analysis. Students will present examples of the analysis from the literature. The class will solve problems, and each student will analyze a set of experimental data. Recommended Preparation: STAT 350 and BIOL 301.
   Course ID: 052558
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Laboratory, Lecture

BIOL 466 (4.00)

Population and Quantitative Genetics

The emphasis in this course is the study in natural populations of characters whose variation is controlled by multiple genes. The foundations in Mendelian and population genetics are described, followed by a comprehensive treatment of the field of quantitative genetics and then by a discussion of the place of quantitative genetics in behavioral genetics, physiological ecology and in population biology in general. Recommended Preparation: STAT 350 and BIOL301
   Course ID: 052561
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

BIOL 468 (4.00)

Ecology of Rivers and Streams

This course provides an understanding of the structure and functions of lotic ecosystems and how these systems operate in terms of energetics,interactions among component species, and the physical and chemical properties of undisturbed and disturbed watersheds. Special attention will be given to the relationships between biodiversity, species substitutability and ecosystem processing as they relate to the conservation and protection of rivers, streams and non-tidal wetlands. Recommended Preparation: BIOL 301, CHEM 102 and junior standing.
   Course ID: 052563
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

BIOL 470 (4.00)

General Virology

This course is a comprehensive overview of virology, with an emphasis on animal viruses. Topics include the physical and chemical nature of viruses, techniques used to study viruses in the laboratory, virus replication and genetics, virus-host interactions, and antiviral strategies. Recommended Course Description:BIOL 303
   Course ID: 052564
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 302 and BIOL 303 with a grade of 'C' or better.

BIOL 476 (4.00)

Antibotics: Origin, Mechanism, Resistance

Infectious agents, the bacteria and viruses, accounted for 57 percent of the deaths in the U.S. in 1900 and less than 4 percent in 1990. The discovery and application of antibiotics and other chemotherapeutic agents are largely responsible for this dramatic reversal. In this course the origin of selected chemotherapeutic agents, their detailed mode of action and the basis for emergence of resistant microbial populations will be discussed. Similarly, the action of selected drugs used in chemotherapy, which attempts to control cancer cell growth, will be outlined. The principle of rational drug design and radical "new" methods of attacking microbial populations will be explored.
   Course ID: 052566
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL302 and BIOL303 and CHEM 351 with a grade of C or better.

BIOL 477 (4.00)

Applications of Biodetection Approaches

The ability to detect and identify genetic and protein markers forms a common theme for many different fields of biological sciences including medical diagnostics, environmental microbiology, food/water safety, biodefense/homeland security, and veterinary science. Because of its central role throughout a diverse set of biological disciplines the methods and approaches for biodetection are extremely varied and wide-ranging. This course begins with basic detection approaches and continues with examples of principles guiding biodetection by relating each approach to important present-day challenges facing society. The course will also include an in-depth analysis of biological principles guiding detection strategies to understand not only the potential but also the limitations of each approach.
   Course ID: 100462
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 302 and BIOL 303 with a grade of 'C' or better.

BIOL 480 (4.00)

Animal Behavior

This course explores the general themes and important questions in animal behavior. We cover subjects that examine how and why animals interact in the way they do with each other and with their environment. Topics will include the genetics of behavior, behavioral development, learning, animal communication, habitat selection, foraging, sexual selection, and mating systems, among others. This is a quantitative course; a familiarity with basic statistics and mathematics is assumed.
   Course ID: 100498
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Writing Intensive
   Requirement Group: You must complete BIOL 142. with a grade of 'C' or better.

BIOL 481 (4.00)

Advanced Topics in Evolutionary Biology

This advanced course analyzes principles of and current topics in evolutionary biology. The study of evolution informs every facet of biological inquiry and every level of biological organization, from molecules to ecosystems. Topics will vary across semesters according to current research and the interests of faculty. Representative topics may include the origin of species, natural and sexual selection, neutral theory, comparative methods, and evolutionary ecology. The course is a mix of lectures, problem-based learning, and student-led presentations of primary research literature. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 102010
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: BIOL 681
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL142 and BIOL302

BIOL 483 (4.00)

Evolution: From Genes to Genomes

This is a combined lecture and hands-on computing course comprising four major sections that study the applications of evolutionary theory to the exploration and analysis of phenotypic and biological sequence data. We will begin by building a sound conceptual basis for the theory of evolution, including an introduction to population genetics. Real biological sequence data then will be introduced and used to illustrate and extend this theory. From here, the focus will shift to some major branches of current evolutionary research, introducing recent published work for each topic. Finally, we will stage a series of student-led debates that require application of the science that has been learned to current socio-political areas of controversy.
   Course ID: 052567
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Writing Intensive
   Requirement Group: You must have completed BIOL 301 and BIOL 302 with a grade of C or better.

BIOL 486 (4.00)

Genome Science

Life science at the whole genome level represents a rapidly expanding new paradigm that defines a new field, genome science. BIOL 486 provides students with the requisites for understanding genome science and includes experimental basics of functional genomics and analytical basics of bioinformatics. Biomedical and agricultural research are developing the potential of genome science, in both the public and private sectors. Important questions that have been unapproachable are now thought to be within reach. For example, students in BIOL 486 will learn how genome science may provide tools to unravel the arcane genetics of complex diseases and traits. Information sources will include textbook(s), primary literature and computer methods.
   Course ID: 052570
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete STAT350 or STAT355 and BIOL302 and CHEM351 with a grade of 'C' or better.

BIOL 495 (2.00 - 4.00)

Seminar in Bioinformatics

A "capstone" seminar course for students in the Bioinformatics and Computational Biology Program. Students will be introduced to examples of the integrated uses of the various disciplines that together comprise bioinformatics and computational biology. Variable credit course is repeatable.
   Course ID: 052574
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete BIOL313 and BIOL430; and CMSC341 with a grade of 'C' or better.CMSC341 can be taken concurrently.

BIOL 497H (3.00)

Honors Capstone course

Students who are pursuing departmental honors will write and submit a scholarly paper reporting on the outcome of their senior research project, and will present their research either orally or as a poster, at one or more public forums, as decided by the Departmental Honors committee. Students will also be expected to attend at least 12 departmental seminars and prepare at least 6 one page abstracts of these seminars. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 052575
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have been admitted to the Honors College to take this course.

BIOL 499 (1.00 - 4.00)

Undergraduate Laboratory/Field Research

Original laboratory or field research conducted under the supervision of a faculty member. Variable credit course is repeatable up to 8 credit.
   Course ID: 052576
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study
   Course Equivalents: BIOL 499H

BIOL 499H (1.00 - 6.00)

Undergraduate Laboratory/Field Research-Honors

Original laboratory or field research for students in the Biological Sciences Honors Program to be conducted under the supervision of an UMBC faculty member. Variable credit course is repeatable.
   Course ID: 052577
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study
   Course Equivalents: BIOL 499

BIOL 499L (1.00)

Undergraduate Research Seminar

BIOL students (BS only) may use independent research in the laboratory of a faculty member as a substitute for one of the upper level laboratory classes required by the major. To do so, students must register for BIOL 499 for two semesters in a row. In the second semester they must also register for this course, BIOL 499L, in which they will give oral presentations and write a final paper about their research project. Recommended Course Preparation:BIOL 300L
   Course ID: 100637
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study
   Attributes: Writing Intensive

Chemistry

CHEM 100 (3.00)

The Chemical World

A topical discussion of the science of chemistry and its relationship to our everyday lives. While no previous knowledge of chemistry is required, this course does involve the use of chemical formulas and such basic math as algebra and scientific notation. (Spring)
   Course ID: 052670
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)

CHEM 101 (4.00)

Principles of Chemistry I

An introduction to chemistry for science majors and other students who require a thorough grounding in the principles of chemistry. Topics treated include the atomic-molecular theory of matter, stoichiometry, states of matter, chemical nomenclature, energetics of chemical and physical processes, solutions, periodic properties, VSEPR, molecular orbital theory and chemistry of familiar elements. Note: Credit may not be obtained for both CHEM 101 and 123.
   Course ID: 052671
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Course Equivalents: CHEM 101H
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete MATH 106 or MATH106Y or MATH150 or MATH151 or MATH155 with a C or better or have AP credit for MATH150 or MATH151 or have a MATH placement score of 4 or5.

CHEM 101H (4.00)

Principles of Chemistry I - Honors

   Course ID: 052672
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture, Seminar
   Course Equivalents: CHEM 101
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must be admitted to the Honors College.

CHEM 102 (4.00)

Principles of Chemistry II

Principles of chemical and physical equilibrium, liquids and solids, elementary thermodynamics, electron and proton transfer reactions, electrochemistry, chemical kinetics and a further study of the periodic properties of the elements. (Fall/Spring/Summer)
   Course ID: 052673
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Course Equivalents: CHEM 102H
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must have completed CHEM101 or CHEM101H with a grade of "C" or better.

CHEM 102H (4.00)

Principles of Chemistry - Honors

   Course ID: 052674
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture, Seminar
   Course Equivalents: CHEM 102
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must have completed CHEM101 or CHEM101H with a grade of "C" or better and also be admitted to the Honors College.

CHEM 102L (2.00)

Introductory Chemistry Lab I

Companion course to CHEM 102, intended for all students who require two or more years of chemistry. (Fall/Spring/Summer)
   Course ID: 052675
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00, Lab Component (must be paired with S course) (GEP), Lab Component (must be paired with S course) (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM101 or CHEM101H and CHEM102 or CHEM102H all with a C or better. CHEM102 or CHEM102H can be completed or taken concurrently.

CHEM 110L (1.00)

Scientific Glass Blowing Lab

   Course ID: 052679
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory

CHEM 123 (4.00)

Introduction to General Organic and Biochemistry I

A two-semester chemistry course intended for students preparing for health sciences. Topics include atomic-molecular theory, properties of the elements, bonding and molecular structure, solutions, elementary organic chemistry, proteins, lipids, carbohydrates and nucleic acids. (Fall/Summer) Recommended Preparation: A working knowledge of elementary algebra is required
   Course ID: 052682
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)

CHEM 124 (3.00)

Introduction to General Organic and Biochemistry II

Continuation of CHEM 123. (Spring/Summer)
   Course ID: 052683
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Science (non-lab) (GEP), Science (non-lab) (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM123 with a C or better.

CHEM 124L (2.00)

General Organic and Biochemistry Lab

A companion laboratory course to CHEM 124. This course, together with CHEM 123 and 124, will complete the chemistry requirement for nurses, dental hygienists, physical therapists and others in health-related sciences,with the exception of premed and predental students. (Spring/Summer)
   Course ID: 052684
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00, Lab Component (must be paired with S course) (GEP), Lab Component (must be paired with S course) (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must have completed CHEM123 and CHEM124 both with a C or better. CHEM124 can be taken concurrently.

CHEM 299 (1.00 - 3.00)

Training in Experimental Chemistry (Cooperative Education)

This course cannot be applied to the requirements of the major in chemistry. It does, however, provide a mechanism whereby a student intending to pursue a career in chemistry may acquire academic credit for training obtained while employed outside of the university. The number of credits assigned, which may not exceed three per semester, is based upon the instructor's assessment of the scientific level of the employment and its contribution to the professional development of the student. The grade assigned is based upon a report written by the student and the instructor's appraisal of the student's performance. Variable credit course repeatable up to 6 credits.
   Course ID: 052688
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study

CHEM 300 (4.00)

Analytical Chemistry

A lecture-laboratory course covering the theory and practice of quantitative chemical analysis. The emphasis is on homogeneous and heterogeneous equibilibria involved in gravimetric and volumetric methods. Introduction to instrumental techniques includes potentiometry, spectrophotometry and chromatographic separations. (Fall/Spring)
   Course ID: 052689
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00
   Requirement Group: You must have completed CHEM102 or 102H and CHEM 102L with a grade of "C" or better.

CHEM 301 (4.00)

Physical Chemistry I

A lecture course covering the laws of thermodynamics, with emphasis on their application to chemical systems. Topics considered include thermochemistry, equations of state, physical and chemical equilibrium, electrochemistry, kinetic theory of gases, chemical kinetics and the theory of rate processes. (Fall)
   Course ID: 052690
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed CHEM102 or CHEM102H and MATH152 or MATH152H and PHYS122 all with a C or better. PHYS122 can also be taken concurrently.

CHEM 302 (3.00)

Physical Chemistry II

Continuation of CHEM 301. Topics considered include molecular structure and bonding, interpretation of spectra, and introductory quantum and statistical mechanics. (Spring)
   Course ID: 052691
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed CHEM301 with a C or better.

CHEM 303 (3.00)

Physical Chemistry for the Biochemical Sciences

This course is designed to familiarize students with the qualitative and quantitative concepts of physical chemistry as they apply to biochemical systems and macromolecules. Approximately one-third of the course will be devoted to topics in thermodynamics, kinetics, and spectroscopy. Topics considered include general equilibrium thermodynamics emphasizing biochemical applications, ligand binding, biological oxidation-reduction reactions, membranes, colligative properties and transport properties, kinetics including elementary rate laws, reaction mechanisms and activated processes, and relaxation and enzyme kinetics, and an introduction to quantum chemistry, electronic structure and bonding, and molecular spectroscopy (including vibrational, electronic and magnetic spectroscopy). The use of modern instrumentation will be discussed throughout the course. (Spring)
   Course ID: 052692
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM351 and MATH152 with a C or better. PHYS112 or PHYS122 must be completed with a C or better and can be taken concurrently

CHEM 311L (3.00)

Advanced Laboratory I.

Laboratory exercises encompassing experimental problems in physical, inorganic, synthetic and instrumental analytical chemistry. Emphasis is placed on the analysis of data, the techniques of measurement and computer-interfaced instrumentation. (Fall)
   Course ID: 052695
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00
   Requirement Group: You must have completed CHEM301 with a C or better or be enrolled concurrently.

CHEM 312L (3.00)

Advanced Laboratory II.

Continuation of CHEM 311L. (Spring)
   Course ID: 052696
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00, Writing Intensive
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 300 and CHEM311L and CHEM302 all with a C or better. You can also take CHEM302 concurrently.

CHEM 351 (3.00)

Organic Chemistry I

The chemistry of aliphatic and aromatic compounds, including bonding, stereochemistry and reactions of functional groups. Reaction mechanisms, synthetic methods and characterization of organic molecules. (Fall/Spring)
   Course ID: 052697
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed CHEM102 or CHEM102H with a C or better.

CHEM 351L (2.00)

Organic Chemistry Laboratory I

Companion laboratory course to CHEM351. (Fall/Spring)
   Course ID: 052698
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM102 or CHEM102H and CHEM102L and CHEM 351 all with a C or better. CHEM351 can be taken concurrently.

CHEM 352 (3.00)

Organic Chemistry II

Continuation of CHEM 351. (Spring/Summer)
   Course ID: 052699
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM102 or CHEM102H and CHEM351 with a C or better.

CHEM 352L (2.00)

Organic Chemistry Laboratory II

Companion laboratory class to CHEM 352 and continuation of CHEM 351L. (Spring/Summer)
   Course ID: 052700
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM102L and CHEM351 and CHEM351L and CHEM352 all with a C or better. CHEM 352 can be taken concurrently..

CHEM 396 (1.00 - 3.00)

Undergraduate Learning Assistantship

This service-learning course is designed for undergraduate learning assistants in non-laboratory chemistry courses. Students must be recommended in writing by the faculty member teaching the course and be approved by the department. Student work must be performed in a course taught by the Chemistry and Biochemistry department and must have a significant learning component. In addition to their classroom responsibilities, students will participate in a weekly session on effective learning methods and pedagogy taught by a member of the chemistry faculty. P/F grading only, credit will be earned for the mandatory weekly session and for the preparation for and interaction with students in the classroom. A maximum of eight credits of CHEM 396 is allowed. Permission of the instructor is required. Recommended Preparation: A grade of B or higher in the course that they will serve as a Learning Assistant.
   Course ID: 102073
   Consent: Instructor Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

CHEM 397 (1.00)

Ethics and Integrity in Scientific Research

Individuals involved in contemporary scientific research have ethical responsibilities for their conduct. The goal of this course is to provide studentsconsidering a career in scientific research with an appropriate framework for establishing appropriate scientific integrity. Various topics relevant to scientific integrity, including defining, handling and responding to fraud and misconduct; peer review; obligations and rights of students and mentors; ethical conduct in animal and human experimentation; ownership of data; reagents; and intellectual property, authorship and conflict of interest will be presented and discussed. Specific research situations and examples of past ethical violations will be used to illustrate appropriate ethical standards.
   Course ID: 052701
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

CHEM 398 (2.00)

Seminar in Chemistry

In this course, the problem of lead poisoning will serve as a focal point to develop perspective, insight and retrospection into an important societal problem. The course will be presented as a series of seminars that cover in-depth the many facets of lead and lead poisoning. Some of the topics include the chemistry of lead, its history, toxicology, ecology, legal and political ramifications, and its remediation. The culmination of the course will be the student projects, which will meld their knowledge, interpretation of lecture material and personal experience.
   Course ID: 052702
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

CHEM 399 (1.00 - 3.00)

Tutorial Projects in Chemistry

Independent study supervised by a faculty member. The course is intended for students who wish to study topics in chemistry not covered by the regular course offerings. One credit hour is equal to a minimum of four hours of work in the laboratory per week. Chem 399 may be taken for a maximum of 3 credits and may only be taken once. A maximum of eight credits from the combination of BIOL 398, 399, 499, CHEM 399 and 499 may be applied toward the 120 credits for graduation. Variable credit course repeatable up to 6 credits.
   Course ID: 052703
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study

CHEM 401 (3.00)

Chemical and Statistical Thermodynamics

Basic methods of classical and statistical thermodynamics developed at a level appropriate for first-year graduate students and advanced undergraduates. (Spring)
   Course ID: 052704
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM302 with a C or better.

CHEM 405 (3.00)

Inorganic Chemistry

Basic theoretical concepts of inorganic chemistry, including a study of the periodic table, the elements and their physical and chemical properties. Several theories of bonding are discussed, as well as the mechanisms of inorganic reactions, coordination chemistry and the chemistry of transition metals. (Fall)
   Course ID: 052705
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 352 with a grade of C or better

CHEM 405L (3.00)

Advanced Inorganic Chemistry Lab

The course skills that will be emphasized in the course are anaerobic synthesis and advanced characterization methods. These methods will be applied to inorganic complexes important in biological/medicinal inorganic chemistry and nanomaterials. This interdisciplinary course aims to combine traditional inorganic chemistry concepts/methods with areas of inorganic chemistry not covered in lower-level courses.
   Course ID: 100099
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM300 and CHEM352L and CHEM405 with a C or better.

CHEM 406 (3.00)

Bioinorganic Chemistry

Intended for senior-level undergraduates and graduate students, this course focuses on the role and function of metals in biology. Topics include metalloenzyme mechanisms, spectroscopy and use of metals in medicine. Recommended Preparation: CHEM 405 or CHEM 437
   Course ID: 052706
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 405 with a C or better.

CHEM 410 (3.00)

Quantum Chemistry

Introduction to the principles of quantum mechanics and their application to chemical systems. Topics include the postulatory basis of quantum mechanics; approximate methods; vibrational, rotational, electronic, nuclear magnetic and electron spin spectroscopy; atomic structure; the chemical bond, valence bond; and molecular orbital theory.
   Course ID: 052707
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 302 or CHEM 303 w/ a C or better.

CHEM 415 (3.00)

Statistical Mechanics and Theory of Rate Processes

Introduction to statistical mechanics and theoretical aspects of absolute reaction rate theory. Major topics include statistical definition of entropy; compounding of systems; combinational problems; the methods of Gibbs; quantum statistics; partition functions; applications to equilibrium states of gases, solids and liquids; and partition formulation of the theory of absolute reaction rates.
   Course ID: 052709
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM302 with a C or better.

CHEM 420 (3.00)

Computer Applications in Chemistry

The course is designed to help develop an appreciation and understanding of how to write a computer program to solve problems related to chemical research. Fundamentals of electronic chemical structure calculations. This is not a theory course, but a practical course in which programming techniques, data handling, and online computational tools are discussed. (Fall)
   Course ID: 052710
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 302 or CHEM 303 with a C or better.

CHEM 431 (3.00)

Chemistry of Proteins

An advanced treatment of the chemistry of proteins and protein-containing supramolecular structures. The topics include isolation and purification of proteins, structure of proteins and relation of structure to biological function.
   Course ID: 052713
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 437 with a C or better

CHEM 432 (3.00)

Advanced Biochemistry

The topics presented would not normally be covered in any other biochemistry course and may include an advanced treatment of enzyme kinetics with emphasis upon two-substrate systems, allosteric control mechanisms, replication and transcription, and the biochemistry of specialized tissues. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 052714
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Advanced Biochemistry, Molecular Recog., Adv Bioc:Post-Trans Reg, Adv Bioc:Allosteric Prot, Molec Recognition
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM437 and CHEM438 with a C or better

CHEM 433 (3.00)

Biochemistry of Nucleic Acids

A survey of nucleic acid structure and function, with emphasis on chemical aspects. Topics will include DNA and RNA structure, packaging of nucleic acids, chemical and physical properties of nucleic acids, proteins and enzymes of DNA replication, fidelity of nucleic acid synthesis, biochemistry of DNA recombination, enzymology of transcription and RNA processing.
   Course ID: 052715
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 437 with a C or better

CHEM 435 (3.00)

Biochemistry of Complex Carbohydrates

Structure and function of the carbohydrates of glycoprotiens, glycolipids, proteoglycans and bacterial polysaccharides; carbohydrates as informational macromolecules; decoding by lectins; biosynthesis; structure; engineering of glycoproteins; bacterial adhesion; and virulence and tumor antigens.
   Course ID: 052717
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 437 with a C or better

CHEM 437 (4.00)

Comprehensive Biochemistry I

The first semester of a two semester sequence providing a thorough introduction to the principles of modern biochemistry. Major topics include enzyme kinetics and the structures and properties of proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids. (Fall)
   Course ID: 052718
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 352 with a grade of C or better

CHEM 437L (4.00)

Biochemistry Laboratory

Modern methods of biochemical research. Laboratory experiments are designed to provide experience in working with biologically active materials and familiarity with standard biochemical techniques. These include spectrophotometry; chromatography; isotope tracer techniques; ultra-centrifugation; enzyme kinetics; and isolation, purification and characterization of proteins, nucleic acids and subcellular organelles. Two laboratory sessions per week.
   Course ID: 052719
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00, Writing Intensive
   Requirement Group: You must have completed CHEM351L and CHEM300 with a C or better. Corequisite :CHEM437 and consent of instructor.

CHEM 438 (4.00)

Comprehensive Biochemistry II

Continuation of CHEM 437. Includes metabolic pathways and selected topics in nucleic acid and membrane chemistry. (spring)
   Course ID: 052720
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 437 with a C or better

CHEM 441 (3.00)

Physical Chemistry of Macromolecules

Introduction to the physical chemistry of macromolecules. Emphasis is placed on the development of broad general concepts applicable to the study of synthetic and biological macromolecules. Topics considered include determination of molecular weight and molecular weight distributions; conformational properties of high polymers; and thermodynamics and transport properties of polymer solutions, polyelectrolytes and polymerization processes. Techniques such as sedimentation analysis, light scattering, osmometry and viscometry are discussed.
   Course ID: 052721
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have completed CHEM301 with a C or better.

CHEM 442 (3.00)

Physical Biochemistry

Structural determination of proteins and nucleic acids in the solid state and in solution. Transitions between and stability of secondary and tertiary structure. Ligand binding and association processes. Interpretation of spectra, titration curves and multi-component equilibria, hydrodynamic properties and fluorescence polarization.
   Course ID: 052722
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM301 or CHEM303 and CHEM437. All courses must be completed with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 443 (3.00)

Molecular Spectroscopy and Biomacromolecules

Team-taught course covering theory and applications of advanced spectroscopic techniques used to study the structure and function of biomacromolecules (polysaccharides, DNA, coenzymes and cofactors). Aspects of modern Fourier Transform NMR, including one- and two-dimensional methods (COSY, NOESY,TOCSY) will be presented. Principles of mass spectrometry and examples of the potential, limitations and applications of electron impact; desorption ionization; high-resolution tandem-mass spectrometry and interfaced chromatography mass spectrometry will be discussed. Theory and applications of other spectroscopic techniques, including molecular vibrational (raman, resonance raman and infrared), electron spin resonance (ESR) and laser fluorescence spectroscopies also will be presented. Recommended Preparation: CHEM 301
   Course ID: 052723
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

CHEM 444 (3.00)

Molecular Modeling In Biochemistry

Survey of theoretical methods for simulation of biopolymer conformation. Energy maps, energy minimization and molecular dynamics simulation. Influence of solvents. Applications to proteins, nucleic acids, etc. Calculations using the CHARMm code.
   Course ID: 052724
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM301 or CHEM303 and CHEM437. All courses must be completed with a grade of C or better.

CHEM 450 (3.00)

Chemistry of Heterocyclic Compounds

An in-depth survey of the properties, reactions and synthesis of heterocyclic compounds containing the heteroatoms of oxygen, sulfur and/or nitrogen. The course will consist of lectures based on readings from monographs and current literature.
   Course ID: 052725
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 352 with a grade of C or better

CHEM 451 (3.00)

Mechanisms of Organic Reactions

Advanced general treatment of the study of organic reaction mechanisms, with emphasis on the development of broad principles governing various organic reactions. Description of metastable intermediates such as carbonium ions, carbanions, carbenes and free radicals, kinetic effects in relation to structure, conformational analysis and stereochemistry.
   Course ID: 052727
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 352 with a grade of C or better

CHEM 451H (3.00)

Mechanisms of Organic Reactions

Advanced general treatment of the study of organic reaction mechanisms, with emphasis on the development of broad principles governing various organic reactions. Description of metastable intermediates such as carbonium ions, carbanions, carbenes and free radicals, kinetic effects in relation to structure, conformational analysis and stereochemistry.
   Course ID: 100374
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 352 with a grade of C or better

CHEM 452 (3.00)

Physical Organic Chemistry

Introduction to theoretical aspects of organic chemistry. Molecular orbital approximations, linear-free energy relationships, general theory of acid-base catalysis, medium effects and isotope effects.
   Course ID: 052728
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 301 or CHEM 303.

CHEM 453 (3.00)

Organic Chemistry of Nucleic Acids

A survey of organic chemical principles governing structure, properties and reactions of nucleic acids, including synthesis of nucleic acid bases, nucleosides,nucleotides and polynucleotides, and their important synthetic analogs possessing antiviral and antitumor properties. Study of reactivity of nucleic acid building blocks,including addition and substitution reaction, ring-openings and rearrangements, hydrolysis of glycosidic and phosphodiester bonds, and photochemical reactions.Study of primary structure, acid-base property, tautomerism and conformation ofnucleic acids. Review of secondary structure, base-pairing and -stacking interactions, helical structure, stability, conformation, denaturation, renaturationand cross-linking.
   Course ID: 052729
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 352 with a grade of C or better

CHEM 455 (3.00)

Introduction to Biomedicinal Chemistry

A survey of the drug design, discovery and development processes utilized by academic and industrial medicinal chemists using rational approaches to drug design and development from a biological, organic chemistry and mechanistic standpoint. Topics will include: structure activity relationship studies (SAR), identification of the pharmacophore, stereochemical considerations, the role of electronic and H-bonding interactions, bioavailability, +chemical and metabolic stability, toxicity, drug metabolism, DNA interactive drugs, receptors and enzymes as drug targets, the design and mechanistic features of receptor and enzyme inhibitors and the pharmacokinetic variability and design of prodrugs, the advantages and disadvantages of using monotherapy vs combination therapies such as multitargeted drugs, dual inhibitors and mutual prodrugs, among other current approaches to drug design. Additional topics will include the use of computers in drug design, the development of resistance, use of synergism in multidrug therapy, clinical trials, patent issues as well as moral and ethical responsibilities facing medicinal chemists. Case studies will focus on currently used (or recently used, but discontinued) drugs, particularly those reflecting controversy or innovation, as well as historical perspectives.
   Course ID: 052730
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 352 with a grade of C or better

CHEM 457 (3.00)

Total Synthesis of Natural Products

The course will cover the total syntheses of selected natural products from animal, plant, marine, bacterial and fungal sources, including vitamins, alkaloids, hormones, terpenoids and antibiotics. Both historically significant total syntheses of landmark, such as those of cholesterol, morphine, strychnine and vitamin B12, as well as the more modern total syntheses, such as those as taxol, bleomycin and enediyne antibiotics, will be elaborated. Students who opt to take the course for graduate credits (CHEM 657) will be required to write an additional term paper and/or make an oral presentation on the total synthesis of a selected natural product.
   Course ID: 052731
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: CHEM 457H
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 352 with a grade of C or better

CHEM 457H (3.00)

Total Synthesis of Natural Products

The course will cover the total syntheses of selected natural products from animal, plant, marine, bacterial and fungal sources, including vitamins, alkaloids, hormones, terpenoids and antibiotics. Both historically significant total syntheses of landmark, such as those of cholesterol, morphine, strychnine and vitamin B12, as well as the more modern total syntheses, such as those as taxol, bleomycin and enediyne antibiotics, will be elaborated. Students who opt to take the course for graduate credits (CHEM 657) will be required to write an additional term paper and/or make an oral presentation on the total synthesis of a selected natural product.
   Course ID: 100375
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: CHEM 457
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 352 with a grade of C or better

CHEM 461 (4.00)

Advanced Instrumental Methods of Analysis

A lecture-laboratory course covering the theory, instrumentation and applications of modern instrumental techniques. Advantages and limitations of different instrumental methods are discussed using selected topics of environmental, pharmacological and toxicological analysis. Laboratory experiments include polarography and pulse voltammetry, anodic stripping analysis, potentiometry with ion-selective electrodes, flame and electrothermal atomic absorption, UV-VISspectrophotometry, capillary gas chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) (Spring)
   Course ID: 052732
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Laboratory, Lecture
   Attributes: Course Fee = $50.00
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 300 and CHEM 311L with a C or better.

CHEM 465 (3.00)

Mass Spectrometry at the Chemistry-Biology Interface

Primary mass spectrometric methods for the structural characterization and functional investigation of biomolecules, such as proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates, etc. will be covered. Sequencing, identification of post-translational modifications, proteome application and functional investigations of biomolecules will be discussed using a problem based approach.
   Course ID: 052733
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 300 and CHEM 301 with a C or better.

CHEM 470 (3.00)

Toxicological Chemistry

The relationship between the chemical properties of toxic chemicals, e.g., chlorinated hydrocarbons, metals, drugs, solvents and naturally occurring toxicants and their genotoxic effects, are systematically examined. Topics covered include biotransformations, dose-response and statistical considerations, chemical airpollution, pharmacokinetics, chemical mutagenicity and carcinogenicity, analytical procedures, geo-chemistry of environmental pollution, radiation toxicology and combinations of chemicals.
   Course ID: 052734
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 352 with a grade of C or better

CHEM 472 (3.00)

Enzyme Reaction Mechanisms

The mechanism of enzyme action will be examined with emphasis on three-dimensional structure of enzymes, chemical catalysis, methods of determining enzyme mechanisms, stereochemistry of enzymatic reactions, detection of intermediates, affinity labels and suicide inhibitors, transition stateanalogs, energy relationships, evolutionarily "perfect" enzymes, genetic engineering and enzymes and use of binding energy in catalysis. Instruction will be in both lecture and seminar format, with emphasis on recent literature.
   Course ID: 052735
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete CHEM 352 and CHEM 437.

CHEM 490 (1.00 - 3.00)

Special Topics in Chemistry

This course is intended for senior science students. Both format and topics may vary. Variable credit course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 052737
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Toxicology/Risk Assessmt, Cpx Carbohydrates, Spec Topics Dynamic/Mech, Electronics For Chem, Optical Spectroscopy, Advan. Kinetics, Computer Applic In Chem, Methods In Spectroscopy, Analytical Spectroscopy, Top:Intro To Toxicology, Computer App In Chem, Analytical Chemistry, Dynamics & Mechanisms, Adv Bioanalytical Tech, Nanoparticles, Top: Materials Aging, Special Topics In Chem, Top:Forensic Toxicology, Photochemistry, Polymer Chemistry, Computer Applic. In Chem, X-Ray Spec, Computer Applic/Chem, Org Synth Meth, Organic Spectroscopy, Organic Spectrocopy, Independent Study, Peptides And Proteins, Spectroscopy, Chemometrics, Environmental Chemistry, Dynamics And Mechanisms, Quantum Chem/Spectroscop, Fluorescence Sensing, Fluorescence Spectroscopy for the 21st Century, A Survey of Sensors and Instrumentation, Fluorescence Spectroscopy & Plasmonics, Structural Biology, Quantum Chemistry & Chemical Bonding, Bioanalytical Chemistry, Cellular Biochemistry, Bio and Bio-inspired materials, Advanced NMR Spectroscopy, "Chemical Kinetics: Theory and Experiment, Biochemistry of Nutrition

CHEM 499 (1.00 - 3.00)

Undergraduate Research

Original laboratory or theoretical investigation suitable for advanced students. Registration with the consent of the faculty member with whom the research is to be carried out. Hours to be arranged. One credit hour is equal to a minimumof four hours work in the laboratory per week. A formal paper will be required on research performed. Variable credit course repeatable up to 6 credits.
   Course ID: 052738
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study