UMBC logo
Undergraduate Catalog

Psychology

Faculty

View Faculty Details

Chair

Christopher Murphy

Professors

Linda Baker
Thomas Blass
Anne Brodsky
Lynnda Dahlquist
Carlo DiClemente
Kenneth I. Maton
Bernard M. Rabin
Shari Waldstein

Associate Professors

Shawn Bediako
John Borrero
Charissa Cheah
Robert Deluty
Steven C. Pitts
Jason Schiffman
David Schultz
Susan Sonnenschein
Zoe S. Warwick

Assistant Professors

Robin Barry
Danielle L. Beatty
Nicole Else-Quest
Raimi Quiton
Shuyan Sun

Senior Lecturer

Diane Lindwarm Alonso
Eileen O'Brien

Lecturers

Adia J. Garrett
Julie Murphy
Theodore H. Rosen
Karen Watkins-Lewis

Adjunct Professors

John Allen
Alan Bellack
Maureen Black
Michael Cataldo
Geoffrey Schoenbaum

Adjunct Associate Professors

Iser DeLeon
Michael Glasgow
Louis Hagopian
Sung Woo Kahng
Leslie Katzel
Vicki Tepper

Adjunct Assistant Professors

Robert Anderson
Mariano R. Sto. Domingo
Brenda Hussey-Gardner
Lisa Jordan
Patricia Kurtz
Gloria Reeves
Peter Resta
Cindy Schaefer
John Sollers, III
Sharon Stephen
Cheryl Zwart

Affiliate Associate Professor

John Martello

Emeritus Professors

A. Charles Catania
Marilyn E. Demorest
Stanley Feldstein
Jonathan C. Finkelstein
Lowell D. Groninger
Aron Siegman

Emeritus Associate Professor

Mary Ann Metzger
Robert R. Provine

Emeritus Faculty

Karen Freiberg

Courses in this program are listed under PSYC .

UMBC's Department of Psychology provides an exceptional opportunity for students to see how basic laboratory research can be translated into treatments, interventions and policies that improve the quality of life. Interested undergraduates work with internationally recognized researchers at the cutting edge of science. In recent years, students have participated in studies of such issues as the neurological basis of laughter and yawning, how rats and people regulate eating, how infants 'bond' with their parents, how nonhuman species learn complex tasks, the relations between behavior and heart disease and what society can do to foster the social and academic success of disadvantaged youth. Psychology is an exciting discipline; at UMBC, undergraduates can share in that excitement.

Career and Academic Paths

The psychology major provides a firm foundation for students interested in graduate study and a range of careers and professions. Positions held by program graduates include clinical psychologist, counseling psychologist, school psychologist, industrial psychologist, research consultant, personnel administrator, university professor, social worker, lawyer, physician, dentist, optometrist and early-education or elementary school teacher. Each year, many of UMBC's graduating seniors go on directly to graduate programs in psychology (M.A., Ph.D. and Psy.D.) and in related fields such as social work (M.S.W.). Many are admitted to some of the most highly rated programs in the United States. Students interested in pursuing graduate study should consult with their academic advisor upon declaring their major. UMBC offers doctoral programs in applied developmental psychology and human-services psychology, including behavioral medicine, clinical psychology and community-applied social psychology.

Academic Advising

All new freshmen, transfers and recently declared majors should meet with the department's academic advisor, Darian Schiffman (410-455-2366,darian@umbc.edu, Math-Psychology rm 321) during their first semester, prior to course registration. Ms Schiffman also will assist students with a psychology minor and those students who may be considering psychology as a major. Additionally, she is available to answer questions about university requirements (such as academic policies, registration concerns and General Education Program requirements), academic support, transfer concerns, research opportunities and career options. Each student is assigned a faculty advisor after his or her first semester as a psychology major. Students with interests in a specific area of psychology (e.g., biopsychology) may request that a particular faculty member be assigned as their advisor. The departmental advising process is designed to give each student individual attention and guidance about curricular choices. All students must meet with an advisor at least once per semester, to discuss their course selection for the upcoming semester and be cleared to register. Advising appointments can be made by signing up outside the advisor's office. Please arrive on time with a transcript and any other relevant paperwork.

Major Program

Requirements for the Bachelor of Science (B.S.) in Psychology

The B.S. in Psychology will consist of 69 credits for students who follow the CHEM 101+ 102 sequence (68 credits if transferring in a 3 credit Introductory Psychology course) and 68 credits for students who follow the CHEM 123+ 124 sequence (67 credits if transferring in a 3 credit Introductory Psychology course) . The distribution is as follows:

A. General requirements (21 credits)

  • PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology
  • PSYC 331 Experimental Psychology: Design and Analysis I
  • PSYC 332 Experimental Psychology: Design and Analysis II
  • PSYC 210 Psychology of Learning
  • PSYC 335 Physiological Psychology
  • PSYC 370 Sensation and Perception

B. Distribution requirements (12 credits)

One course in each of the following four domains (no more than two courses at the 200-level):

Social, Personality, and Abnormal Psychology

  • PSYC 285 Abnormal Psychology
  • PSYC 340 Social Psychology
  • PSYC 380 Personality
  • PSYC 382 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology

Development

  • PSYC 200 Child Developmental Psychology
  • PSYC 304 Adolescent Psychology
  • PSYC 305 The Exceptional Child
  • PSYC 307 Psychology of Aging
  • PSYC 365 Children with Disabilities

Culture, Diversity and Context

  • PSYC 230 Psychology and Culture
  • PSYC 330 Child Development and Culture
  • PSYC 357 Psychology of Women
  • PSYC 356 The Psychology of Sex and Gender
  • PSYC 387 Community Psychology

Applied Psychology

  • PSYC 308 Child Maltreatment
  • PSYC 320 Psychological Assessment
  • PSYC 324 Introduction to Interviewing Techniques
  • PSYC 342 The Psychology of Aggression and Antisocial Behavior
  • PSYC 345 Introduction to Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy
  • PSYC 346 Industrial/Organizational Psychology
  • PSYC 385 Health Psychology

C. Approved electives in psychology (6 credits)

Two upper-level courses in psychology, with at least one at the 400-level.

May not use PSYC 306, 397, 398, 399, 490, 498, 499

D. Research experience (6 credits)

Via one or more of the following options or other advisor-approved experience (for a total of 6 credits):

  • PSYC 397 Research Experience
  • PSYC 490 Independent Research
  • PSYC 498-499 Honors Thesis

E. Interdisciplinary coursework requirements (23-24 credits)

  • BIOL 141 Foundations of Biology: Energy and Organisms
  • BIOL 142 Foundations of Biology: Ecology and Evolution
  • BIOL 302 Genetics
  • MATH 150 Pre-calculus or MATH 155 Applied Calculus
  • CHEM 101 Principles of Chemistry I
  • CHEM 102 Principles of Chemistry II
    OR
  • CHEM 123 Introduction to General Organic and Biochemistry I
  • CHEM 124 Introduction to General Organic and Biochemistry II

Requirements for the Bachelor of Arts (B.A.) in Psychology

The B.A. in Psychology will consist of at least 36 credits distributed as follows (35 credits if transferring in a 3 credit Introductory Psychology course):

A. General requirements (12 credits)

  • PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology
  • PSYC 331 Experimental Psychology: Design and Analysis I
  • PSYC 332 Experimental Psychology: Design and Analysis II

B. Distribution requirements (18 credits)

One course in each of the following six domains (no more than three courses at the 200-level):

Learning and Cognition

  • PSYC 210 Psychology of Learning
  • PSYC 316 Language and Thought
  • PSYC 317 Cognitive Psychology
  • PSYC 360 Motivation

Social, Personality, and Abnormal Psychology

  • PSYC 285 Abnormal Psychology
  • PSYC 340 Social Psychology
  • PSYC 380 Personality
  • PSYC 382 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology

Biological Bases of Behavior

  • PSYC 335 Physiological Psychology
  • PSYC 370 Sensation and Perception
  • PSYC 375 Neuroanatomy
  • PSYC 390 Neuropsychopharmacology

Development

  • PSYC 200 Child Developmental Psychology
  • PSYC 304 Adolescent Psychology
  • PSYC 305 The Exceptional Child
  • PSYC 307 Psychology of Aging
  • PSYC 365 Children with Disabilities

Culture, Diversity and Context

  • PSYC 230 Psychology and Culture
  • PSYC 330 Child Development and Culture
  • PSYC 357 Psychology of Women
  • PSYC 356 The Psychology of Sex and Gender
  • PSYC 387 Community Psychology

Applied Psychology

  • PSYC 308 Child Maltreatment
  • PSYC 320 Psychological Assessment
  • PSYC 324 Introduction to Interviewing Techniques
  • PSYC 342 The Psychology of Aggression and Antisocial Behavior
  • PSYC 345 Introduction to Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy
  • PSYC 346 Industrial/Organizational Psychology
  • PSYC 385 Health Psychology

C. Approved electives in psychology (6 credits)

Two upper-level courses in psychology, with at least one at the 400 level.

May not use PSYC 306, 397, 398, 399, 490, 498, 499

Minimum grade: No course in which a student earns a grade below C may count toward the major, and all prerequisites must be passed with a grade of C or better.

Minimum credits at UMBC: Psychology majors must complete at least 18 credits in psychology at UMBC, unless an exemption is granted by the Department of Psychology Undergraduate Studies Committee. Psychology majors are urged to take PSYC 331-332 in the sophomore or junior year; PSYC 332 is a prerequisite for 400-level electives. All qualified psychology majors are offered the opportunity to do independent laboratory, library or field research; students should check course descriptions for PSYC 397 and PSYC 490. This work must have advance approval from a member of the faculty.

Psychology majors completing additional academic programs: Students double majoring in PSYC and SOWK may apply up to three credits of approved 300-level courses in the program (e.g., SOWK 388) to fulfill the approved electives requirement in psychology. Students who are double majoring in PSYC and SOCY may use one of the following SOCY courses in place of one of the PSYC 300-level electives: SOCY 332, 333, 341, 351, 353, 355, 357, 430, 451, 458; ANTH 312, 314. Students who are completing the Education Certificate may use EDUC 311 in place of one of the PSYC 300-level electives.

Majors with Optional Areas of Concentration

Students majoring in Psychology (either B.A. or B.S. degree) may choose to complete a concentration, which provides depth and breadth of knowledge in a particular area of psychology. These specialized curricula are designed to prepare students interested in bachelor-level careers with skills that can enhance their occupational opportunities, and to provide training for advanced studies in these and allied areas.

Concentrations are offered in Developmental Psychology, Human Services Psychology, and Biopsychology. Concentration coursework can be used to partially fulfill major requirements (some domain and upper-level requirements); however, students must ensure that they take additional coursework (e.g. PSYC 331, 332) to satisfy all requirements for the major. Completion of a concentration is recognized with a certificate from the Department, but does not show on a student's transcript. In exceptional circumstances, some flexibility in fulfilling requirements may be permitted.

Developmental Psychology Concentration

Completion of this concentration will partially fulfill requirements for the major; however, students must ensure that they take additional coursework (e.g. PSYC 331, 332) to satisfy all major (B.A. or B.S. degree) requirements.

A. Required core courses

  • PSYC 200 Developmental Psychology
  • PSYC 210 Psychology of Learning
  • PSYC 304 Adolescent Psychology
  • PSYC 307 Psychology of Aging
  • PSYC 407 Advanced Child Psychology

B. Three courses from the list below:

-including one from each focus group. Note: with advisor approval, Special Topics seminars (PSYC 393; 493) may fulfill a focus group requirement

Special Populations Focus

  • PSYC 305 The Exceptional Child
  • PSYC 308 Child Maltreatment
  • PSYC 382 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology
  • PSYC 357 Psychology of Women
  • PSYC 365 Children with Disabilities

Applied Focus

  • PSYC 320 Psychological Assessment
  • PSYC 330 Child Development and Culture
  • PSYC 409 Development and Education
  • PSYC 465 Family Psychology

C. Research/internship via one of more of the following (3 credits-advisor approval required)

  • PSYC 397 Research Experience in Psychology
  • PSYC 398 Applied Psychology Internship
  • PSYC 490 Independent Research

Human Services Psychology Concentration

Completion of this concentration will partially fulfill requirements for the major; however, students must ensure that they take additional coursework (e.g. PSYC 331, 332) to satisfy all major (B.A. or B.S. degree) requirements.

A. Required core courses

  • PSYC 210 Psychology of Learning
  • PSYC 285 Abnormal Psychology
  • PSYC 320 Psychological Assessment
  • PSYC 335 Physiological Psychology
  • PSYC 340 Social Psychology

B. Four courses from the list below:

-including one from each focus group. Note: with advisor approval,

Special Topics seminars (PSYC 393; 493) may fulfill a focus group requirement

Clinical Focus

  • PSYC 324 Introduction to Interviewing Techniques
  • PSYC 345 Introduction to Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy
  • PSYC 382 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology
  • PSYC 406 Advanced Behavior Pathology
  • PSYC 455 Schizophrenia

Behavioral Medicine Focus

  • PSYC 385 Health Psychology
  • PSYC 390 Neuropsychopharmacology
  • PSYC 441 Social/Health Psychology

Community/Social Focus

  • PSYC 230 Psychology and Culture
  • PSYC 387 Community Psychology
  • PSYC 437 Contemporary Social Issues: Making a Difference
  • PSYC 356 Psychology of Sex and Gender OR PSYC 357 Psychology of Women

C.Research/internship via one of more of the following (3credits-advisor approval required)

  • PSYC 397 Research Experience in Psychology
  • PSYC 398 Applied Psychology Internship
  • PSYC 490 Independent Research

Biopsychology Concentration

Completion of this concentration will partially fulfill requirements for the major; however, students must ensure that they take additional coursework (e.g. PSYC 331, 332) to satisfy all major (B.A. or B.S. degree) requirements.

A. Required core courses

  • PSYC 210 Psychology of Learning
  • PSYC 335 Physiological Psychology
  • PSYC 370 Sensation and Perception
  • BIOL 141 Foundations of Biology: Cells, Energy and Organisms
  • BIOL 142 Foundations of Biology: Ecology and Evolution

B. Three courses from the list below:

  • PSYC 356 Psychology of Sex and Gender
  • PSYC 385 Health Psychology
  • PSYC 390 Neuropsychopharmacology
  • PSYC 375 Neuroanatomy
  • PSYC 463 Eating: Normal and Abnormal
  • BIOL 302 Molecular and General Genetics
    OR
  • BIOL 123 Human Genetics
  • BIOL 3** or 4**: Advisor approval required
  • PSYC 393 or 493 Special Topics in Psychology: Advisor approval required

C. Research/internship via one of more of the following (3 credits-advisor approval required)

  • PSYC 397 Research Experience in Psychology
  • PSYC 398 Applied Psychology Internship
  • PSYC 490 Independent Research

Certificate in Psychology of the Workplace

This certificate program is open to all UMBC students, and successful completion will be noted on the student's transcript.
Completion of this certificate will provide a foundation in the psychology of organizations. Students interested in careers in Human Resources and other areas of workplace management, as well as those considering graduate studies in business or Industrial/Organizational Psychology, will gain relevant skills and insights regarding multiple aspects of a workplace.

A. Required courses (19 credits)

  • PSYC 331 Experimental Psychology OR STAT 121 Introduction to Statistics for the Social Sciences
  • PSYC 320 Psychological Assessment
  • PSYC 324 Introduction to interviewing Techniques
  • PSYC 340 Social Psychology
  • PSYC 346 Industrial/Organizational Psychology
  • MGMT 210 Practice of Management
  • MGMT 310 Human Resources Management

B. Two courses from the following list (or other advisor-approved course) (6 credits)

  • MGMT 385 Business Ethics and Society
  • SOCY 432 Work and Retirement
  • HAPP 401 Occupational Health Policy and Practice
  • MGMT 360 Business law
  • ECON 352 Industrial Relations
  • POLI 354 Public Management and Personnel Systems
  • POLI 432 Civil Rights
  • GWST 250 Gender Roles in Economic Life
  • GWST 338 Women and Law

C. Internship (3 credits-advisor approval required)

  • PSYC 398 Applied Psychology Internship

The Shriver Center can provide guidance in locating appropriate internships.

Minor Program

Students not choosing to major in psychology may, nevertheless, find a background in psychology useful and important. Such students may choose a minor in psychology. Students interested in psychology as a minor should consult the department advisor, Darian Schiffman (darian@umbc.edu, Math-Psychology room 321), in choosing their courses.

Requirements for the Minor in Psychology

The minor in psychology will consist of a minimum of 19 credits (18 credits if transferring in a 3 credit Introductory Psychology course):

A. General requirement (4 credits)

  • PSYC 100 Introduction to Psychology

B. Distribution requirements (15 credits)

One course in five of the following six domains (no more than two courses at the 200-level):

Learning and Cognition

  • PSYC 210 Psychology of Learning
  • PSYC 316 Language and Thought
  • PSYC 317 Cognitive Psychology
  • PSYC 360 Motivation

Social, Personality, and Abnormal Psychology

  • PSYC 285 Abnormal Psychology
  • PSYC 340 Social Psychology
  • PSYC 380 Personality
  • PSYC 382 Child and Adolescent Psychopathology

Biological Bases of Behavior

  • PSYC 335 Physiological Psychology
  • PSYC 370 Sensation & Perception
  • PSYC 375 Neuroanatomy
  • PSYC 390 Neuropsychopharmacology

Development

  • PSYC 200 Child Developmental Psychology
  • PSYC 304 Adolescent Psychology
  • PSYC 305 The Exceptional Child
  • PSYC 307 Psychology of Aging
  • PSYC 365 Children with Disabilities

Culture, Diversity and Context

  • PSYC 230 Psychology and Culture
  • PSYC 330 Child Development and Culture
  • PSYC 357 Psychology of Women
  • PSYC 356 The Psychology of Sex and Gender
  • PSYC 387 Community Psychology

Applied Psychology

  • PSYC 308 Child Maltreatment
  • PSYC 320 Psychological Assessment
  • PSYC 324 Introduction to Interviewing Techniques
  • PSYC 342 The Psychology of Aggression and Antisocial Behavior
  • PSYC 345 Introduction to Clinical Psychology and Psychotherapy
  • PSYC 346 Industrial/Organizational Psychology
  • PSYC 385 Health Psychology

No course in which a student earns a grade below C may count toward the minor. Psychology minors must complete at least nine credits in psychology at UMBC.

Honors Program

The departmental honors program is open to qualified students who wish to pursue advanced independent research in psychology. Students interested in going to graduate school in psychology are particularly encouraged to become honors candidates because research experience is given considerable weight by admissions committees. Students who complete the honors sequence of courses (PSYC 498 and PSYC 499) and have a GPA in psychology of 3.5 or above are eligible to receive the B.A. or B.S. degree with departmental honors.

The Universities at Shady Grove

The UMBC psychology department is represented at the Universities at Shady Grove, (USG) an off-site location in Montgomery County that is home to 9 of the 11 institutions from the University System of Maryland (USM). The UMBC Psychology Program at USG is intended to provide junior- and senior-level classes to students who have transferred to the program from either a two-year or four-year institution. The program is equivalent in course material and content to the program at the home campus, and all psychology students, upon graduation, receive a B.A. in Psychology from UMBC. For more information about the program at the Universities at Shady Grove, see the UMBC@USG Web site at www.umbc.edu/shadygrove.

Graduate Courses

Some graduate courses in applied developmental and human services psychology are open to qualified undergraduates under the conditions specified in the academic regulations chapter of this catalog. Complete course descriptions may be found in the Graduate Catalog.

Special Opportunities

There are a variety of opportunities for undergraduates to gain applied and research experience. Students regularly obtain internships and co-op education experiences through the department and UMBC's Shriver Center. Similarly, a large number of students secure hands-on research experience by collaborating with psychology faculty members. Many undergraduate researchers have had the opportunity to co-author publications and present professional conference papers. A listing of faculty research programs and opportunities for student involvement can be found on the Department website (www.umbc.edu/psyc) and posted in the Psychology department (opposite Room 321). Interested students should contact the faculty member directly to inquire what research involvement opportunities are currently available.

Student Organizations

The department sponsors Psi Chi, the national honorary society for psychology. Psi Chi meets regularly and discusses such issues as graduate school preparation, job and internship resources, research opportunities and student-faculty relationships. Psi Chi membership criteria include completion of at least three semesters and a minimum of nine semester hours of psychology courses, declaration of the major or minor in psychology, a cumulative GPA above 3.0 and a psychology course GPA above 3.25. Visit us at our website at:http://www.umbc.edu/studentlife/orgs/psichi/Welcome.html