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Undergraduate Catalog 2012

Philosophy

PHIL 100 (3.00)

Introduction to Philosophy

An introduction to fundamental philosophical concepts and methods, through the consideration of issues such as the existence and nature of God, the relationship between mind and body, personal identity, the relationship between free will and determinism, moral responsibility, the nature and possibility of knowledge, causality and the nature of reality. The course emphasizes the formulation and evaluation of philosophical arguments and may draw upon historical as well as contemporary readings.
   Course ID: 056006
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: PHIL 100H, PHIL 100Y
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)

PHIL 100H (3.00)

Introduction to Philosophy - Honors

An introduction to fundamental philosophical concepts and methods, through the consideration of issues such as the existence and nature of God, the relationship between mind and body, personal identity, the relationship between free will and determinism, moral responsibility, the nature and possibility of knowledge, causality and the nature of reality. The course emphasizes the formulation and evaluation of philosophical arguments and may draw upon historical as well as contemporary readings.
   Course ID: 056007
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: PHIL 100, PHIL 100Y
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must be admitted to the Honors College.

PHIL 100Y (4.00)

Introduction to Philosophy

An introduction to fundamental philosophical concepts and methods, through the consideration of issues such as existence and nature of God, the relationship between mind and body, personal identity, the relationship between free will and determinism, moral responsibility, the nature and possibility of knowledge, causality and the nature of reality. The course emphasizes the formulation and evaluation pf philosophical arguments and may draw upon historical as well as contemporary readings.
   Course ID: 056008
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Course Equivalents: PHIL 100, PHIL 100H
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)

PHIL 146 (3.00)

Critical Thinking

An introduction to the basic concepts and principles of reasoning. Topics include the analysis and evaluation of the logical structure of arguments, the meaning and functions of words in arguments, and the detection of fallacious or deceptive patterns of thinking. The course is intended to develop skill in responding critically to incorrect reasoning in everyday discourse.
   Course ID: 056010
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)

PHIL 150 (3.00)

Contemporary Moral Issues

An introduction to the problems and concepts of moral philosophy that focuses on current moral issues. This course introduces students to moral theories and their implications, the nature of moral reasoning and argument, and the meaning and justification of moral concepts such as obligation and rights. Topics may include free speech, abortion and euthanasia, environmental ethics, the rights of animals, and distributive and compensatory justice.
   Course ID: 056012
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Course Equivalents: PHIL 150Y
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)

PHIL 150Y (4.00)

Contemporary Moral Issues

An introduction to the problems and concepts of moral philosophy that focuses on current moral issues. This course introduces students to moral theories and their implications, the nature of moral reasoning and argument, and the meaning and justification of moral concepts such as obligation and rights. Topics may include free speech, abortion and euthanasia, environmental ethics, the rights of animals and distributive and compensatory justice.
   Course ID: 056014
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Course Equivalents: PHIL 150
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)

PHIL 152 (3.00)

Introduction to Moral Theory

An introduction to philosophical theories of morality, which address such questions as: What ought we do? How ought we to live? Is there any right answer to such questions? If there are any right answers, upon what are they based, and how do we come to know them? What makes it the case that we should or should not lie, kill other people or eat animals? Various theoretical positions are covered and may include moral skepticism or relativism, Aristotelianism or virtue ethics, utilitarianism, Kantianism and other forms of non-consequentialism. Readings may include both historical and contemporary sources. Critical and charitable reading, argument analysis and writing are emphasized.
   Course ID: 056015
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: PHIL 152H, PHIL 152Y
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)

PHIL 152H (3.00)

Honors Introduction to Moral Theory

An introduction to philosophical theories of morality, which address such questions as: What ought we do? How ought we to live? Is there any right answer to such questions? If there are any right answers, upon what are they based, and how do we come to know them? What makes it the case that we should or should not lie, kill other people or eat animals? Various theoretical positions are covered and may include moral skepticism or relativism, Aristotelianism or virtue ethics, utilitarianism, Kantianism and other forms of non-consequentialism. Readings may include both historical and contemporary sources. Critical and charitable reading, argument analysis and writing are emphasized.
   Course ID: 100126
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: PHIL 152, PHIL 152Y
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must be admitted to the Honors College.

PHIL 152Y (4.00)

Introduction to Moral Theory

An introduction to philosophical theories of morality, which address such questions as: What ought we to do? How ought we to live? Is there any right answer to such questions? If there are any right answers, upon what are they based, and how do we come to know them? What makes it the case that we should or should not lie, kill other people or eat animals? Various theoretical positions are covered and may include moral skepticism or relativism, Aristotelianism or virtue ethics, utilitarianism, Kantianism and other forms of non-consequentialism. Readings may include both historical and contemporary sources. Critical and charitable reading, argument analysis and writing are emphasized.
   Course ID: 056016
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Course Equivalents: PHIL 152, PHIL 152H
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)

PHIL 210 (3.00)

Philosophy of Religion

A critical examination of the nature and justification of religious belief. Topics to be discussed include the existence of God, the nature of religious belief, the problem of evil, the possibility of life after death, and the relation between religion and morality.
   Course ID: 050222
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)

PHIL 248 (3.00)

Introduction to Scientific Reasoning

The study of scientific reasoning. Among the central issues are: deductive reasoning; inductive reasoning; the justification of inductive inferences; examples of inductive reasoning, such as statistical inferences with respect to both correlation and causal hypotheses; the nature of science and its evolution; analysis of the roles that models, predictions and evidence play in justifying scientific theories.
   Course ID: 056019
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)

PHIL 251 (3.00)

Ethical Issues in Science and Engineering

The primary focus of the course will be inquiry into the ethical responsibilities of scientists, engineers and information technologists in today's high-tech, information-oriented society. Students will be introduced to both historical and contemporary issues involving ethical and professional responsibility through an extensive discussion and analysis of case studies. The key feature of the course will involve learning how to conduct an ethical analysis and then learning how to apply this analysis to a case study. Teams will be formed early in the semester so each group can meet and discuss case studies before they are discussed in class and before written assignments are due. Each team also will be required to engage in an extended case study project that will culminate in a team presentation of the case study in a PowerPoint format. Note: Philosophy students may not count PHIL 251 and PHIL 252 towards the major. Credit will not be given for both PHIL 251 and ENES 251.
   Course ID: 056021
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)

PHIL 252 (3.00)

Ethical Responsibility in Computer and Information Science

The primary focus of this course will be an inquiry into the ethical responsibilities of information technologists in today's high-tech, information-oriented society. Students will be introduced to historical and contemporary issues involving ethical and professional responsibility through extensive discussion and analysis of case studies in computer science and information systems. The key outcome of the course involves learning how to conduct an ethical analysis and then apply this analysis to a real case. Note: Credit will not be given to both PHIL 252 and either CMSC 304 or IS 304.
   Course ID: 056023
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GFR)

PHIL 258 (3.00)

Introduction to Feminist Philosophy

Drawing on historical and contemporary sources, this course critically examines the ways in which women and women's experiences have been ignored and explicitly and implicitly devalued in Western philosophy. It also seeks to uncover what, if anything, about the methods and central concepts of Western philosophy account for such exclusion and (apparent) contempt. More positively, we will evaluate new feminist approaches to old philosophical questions, such as: What is knowledge? What is justice?
   Course ID: 050133
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: GWST 258

PHIL 320 (3.00)

Topics in the History of Philosophy

A detailed study of an important development in the history of philosophy, such as scholasticism, continental rationalism, British empiricism, existentialist philosophies of man or logical empiricism. Specific topic is announced each semester offered. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits or 2 attempts.
   Course ID: 056030
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Top:Indian Philosophy, Topics In Hist Of Phil, Existentialism, Medieval Philosophy, Top:Hist Of Ethical Theo, Top: Medieval Philosophy, British Empiricism
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking this course.

PHIL 321 (3.00)

History of Philosophy: Ancient

The history of major philosophical views from the pre-Socratics through Hellenistic philosophy, with special emphasis on the early and middle dialogues of Plato and the physical, ethical and metaphysical works of Aristotle.
   Course ID: 056032
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: PHIL 321H
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking this course.

PHIL 321H (3.00)

History of Philosophy: Ancient

The history of major philosophical views from the pre-Socratics through Hellenistic philosophy, with special emphasis on the early and middle dialogues of Plato and the physical, ethical and metaphysical works of Aristotle.
   Course ID: 100018
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: PHIL 321
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking any 300-level PHIL course. You must also be an Honors College student to enroll in this course.

PHIL 322 (3.00)

History of Philosophy: Modern

An examination of major philosophical positions in the 17th and 18th centuries. Philosophers studied typically include Descartes, Spinoza, Locke, Leibniz, Berkeley, Hume and Kant.
   Course ID: 056033
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: PHIL 322H
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking this course.

PHIL 322H (3.00)

History of Philosophy: Modern (Honors)

   Course ID: 056034
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: PHIL 322
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking any 300-level PHIL course. You must also be admitted to the Honors College to take this course.

PHIL 327 (3.00)

American Pragmatism

An examination of the origin and development of the American pragmatist movements, from their beginnings with Pierce, James and Dewey, to contemporary pragmatists such as Quine. The course compares the merits of the pragmatic method with those of rationalist and empiricist methodologies.
   Course ID: 056035
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking this course.

PHIL 328 (3.00)

History of Analytic Philosophy

A study of central texts and themes in the history of analytic philosophy. Readings will be drawn from figures such as Green, McTaggert, Bradley, Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Austin, Ayer, Carnap, Dewey, Quine, Davidson and Rorty.
   Course ID: 056036
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking this course.

PHIL 332 (3.00)

Philosophy of the Asian Martial Arts

A critical survey of the classical philosophical literature of the Asian martial arts. The original writings of some pre-eminent Asian philosophers, sages and martial artists will be examined and discussed. Topics include the nature of philosophy in Asian culture; the conceptual relations between Confucianism, Taoism, Zen Buddhism and the philosophy of the Asian martial arts; the values and ethics of warriorship and the role the philosophy of the martial arts has played in shaping some Asian cultures.
   Course ID: 056037
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Culture (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR), Culture (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking this course.

PHIL 334 (3.00)

Asian Philosophy

This course will consist of a critical survey of the major philosophical and spiritual traditions of India, China and Japan. The key concepts and principles of Hinduism, Jainism, Sikhism, Confucianism, Taoism, Buddhism, Zen Buddhism and Shintoism will be examined and discussed. Topics will include the difference in emphasis and approach between the philosophical thought of East and West, the conceptual relations between the various Asian traditions and the importance of the concept of enlightenment in Asian thought. Special attention will be given to the role that Asian philosophy has played in shaping Asian culture.
   Course ID: 056038
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Culture (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR), Culture (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking this course.

PHIL 346 (3.00)

Deductive Systems

An introduction to symbolized deductive logic, including the construction of formalized systems for traditional logic, the sentential calculus and first-order predicate calculus. These systems will be constructed semantically (as formalizations of deductive reasoning in natural languages) and syntactically (as uninterpreted systems). The course emphasizes the distinction between mechanical decision procedures and the construction of deductive proofs.
   Course ID: 056040
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP)
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking this course.

PHIL 350 (3.00)

Ethical Theory

A critical examination of a range of major ethical theories, chosen from among virtue theories, divine command theories, utilitarian theories, contractualist theories, existentialism and Kantianism. Readings may be drawn from both historical and contemporary texts.
   Course ID: 056042
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: PHIL 350H
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking this course.

PHIL 350H (3.00)

Ethical Theory

A critical examination of a range of major ethical theories, chosen from among virtue theories, divine command theories, utilitarian theories, contractualist theories, existentialism and Kantianism. Readings may be drawn from both historical and contemporary texts.
   Course ID: 100353
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: PHIL 350
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking this course.

PHIL 355 (3.00)

Political Philosophy

A critical examination of selected philosophical theories aimed at addressing such questions as: What is the extent of political authority, and what (if any) legitimate forms can it take? Can coercion by the state be justified? What are the obligations of citizens? What is the nature of law, and can the rule of law extend to states? What understanding of human nature and human needs underlies the various particular answers to such questions? Readings may be drawn from historical as well as contemporary sources. Please see the current Course Schedule for further details.
   Course ID: 056043
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking this course.

PHIL 356 (3.00)

Philosophy of Law

What is the rule of law, and why is it a good thing? This course addresses these foundational questions and attempts to connect them with practical issues that confront contemporary society. Students will have the opportunity to study various accounts of Constitutional interpretation and judicial review through the examination of landmark and recent Supreme Court decisions. The course will occasionally focus on a special topic such as: race and American law, feminist jurisprudence and International criminal tribunals.
   Course ID: 056044
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking this course.

PHIL 358 (3.00)

Bioethics

A survey of the ethical constraints on the practice of medicine, on biomedical research using human and non-human animals, and on the delivery of health care. Specific topics will include doctor-patient confidentiality; autonomy, competence and medical decision-making; ethical issues at the beginning and end of human life; and controversial biomedical technologies such as cloning and stem cell research. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 050142
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: PHIL 358H
   Same as Offering: HAPP 358
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP)

PHIL 358H (3.00)

Bioethics

A survey of the ethical constraints on the practice of medicine, on biomedical research using human and non-human animals, and on the delivery of health care. Specific topics will include doctor-patient confidentiality; autonomy, competence and medical decision-making; ethical issues at the beginning and end of human life; and controversial biomedical technologies such as cloning and stem cell research
   Course ID: 100017
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: HAPP 358, PHIL 358
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking any 300-level PHIL course. You must also be an Honors College student to enroll in this course.

PHIL 368 (3.00)

Aesthetics

An exploration of central philosophical issues concerning art and art criticism. Topics to be discussed may include the nature of beauty, aesthetic evaluations, the identity of works of art, the relation of art to morality, the relation between art and nature, the status of aesthetic experience and perception. Readings will be drawn from historical and contemporary sources.
   Course ID: 056046
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking this course.

PHIL 370 (3.00)

Philosophy and Parapsychology

A survey of experimental and anecdotal evidence for paranormal phenomena and the philosophical issues that arise from their consideration. Topics include ESP, psycho-kinesis, poltergeists, apparitions, survival of death, mind-body identity theories, the nature of scientific explanation and the nature of causality.
   Course ID: 056047
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking this course.

PHIL 371 (3.00)

Epistemology

A survey of central issues concerning knowledge, belief and justification. Topics to be covered may include: a prior knowledge, perception, skepticism, the problem of other minds, self-knowledge, coherence and correspondence theories of knowledge and truth, internalist and externalist accounts of justification, foundationalism, naturalism and transcendental arguments. Readings will be drawn from historical and contemporary sources.
   Course ID: 056048
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking this course.

PHIL 372 (3.00)

Philosophy of Science

What is the exact nature of science? This course considers answers given by different philosophical schools. We examine how these schools explicate central scientific terms such as laws, explanations, theories, models, confirmation, justification, scientific progress and scientific revolutions, and how they account for the nature of the history of science.
   Course ID: 056049
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: PHIL 372H
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP)
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking this course.

PHIL 372H (3.00)

Philosophy of Science - Honors

What is the exact nature of science? This course considers answers given by different philosophical schools. We examine how these schools explicate central scientific terms such as laws, explanations, theories, models, confirmation, justification, scientific progress and scientific revolutions, and how they account for the nature of the history of science.
   Course ID: 100227
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: PHIL 372
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking any 300-level PHIL course. You must also be admitted to the Honors College to take this course.

PHIL 373 (3.00)

Metaphysics

A survey of central metaphysical concepts and themes in the Western philosophical tradition. Topics to be covered may include: identity, personal identity, causation, free will, the mind-body problem, properties, laws of nature, necessity, essentialism, realism and antirealism, and the existence of God. Readings will be drawn from historical and contemporary sources.
   Course ID: 056050
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking this course.

PHIL 390 (3.00)

Philosophy of Sport

An examination of the nature and significance of sport to determine the relation sport bears to the basic concerns of humankind. Topics include the relationship between human embodiment, the self and sport; the existential aspects of sport and play; the morality of hunting and ethical issues in sport.
   Course ID: 056054
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking this course.

PHIL 391 (3.00)

The Philosophy of Sex

An examination of the philosophical aspects of human sexuality. Topics include theories of sexual desire and sexual activity; the concept of sexual perversion; the moral evaluation of sex acts; feminist analysis of the sexual relations between men and women; and the moral status of homosexuality, adultery, pornography and abortion.
   Course ID: 050122
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: GWST 391

PHIL 394 (3.00)

Philosophy of Biology

An examination of biology from a philosophical point of view. Some of the philosophical problems considered are the tautological character of the principle of natural selection, genic vs. group selection, the definition of fitness, the nature of biological species, the statistical character of evolutionary theory, and the reduction of biological laws to laws in physics and chemistry.
   Course ID: 056056
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking this course.

PHIL 395 (3.00)

Philosophy of Physics

A study of the philosophical foundation of physics. We consider some of the major theories in the history of physics, such as Newtonian mechanics, relativity theory and quantum mechanics. A special emphasis will be given to the consideration of central concepts, such as time, matter, motion, force, field, geometry and probability, as well as famous scientific paradoxes. Some familiarity with central concepts of modern physics is presupposed.
   Course ID: 056057
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking this course.

PHIL 399 (3.00)

Topics in Philosophy

A philosophical examination of a concept playing a significant role in the history of ideas or contemporary culture. Recent topics included the philosophy of work, morality and the media, and creationism and evolution. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 056061
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Top:Crit.Thkg Vs New Age, Topics:Godel,Escher,Bach, Top:Crit Thkg Vs New Age, The Problem Of Evil, Philosophy And Film, Aesthetics In Film, Evolution Vs. Int. Des., Top:Minds/Machines/Logic, Top:Interpretation, Deception: Self & Others, Philosophy And Biography, Top:Contractarian Ethics, Top:Critical Metaphysics, Topics In Philosophy, Topic: Risk & Society, What IS A Person, Feminism, Ethics And Technology, Top: Phil Of Sex, Top: Phil Of Biology, Top:Phil In Sci Fi, Top: Phil & Biography, Top:Contractarian Ethic, Philosophy Of Humor, Top: Phil Of Sport, Top:Phil In Sci Fiction, Phil In Science Fiction, Philosophy & Biography, Topic: Critical Thinking, Using Info Effectively, Top: Phil Of Literature, Top:Crit Thnkng/New Age, Animal Lang & Intell, Minds, Machines & Logic, Citizenship, Evol Vs Intelligent Des, Philosophy Of Film, Topics: Miracles, Issues Of Life And Death, Critical Thinking, Crit Vs New Age Thinking, Top: Ethics/Volunteering, Top:The Problem Of Evil, Top:Philosophy Of Music, Crit Thinking Vs New Age, Philosophy & Animals, Critical Tnkg Vs New Age, Business Ethics, Philosophy and Literature, Nietzsche, Critical Thinking about Extraordinary Claims, The Foundation of Ethics: The Nature of Value, Metaethics
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking this course.

PHIL 399B (3.00)

Topics in Philosophy

This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 056062
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Top:Crit.Thkg Vs New Age, Top:Crit Thkg Vs New Age, The Problem Of Evil, Ethics/Integrity Sci Res, Philosophy And Film, Aesthetics In Film, Evolution Vs. Int. Des., Top:Minds/Machines/Logic, Top:Philosphicl Theology, Topics In Philosophy, Topic: Risk & Society, Feminism, Topics, Top: Phil Of Biology, Top: Skepticism, Top:Contractarian Ethic, Top:Kierkgrd & Nietzsche, Philosophy Of Law, Philosophy Of Humor, Top: Phil Of Sport, Top:Construct Phil Argmt, Topic: Critical Thinking, Personal Relationships, Using Info Effectively, Top:Crit Thnkng/New Age, Minds, Machines & Logic, Evol Vs Intelligent Des, Philosophy Of Film, Topics: Miracles, Issues Of Life And Death, Crit Vs New Age Thinking, Top: Ethics/Volunteering, Crit Thinking Vs New Age, Philosophy & Animals, Free Will And Moral Resp, Critical Tnkg Vs New Age, Business Ethics
   Requirement Group: You must have taken (1) PHIL course and received a grade of "C" or better before taking this course.

PHIL 400 (1.00 - 3.00)

Independent Study in Philosophy

Independent study on an approved topic in philosophy. Limited to and required of departmental honors candidates. Variable credit course repeatable for a maximum of 3 credits.
   Course ID: 056063
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study
   Requirement Group: You must complete (2) PHIL courses (at least one 300 level), with a grade of C or better to take this class.

PHIL 405 (3.00)

Honors Independent Study in Philosophy

Independent study on an approved topic in philosophy. Limited to and required of departmental honors candidates. Note: Offered Fall semester only.
   Course ID: 056064
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must earn admission into the departmental honors program to take this course.

PHIL 406 (3.00)

Honors Independent Studies in Philosphy

See Phil 405 for course description and prerequisite. Requires Admission into the department Honors Program.
   Course ID: 100098
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study
   Requirement Group: You must complete (2) PHIL courses (at least one 300 level), with a grade of C or better to take this class.

PHIL 420 (3.00)

Advanced Topics in 19th and 20th Century European Philosophy

A study of a major movement, theme, or figure in the development of European philosophy since Kant. Possible topics include: Kant and Neo-Kantianism, the development of post-Kantian Idealism, Hegel, Phenomenology, Marx and Marxism, Continental Aesthetics, Existentialism, the Frankfurt School, French post-structuralism. Recommended Course Preparation: PHIL322. This course is repeatable up to 6 credits or 2 attempts.
   Course ID: 056065
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete (2) PHIL courses (at least one 300 level), with a grade of C or better to take this class.

PHIL 445 (3.00)

Philosophy of Language

A survey of philosophical issues concerning the nature of meaning, understanding,communication and language. Topics to be discussed may include the relations between meaning, intention and belief; the relationship between mental content and linguistic meaning; interpretation; the possibility of thought without language; the factual status of meaning and understanding; the nature of naming and referring; the relation between individual understanding and the physical and social environment. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 056067
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete (2) PHIL courses (at least one 300 level), with a grade of C or better to take this class.

PHIL 452 (3.00)

Advanced Topics in Ethics

An intensive analysis of significant positions in historical or contemporary moral theory. Examples might include Greek ethics, utilitarianism, contemporary concepts of rights and obligations. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits or 2 attempts.
   Course ID: 056068
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Adv. Topics In Ethics, Care Ethics, Top: Business Ethics, Adv Topics In Ethics, Kant's Moral Philosophy, Morality,Animals,Environ, Moral Rationalism, Top: Cnsqntlsm/Cntrctlsm, Top: Care Ethic, Moral Psychology, Global Ethics, Ethics and Evolution
   Requirement Group: You must complete (2) PHIL courses (at least one 300 level), with a grade of C or better to take this class.

PHIL 454 (3.00)

Animals and the Environment: Moral Theory and its Application

Do we stand in moral relations to animals? Can we owe things to the environment? This is a moral theory course that focuses on the understanding and critical assessment of various philosophers' attempts to answer these questions. In the course of examining these theories, a number of more concrete questions will come up, for example, scientific questions about the natures of animals and of the environment and about the potential effects of human activities. In addition, a number of particular moral questions arise, such as: Is it acceptable to have animals for pets or to eat them? Are zoos morally permissible? Is the intentional (or negligent) extermination of a species ever morally justified? This is a seminar for students with a strong background in philosophy, environmental sciences or policy.
   Course ID: 056069
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete (2) PHIL courses (at least one 300 level), with a grade of C or better to take this class.

PHIL 455 (3.00)

Applied Ethics

An examination of applied and professional ethics, including their relationship to ethical theory, the attempt to codify ethical rules for different professions, the use of case studies as a method of moral reasoning and the dilemmas faced by moral agents who also are acting in a professional role.
   Course ID: 056070
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete (2) PHIL courses (at least one 300 level), with a grade of C or better to take this class.

PHIL 458 (3.00)

Advanced Topics in Feminist Philosophy

A detailed examination of some single field of feminist philosophy. Topics will vary from year to year but are likely to include the following: feminist ethics, feminist epistemology and feminist aesthetics. In each case, the class will focus on the theoretical and practical impact of feminist thinking on these traditional areas of philosophy. We will critically discuss the relevance of women's lived experience for philosophical theorizing. Recommended Preparation: Two of the following PHIL 258, PHIL 350, PHIL 368, PHIL 371, PHIL 373, PHIL 372, GWST 480 or permission of the instructor.
   Course ID: 050120
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: GWST 458

PHIL 470 (3.00)

Philosophy of Mind

A survey of central issues about the nature of mind and its relation to the physical world. Topics to be discussed may include: the nature of belief, intention, desire, action, emotion, pain; special problems raised by consciousness; competing conceptions of the relation between mental and physical states and events, the possibility of psychological laws, and how mental phenomena can play a casual/explanatory role in the physical world. Recommended Preparation: Two courses in philosophy or permission of instructor.
   Course ID: 056073
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

PHIL 471 (3.00)

Freedom, Determinism and Responsibility

A survey of different conceptions of human freedom, moral responsibility, and how they relate to deterministic and indeterministic pictures of the natural world. Topics to be considered may include: the compatibility of freedom and moral responsibility with determinism, the relation between choice and personal identity, the conceivability of life without freedom or responsibility, and competing conceptions of punishment. Readings will be drawn from historical and contemporary sources. Recommended Preparation: Two courses in philosophy or permission of instructor.
   Course ID: 056074
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

PHIL 472 (3.00)

Advanced Topics in the Philosophy of Science

An intensive study of an advanced topic in the philosophy of science, biology, physics or probability. Representative topics include scientific realism, explanation, causation, laws, units of biological selection, species and natural kinds, quantum mechanics and quantum paradoxes, interpretations of probability and sociological explanation. Recommended Preparation: PHIL 372 or 394, 395 and one other philosophy course, or permission of the instructor. A background in some particular science is strongly recommended. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits.
   Course ID: 056075
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Reconstructing The Past, Scientific Realism, Philosophy Of Biology, Adv Top: Phil Of Science, Human Genome Project, Advanced Topics, Causes/Laws/Poss Worlds, Sci Realism & Empiricism, Phil Quantum Mechanics, Causation, Phil Of Quantum Mech, Causation, Laws, & Nat. Necess, Evolution

PHIL 481 (3.00)

Ancient Philosophy

Advanced work on one or more figures or issues in ancient Greek philosophy. Possible topics include the pre-Socratics, Plato and/or Aristotle, Plato's epistemology, Aristotle's philosophy of biology, ancient skepticism, Stoicism and the early Platonists. Please see the current Schedule of Courses for further details. Recommended Preparation: Two courses in philosophy or permission of instructor.
   Course ID: 056076
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Ancient Epistemology, Hellenistic Philosophy, Plato's 'Republic'

PHIL 484 (3.00)

Kant's Theoretical Philosophy

An intensive introduction to Kant's philosophy as presented in the Critique of Pure Reason and related texts. The course usually focuses on selected parts of the Critique of Pure Reason, including especially the aesthetic, the deduction, the principles and the antinomies. An alternative set of selections may be offered in different terms. Please see the current Schedule of Courses for further details. Recommended Preparation: Two courses in philosophy or permission of instructor.
   Course ID: 056077
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

PHIL 498 (3.00)

Advanced Topics in Philosophy

See PHIL 499 for course description. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 056079
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Top: Philosophical Pysc, Adv Topics In Philosophy, Top: Percptn & Represntn, Top: Perceptn/Representn, Top: Philosophical Psych, Adv Topics: Emotions, Adv Top:Truth/Sci Expl, Freedom, Determnsm, Resp, Action, Emotion, and Will, Irrationality and Emotion, Kant, Skepticism, Minds, Machines, and Logic, Wittgenstein's `Philosophical Investigations'

PHIL 499 (3.00)

Advanced Topics in Philosophy

A detailed examination either of a major area of philosophical inquiry (such as metaphysics, theory of knowledge) or of a specialized topic within one of these areas (such as the philosophy of space and time, the nature of causality, mathematical logic). Recommended Preparation: Two courses in philosophy or permission of the instructor. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 056080
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Adv Top: Phil In Lit, Philosophy Of Economics, Adv Topics In Philosophy, The Emotions, Top: Metaphilosophy, Philosohy & Parapsyc, Self, Identity, Survival, Advanced Topics In Phil, Top:Phil & Parapsychlgy, Free Will, Topics In Philosophy, Narrating Illness, Adv Top: Phil Of Science, Top: Biomedical Ethics, Heidegger, Possible Worlds, Top:Moral Desert, Deception Of Self/Others, Wittgenstein, Human Knowledge, Deception, Adv Topics In Phil, Business Ethics, Plato, Paradoxes, Wittgenstein's 'Philosophical Investigations', Minds, Machines, and Logic