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Undergraduate Catalog 2013

Anthropology

ANTH 101 (3.00)

Introduction to Anthropology

Introduction to Anthropology explores the four traditional fields of anthropology: physical/biological anthropology, archeology, linguistic anthropology, and cultural anthropology. Students will be introduced to key research questions, methods, and findings generated by anthropologists from across these sub-disciplines. Topics to be explored include: the fossil trail and hominid evolution, archeological methods and theories used to understand material culture, historical and present-day approaches to the study of language, and core concepts in cultural anthropology such as ritual, social structure, and meaning. The course employs a cross-cultural approach to allow students to gain an appreciation of the diversity of past and present human cultures.
   Course ID: 102011
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP)

ANTH 211 (3.00)

Cultural Anthropology

An introduction to the central concepts and issues in cultural anthropology. The course employs a worldwide comparative perspective that examines topics such as: the concept of culture, cultural-ecological systems and family organization; magic, religion and witchcraft; socialization, personality and mental illness; conflict resolution and warfare.
   Course ID: 052228
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: ANTH 211Y
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

ANTH 211Y (4.00)

Cultural Anthropology

An introduction to the central concepts and issues in cultural anthropology. The course employs a worldwide comparative perspective that examines topics such as: the concept of culture, cultural-ecological systems and family organization; magic, religion and witchcraft; socialization, personality and mental illness; conflict resolution and warfare.
   Course ID: 100249
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Discussion, Lecture
   Course Equivalents: ANTH 211
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

ANTH 212 (3.00)

The Ethnographer's World

An overview of the ways in which anthropologists have studied and written about distinct cultural systems in numerous world regions. Using ethnographic case studies, the course explores how diverse cultural groups confront such issues as gender roles, political organization, economic strategies and colonialists. Particularly attentive to the problems of conducting ethnographic research in a changing world characterized by transnational ties, the course is meant for those students interested in global issues and in ethno-graphic writing. Prospective anthropology majors are particularly encouraged.
   Course ID: 052229
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)

ANTH 297 (3.00)

Selected Topics in Anthropology

The specific topic will be announced in advance of the semester the course is offered. This course is repeatable.
   Course ID: 052230
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: American Folklife, The World Of Language II, World Language Commun, Germ Ethnic Culture, Ethnography Of Melanesia, Anthropology Of Gender, World Language Comm., World Language Communit, World Language Community, Mthds & Mtrls Research, World Lang Communities, Magic And Witchcraft
   Requirement Group: You must complete SOCY 101 or ANTH 211 with a "C" or higher.

ANTH 302 (3.00)

Human Evolution, Physical Anthropology and Archaeology

Explores the use of physical anthropology and archaeology in examining the ancient history of the human species. Traces our earliest fossil-archaeological remains in discussing worldwide cultural evolution and genetic variation from the first humans to the rise of urban societies.
   Course ID: 052231
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete SOCY 101 or ANTH 211 with a "C" or higher.

ANTH 303 (3.00)

Anthropological Research Methods

This course introduces students to the research methods of cultural anthropology.Through a series of projects conducted in the local community, students will learn such techniques as participant observation, informal and formal interviewing, ecological mapping, genealogy and oral history, social network analysis, use of archival documents, and photographic and audio documentation.
   Course ID: 052232
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete SOCY 101 or ANTH 211 with a "C" or higher.

ANTH 304 (3.00)

Kin, Community and Ethnicity

This course explores kinship systems, ethnicity, neighborhood and other social arrangements in various cultural settings through the reading of selected ethnographic materials. The course also will investigate how anthropological approaches to social organization reflect broader philosophical and political changes in our society.
   Course ID: 052233
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete SOCY 101 or ANTH 211 with a "C" or higher.

ANTH 310 (3.00)

Ethnographic Film

The objectives of the course are to present ethnographic films that introduce the concept of culture, the significance of diversity and representation of the other; and address key processes and issues in anthropological filmmaking.
   Course ID: 052234
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Culture (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete SOCY 101 or ANTH 211 with a "C" or higher.

ANTH 311 (3.00)

Urban Anthropology

An anthropological analysis of the phenomenon of urbanism, stressing the impact of city life on social organization and culture throughout the world. Cities will be analyzed from a holistic perspective detailing the evolution and organization of non-Western cities, the impact of urban values on Third World populations and the culture of specialized urban communities - squatter settlements, skid rows, ghettos, ethnic enclaves.
   Course ID: 052235
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Social Sciences (GEP), Social Sciences (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete SOCY 101 or ANTH 211 with a "C" or higher.

ANTH 312 (3.00)

Medical Anthropology

This course is an overview of some basic findings in the field of medical anthropology. Case studies, readings, films, videotapes and other resources are used to examine folk medical knowledge, religious healing and cross-cultural studies of health behavior from an anthropological point of view. Other topics covered include folk medical practices in major American ethnic, minority, social class and subcultural groups. The resistance of Third World populations to changing their health beliefs and practices is explored. The place of trance, possession, sorcery and altered states of consciousness in healing rituals is examined.
   Course ID: 052236
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Writing Intensive, Social Sciences (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete SOCY 101 or ANTH 211 with a "C" or higher.

ANTH 313 (3.00)

Applied Anthropology

Applied Anthropologists employ the theories and methods of anthropology to address practical problems and social issues in cultural context. Applied anthropologists often have the goal of improving the lives and well-being of human groups worldwide and attend to issues of inequality and social justice. This course explores how anthropologists use an anthropological lens to analyze and intervene on a range of issues, which may include discussions of international development, women┬┐s rights, education policy, and/or health care. Applied Anthropology explores theories of practice, common methods used and refined by applied anthropologists, and the ethical debates surrounding applied work. In addition, students examine how understandings of culture, subjectivity, and sociohistorical experience can help inform interventions and policy.
   Course ID: 052237
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete SOCY 101 or ANTH 211 with a "C" or higher.

ANTH 316 (3.00)

Anthropology of Religion

This course examines the nature of belief systems, myth, and ritual in various societies of the world through ethnographic case studies. Cases to be examined may be drawn from societies in South America, Asia, the Pacific, Africa and the United States. Using these different case studies, the course examines a range of perspectives used by anthropologists to understand religious practices and belief systems.
   Course ID: 050044
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: RLST 316
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete SOCY 101 or ANTH 211 with a "C" or higher.

ANTH 317 (3.00)

Contemporary Problems in Anthropological Perspective : Special Topics

The course explores issues of global significance from a cross-cultural perspective by focusing on the tensions between increasing diversity of perspective in an increasingly interdependent world. From the view points of an emergent anthropology in action, we will examine the comparative, cross-cultural contexts of demographic change, ecology, economic development, information systems, international health, and nationalism. We will study anthropological texts that broaden the cultural analysis of the global change process and its effects on institutions and communities. This course is repeatable up to 12 credits or 4 attempts.
   Course ID: 052240
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

ANTH 318 (3.00)

Anthropology of Science and Technology

This course explores the social construction of the scientific process and enterprise both in American society and across cultures. Social expectations of science, images of science and scientists, and how scientists do their work will be examined. The course will also will focus on the production of scientific activity in the contexts of capitalism, institutional arrangements, politics and religion. The place of science in culture will be discussed with an emphasis on the fragile contract between scientists and nonscientists about the place of science in culture. Reading materials for the course often include the writings of working scientists. This course is repeatable .
   Course ID: 052241
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Writing Intensive, Social Sciences (GFR)

ANTH 320 (3.00)

Witchcraft and Magic

This is a course that concerns witchcraft, magic and sorcery. These behavioral and symbolic forms exist or have existed in virtually all human societies and cultures. In the West, they may be generally referred to as occult practices, exist in a separate domain from everyday life, and refer to an unseen world. In contrast, in indigenous societies, witchcraft, magic and sorcery may permeate life and interpersonal relations in distinctive ways. Currently, the significance and role of witchcraft have been increasing in importance in many cultures; in addition, the development of Wicca in the West also attests to the vitality of these beliefs. In this class, we will deal with a variety of issues, including defining these entities; showing how they work in different types of societies, exploring differences among traditions, and discussing if and how they might work.
   Course ID: 052242
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture

ANTH 326 (3.00)

American Indian Cultures

Through the use of archeological and contemporary community studies, this course will explore the diversity of traditional North American Indian and Eskimo cultures and the adaptation of indigenous peoples to America in the 1980s.
   Course ID: 052245
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GEP), Social Sciences (GEP), Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete SOCY 101 or ANTH 211 with a "C" or higher.

ANTH 367 (3.00)

The Anthropology of Gender

The Anthropology of Gender concerns the wide range of meanings given to gender and sexuality in different settings. In exploring how gender and sexuality are culturally constructed the course does not focus on the biology of gender and sexuality per se. Rather, the course explores distinctive peoples understandings of gender and sexuality. Lectures focus on basic principles by which to examine gender in cross-cultural perspective. Readings focus on detailed and complex examples of distinctive gender and sexuality system
   Course ID: 100972
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete SOCY 101 or ANTH 211 with a "C" or higher.

ANTH 382 (3.00)

Global Flows in Local Worlds:The Anthropology of Globalization

Global Flows in Local Worlds examines globalization from the perspective of local communities. Students will explore the interaction among transnational economic, technological, ideological, and material flows and localways of life. The course will use ethnographies and case studies to examine how development and tourism ideologies, media, and migration/transmigration, among other issues, are experienced at the local level, withparticular attention to issues of identity, social relationships, subsistence, and well-being. By exploring globalization with a qualitative, insider perspective, this course will provide students with insight into the deep social and cultural webs connecting and transforming societies worldwide.
   Course ID: 101909
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete SOCY 101 or ANTH 211 with a "C" or higher.

ANTH 397 (3.00)

Selected Topics in Anthropology

The specific topic is to be announced in advance of the semester the course is offered. Recommended Preparation: ANTH 211, SOCY 101. This course is repeatable up to 12 credits.
   Course ID: 052247
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Top:Amer Indian Culture, Top:Gender/Class/Wld Dev, Top: Health Care/Culture, Sel Topics: Anthropology, German Ethinic Identity, Contemp Native Amer Life, Women In World Devel, American Folklife, Africa: Lang & Culture, German Eth/Cult Identity, Ethno Film, Science And Technology, Death & Regen Of Mexican, Top:Anth Of 3Rd Wrld Dev, Sel Topic: Witchcraft, Topic:Amer Indian Cult, Top:N.Amer.Indian Cultur, Rise Of Civilization, Public Policy Anth, Sociolinguistics, Top:Anth Of Food/Hunger, East Asia, War Stories, War Polit & Conflict Res, Economic Dev In Africa, Top:Anth/Wtchcrft&Ritual, Economic Dev Of Africa, Economic Anthropology, Gender & Folk Tradition, Peoples & Cultures/Asia, Asia In Anthro Perspec, Global Issues - Cultural, Melanesia, Anth. Of Food And Eating, Language Planning, Gender/X-Cultural Persp, Anthropology Of Science, Asia Anthro Perspective, Sem In Melanesian Ethnog, Global Issues, Childhood & Adolescence, Issues In Health Care, War Politics, Indigenous Healing Trad., Anthropology Of Gender, Globalization, Top:Anth. Of Witchcraft, Women In World Devel, Early Man And Evolution, Africa: Cult & Develop, Anth: Media, War Politic/Conflict Res, Indig Healing Traditions, Healing Tradit Of N.Amer, Anthropology Of Art, Top:Women/Devel-Americas, Top:Cultures Of The Wrld, Helth Care And Culture, Health Care And Culture, Economic Anth, Time And Memory, Top:Maritime Archaeology, History Of West Africa, Sel Top: Anthropology, Top:Anth Of Food&Hunger, Anth Of Science And Tech, Comm. Of Organization, Anthropology Of Eating, Top: Anth Of Religion, Top:Family, Kin & Groups, Top: Amer Indian Culture, Ethnographic Film, Anth Of Sports, Anth: Childhood/Adolecen, Public And Comm Health, Prehistoric Art: The Creative Explosion, Anth of Material Culture, Globalization in Narrative Perspective, The Anthropology of Gender, Urban Archeology in America, Justice & Equality: Explor. in Legal Anthropology, Anthropology of Food, Gender and International Development, The Anthropology of Policing, Anthropology of Suffering, Immigrant Families in the U.S., Forensic Anthropology, Everyday Lives in a Changing South Asia

ANTH 399 (1.00 - 3.00)

Independent Study

This course is repeatable .
   Course ID: 052248
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study
   Requirement Group: You must complete a minimum of 9 credits of Anthropology courses each with a minimum grade of "C".

ANTH 400 (3.00)

Anthropological Theory

Anthropological theory in historical perspective focusing on the rise of a distinct anthropological perspective on the comparative study of human societies and cultures. The course will detail various theoretical models developed in the 19th and 20th centuries to explain the similarities and differences in cultural systems.
   Course ID: 052249
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Requirement Group: You must complete Anthropology 211 or 2 other Anthropology 300-level courses with a minimum grade of "C".

ANTH 401H (3.00)

Honors Thesis Research

This course, along with ANTH 402H, fulfills the requirement of the major in anthropology with honors. Information describing the requirements for the honors major is available from the departmental office. This course is repeatable .
   Course ID: 052250
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study
   Requirement Group: You must complete Anthropology 303 with a minimum grade of "C".

ANTH 402 (3.00)

The Ethnography of Communication

At the intersection of linguistics and anthropology, the ethnography of communication has as its goal an understanding of the patterning of communicative behavior within culture. Topics to be covered in the course include: what it means to talk in different cultural contexts, the functions of literacy in the United States and elsewhere, the symbolic organization of the world in writing and speaking, language attitudes and social prestige, and how languages and cultures are acquired and reproduced. Readings will include case studies drawn from work on various cultures.
   Course ID: 052251
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Course Equivalents: ANTH 402H
   Requirement Group: You must complete an Anthropology 300-level course with a minimum grade of C.

ANTH 402H (3.00)

HONORS THESIS RESEARCH

This course is a continuation of ANTH 401H. This course is repeatable.
   Course ID: 052252
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study
   Course Equivalents: ANTH 402
   Requirement Group: You must complete Anthropology 401H with a minimum grade of C.

ANTH 416 (3.00)

Cyberspace Culture

The "information super highway," "communications revolution" and "cyberspace" are used to describe the contemporary revolution in human communications. This course will explore the cultural and societal implications of computer-mediated communications (CMC) by addressing such topics and questions as: representations of self and self-identity in cyberspace, interactions in cyberspace,information technology and institutional change, community formation in cyberspace, democracy and collective action in cyberspace, and order and deviance in cyberspace. Throughout the course, contemporary technological advances will be compared and contrasted with the cultural and societal effects of previous technologies, such as the printing press, wireless telephone, television.
   Course ID: 050045
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: SOCY 416
   Requirement Group: You must complete Anthropology 211 or Anthropology 212 or Sociology 101 or Sociology 101H and, in addition, 9 credits in Sociology and Anthropology. Each course must have a minimum grade of C.

ANTH 419 (3.00)

Qualitative Methods in Social Research

This course will focus on the styles of research, analysis and epistemologies associated with qualitative research in the applied social and policy sciences. As an increasingly important mode of inquiry, qualitative, multi-method approaches are particularly relevant to the study of social interaction and behavior in natural settings. Qualitative approaches involve the collection and analysis of empirical information from multiple sources, such as first-person accounts, life histories,visual/printed records, semi-structured and open-ended interviews, informal and formal observations, biographical and autobiographical materials, among others. Students in the course will learn how to design, collect and analyze qualitative information by conducting a small, semester-long study. Sections of the research project will be prepared, presented and evaluated throughout the course.
   Course ID: 050048
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Same as Offering: SOCY 419
   Requirement Group: You must complete ANTH 211 or SOCY 101 and, in addition, 9 credits in Sociology or Anthropology. Each course must have a minimum grade of C.

ANTH 424 (3.00)

Psychological Anthropology

This course examines the inter-relationships between psychological processes, culture, and society. It will introduce the history and range of topics within psychological anthropology, including child socialization and self-making, religious experience and altered states of consciousness, emotion and cognition, and psychopathology across cultures. Students will explore how social and cultural environments shape people and how people make use of those socio-cultural worlds in ways that are psychologically satisfying and meaningful.
   Course ID: 052238
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Attributes: Culture (GFR), Social Sciences (GFR)
   Requirement Group: You must complete ANTH 211 or SOCY 101 or PSYC 100 with a C or better.

ANTH 497 (3.00)

Advanced Selected Topics in Anthropology

The specific topic will be announced in advance of the semester the course is offered. This course is repeatable.
   Course ID: 052255
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Lecture
   Topics: Ethnography Of Education, Ethnography Of Commnctn, Center For Aging Intern., Cyberspace:Culture & Soc, Internships, Ctr For Aging Internship, Contmp Iss In Cultrl Ant, Aging And Mental Health, Intro To Field Research, Material Cult In US, Adv Seminar/Ethnography, Material Culture In US, Ethnography Of Communctn, Fld Research Hlth/Aging, Eging And Mentla Health, Adv Anth Theory, Comparative Slavery, Poli Economy Of Culture, Ethnography Of Commun, Top:Ethnography Of Comm., Adv Top In Anthropology, Interships, Center For Aging Interns, Emotion Across Culture, Ethnographic Description, Qualitative Methods, Ethnogrphy Of Communcat
   Requirement Group: You must complete Anthropology 211 and 9 credits of Anthropology. You must earn a minimum grade of C for each course.

ANTH 499 (1.00 - 3.00)

Independent Study

This course is repeatable.
   Course ID: 052256
   Consent: No Special Consent Required
   Components: Independent Study
   Requirement Group: You must complete a minimum of 9 credits of Anthropology courses each with a minimum grade of "C".