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Undergraduate Catalog 2012

Political Science

POLI 100 (3.00)

American Government and Politics

An introduction to American national government and politics. An examination of the ideas, institutions and processes that define the American political system. Intended as a first course in political science for both majors and non -majors.
   Course ID: 056226
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: POLI 100H, POLI 100Y
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

POLI 100H (3.00)

American Government and Politics - Honors

An introduction to American national government and politics. An examination of the ideas, institutions and processes that define the American political system. Intended as a first course in political science for both majors and non majors.
   Course ID: 056227
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Course Equivalents: POLI 100, POLI 100Y
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

POLI 100Y (4.00)

American Government and Politics

An introduction to American national government and politics. An examination of the ideas, institutions and processes that define the American political system. Intended as a first course in political science for both majors and non-majors.
   Course ID: 056228
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Course Equivalents: POLI 100, POLI 100H
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

POLI 170 (3.00)

Politics, Culture, and Human Diversity

An introduction to the relationships among politics, culture and human diversity throughout the world. Can cultures and human diversity be judged by independent standards of justice? When does cultural diversity endanger political unity? Must religious nationalism endanger, and can secularism protect, cultural diversity?
   Course ID: 056232
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

POLI 200 (3.00)

Introduction to Political Science

An introduction to the science of politics addressing such fundamental problems, ideas and concepts as justice, power, equality, institutional principles and political behavior.
   Course ID: 056233
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

POLI 205 (3.00)

Civic Agency and Social Entrepreneurship

By building their theoretical knowledge and practical skills, this course empowers and prepares students to work effectively in their communities, social groups and democracy to initiate and achieve social change. Students will analyze and evaluate prevailing ideas about effective citizenship, activism, service and politics, including conventional assumptions about the limits of ordinary citizens' capacity to become agents of transformation. Students will work in teams to develop strategic plans for social change on campus and beyond.
   Course ID: 100366
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: AMST 205, SOCY 205

POLI 209 (1.00 - 3.00)

Selected Topics in Political Science

Study at an introductory level of a particular topic that overlaps two or more areas of political science. The specific topic will be announced before registration. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 056235
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Introduction To The Law, Mthd & Mtrls Of Research, Law And The Legal System, Civic Imag/Social Entrep, Presidential Elections, Politics & Religion, Chinese Politics

POLI 210 (3.00)

Political Philosophy

An introduction to the philosophical problems underlying political issues and the attempts through the centuries to solve these problems. Although covering many centuries of philosophy, we need not do so in chronological order. This course will introduce students to political philosophy and will, and at the same time, attempt to locate the role of philosophical reasoning within political science. Recommended Preparation: Sophomore standing or POLI 100.
   Course ID: 056236
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: POLI 210H
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)

POLI 210H (3.00)

Political Philosophy

An introduction to the philosophical problems underlying political issues and the attempts through the centuries to solve these problems. Although covering many centuries of philosophy, we need not do so in chrono-logical order. This course will introduce students to political philosophy and will, and at the same time, attempt to locate the role of philosophical reasoning within political science. Recommended Preparation: Sophomore standing or POLI 100.
   Course ID: 100347
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: POLI 210
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Arts and Humanities (GFR)

POLI 220 (3.00)

The U.S. Constitution: Where It Came From and What It Says

This course examines the circumstances leading to the Federal Convention of 1787 that drafted the U.S. Constitution, the deliberations and decisions of the convention, the basic structure of the document, the campaign for (and against) ratification of the Constitution, and the establishment of the U.S. government in 1789. It also examines the provisions of the Constitution and their impact on U.S. political institutions. This is not a course in constitutional law. Recommended Preparation: Sophomore standing or POLI 100.
   Course ID: 056237
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

POLI 230 (3.00)

Introduction to Constitutional Law (SS)

An examination of United States constitutional law by analyzing the leading decisions of the Supreme Court. Emphasis on the critical constitutional doctrines of separation of powers, federalism, tax and commerce power, and judicial review. A few leading cases on civil rights and civil liberties also will be covered. Recommended Preparation: POLI 100 or permission of the instructor.
   Course ID: 056240
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GFR)

POLI 233 (3.00)

Common Law and Legal Analysis

This course will introduce students to the origins and basic elements of American Common Law. It also will introduce them to the case analysis method known as briefing. There will be particular emphasis on the development of students' analytical and writing skills. Recommended Preparation: Sophomore standing.
   Course ID: 056241
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 240 (3.00)

State and Local Politics

An introduction to the structures and political processes of state and local governments in the United States, with particular emphasis on Maryland. Recommended Preparation: Sophomore standing or POLI 100.
   Course ID: 056242
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GFR)

POLI 250 (3.00)

Introduction to Public Administration and Policy

This course provides a basic understanding of the theories and practice of public administration: how public organizations are different from private organizations, the political context of public administration, the problems of bureaucratic power and control, organizational theory and personnel management, and core policy and management processes such as regulation and budgeting. Recommended Preparation: Sophomore standing or POLI 100.
   Course ID: 056243
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GFR)

POLI 260 (3.00)

Comparative Politics

This introductory course provides a basic understanding of the fundamental concepts in comparative politics. During the semester, students will learn to think critically and analytically about politics. In addition, students will learn about different political systems across the globe and how they function and provide governance to citizens. Recommended Preparation: Sophomore standing or POLI 100.
   Course ID: 056244
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GFR)

POLI 280 (3.00)

International Relations

This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of international relations. Students are taught the basic concepts, main theoretical approaches, and major issues in the study of world politics. The central purpose of the course is to help students develop the conceptual tools and analytical skills necessary for explaining international affairs. Students who choose to take POLI 280 MAY NOT subsequently enroll in POLI 281.
   Course ID: 056245
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: POLI 280H
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

POLI 280H (3.00)

International Relations

Study of politics among nations. Purpose is to identify theoretical guides to aid in the understanding of international politics. Contemporary problems and issues will be examined. Recommended Preparation: Sophomore standing or POLI 100.
   Course ID: 100343
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: POLI 280
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

POLI 281 (3.00)

International Relations (w/ writing focus)

This course is an introduction to the theory and practice of international relations. Students are taught the basic concepts, main theoretical approaches, and major issues in the study of world politics. The central purpose of the course is to help students develop the conceptual tools and analytical skills necessary for explaining international affairs. This course offers the same content as POLI 280; however, it is designed as a 'writing-intensive' version of the course. Students who choose to take POLI 281 MAY NOT subsequently take POLI 280.
   Course ID: 100547
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP)

POLI 300 (4.00)

Quantitative Analysis in Political Science

The primary objective of this course is to help students understand and evaluate the kinds of quantitative information presented in tables, graphs, and statistics in political science textbooks and articles that are commonly invoked in debates concerning public affairs and public policy. It also helps develop students' own research skills. It focuses particularly on survey research on public opinion and voting behavior. Recommended Preparation: POLI 100 plus MATH 106 or a score on the LRC algebra placement exam suitable for a general education MATH course.
   Course ID: 056247
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 301 (3.00)

Research Methods in Political Science

This course focuses on the preparation of research designs, consideration of quantitative versus qualitative methods, problems of inference and causality, development of cases, and the uses of statistics. The primary objective is to develop students' research capabilities. Recommended Preparation: POLI 100 plus sophomore standing.
   Course ID: 056248
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Writing Intensive

POLI 304 (3.00)

Community Research

This course will involve undergraduate students in a team-based project to generate field research findings useful to a government or non-profit client/partner. The policy areas to be researched will include environment, health, housing, poverty, and urban development, among others. Team participants will include teaching and research faculty and staff, advanced graduate students, and a Sondheim Program-based Peaceworker. Undergraduates will contribute to the research design and to the preparation of the research findings, and will conduct extensive field research. They will build practical research skills and engage with members of local communities. This course is repeatable up to 6 credits or 2 attempts.
   Course ID: 100236
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: AMST 304, GES 304, PUB 304

POLI 309 (3.00)

Selected Topics in Political Science

Study of a particular topic that overlaps two or more areas of political science. The specific topic will be announced before registration. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 056250
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Women And Politics, Business-Gov Relations, Politics Of Citizenship, Mod Political Campaigns, Presidential Election, Cntmp.Am. Foreign Policy, Topic:Maryland Politics, Campaign, Political Science Intern, Selected Topics In Poli, Business-Govt Relations, Media And Politics, Research Methods In Crim, Citizen Involvement, Contem African Politics, The Pol/Gov Of East Asia, Activism And Leadership, Women And Law, Top:Maryland Politics, 20Th Century/Balkan Poli, Constitutional Law, Inter Relation Asia Paci, Gender & Nationalism, Knowledge & Responsiblty, Pol Of Race And Gender, Const Law US Foreign Rel, Const Law Of US Frgn Rel, Contemporary American, Election 1992:Geog Aprsl, Impact Of Soviet Union, U.S. Campaigns& Election, Gender And Nationalism, Intelligence and National Security, Young Voters & the Future of American Democracy, Environmental Politics, Policy, Analysis and Advocacy

POLI 310 (3.00)

Political Philosophy Before 1600

This course consists of close textual analysis of a small number of works of political philosophy written before 1600. Among the authors that may be covered in any given year will be Thucydides, Xenophon, Plato, Aristotle, Thomas Aquinas and Machiavelli. Recommended Preparation: Sophomore standing or POLI 210.
   Course ID: 056251
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 315 (3.00)

Political Philosophy from 1600

This course consists of close textual analysis of a small number of works of political philosophy written since 1600. Among the authors who may be chosen in any given year will be Hobbes, Locke, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Marx and Nietzsche. Recommended Preparation: Sophomore standing or POLI 210.
   Course ID: 056255
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GFR)

POLI 317 (3.00)

American Political Development

This course examines the development of the American political system through a historical lens. The course uses theories of American political culture and ideology to frame particular policy areas through historical time periods from the early 1800s to the early 2000s.
   Course ID: 100319
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: HIST 317

POLI 318 (3.00)

United States Constitutional History

A survey of Constitutional history from the founding of the English colonies in North America until the present. The class focuses in particular on the Enlightenment and Common Law roots of the United States Constitution, debates over the scope of federal power, the role of slavery and freedom in constitutional debates, and the rising pressure to expand civil rights and responsibilities for all citizens.
   Course ID: 100320
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: HIST 318

POLI 319 (1.00 - 6.00)

Selected Topics in Political Philosophy

This class allows the opportunity to investigate a given topic in political philosophy outside of a historical period and beyond the scope of one author. Possible topics include: philosophical responses to slavery, natural law, feminist theory and democratic theory. Recommended Preparation: POLI 210 or permission of instructor. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 056256
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Slavery In Westrn Poli, Equality, Utopian Thry & Scnce Fic, "equality", Race, Gender & Democracy, Tocqueville's Amer. Film, Eastern Political Thought

POLI 320 (3.00)

American Political Thought

Political ideas that have been most significant in shaping the American political regime and way of life. Emphasis on the philosophic dimension of American statesmanship and on principles underlying major changes in the character of the American polity. Students are given opportunities to study subjects of special concerns to them. Recommended Preparation: Sophomore standing or POLI 100.
   Course ID: 056257
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 323 (3.00)

The Presidency

This course examines the U.S. presidency as a highly idiosyncratic, rapidly evolving political institution. The focus will be on the contemporary presidency, with specific attention paid to subtopics, including the study and assessment of the presidency and presidents; constitutional design, presidential power and leadership; campaigns and elections; public opinion, media and the rhetorical presidency; structural organization of the White House, executive office of the president and the executive branch; relations with Congress and the bureaucracy; and the president's role in domestic, economic and budgetary policies. Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or POLI 100.
   Course ID: 056259
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 324 (3.00)

The Congress

This course examines the contemporary U.S. Congress, with a constant eye toward the paradoxes that define, and dilemmas that face, the institution and its members. The course focuses on a single theme with wide-reaching implications, namely the tension between the representative Congress as the collection of individual members with idiosyncratic, local, divergent needs and the lawmaking Congress as a collective body with shared, national, convergent responsibilities. Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or POLI 100.
   Course ID: 056260
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 325 (3.00)

Political Parties and Elections

A theoretical and comparative examination of the electoral process, with special attention to American politics. Consideration of electoral methods, party organization, party systems, candidate selection and voter behavior. Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or POLI 100.
   Course ID: 056261
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 327 (3.00)

Interest Groups and Lobbyists

This course examines the significance of organized interests and lobbying behavior on national policy. Specific topics include a history of lobbying and interest-group activity; the nature of representation; collective action and collective action dilemmas; membership, recruiting and fundraising; the structure and organization of interest groups; interest-group objectives and activities; tactics, information, access and influence of groups in lobbying Congress, the president, courts and the bureaucracy; campaign financing and political action committees; regulation of lobbying and campaign activities; and the impact of groups on policy outcomes. Recommended Preparation: Sophomore standing or POLI 100.
   Course ID: 056262
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 328 (3.00)

Women and Politics

This course is an examination of significant current trends in women's political mobilization in the United States, including topics such as the gender gap, gender differences in electoral strategies, the impact of gender on political behavior, the status of women in public office, the history of women in public office and the history of women's political participation. Recommended Preparation: One prior course in political science or gender and women's studies.
   Course ID: 050129
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: GWST 328

POLI 334 (3.00)

Judicial Process

This course is designed to give the student an introduction to the way in which the American court system operates. Students will learn the elements of the formal judicial process by briefing and discussing court decisions. Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or POLI 233.
   Course ID: 056264
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 337 (3.00)

Comparative Justice

This course will examine public law systems across a spectrum of nations and in several international tribunals. We will compare the structure, powers and role of national and international courts as well as the varied meanings of justice and rights. This analysis will be conducted using cases from the courts in our study, as well as by reading scholarly and journalistic reports on the topics discussed. Recommended Preparation: Any 200-level POLI course or junior standing.
   Course ID: 056265
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Writing Intensive

POLI 338 (3.00)

Women, Gender, and Law

This course examines ways in which gender affects rights with the American civil and criminal legal systems. It explores the interrelationship between traditional attitudes and stereotypes concerning women's roles in society and the historical development of women's legal rights. The course focuses on the consequences of sex differences in shaping the rights of persons under the U.S. Constitution statutory remedies to discrimination in employment and education, legal issues relating to reproduction and personal life, and the response of criminal law to issues affecting women, including domestic violence, rape and prostitution. Recommended Preparation: One prior course in political science or gender and women's studies.
   Course ID: 050109
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: GWST 338
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

POLI 339 (3.00)

Legal Advocacy

This course instructs students in various methods of legal and political advocacy. Each year the American Mock Trial Association distributes complete case materials. Using these materials students study the law of the case, the law of evidence, civil or criminal procedure and strategic methods for implementing these rules. This course will provide students with: (1) knowledge of trial practice and the judicial process; (2) training in constructing and testing logical arguments; (3) training in thinking and speaking in high pressure situations; (4) training in written advocacy; (5) instruction on the law of evidence; and (6) instruction in various legal areas. Recommended Preparation: POLI 100 or permission of instructor. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 3 credits.
   Course ID: 056266
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 340 (3.00)

Problem-Solving in the Urban Black Community

Urban problems within the Black community. Nature and types of problems, causes (internal and external), effects and remedies. Topics to be announced each semester offered. Recommended Preparation: AFST 271 or junior/senior status
   Course ID: 050019
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: POLI 436
   Same as Offering: AFST 385

POLI 341 (1.00)

Legislative Simulation

This course teaches legislative skills via active, faculty-supervised involvement in UMBC's Maryland Student Legislature (MSL) delegation. Students write and debate original legislation, learn parliamentary procedure, and participate in off-campus legislative sessions with college students from around the state. They also gain in-depth knowledge of the Maryland General Assembly. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 4 credits or 4 attempts.
   Course ID: 100556
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete POLI 100.

POLI 349 (3.00)

Environmental Politics

This course explores how political beliefs, behaviors, and institutions produce public policies intended to protect the natural environment and the humans that depend on that environment. Particular emphasis is placed on how environmental and other advocacy organizations attempt to affect those institutions¿ decisions. Central to the course is student participation in various forms of environmental politics, with the support of the course¿s instructor. Recommended Course Preparation: POLI 100 or GES 120.
   Course ID: 101932
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: Your academic level must be junior to enroll.

POLI 350 (3.00)

The Policy-Making Process

This course introduces students to the context, participants and stages (e.g., problem definition and implementation) of the American public policy process. It focuses on domestic public policy-making at the national level and examines some of the political, constitutional and social equality issues affecting public policy making. In addition, the course analyzes several substantive policy areas (energy, crime, welfare, health and education) employing the policy stages around which the course is structured. Recommended Preparation: POLI 100 or junior standing.
   Course ID: 056271
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 352 (3.00)

Administrative Law

The principles and practices of administrative law in the United States. Topics include legislative and executive control of administrative action, processes of administrative decision-making, the informal administrative process and governmental tort liability. Recommended Preparation: Junior standing and one of POLI 100, POLI 233 or POLI 250.
   Course ID: 056273
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 353 (3.00)

Governmental Budgeting and Financial Administration

The course begins with an overview of how governments acquire money through taxation and debt and comply with balanced budget and related constraints. It proceeds to the study of how governments spend money. Among the topics covered are budget analysis methods, the institutional structure of the budget process, political strategies for budgetary competition, performance budgeting, management, budgeting for infrastructure and economic development, and contracting with private providers of public services. Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or POLI 250.
   Course ID: 056274
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Writing Intensive

POLI 354 (3.00)

Public Management and Personnel Systems

This course explores how government agencies are led and managed. Topics include the roles and personalities of agency leaders, how agencies interact with political authorities and citizens to establish their missions, organizational cultures, the internal structures of government agencies, and the relationship of agencies with non-profit and private sector partners. A major focus of the course is on the selection and motivation of personnel in the context of merit systems and unionization. Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or POLI 250.
   Course ID: 056275
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 360 (3.00)

Comparative Political Analysis

Examination of liberal-pluralist, Marxist-radical and conservative-corporatist frameworks as alternative approaches to the study of comparative politics. These approaches represent both ways of interpreting politics, as well as ways of thinking critically about them. There will be case studies of selected countries to test the propositions of the course. Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or POLI 260.
   Course ID: 056277
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Writing Intensive, Social Sciences (GFR)

POLI 371 (3.00)

Comparative Asian Politics

Comparative study of the politics of Asian regimes with emphasis on the origins and impact of democratic versus authoritarian regimes and the problems of modernization in such countries as Japan, India, Indonesia and China. Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or POLI 260.
   Course ID: 056282
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 373 (3.00)

Comparative Middle Eastern and North African Politics

Comparative study of the politics of the Middle Eastern and North African states, including the relationship between development, political organization and social structure. Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or POLI 260.
   Course ID: 056283
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 374 (3.00)

European Politics

First, the course offers an examination of classical concepts in comparative and European politics, such as electoral systems, political parties, federalism, and the welfare state. Next, we study the European Union, its history, institutions, and effects on European politics. Finally, at the very end of the semester we turn to the former Communist countries of Eastern Europe, discuss the recent regime transition that has occurred in many countries and consider the impact of the most recent enlargement on the European Union. Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or POLI 260.
   Course ID: 056284
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 377 (3.00)

Latin American Politics

Comparative study of the politics of Latin-American states. Emphasis on political problems associated with development and modernization in the Western hemisphere. Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or POLI 260.
   Course ID: 056285
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 378 (3.00)

Contemporary African Politics

Nationalism and the struggle for independence. The evolution of post-independence systems and institutions. Examination of problems and trends since independence, including development administration, territorial and ethnic conflicts, nation-building and the role of the military, decolonization and neocolonialism, and Africa in world affairs. Recommended Preparation: AFST 211 or HIST 242. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 050020
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Contemp African Politics
   Same as Offering: AFST 320

POLI 379 (3.00)

War and Film

This course explores the history of interaction between war and film to understand the impact of these two powerful technologies on each other and on human life. Students taking the course can expect to develop a culturally differentiated understanding of meanings of war in film. We will watch and critically review films, audio, and other media and tie intellectual developments with the representation of war in film. Recommended Course Preparation: POLI 280
   Course ID: 100970
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Arts and Humanities (GEP), Culture (GEP)

POLI 380 (3.00)

International Relations Theory

An intensive overview of the central schools of thought in the study of international relations (IR). We will read, discuss and write about theories rooted in realism, liberalism, Marxism, constructivism and other IR paradigms. Emphasis is on the purposes of theory, the main perspectives in IR theory and how IR theory has developed in conjunction with the evolution of international relations itself. Students should be prepared for careful reading, critical discussion and analytical writing. Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or POLI 280.
   Course ID: 056286
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 381 (3.00)

International Relations of the Asia-Pacific Region

Theoretical and historical examination of international relations in the Asia-Pacific region since 1945. Topics will include: the Cold War in Asia; regional great-power rivalries; contemporary flashpoints such as the Korean peninsula and Taiwan; transnational terrorism; the U.S.-led regional alliance system; and multilateral groupings, such as APEC and ASEAN. Throughout the course, we will pay close attention to how history has shaped theory and how theory, in turn, has shaped history. Recommended Preparation: POLI 280.
   Course ID: 056287
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 384 (3.00)

Diplomacy and the United Nations

This course is an orientation to the activities of the United Nations. It focuses on pressing international issues and provides an overview of international laws and the procedures of diplomacy. Students will simulate United Nations sessions and treaty negotiation in addition to articulating policy for individual nations. Course materials and class discussions will assist students in preparation for Model United Nations conferences. Non-delegates are welcome to enroll. Offered only in fall semesters. Recommended Preparation: Sophomore standing or POLI 280.
   Course ID: 056290
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 384L (1.00)

Model United Nations

Open to students attending fall or spring Model United Nations conferences. Students will attend collegiate conferences to serve as a nation's expert on assigned committees to negotiate United Nations resolutions. Students will be graded on their research on issues, completeness of position papers and draft resolutions prepared for the conference. Offered both fall and spring semesters. Recommended Preparation: POLI 384. This course is repeatable for a maximum of 4 credits or 4 attempts.
   Course ID: 056291
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 385 (3.00)

International Security

This course is both an introduction to the scholarly discipline of security studies and a broad survey of contemporary international security issues. Topics will include core concepts in security studies; strategy during the Cold War; post-Cold War international security issues, such as nuclear dangers and arms control; major-power relations in Europe and Asia; and so-called new security issues, such as sub-state conflicts, transnational terrorism, refugee and migration flows, the problem of failed states and environmental degradation. Recommended Recommended Preparation: POLI 280.
   Course ID: 056292
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 386 (3.00)

The Politics of Development

This course examines how the process of economic development is governed on the national, transnational and international levels. Theories of political modernization, imperialism and dependency, the developmental state, neoliberalism and post-developmentalism will be used as alternative approaches in the study of several policy areas, such as international trade,technology and intellectual property, social welfare and natural resources. Recommended Preparation: (GLBL101and GLBL301) OR (POLI260 and POLI280)
   Course ID: 102074
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: GLBL 386

POLI 387 (3.00)

Political Economy: A Primer

In a world of scarcity, societies use both political and economic means to determine 'who gets what, where, when, why, and how.' The political-economic 'mix' employed, reflects each society's basic values and beliefs about what constitutes 'the good society.' In this course, we will examine concepts, institutions, and instruments associated with the domains of politics (e.g., power/governance) and economics (e.g., exchange/ markets). We will consider their relative strengths and weaknesses as these relate to motivating behavior and organizing collective activity in order to address the great social challenges of our day. Topical case studies will vary from semester to semester, but case study topics are likely to include climate change, affordable health care, entitlements, governing/regulating the Internet.
   Course ID: 056294
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP)
   Requirement Group: You must complete one GEP SS course.

POLI 388 (3.00)

International Conflict and Cooperation

The course introduces game theory at an elementary level. Simple models of strategic interaction and conflict will be presented to analyze the strategy and tactics of international (and other) deterrence, coercion, bargaining and cooperation. Attention will be given to doctrines of nuclear strategy and arms control and to the changing strategic balance between the United States and the Soviet Union during the Cold War period. Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or POLI 280.
   Course ID: 056295
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 390 (3.00)

American Foreign Policy

This course examines how American foreign policy is created and under what constitutional authority it is established. It explores the historical underpinnings and contemporary currents of American foreign policy. The course also examines the way Americans perceive global events and considers how these perceptions influence contemporary policy. Recommended Preparation: POLI 280 or junior standing.
   Course ID: 056296
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)

POLI 395 (3.00)

National Security Policy of the United States

A comprehensive overview of the problems of policy, organization and implementation involved in providing for the national security of the United States. Background in international politics is helpful but not required. Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or one course in international politics.
   Course ID: 056301
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 401 (1.00 - 3.00)

Individual Study in Political Science

Independent reading and research supervised by a member of the political science faculty. Intended for students who desire to study independently an aspect of political science not covered by regular course offering. Variable credit course repeatable for a maximum of 12 credits.
   Course ID: 056303
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study

POLI 402 (1.00 - 3.00)

Honors Research

Research leading to honors thesis under supervision of a member of the political science faculty. Prerequisite: Admission into the departmental honors program. Variable credit course repeatable for a maximum of 6 credits.
   Course ID: 056304
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study

POLI 403 (1.00 - 3.00)

Research Internship

Student applicants selected by the department will work closely with a faculty member in the conduct of research or the preparation of publications. Intended for advanced students who are seriously interested in entering graduate study in political science or a related field. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 056305
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study

POLI 405 (1.00 - 3.00)

Seminar in Political Science

An advanced seminar on some topic within political science to be selected by the instructor and announced before registration. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 056306
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Community And Politics, Identity Politics & American Democracy, Globalization and Transitional Justice, The Political Theory of the American Framing, Cultural Identity and American Democracy

POLI 406 (3.00)

Seminar in Political Psychology

A seminar covering those areas of politics in which a psychological perspective can enhance understanding of the political process. No background in psychology will be assumed. Under the guidance of the instructor, students will pursue individual research projects, as well as discuss and evaluate generally assigned readings. Recommended Preparation: Junior standing.
   Course ID: 056307
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 409 (1.00 - 3.00)

Selected Topics in Political Science

Study of a particular topic that overlaps two or more areas of political science. The specific topic will be announced before registration. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 056308
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Electoral Systems, Individuals W/Disability, Leadership And Respons, Ser To Urban Communities, Mock Trial II, Honrs Thesis Prep Course, Globalism & Int'l Terror, Election 1988:, Top:Hum Parntg &Hum Evol, Information Policy, Topic: Women And Law, Top:Hum Parent&Hum Evol, Mgmt Gov In An Urban Env, Challenges To Privacy, Politics/Evolution, Environmental Policy, International Terrorism, Politics Of Human Rights, Selected Topics Poli Sci, History Of Terrorism, Slectd Tps In Poli Sci, Politics Of Terrorism, Individ W/Disabilities, Fld Sem On Public Ldrshp, Pub Policy&Pub Speaking, Politics Of Iraq, Dynamics/Water Rec Mgmt, Fighting Terrorism, Top:Biol Found Poli Thry, Social Policy Reform, Mock Trial, Religion & Int'l Politic, Transitional Justice, Top: Women & Law, Corp Business/Econ Dev, Biol Found Poli Theory, Sel Topics In Poli Sci, The Honors Research Proj, Politics Of Kurdistan, World Politics 21St Cent, Globalization and Transitional Justice, Research in UMBC Political History, Computer & Digital Forensics, Political Writing, Democracy and Revolution in the Middle East, The Politics of Cybersecurity, Maryland Student Legislature, Democratization, Law and Social Change

POLI 410 (1.00 - 3.00)

Seminar in Political Philosophy

Advanced study of selected texts, with emphasis on exploration of problems in political philosophy, such as the fact/value problem, the relationship between political philosophy and ideology, or the dilemmas of equality, freedom and excellence in a liberal democracy. The specific topic will be announced before registration. Prerequisite: Application and acceptance by the instructor. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 056310
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Pol Phil & Theater, Human Body/Body Politic, Seminar:Rousseau's Phil, Seminar: Aristotle, Classical Chinese Tchng, Bro,Sis, Fellow Citizens, Moral Laws, Sem: Rousseau, Aristotle, Political Phil Rousseau, Thomas Hobbs And Origin, Rousseau, Political Phil & Autobio, Sem: Detocqueville, Pol Phil & Internat Rel, Fellow Citizens, Sem: Aristotle, Seminar: Montesquieu, Seminar: Tyranny, Justice For All, Democracy In America

POLI 412 (3.00)

Ethics and Public Policy

Moral issues facing people individually and collectively in their professional or public roles, such as government officials, corporate managers, scientists, doctors and citizens. Clarification of value concepts such as freedom, equality, justice, the public interest and community. Exposition of these values as they pertain to actual cases of decision-making and policy debates. Issue areas examined include personal integrity in public and private organizations, corporate social responsibility, government regulation of technology and the ethics of income redistribution. This is a seminar course intended for upper-level students with some background in ethics and/or political philosophy. Recommended Preparation: Permission of instructor.
   Course ID: 056312
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 419 (3.00)

Selected Topics in Political Theory

Study of a particular topic within the area of political philosophy and theory. The specific topic will be announced before registration. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 056316
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Topic:Biol & Pol Consios, After The Age Of Reason, Hobbes Origin Of Modern, Crisis Of Poli Origins, Top:Ethics/Public Policy, Political Phil Today, Biol Thry& Pol Conscious, Topics In Political Thry, Topics:Political Theory, Political Phil & Lit, Af/Am Political Thought, Humane Warfare?, Political Education, Islam, Law, and Politics, Global Political Theories, Political Philosphy of War and Peace, Globalization

POLI 423 (3.00)

Presidential Elections

This course examines the subject of presidential election in its full generality. It considers normative criteria for leadership selection processes; the creation; evolution and contemporary structure of the U.S. presidential selection process; and the strategic considerations that derive from this structure. Recommended Preparation: POLI 323 or 325 or junior standing.
   Course ID: 056319
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 425 (3.00)

U.S. Campaigns and Elections

This course examines campaigns and elections in the United States as important elements of representative democracy. Candidates, voters, political parties, groups and consultants are evaluated according to the function each serves in the democratic process and the role each plays in electoral politics. Recommended Preparation: POLI 325 or junior standing.
   Course ID: 056320
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 427 (3.00)

African American Politics

An examination of the unique history, content and forms of African American political participation, with a particular emphasis on the nature and consequences of African-American influence within, or exclusion from, the workings of various political institutions. Attention is focused on the attitudinal and structural dimensions of participation, the socio-economic conditions of African Americans and on selected attempts by African Americans to use the political process for ameliorating said conditions. Upon completion, students will be familiarized with issues affecting contemporary discussions within African-American politics and democratic theory.
   Course ID: 056322
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: POLI 325

POLI 428 (4.00)

Politics Internship

Student applicants selected by the department intern in the offices of elected officials. During the internship, students also participate in a directed reading program, scheduled meetings with other UMBC participants, and seminars involving guest speakers and students from all participating colleges in the area. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 056323
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 429 (3.00)

Selected Topics in American Government and Politics

Study of a particular topic within the area of American politics. The specific topic will be announced before registration. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 056325
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Sci, Tech, & Public Pol, Top:Presidential Electns, Politics Envirn Policy, Top:Pol.Of Envir.Pol Mkg, Implementing Pub Policy, Implementing The Program, American Political Arena, Executive Branch Policy, The Issue Of Privacy, Sci, Tech, Public Policy, Media And Politics, The Amer.Political Arena, Afro-American Politics, Presidential Elections, Top:Political Leadership, Topic:, Environmental Policy Mkg, Wealth, Power, & Values, National Security Policy, Top: Politics & Sports, Science, Tech, & Policy, Sci, Tech, And Pub Pol, Science/Tech/Publ Policy, Top:Environmental Policy, Top:Politics Of Regulatn, Science,Tech & Publc Pol, US Political Leadership, The Pol. Of Health, Sel Top American Govt, Mass Media &Amer Politic

POLI 432 (3.00)

Civil Rights

Examination of the criminal justice, due process and equal protection rights of Americans as articulated in judicial decisions and statutes. Among issues studied are capital punishment, affirmative action, abortion, equality in education, housing, etc. Recommended Preparation: POLI 230 or junior standing.
   Course ID: 056327
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 433 (3.00)

First Amendment Freedoms

The freedoms of speech, press, religion and assembly as defined in important Supreme Court decisions. The problem of liberty versus authority in a democratic regime. The competing theories of First Amendment interpretation by courts. Recommended Preparation: POLI 230 or junior standing.
   Course ID: 056328
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: PUBL 633

POLI 435 (3.00)

Legal Reasoning

Designed to give students advanced understanding of the ways in which American lawyers and judges think about legal questions and issues. The course will be devoted to intensive practice in the process of legal analysis. Students will study a series of cases and related materials that address the basic tools of legal reasoning and the special characteristics of reasoning in the specific areas of American law. Recommended Preparation: Permission of the instructor
   Course ID: 056330
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 436 (3.00)

Health Law

Topics include an overview of major issues in health law, such as definitions of life, the Good Samaritan concept, client rights, privacy, professional licensing, liability and malpractice. Recommended Preparation: Junior standing.
   Course ID: 056331
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: AFST 385, POLI 340

POLI 437 (3.00)

International Human Rights Law

In this course we study human rights law and the many actors and institutions struggling with its enforcement. In it we use the case method to master the legal contours of human rights and explain their limits and possibilities. To understand contemporary human rights law, one has to have a good grounding in the philosophical, political and legal concepts that form the basis of international human rights. We also focus our study on efforts to find domestic and international justice, and the relationship between human rights and international law. We introduce the legal elements of various human rights provisions and take into account the role that NGOs play in the protection and sustenance of human rights regimes. Finally, we examine several specific rights through efforts to enforce them in domestic and international courts. Recommended Course Preparation: POLI 230, 233, 280, 337, 432, 433 OR 482.
   Course ID: 100676
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 438 (4.00)

Legal Internship

Student applicants selected by the department intern under lawyers and judges. The internship program includes supervised public service, directed reading and research, and classroom and seminar instruction. Intended for non-majors as well as majors. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 056332
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Writing Intensive

POLI 439 (3.00)

Selected Topics in Public Law

Study of a particular topic within the area of public law, such as the relationship between private law and public justice, the role of the judicial process in social change or a particular area of constitutional law. The specific topic will be announced before registration. Prerequisite: See current Schedule of Classes. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 056334
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Legal Reasoning, Hate Speech & First Amen, Law And The Policy Proc, Top: Health Law, Top:Secrecy/Surveillance, Public Law; Legal Reason, Children And The Law, Top:Criminal Justice Pol, Transitional Justice, Sel Topics Public Law, Law And The Internet, International Trade Law, Modern National Security Law

POLI 440 (3.00)

Urban Politics

An examination of problems, politics and policies relevant to state, county, city and other forms of local government organizations. Problems of the city in an age of urbanization and trends in metropolitan and suburban politics are considered,with particular reference to the Baltimore area. Recommended Preparation: Junior standing plus POLI 240 or POLI 250.
   Course ID: 056335
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 442 (3.00)

Intergovernmental Relations

An examination of the American federal system, with emphasis on processes of conflict and coordination between local governments, state governments and national government. Attention is focused on the allocation of responsibilities to different levels of government and the use of intergovernmental tools (such as grants, mandates, and cooperative agreements) to implement domestic policies. Recommended Preparation: POLI 240 or junior standing.
   Course ID: 056336
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: POLI 452

POLI 443 (3.00)

Urban Problems and Policy Analysis

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of the nature and causes of urban problems and the ability to analyze and understand the problems and policies addressed to them. Recommended Preparation: Permission of instructor. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 056337
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 445 (3.00)

Law, Politics and American Educational Policy

Examination of the way in which the political process creates and implements educational policy. Topics include school integration, students' rights and academic freedom, religion and education, federal legislation and regulation, politics of higher education, school finance, collective bargaining, urban school governance and school choice.
   Course ID: 056338
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 446 (3.00)

The Politics of Poverty and Social Welfare Policy

Study of liberal, conservative and radical views of the welfare state. How politics in Congress, the bureaucracy, interest groups and federal-state relations affect the formulation and implementation of social welfare policies. Comparisons of American policies and politics with those of other nations. Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or two courses in American politics.
   Course ID: 056339
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Writing Intensive

POLI 448 (4.00)

Internship in Policy, Politics, and Administration

Students selected by the department intern in the offices of elected officials, political parties, advocacy groups, think tanks, government agencies, public administrators, or other institutions in the policy process. Supervised reading and research programs and seminars with other interns develop relevant professional skills and situate the internship experience within the broader study of efforts to shape public policy.
   Course ID: 100367
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 450 (3.00)

Seminar in Public Administration and Policy

An integrative seminar for advanced students in public administration and policy. The course applies theories of administrative capacity, organizational leadership, policy design and political feasibility to current policy problems. Students prepare research papers with special attention paid to improving information gathering and writing skills. Recommended Preparation: POLI 350, 353 and 354 or permission of instructor.
   Course ID: 056341
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 452 (3.00)

Politics of Health

This course examines how health policies reflect the political system in which they are enacted and implemented. It introduces concepts, theories and literature concerning the development of the U.S. healthcare system and the contemporary agendas and actions of the federal and state governments. It applies political dimensions to policy issues such as access to insurance and health services, cost containment, disease and injury prevention, and initiatives for health care reform. Recommended Preparation: Junior standing and POLI 100 or permission of instructor.
   Course ID: 056342
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: POLI 442

POLI 458 (4.00)

Administrative Internship

Student applicants selected by the department intern in the offices of federal, state and local administrations. The internship includes supervised reading programs and seminars with other interns and other speakers. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 056343
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 459 (3.00)

Selected Topics In Public Policy

Study of a particular topic within the area of public policy. The specific topic will be announced before registration. Prerequisite: See current Schedule of Classes. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 056345
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Public Admin And Policy, An International Perspec, Urban Management, Social Policy Reform

POLI 460 (3.00)

Comparative Institutional Development

Institutions are the rules that guide human interaction. Whenever we come into contact with other humans, institutions are involved. But where did our social, political and economic institutions come from? How did they become so firmly entrenched in our societies? This class attempts to answer these profound and often abstract questions by reading influential books on the subject and by generating our own ideas in class discussions. Recommended Preparation: POLI 260.
   Course ID: 056346
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 461 (3.00)

Comparative Legislatures

This class will present an analysis of various democratic legislatures around the globe. Each student will be assigned a specific legislature and will be responsible for gathering and analyzing information for that legislature during the semester. Topics for class discussion will include each legislature's history, broad institutional structures (procedures and rules), and main political features (parties and politicians). Recommended Preparation: POLI 260
   Course ID: 056347
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 462 (3.00)

Comparative Electoral Systems and Representation

This course examines the great variety of election methods used around the world and their consequences for the representation of parties, interests and groups - especially those with minority status - in legislatures, governments and policy outcomes. Recommended Preparation: POLI 260 or POLI 325.
   Course ID: 056348
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: POLI 472

POLI 464 (3.00)

Comparative Political Economy

An examination of the political and policy responses of the advanced industrial states in Western Europe, North America and Japan to past and present economic challenges. The course will focus on how ideology, political, social and economic institutions, and socioeconomic interests in each area shape its response to the rise of the new competitors in other parts of the world, changes in technology and production, and the globalization of markets and finance. Recommended Preparation: POLl 260 or junior standing.
   Course ID: 056350
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 467 (3.00)

Comparative Foreign Policy

This course focuses on the intersection of two important subfields in Political Science, foreign policy and comparative politics. Initial work centers on an examination of the conceptual and methodological tools for the analysis of foreign policy formulation and implementation. Students explore commonalities and differences in the behavior of states from both a regional comparative basis as well as a topical one. The latter includes decision-making theory, two-level game analysis, and an intercultural dissonance hypothesis. Recommended Course Preparation: POLI 260 and /or POLI 280.
   Course ID: 056353
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 469 (3.00)

Selected Topics in Comparative Politics

Study of a particular topic chosen from within the area of comparative politics. The specific topic will be announced before registration. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 056355
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Top:Latin American Devel, Reform In Soviet Union, Islamic Law: Origins, Comp Env Politics&Policy, Politics Of Canada, Top:Conservatism/Devel, Islamic Law, Top:Anth Of 3Rd Wrld Dev, Society/Politics In Euro, Comparative Justice, Top: Compartv Pol Econ, Top: Arab Thought, Top:Central Amer Politcs, Political Islam, Democratic Practice, Govt & Poli In Mideast, Politics Of Develpment, Soviet Union & Legacy, Comparative Legislatives, Democratic Consol Africa, Topics In Comp Politics, Trans.Frm Author.To Demo, Centrl Europe/Euro Union, Institutional Dev., Comp. Welfare Systems, Dem In Sub Sahara Africa, Top:Modern Arab Thought, Democ/Authortrn Regime, Islam And Politics, Politics And Islam, Top:Comp Political Econ, Top:European Integration, Islam & Politics, European Integration, Sem: Comp Political Econ, Top:Soviet Reform, Relig & Polit In Mideast, Comparative Politics, Modern Irish Politics, Italian Politics, Politics of Native America, Opposition Parties, New Europe/State of Transatlantic

POLI 470 (3.00)

Politics of Human Rights

The term "human rights" has become an incredibly powerful one in international relations, used as everything from a justification for support of a given country to an excuse for war against one. But "human rights" is more than a catch-all phrase differentiating the "good" from the "bad" in this world. It is a set of commonly recognized norms and laws that have evolved over hundreds of years. It is a system of international, regional and domestic enforcement mechanisms. And it is an increasingly important part of Western states' self-identities and foreign policies. The purpose of this course is to explore what human rights are, how they have evolved, and how they influence the international and domestic political arenas. Recommended Course Preparation: POLI260, POLI280
   Course ID: 101873
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Writing Intensive

POLI 471 (3.00)

Globalization and Transitional Justice

In this course we analyze transitional justice, the process by which political elites in post-repressive states account for human rights violations orchestrated by their predecessors. When and under what conditions do newly empowered political leaders choose to confront past abuses and what are the mechanisms they have at their disposal? Why do some new leaders choose to close the past with a one-line condemnation, while others establish a year-long truth commission and still others initiate a decade of criminal prosecutions? This class focuses on the political, rather than judicial, side of transitional justice, taking into account the elite calculus of risk and advantage inherent in the variety of policies political leaders have at their disposal. Recommended Course Preparation: POLI 260, POLI 280
   Course ID: 101872
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Writing Intensive

POLI 472 (3.00)

Modern Indian Politics

This course examines modern nation-building and self-government in a traditional society. Other topics discussed include: the secular state; political parties, economic development, the transformation of caste, the rise of revolutionary movements and of ethnic and religious nationalism, the development of nuclear weapons, and the continuing conflict with Pakistan. Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or POLl 100 or 170.
   Course ID: 056356
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: POLI 462
   Attributes: Culture (GFR)

POLI 473 (3.00)

Mahatma Gandhi's Political Experiments with Truth

A study of Gandhi's effort to gain national independence and to reform India by non-violent vindication of truth. A reflection on Gandhi's sexual asceticism, civil disobedience, and politicization of women. A comparison and contrast of Gandhi with Socrates, Henry Thoreau and Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. Intended for non-majors as well as majors. A seminar presentation, a research paper, and regular class attendance are all required. Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or a grade of C or better in POLI200 or POLI301 or a writing class beyond ENGL100
   Course ID: 050224
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: RLST 473
   Attributes: Culture (GFR)

POLI 474 (3.00)

Democratization

In this course, we explore the theory behind, and the policy questions surrounding, democratization. We begin this class by considering the outstanding traits of democracies and their alternatives, and looking at various theories that help account for why some states democratize and others do not. Next, we consider democratization from the viewpoint of the citizen in non-democratic states. In this section, we look both at the role of the masses and that of counter-elite activists as they seek to weaken the non-democratic state and replace it with a democratic alternative. Since these actors are frequently assisted by outside states, and especially the United States, we subsequently consider the pros and cons of democracy assistance. Finally, this class looks at the various conundrums common to democratizing states, ranging from choosing appropriate institutional mechanisms to the process of dealing with past human rights abuses and abusers. Recommended Course Preparation: POLI260, POLI280
   Course ID: 101993
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 475 (3.00)

Politics in the Former Soviet Union

This seminar is designed to introduce the student to the politics and government of the countries that occupy the territory of the former Soviet Union. It will cover both the history and the current political status of these countries with particular reference to the influence of the Soviet experience on their internal politics and international relations. Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or POLl 260.
   Course ID: 056357
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 480 (3.00)

International Organization

One characteristic of the increasingly globalized international environment is the proliferation of intergovernmental organizations (IGOs, such as the U.N., the World Bank, IMF, WTO) and non-governmental organizations (NGOs, such as Amnesty International, Greenpeace and the International Red Cross). This course examines what it means to organize internationally, both in theory and in practice. It considers the future of IGOs and NGOs and their likely impact on the dynamics of international relations. Recommended Preparation: POLl 280 or junior standing.
   Course ID: 056358
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 482 (3.00)

International Law

This course is designed to introduce students to the complexities of law in the international environment. The course begins by familiarizing students with the American legal system, a brief overview of the international system and how cases are reported in the U.S., as well as the nature of international law. The first half of the class deals with how international law is created by examining treaties, the role of custom, general principles of law and judicial opinions. The second half of the class deals with the United Nations, nonofficial sources of law and the application of international law in specific instances, including a brief review of human rights. Recommended Preparation: POLl 280 and any law course.
   Course ID: 056360
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 483 (3.00)

International Negotiation

This course presents the principles of international negotiation. Using the case study method and a multiparty negotiation simulation, students will learn in hands-on fashion about the theory and practice of negotiation. Key conceptual notions include game theoretic models of strategic situations and mediation approaches. Special topics include the role of the media in agenda-setting, the importance of non-state actors in the 21 st century diplomatic arena, and the challenges of public goods issues in international and transnational negotiations. Recommended Course Preparation: POLI 280
   Course ID: 102083
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: GLBL 483

POLI 484 (3.00)

Politics and International Relations of Iran

Examines Iranian politics and foreign affairs over the last century. Covers the constitutional revolution of 1905-06; modernization under Reza Shah; the 1951 nationalization of Iran's oil industry and 1953 coup; the reign of the Shah, Iran's role in the Cold War; the 1978-1979 Islamic revolution; and the Iran-Iraq war. Focuses intensively on post-revolutionary Iran, especially its aspirations for great-power status, pursuit of nuclear weapons, and contentious relations with the United States. Recommended Preparation: POLI 260, POLI 280, or junior standing.
   Course ID: 100188
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 485 (3.00)

Dynamics of the Arab-Israeli Conflict

The course starts with a focus on the development of the Arab-Israeli conflict from its beginnings in the period when Palestine was controlled by the Ottoman Empire. The growth of Arab nationalism and Zionism will be compared, as will the conflicting promises made by the British to both Zionists and Arab nationalists during World War I. Next is a review of British rule over both Arabs and Zionists during the Palestine Mandate. The second half of the course is an examination of the Arab-Israeli wars since 1948, the Camp David and Oslo peace processes, the Al-Aksa Intifadah and developments since then. The conflict is analyzed against the background of great powers intervention in the Middle East, and the dynamics of intra-Arab politics, political Islam and oil. Recommended Preparation: One of the following: JDST 274, 310, POLI 280 or 373
   Course ID: 050185
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: JDST 410

POLI 486 (3.00)

Middle East International Relations.

An examination of the development of international relations in the Middle East since the 19th century. Special emphasis is placed on intra-Arab relations, the Arab-lsraeli conflict and the role of the great powers in the Middle East. Recommended Preparation: POLl 373 or any course in international politics.
   Course ID: 056361
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 487 (3.00)

International Political Economy

The course focuses on the basic analytical tools and knowledge of economics needed to develop an understanding of important international economic problems with which political actors must cope. The course explores the challenges for policy-makers stemming from the globalization of finance, markets and production. Recommended Preparation: Junior standing or POLl 280 or ECON 280.
   Course ID: 056362
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 488 (3.00)

Politics and International Relations of South Asia

Overview of the politics and international relations of South Asia, a region that includes India, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Afghanistan, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Bhutan and the Maldives. Topics covered include the history of the region, covering the British colonial period, the awakening of nationalism in the late 19th century, the independence movements of the early 20th century and the formation of newly independent polities at mid-century; processes of political and economic development; significant issues in South Asia's international politics, including India-Pakistan relations, Kashmir, the foreign policies of regional actors, nuclear proliferation, Afghanistan's long war, ethnic conflict, transnational terrorism, and U.S. foreign policy in the region. Recommended Preparation: POLI 280 or junior standing.
   Course ID: 056363
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 489 (3.00)

Selected Topics in International Relations

Study of a particular topic in international relations. The specific topic will be announced before registrations. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 056364
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Sel Topics:Internatl Rel, US-Israeli Relations, Intl Environmental Poli, Amer In Global Economy, International Law, Nuclear Issues/Terrorism, Migration In Int'l Rel, Top: Frn Ecn Pol Inds St, Peace, Order & Cooperat, Top: Soviet Forgn Policy, Top:Internatl Organizatn, Human Rights, South Asia, Sel Topics Am Forgn Plcy, Top:Amer Frgn Econ Pol, Environ/Causes Of War, Science & Intl Politics, Comp. Foreign Policies, Comparative Foreign Policy, International Law & Org, Internatl Negotiations, Internat'l Organization, American Foreign Policy, Top:Arm Contrl/Natl Sec, Intnl Negotiation Lab, Cont Issues Int Relation, Arab-Israeli Conflict, ., Science & Int'l Politics, Top:, Internat Organizations, Modern Iran, Politics & Int'l Relations of Iran, Mid East International Rel, Latin Am/Afr US Pol, Power Shift: America and the "Rise of the Rest", Pakistan-Afghanistan, International Relations of Latin America, Changing Power Configurations

POLI 490 (3.00)

Political Violence

This course examines the causes, character, and consequences of political violence¿as opposed to interstate war. We will ask why political violence occurs in one location and at a particular time. What structural conditions make political violence likely? How do agents contribute to violence? What are the patterns of political violence? How problems of collective action are resolved in the conduct of violence? How do competing groups and states respond? What conditions make peace likely? Recommended course Preparation: POLI 385 and POLI 388
   Course ID: 100971
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Writing Intensive

POLI 492 (3.00)

Contemporary American Foreign Policy

This course is designed for students with a basic understanding of foreign policy and the foreign policy apparatus in the United States. The course examines present-day issues that confront the United States in the foreign policy arena. Students will explore American foreign policy as it relates to other key states in world politics. Group work and class participation will be an integral part of the course. Recommended Preparation: POLI 280 and junior standing.
   Course ID: 056365
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

POLI 499 (3.00)

Selected Topics in American Foreign Policy

Study of a particular topic within the area of foreign policy. The specific topic will be announced before registration. This course is repeatable for credit.
   Course ID: 056367
   Consent: Department Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Cit Educ In Inter Relat, Foreign Policy, Sel Top Amer Forgn Plcy, To: Amer Defense Policy, Top:Uruguay & Trade Tren