Skip to Main Content

Cybersecurity

Engineering Management Course Descriptions

Note: Not all Engineering Management courses are offered every semester, and new courses may be added at any time. Check the schedule of classes, for the latest offerings. All courses are 3 credits unless otherwise noted. Please consult the Graduate Catalog and departmental website for each specialization for most up-to-date course descriptions.

General

ENMG 650: Project Management Fundamentals

Students learn the fundamentals of managing projects in a systematic way. These fundamentals can be applied within any industry and work environment and will serve as the foundation for more specialized project management study. Principles and techniques are further reinforced through practical case studies and team projects in which students simulate project management processes and techniques.

ENMG 652: Management, Leadership, and Communication

Students learn effective management and communication skills through case study-analysis, reading, class discussion and role-playing. The course covers topics such as effective listening, setting expectations, delegation, coaching, performance, evaluations, conflict management, negotiation with senior management and managing with integrity.

ENMG 654: Leading Teams and Organizations

Students analyze leadership case studies across a wide range of industries and environments to identify effective leadership principles that may be applied in their own organizations. Students learn how to influence people throughout their organization, lead effective teams, create an inclusive workplace, use the Six Sigma process, implement and manage change and develop a leadership style.

Prerequisite: ENMG 652: Management, Leadership and Communication

ENMG 656: Engineering Law and Ethics

This course provides a comprehensive overview of important legal principles affecting engineers, engineering sciences and corporate management, with a focus on the intersection of these legal principles with business ethics. The student learns how to think through and process legal problems consistent with ethical norms, and how to analyze business risks in light of operative legal constructs, taking into consideration ethical issues, to arrive at a range of correct business decisions. Throughout the course, the student will learn substantive legal principles including an overview of constitutional, contract, tort, corporate and regulatory law. Students will work in groups during certain exercises, role play in real and hypothetical case studies, and make a final presentation of a comprehensive legal and ethical engineering problem.

ENMG 658: Financial Management

This course will cover the fundamentals of setting up, reading and analyzing financial statements and reports in a business setting.  Course topics will include: project budgeting, profit planning, return on investment and basic corporate finance. Students will analyze case studies from specific industries.

ENMG 659: Strategic Management

This course is intended to integrate the learning from the previous management courses and to focus it on the perspective and problems of the Chief Executive Officer and other organizational strategic managers. The theme of the course is that any organization improves its chances of sustained success when its managers formulate an action-oriented strategic business plan based on the strategic management process. Case studies are included to illustrate the concepts and their applications.

Prerequisite: Minimum of three engineering management courses

ENMG 660: Systems Engineering Principles

This course provides the foundational framework to understand the system engineering (SE) process, selection of specialized SE tools and the execution of SE under differing design or acquisition philosophies. the courses addresses: (1)SE principles (2)SE processes and metholodogies (3) integration of technical disciplines and (4) SE management.

This course can be counted as either a management course or an engineering course for the M.S. in Engineering Management.

ENMG 661: Leading Virtual Global Teams

This course is designed to help the student apply managerial concepts and skills to managing and leading virtual and/or global work teams. Geographically dispersed work teams have great challenges: tone is difficult to convey electronically, time zones limit audio communication opportunities, work oversight requires more reposting, and team building is exceedingly difficult using technological - rather than in-person - tools. Language and culture differences in multinational teams compound these challenges. Students will learn to empower others, build credibility, communicate appropriately and adapt quickly across cultures and technologies.

ENMG 663:  Advanced Project Management Applications

This advanced course in project management builds on the beginner level project management courses to expand the hands-on applications, with a focus on critical evaluation of project performance and ultimately creating an environment for maximizing one's own project management performance. With a strong emphasis on the importance of learning through application, the course will bridge academia with the professional business environment to provide opportunities for students to interact with industry professionals as the students execute their course work. Students will also confront the real challenges facing project managers associated with the growing global and virtual workforce through the use of on-line learning tools and methods of collaboration. At the successful completion of the course, students will have the requisite skills and experiences necessary to function effectively, and artfully, as skilled project managers.

ENMG 664: Quality Engineering & Management

This course provides an overview of the basic principles and tools of quality and their applications from an engineering perspective. The primary quality schools of thought or methodologies, including Total Quality Management, Six Sigma and Lean Six Sigma, and quality approaches from key figures in the development and application of quality as a business practice, including W. Edwards Deming and Joseph M. Juran will be analyzed. Some of the key mathematical tools used in quality systems will be discussed, including Pareto charts, measurement systems analysis, design of experiments, response surface methodology, and statistical process control. Students will apply these techniques to solve engineering problems using the R software. Reading assignments, homework, exams, and the project will emphasize quality approaches, techniques, and problem solving.

This course can be counted as either a management course or an engineering course for the M.S. in Engineering Management.

ENMG 668: Project and Systems Engineering Management

This course will cover fundamental project control and systems engineering management concepts, including how to plan, set up cost accounts, bid, staff and execute a project from a project control perspective.  It provides an understanding of the critical relations and interconnections between project management and systems engineering management.  It is designed to address how systems engineering management supports traditional program management activities to break down complex programs into manageable and assignable tasks.

ENMG 672: Decision and Risk Analysis

This course provides an overview of decision and risk analysis techniques. It focuses on how to make rational decisions in the presence of uncertainty and conflicting objectives. This course covers rational decision-making principles and processes; competing objectives, multi-attribute analysis and utility theory; modeling uncertainty and decision problems using decision trees and influence diagrams; solving decision trees and influence diagrams; uses of Bayes’ Theorem; defining and calculating the value of information; regression analysis; incorporating risk attitudes into decision analyses; and conducting sensitivity analyses. A significant portion of the course is devoted to the use of various applications of analytic, empirical, and subjective probability theory to the modeling of uncertain events. As such, students will find it useful to have some experience with basic probability.

This course can be counted as either a management course or an engineering course for the M.S. in Engineering Management.

ENMG 690: Innovation and Technology Entrepreneurship

This course offers an overview of innovation and its role in entrepreneurial ventures, both in new companies and within existing corporations. The basics of entrepreneurship with specific emphasis on technology-based business start-up are investigated. For the purposes of this course, technologies include IT, engineering and biotech. The course covers where to find innovative ideas and how to determine if a business idea is feasible along with an overview of the critical success factors in a new venture start-up.

ENMG 692: Principles of Organization Learning

Corporations are applying radically new management techniques to remain competitive. Today, information forms the basis for competitive advantage as companies are competing as much on their ability to create and manage new information, as they do on marketing and selling their physical products and associated services. This course studies how organizations create and use knowledge to support their operations and strategic planning. A “knowledge-creating” company is said to be one that consistently creates new knowledge, disseminates it widely throughout the organization, and quickly embodies it in new technologies and products, and whose sole business is continuous innovation. Actions are investigated which corporate executives and managers can take to improve their management, translation, and utilization of knowledge, to increase their organization’s absorptive capacities and ability to learn quickly, to posture themselves for innovative responses to changing market conditions, to handle disruptive technology cycles, to implement the effective use of data analytics, and to develop sustainable business models and improve organizational performance.

Businesses collected more customer information in 2010, than in all prior years combined. The amount of corporate data being collected is said to be doubling every 6 months. The intellectual property of these companies will take a second seat and their ability to compete will depend on their current absorptive capacity, and their capacity to learn as an organization faster than their competitors.  This course prepares students for future market environments where innovative businesses will compete based on their ability to process information and learn, and learn quickly. This course has selected the most relevant research papers in the fields of knowledge management, organizational learning, and strategic planning. After this course, you will be familiar with the most significant research dedicated to optimizing business and project processes that has been released in the last decade. Each research paper has been summarized in 2 to 3 page reports to help students manage the significant amounts of information and to track the key points being made in each paper. The future may already be here, so why not be prepared for it!

Cybersecurity Courses That Qualify as Management Courses

CYBR 620: Introduction to Cybersecurity

This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of cybersecurity by discussing the evolution of information security into cybersecurity, cybersecurity theory, and the relationship of cybersecurity to nations, businesses, society, and people.  Students will be exposed to multiple cybersecurity technologies, processes, and procedures, learn how to analyze the threats, vulnerabilities and risks present in these environments, and develop appropriate strategies to mitigate potential cybersecurity problems.

CYBR 621: Cyber Warfare

This course addresses some of the unique and emerging policy, doctrine, strategy, and operational requirements of conducting cyber warfare at the nation-state level. It provides students with a unified battlespace perspective and enhances their ability to manage and develop operational systems and concepts in a manner that results in the integrated, controlled, and effective use of cyber assets in warfare.

CYBR 622: Global Cyber Capabilities and Trends

Students will be exposed to the national and international policy and legal considerations related to cybersecurity and cyberspace such as privacy, intellectual property, cybercrime, homeland security (i.e., critical infrastructure protection) and cyberwarfare, and the organizations involved in the formulation of such laws and policies. Broader technology issues also are discussed to demonstrate the interdisciplinary influences and concerns that must be addressed in developing or implementing effective national cybersecurity laws and policies.

CYBR 623: Cybersecurity Law and Policy

Students will be exposed to the national and international policy and legal considerations related to cybersecurity and cyberspace such as privacy, intellectual property, cybercrime, homeland security (i.e., critical infrastructure protection) and cyberwarfare, and the organizations involved in the formulation of such laws and policies. Broader technology issues also are discussed to demonstrate the interdisciplinary influences and concerns that must be addressed in developing or implementing effective national cybersecurity laws and policies.

CYBR 624:  Cybersecurity Project

This is the capstone experience for graduate students in the M.P.S. Cybersecurity program. The Cybersecurity Project provides an opportunity for students to carry out an individual piece of research on a specified topic in the cybersecurity or cyber operations domain. This research should make an original contribution to the body of knowledge in the area of study or otherwise demonstrate the student’s comprehensive knowledge of cybersecurity or cyber operations.

Prerequisite: Completion of cybersecurity breadth courses.

Engineering, Computer Science & IT Courses: Chemical & Biochemical Engineering

ENCH 660: Regulatory Issues in Biotechnology [3]

Provides a comprehensive coverage of all steps involved with the regulatory approval process for a biotechnology-derived product. Documentation preparation for IND, NDA, BLA. Pre-clinical safety data, clinical studies, facilities inspection and scientific and regulatory principles.

ENCH 662: Good Manufacturing Practices for Bioprocesses [3]

In-depth coverage of the development and implementation of good manufacturing practices (GMPs) in the biotech industry. Topics include building and facilities, equipment design, utilities, in-process controls, records and adequate process validation.

ENCH 664: Quality Control and Quality Assurance for Biotechnology Products [3]

In-depth coverage of the key issues associated with adequate quality-control systems, assays and stability for novel biotechnology products: quality concepts, product release testing and specifications, in-process testing, product characterization, qualityassurance documentation and audits and vendor certification.

ENCH 666: Biotechnology GMP Facility Design, Construction and Validation [3]

Presents an in-depth discussion of the engineering design of a biotech facility under GMP compliance. Topics covered include bulk plant design, process equipment design, utilities, instrumentation, controls and computerization, facility and software validation.

*A student who completes the chemical/biochemical regulatory engineering concentration will earn the post-baccalaureate certificate in that area. The individual departments offering these courses may be consulted for further information.

Engineering, Computer Science & IT Courses: Chemical Engineering

ENCH 610: Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics [3]

Advanced application of the general thermodynamic methods to chemical engineering problems. First- and second-law consequences, estimation and correlation of thermodynamic properties, phase and chemical reaction equilibria.

ENCH 630: Transport Phenomena [3]

Heat, mass and momentum transfer theory from the viewpoint of the basic transport equations. Steady and unsteady state, laminar and turbulent flow, boundary layer theory and mechanics of turbulent transport, with specific application to complex chemical engineering situations.

ENCH 640: Advanced Chemical Reaction Kinetics [3]

The theory and application of chemical reaction kinetics to reactor design. Reaction rate theory, homogeneous batch and flow reactors, fundamentals of catalysis, microbial growth kinetics and enzyme kinetics.

ENCH 682: Biochemical Engineering [3]

Introduction to biochemical and microbiological applications for commercial and engineering processes, including industrial fermentation, enzymology, ultrafiltration, food and pharmaceutical processing and resulting waste treatment. Enzyme kinetics, cell growth, energetics and mass transfer. Prerequisite: ENCH 427 and ENCH 440.

Engineering, Computer Science & IT Courses: Computer Engineering

CYBR 620: Introduction to Cybersecurity [3]

This course surveys the topic of Cybersecurity, examining aspects of information, people and technology, the evolution of information security to Cybersecurity, and its technical, legal, and impact perspectives. Students will learn how to apply the Cybersecurity concepts of protection and response to government, critical infrastructure, commercial, and individual situations; analyzing the threats and risks of those environments in light of information processing objectives and threats; and applying an appropriate strategy to build and operate appropriate defenses to mitigate potential impacts upon processing systems.

CMSC 626: Principles of Computer Security [3]

This course will provide an introduction to computer security with a specific focus on the computing aspects. Topics covered include: basics of computer security, including an overview of threat, attack and adversary models; social engineering; essentials of cryptography; traditional computing security models; malicious software; secure programming; operating system security in practice; trusted operating system design; public policy issues, including legal, privacy and ethical issues; network and database security overview.

CMPE 684: Wireless Sensor Networks [3]

A wide range of applications such as disaster management, military and security have fueled the interest in sensor networks during the past few years. Sensors are typically capable of wireless communication and are significantly constrained in the amount of available resources such as energy, storage and computation. Such constraints make the design and operation of sensor networks considerably different from contemporary wireless networks, and necessitate the development of resource conscious protocols and management techniques. This course provides a broad coverage of challenges and latest research results related to the design and management of wireless sensor networks. Covered topics include network architectures, node discovery and localization, deployment strategies, node coverage, routing protocols, medium access arbitration, fault-tolerance, and network security.

CMPE 685: Principles of Communications Networks [3]

This course provides an overview of network communications terms, concepts, architectures, protocols, and technologies. Upon completion of the course, students will be able construct, and assess the completeness of, architectures for simple LAN and WAN communications networks. Topics include wire/fiber and wireless WANs and LANs, the OSI and TCP/IP models, propagation media, analog and digital data and signals, error detection, error correction, data link layer protocols, multiple access techniques, medium access control, circuit and packet switching, X.25, TCP/IP, ATM, Ethernet, switches, routers, routing techniques, congestion control, queuing theory, quality of service (QoS) metrics, network architectures, and network security.

CMSC 687: Introduction to Network Security [3]

This course will provide an introduction to computer security with a specific focus on the computing aspects. Topics covered include: basics of computer security, including an overview of threat, attack and adversary models; social engineering; essentials of cryptography; traditional computing security models; malicious software; secure programming; operating system security in practice; trusted operating system design; public policy issues, including legal, privacy and ethical issues; network and database security overview.

CMPE 691 Introduction to Wireless  Communications [3]

Introduction to wireless communication systems, the cellular concept, mobile radio propagation, large-scale path loss and small-scale fading, multi-path modulation techniques, equalization, diversity, compression, multi-access techniques, wireless networking and wireless systems and standards. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

Engineering, Computer Science & IT Courses: Computer Science

CMSC 611: Advanced Computer Architecture [3]

Memory-system design, pipeline structures, vector computers, scientific array processors, multi-processor architecture. Within each topic, the emphasis is on fundamental limitations: memory bandwidth, inter-processor communication, processing bandwidth and synchronization. Prerequisite: CMSC 411 or consent of instructor.

CMSC 621: Advanced Operating Systems [3]

A detailed study of advanced topics in operating systems, including synchronization mechanisms, virtual memory, deadlocks, distributed resource sharing, computer security and modeling of operating systems. Prerequisite: CMSC 421 or consent of instructor.

CMSC 635: Advanced Computer Graphics [3]

A study of advanced topics in computer graphics emphasizing algorithms for display of 3D objects, including wireframe representation, polygon mesh models, shading algorithms, parametric representation of curves, hidden-surface elimination, fractals and ray tracing. Other topics include advanced topics from the computer graphics literature, page description languages, CORE, GKS, PHIGS, CGI, the X window system, X window intrinsics, Motif and widget programming. Prerequisite: CMSC 435 or CMSC 634 or consent of instructor.

CMSC 645: Advanced Software Engineering [3]

Modern approaches to software development: requirements analysis, system design techniques, formal description techniques, implementation, testing, debugging, metrics, human factors, quality assurance, cost estimation, maintenance and tools. Prerequisite: CMSC 445 or consent of instructor.

CMSC 661: Principles of Database Systems [3]

Advanced topics in the area of database management systems: data models and their underlying mathematical foundations, database manipulation and query languages, functional dependencies, physical data organization and indexing methods, concurrency control, crash recovery, database security and distributed databases. Prerequisite: CMSC 461 or consent of instructor.

CMSC 665: Introduction to Electronic Commerce [3]

This course focuses on the use of electronic means to pursue business objectives. Special emphasis is placed on students’ ability to do research into existing and emerging technology and to summarize and present their findings clearly. The first part of the course is devoted to enabling technologies, including an introduction to business models for e-commerce and basic infrastructure, an overview of networking technologies and their impact on e-commerce and discussions on database technologies and Web-database connectivity. The second part of the course concentrates on the issues that are not solely technical, such as trust management, privacy and personalization, selling information products, copy protection and the digital divide.

CMSC 671: Principles of Artificial Intelligence [3]

A study of topics central to artificial intelligence, including logic for problem-solving, intelligent search techniques, knowledge representation, inference mechanisms, expert systems and AI programming. Prerequisite: CMSC 471 or consent of instructor.

CMSC 681: Advanced Computer Networks [3]

In-depth coverage of fundamental and advanced concepts in computer networking: protocol design, verification and testing; medium access protocols for next-generation networks; error detection and correction schemes; distributed routing algorithms concepts and mathematical analysis; switching architectures, quality-of-service architectures; admission control and scheduling algorithms; flow and congestion control; multi-cast architectures and protocols; network security; and data compression. Prerequisite: CMSC 481 or approval of instructor.

Engineering, Computer Science & IT Courses: Cybersecurity

The following courses are recommended electives for the Cybersecurity track:

  • CMSC 626: Principles of Computer Security [3] or CMPE 620/CYBR 620: Introduction to Cybersecurity
  • CMSC 687: Introduction to Network Security
  • CMSC 691: Computer Forensics and Intrusions

One elective from the following set:

  • CMSC 611: Computer Architecture
  • CMSC 621: Advanced Operating Systems
  • CMSC 628: Introduction to Mobile Computing
  • CMSC 641: Design and Analysis of Algorithms
  • CMSC 644: Information Assurance
  • CMSC 645: Advanced Software Engineering
  • CMSC 652: Cryptography and Data Security
  • CMSC 661: Principles of Database Systems
  • CMSC 671: Principles of Artificial Intelligence
  • CMSC 681: Advanced Computer Networks
  • CMSC 684: Wireless Sensor Networks
  • CMPE 685: Principles of Communication Networks
  • CMSC 687: Introduction to Network Security
  • CMSC 691: Data Mining

CMSC 611: Advanced Computer Architecture [3]

Memory-system design, pipeline structures, vector computers, scientific array processors, multi-processor architecture. Within each topic, the emphasis is on fundamental limitations: memory bandwidth, inter-processor communication, processing bandwidth and synchronization. Prerequisite: CMSC 411 or consent of instructor

CYBR 620: Introduction to Cybersecurity [3]

This course surveys the topic of Cybersecurity, examining aspects of information, people and technology, the evolution of information security to Cybersecurity, and its technical, legal, and impact perspectives. Students will learn how to apply the Cybersecurity concepts of protection and response to government, critical infrastructure, commercial, and individual situations; analyzing the threats and risks of those environments in light of information processing objectives and threats; and applying an appropriate strategy to build and operate appropriate defenses to mitigate potential impacts upon processing systems.

CMSC 621: Advanced Operating Systems [3]

A detailed study of advanced topics in operating systems, including synchronization mechanisms, virtual memory, deadlocks, distributed resource sharing, computer security and modeling of operating systems. Prerequisite: CMSC 421 or consent of instructor.

CMSC 626: Principles of Computer Security [3]

This course will provide an introduction to computer security with a specific focus on the computing aspects. Topics covered include: basics of computer security, including an overview of threat, attack and adversary models; social engineering; essentials of cryptography; traditional computing security models; malicious software; secure programming; operating system security in practice; trusted operating system design; public policy issues, including legal, privacy and ethical issues; network and database security overview.

CMSC 645: Advanced Software Engineering [3]

Modern approaches to software development: requirements analysis, system design techniques, formal description techniques, implementation, testing, debugging, metrics, human factors, quality assurance, cost estimation, maintenance and tools. Prerequisite: CMSC 445 or consent of instructor.

CMSC 652: Cryptography and Data Security [3]

Conventional and public-key cryptography. Selected cryptosystems, including DES and RSA. Digital signatures, pseudo-random number generation, cryptographic protocols and cryptanalytic techniques. Applications of cryptography to e-commerce. Prerequisites: CMSC 441 and MATH 221 or consent of instructor.

CMSC 661: Principles of Database Systems [3]

Advanced topics in the area of database management systems: data models and their underlying mathematical foundations, database manipulation and query languages, functional dependencies, physical data organization and indexing methods, concurrency control, crash recovery, database security and distributed databases. Prerequisite: CMSC 461 or consent of instructor.

CMSC 671: Principles of Artificial Intelligence [3]

A study of topics central to artificial intelligence, including logic for problem-solving, intelligent search echniques, knowledge representation, inference mechanisms, expert systems and AI programming. Prerequisite: CMSC 471 or consent of instructor.

CMSC 681: Advanced Computer Networks [3]

In-depth coverage of fundamental and advanced concepts in computer networking: protocol design, verification and testing; medium access protocols for next-generation networks; error detection and correction schemes; distributed routing algorithms concepts and mathematical analysis; switching architectures, quality-of-service architectures; admission control and scheduling algorithms; flow andcongestion control; multi-cast architectures and protocols; network security; and data compression. Prerequisite: CMSC 481 or approval of instructor.

CMPE 684: Wireless Sensor Networks [3]

A wide range of applications such as disaster management, military and security have fueled the interest in sensor networks during the past few years. Sensors are typically capable of wireless communication and are significantly constrained in the amount of available resources such as energy, storage and computation. Such constraints make the design and operation of sensor networks considerably different from contemporary wireless networks, and necessitate the development of resource conscious protocols and management techniques. This course provides a broad coverage of challenges and latest research results related to the design and management of wireless sensor networks. Covered topics include network architectures, node discovery and localization, deployment strategies, node coverage, routing protocols, medium access arbitration, fault-tolerance, and network security.

CMPE 685: Principles of Communications Networks [3]

This course provides an overview of network communications terms, concepts, architectures, protocols, and technologies. Upon completion of the course, students will be able construct, and assess the completeness of, architectures for simple LAN and WAN communications networks. Topics include wire/fiber and wireless WANs and LANs, the OSI and TCP/IP models, propagation media, analog and digital data and signals, error detection, error correction, data link layer protocols, multiple access techniques, medium access control, circuit and packet switching, X.25, TCP/IP, ATM, Ethernet, switches, routers, routing techniques, congestion control, queuing theory, quality of service (QoS) metrics, network architectures, and network security.

CMSC 687: Introduction to Network Security

This course will provide an introduction to computer security with a specific focus on the computing aspects. Topics covered include: basics of computer security, including an overview of threat, attack and adversary models; social engineering; essentials of cryptography; traditional computing security models; malicious software; secure programming; operating system security in practice; trusted operating system design; public policy issues, including legal, privacy and ethical issues; network and database security overview.

CMSC 691: Computer Forensics and Intrusions

This course will cover the core aspects of the incident response, the legal issues of computer forensics, file system analysis, network-based artifact examination and malware examinations. The course objective is to provide the student with the essential knowledge required to complete a computer forensic exam or incident report in the field.

Engineering, Computer Science & IT Courses: Electrical Engineering

ENEE 601: Signal and Linear Systems Theory [3]

Fundamentals of signals and systems, mathematical theory of continuous and discrete systems, linear time invariant systems, linear time varying systems, state space model and approaches, stability, controllability and observability, minimal realizations. Co-requisite: ENEE 620.

ENEE 610: Digital Signal Processing [3]

This is a first-year graduate course for communication and signal processing majors in electrical engineering (EE) that covers the fundamentals of digital signal processing (DSP). The goal of this course is to provide the first-year EE graduate student with the foundations and tools to understand, design and implement DSP systems, in both hardware and software. MATLAB and SystemView will be the primary vehicles to provide the student with hands-on DSP design and simulation experience. The student also will acquire an understanding of DSP hardware basics and architecture. Topics covered include: (1) A/D-D/A conversion and quantization, number representations and finite wordlength effects; (2) FIR, IIR and lattice filter structures, block diagram and equivalent structures; (3) multi-rate DSP and filterbanks; (4) digital filter design methods and verification; (5) DSP hardware architecture and (6) DSP simulation/laboratory experiences. Prerequisites: ENEE 601, ENEE 620 or their equivalent or permission of instructor.

ENEE 620: Probability and Random Processes [3]

Fundamentals of probability theory and random processes for electrical engineering applications and research: set and measure theory and probability spaces; discrete and continuous random variables and random vectors; probability density and distribution functions and probability measures; expectation, moments and characteristic functions; conditional expectation and conditional random variables; limit theorems and convergence concepts; random processes (stationary/non-stationary, ergodic, point processes, Gaussian, Markov and secondorder); applications to communications and signal processing. Prerequisite: Undergraduate probability course work or consent of instructor.

ENEE 621: Detection and Estimation Theory I [3]

Fundamentals of detection and destimation theory for statistical signal processing applications: theory of hypothesis testing (binary, multiple and composite hypotheses and Bayesian, Neyman Pearson and minimax approaches); theory of signal detection (discrete and continuous time signals; deterministic and random signals; white Gaussian noise, general independent noise and special classes of dependent noise, e.g. colored Gaussian noise; signal design and representations); theory of signal parameter estimation: minimum variance unbiased (MVU) estimation, Cramer-Rao lower bound, general MVU estimation, linear models, maximum likelihood estimation, least squares, general Bayesian estimators (minimum mean-square error and maximum a posterior estimators); linear Bayesian estimators (Wiener filters) and Kalman filters. Prerequisite: ENEE 620 or consent of instructor.

ENEE 630: Solid-State Electronics [3]

Fundamentals of solid-state physics for the micro-electronics field: review of quantum mechanics and statistical mechanics, crystal lattices, reciprocal lattices, dynamics of lattices, classical concepts of electron transport, band theory of electrons, semiconductors and excess carriers in semiconductors. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ENEE 631: Semiconductor Devices [3]

Principles of semiconductor device operation: review of semiconductor physics, p_n junction diodes, bipolar transistors, metal semiconductor contacts, JFETs and MESFETs, and MIS and MOSFET structures. Prerequisite: ENEE 630 or consent of instructor.

ENEE 680: Electromagnetic Theory I [3]

Fundamentals of dynamics in electromagnetic theory: theoretical analysis of Maxwell’s equations, electrodynamics, plane waves, waveguides, dispersion, radiating systems and diffraction. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ENEE 683: Lasers [3]

Introduction to basic theory of lasers: introduction to quantum mechanics and timedependent perturbation theory, interaction of radiation and matter, stimulated and spontaneous emissions, rate equations, laser amplification and oscillation, noise in lasers and laser amplifiers, semi-conductor lasers. Prerequisite: ENEE 680 or consent of instructor.

Engineering, Computer Science & IT Courses: Environmental Engineering

ENCE 610: Environmental Chemistry [3]

This course presents chemical principles in the context of aquatic systems such as rivers, oceans, wetlands and the sub-surface environment. Equilibrium and kinetic concepts are reinforced through the use of chemical equilibrium and kinetic models. Surface and colloid chemistry are also discussed. At the end of the course, the student will be able to understand the basic chemical phenomena that control the fate of pollutants in the environment.

ENCE 612: Environmental Physico-chemical Processes [3]

This course focuses on physico-chemical processes that control the fate of contaminants in engineered and natural systems is discussed. Physico-chemical phenomenon is first introduced from a phenomenal standpoint, then its role in both engineered and natural systems discussed. At the end of the course, the student will be able to understand the basic physico-chemical phenomena that control the fate of pollutants in the environment.

ENCE 614: Environmental Biological Processes [3]

The purpose of this course is to provide students with the fundamental and design aspects of biological processes. The course focuses on engineered biological treatment for both municipal wastewater systems and contaminated soils and sediments. An understanding of biological treatment operations requires knowledge in the fundamental areas of biochemistry, mass transport, microbiology, reaction kinetics and reactor engineering.

One ENCE elective approved by Civil Engineering Department Chair

Engineering, Computer Science & IT Courses: Human Centered Computing

HCC/IS 613: Graphical User Interface Design & Implementation [3]

This course has the objective of introducing the student to graphical user interface systems using the most current version of Java. Students will learn to implement a series of interactive stand-alone or web-based interfaces. Event handling and multi-threaded Java programs will be studied. Image and data transmission via the internet will be presented. Students will read articles from the current research literature that offer guidelines in interface design. Familiarity with UNIX file and directory manipulation is recommended.

HCC 629: Fundamentals of Human-Centered Computing [3]

This course is designed to introduce the student to the fundamentals of human-centered computing, including perceptual and cognitive psychology theories, human-centered computing models, theories, frameworks, and interaction paradigms.

HCC 636: Structured Systems Analysis and Design [3]

Advanced study of structures systems development. Emphasis on strategies and techniques of structured analysis and structured design for producing logical methodologies for dealing with complexity in the development of information systems.

HCC 706: Interfaces For Info. Visualization & Retrieval [3]

Providing access to large amounts of information is an important function of information systems. This course discusses the design of user interfaces that allow users to search for, browse, and interact with information. Specifically, students will be introduced to human information-seeking behavior and its implications for user interfaces, including user interfaces for information retrieval systems and a wide variety of information visualization tools. Information retrieval systems enable users to search for and browse information. Information visualization is the application of computer-supported graphical tools to the presentation of large amounts of abstract information. Prerequisite: IS 629 or permission of the instructor.

HCC 710: Graphic Design for Interactive Systems [3]

This course focuses on visual communications is the presentation of information through the use of type and image. Students in this course would get an understanding of how visual principles can be used, gain experience in working through the design process towards the creation and evaluation of both typographic and image based form, reinforce certain technical and computer skills, and refine your ability to critique and discuss relevant issues both individually and in group situations. In this course, the objective is to create forms that can be both read as well as seen. We consider issues ranging from visual clarity and the needs of the user, creating hierarchy in a non-linear reading order, to the semantic/pragmatic, implicit/explicit characteristics of form.

HCC 727: Computer-Supported Cooperative Work [3]

This course will provide students with an introduction to the discipline of Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW). Groupware systems, ranging from two people to enterprise-level, are exceedingly complex due to the interplay between social dynamics and distributed computing. This course will engage students with contemporary research and industry best practices in the design, development, and evaluation of collaborative information systems.

HCC 728: Online Communities [3]

Social interaction via the Internet is becoming increasingly important. People are gathering in online communities of interest and communities of practice to discuss health, hobbies, games, education, politics and professional issues. In this class students will analyze the technology and social support needed to make these social interactions successful; they will discuss and debate current research in this field and either develop an online community or carry out a small research project.

HCC 729: Human-Centered Design [3]

This course explores the main factors, methods, and processes that underlie the user-centered design of the information systems. The course focuses on conceptualizing and understanding the fundamental human-computer interaction issues as well as user testing and interaction design processes. The course also provides students the opportunity to apply these concepts through the design, evaluation, and implementation of interface prototypes in real-world environments. Prerequisite: IS629 and IS636.

HCC 760: Human-Computer Interaction [3]

This course examines and analyzes cognitive and software concepts that underlie human-computer interaction. The concepts include cognitive theories of memory organization, problem solving strategies, and linguistic comprehension. Interaction software technologies that are examined include menu selection systems, command languages, and direct manipulation techniques. This course is intended to introduce the student to the current literature, and to prepare the student for conducting independent research and for designing appropriate interaction software.

HCC 761: Information Systems in Human Behavior [3]

This course addresses the impact of information systems on individuals, groups, organizations, and societies. Topics will include studying the effects of information systems on phenomena such as human-centered computing, learning, development, cognition, personality, social interactions, problem solving, task performance, organizational effectiveness, consumer behavior, process control, and decision making. The information systems under investigation and analysis will encompass the full range of interrelated components from graphical user interfaces to global enterprise systems, as those factors relate to a system’s use and consequence. The course is structured as a reading and writing seminar having the objective of teaching students the process of developing a publishable article and making a professional presentation of their work. Content mastery is to be understood as a by-product of developing general problem-solving and scholarship skills.

Engineering, Computer Science & IT Courses: Information Systems

IS 603: Decision Technology Systems [3]

A broad overview of decision-making and the systems that are designed to support the process. The management process; computer support for management; the technology of management; decision technology system types, including artificial intelligence, decision support systems, executive and geographic information systems and idea processing systems; systems architectures; system integration considerations, system design and development methodologies; system performance measurement and evaluation; management of decision technology systems; organizational and user issues.

IS 607: Introduction to Information Systems - Online [4]

IS 607 will give you a hands-on introduction to the major basic technologies used in the field of Information Systems. These technologies are: Networking and data communications, programming, databases, HTML, JavaScript and server-side processing. This course will require you to develop web pages and sites. This course uses only client-side technology that requires a web browser. You will also have to FTP files up to servers at UMBC. All details of this process are included in the course materials. Some lectures include movies that require QuickTime or an open source equivalent.

As of Spring 2009, IS 607 is the equivalent to IS 605 and IS 606.

IS 620: Advanced Database Project [3]

In this course, students design and implement a realistic database using software tools such as Prisn, Excelator and Ingres. Working in teams, students proceed through all phases of a database development project, including assembling organization's data requirements and graphically modeling and implementing the database using an SQL-based interface. The principles of project management, planning and control are also covered. Prerequisite: IS 410 or IS 610.

IS 629: Human Factors in Information Systems [3]

This course is designed to introduce the student of information systems management to current research literature and controversial issues regarding the impact of human factors interventions as applied to the ever increasing human-computer interaction.

IS 633: Database Management Systems - Online [3]

The course covers most of the major advancements in database technology that have taken place recently. It does not assume any prior background in the field of databases and, hence, starts with basic introductory concepts along with more advanced topics. The course covers both conceptual and hands-on material in the area of database management, thus enabling the student to have the maximum amount of comprehension and retention of the material covered in the course.

Pre-requisite: IS 607.

IS 634: Structured Systems Analysis and Design - Online [3]

All of the activities required to progress from the initial identification of an organizational problem to the design of an IT-based solution are covered, as well as specific techniques for carrying out those activities. The emphasis is on both learning the mechanics of the techniques and applying them to real projects. 

CO-requisite: IS 607.

IS 636: Structured Systems Analysis and Design [3]

Advanced study of structure systems development. Emphasis on strategies and techniques of structured analysis and structured design for producing logical methodologies for dealing with complexity in developing information systems.

IS 650: Data Communications and Networks [3]

This course provides an in-depth analysis of data communications, network designs and distributed mainframes, mini- and micro-computer information systems. The underlying concepts essential to the design of both communication hardware and software are examined. As the theory is developed, laboratory demonstrations and exercises reinforce the applicability of various tools and paradigms to real-world problems.

IS 651: Network Design and Management [3]

This course covers implementation and administration of enterprise networking and distributed applications. It includes readings and case studies on middleware, network architecture for distributed applications and selected technologies to support enterprise systems. Prerequisite: IS 650.

IS 668: Enterprise-Wide Computing - Online [3]

This course presents enabling technologies, principles and methodologies for enterprise-wide computing solutions, and it provides hands-on training. Specific technology strategies for using information technology to support enterprise integration, enterprise resource planning and business processes and goals are discussed. You are assumed to have taken IS 632 or IS 650, have an elementary knowledge of server-side and client-side web technology, and have taken elementary programming. A major focus of the course is on doing technical, hands-on exercises and so one should enjoy that type of learning.

IS 707: Applications of Artificial Intelligence (AI) [3]

This course provides a survey of artificial intelligence concepts, technologies, applications, techniques, methodologies and issues. The first half of the course will focus on expert systems and the knowledge engineering life cycle. The second half of the course will highlight various knowledge technologies, including case-based reasoning, genetic algorithms, fuzzy logic, neural networks, hybrid intelligent systems, data mining and knowledge management. The course also will discuss management implications of use, non-use and misuse of AI technologies. Prerequisite: Graduate student standing and permission of the instructor.

IS 728: Online Communities [3]

Social interaction via the Internet is becoming increasingly important. People are gathering in online communities of interest and communities of practice to discuss health, hobbies, games, education, politics and professional issues. In this class, students will analyze the technology and social support needed to make these social interactions successful. They also will discuss and debate current research in this field and either develop an online community or carry out a small research project.

IS 765: Project Management [3]

This course covers the manner in which a system project is planned, scheduled and controlled during the project’s life. The use of project management techniques such as PERT (Project Evaluation and Review Technique) and Gantt charts are examined in depth, as well as other techniques of planning, scheduling and controlling projects. Prerequisite: IS 601.

Engineering, Computer Science & IT Courses: Mechanical Engineering

MATH 404: Introduction to Partial Differential Equations I [3]

Quasi-linear and non-linear first-order equations, calculus of variations, linear second order equations and their classification, self-adjoint operators, Sturm Liouville problems and eigenfunction expansions, fundamental solutions and Green's functions, distributions, boundary and initial value problem for potential, wave and heat equations, integral transforms and asymptotic expansions. Prerequisite: MATH 251 and 225

ENME 631: Advanced Conduction and Radiation Heat Transfer [3]

Theory of conduction and radiation. Anisotropic conduction and bi-directional radiation properties and experiments. General conduction and radiation governing equations. Integration, finite difference and finite element techniques. Combined conduction and radiation. Engineering applications. Prerequisite: ENME 315, ENME 321 and ENME 700.

ENME 640: Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics I [3]

A broad study of fundamental principles of fluid mechanics, including potential flow, viscous flow, compressible flow and convection.

ENME 645: Computational Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer [3]

Explores the use of numerical methods for solving heat transfer and fluid flow problems, their properties and solution techniques for conduction, and free and forced convection problems.

A student who completes the four courses listed above will receive the Post Baccalauerate Certificate in Computational Thermal Fluid Dynamics

ENME 662: Linear Vibrations [3]

Fourier and statistical analysis; transient, steady-state and random behavior of linear, lumped-mass systems. Normal-mode theory, shock spectrum concepts, mechanical impedance and mobility methods. Vibrations of continuous media, including rods, beams and membranes.

ENME 664: Dynamics [3]

The algebra and calculus of tensor in Riemannian space are developed with special emphasis on those aspects that are most relevant to mechanics. The geometry of curves and surfaces in E-3 is examined. The concepts are applied to derive of the field equations for the nonlinear theory of continuous media and to various problems arising in classical dynamics.

ENME 670: Continuum Mechanics [3]

The algebra and calculus of tensor in Riemannian space are developed with special emphasis on those aspects that are most relevant to mechanics. The geometry of curves and surfaces in E-3 is examined. The concepts are applied to derive of the field equations for the non-linear theory of continuous media and to various problems arising in classical dynamics.

ENME 677: Applied Elasticity [3]

Analysis of stress and strain, equilibrium and compatibility conditions, plane stress and plane strain problems, torsion and flexure of bars, general three-dimensional analysis, energy methods, thermal stresses and wave propagation.

Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering

Topics vary with semester and may be taken repeatedly, as topics vary. Example topics are biofluid mechanics, soft-tissue mechanics, biomaterials, composites, mechatronics and electro-mechanical design.

ENME  811 - Special Topics in Mechanical Design – Elementary Engineering [3]

ENME  813 - Special Topics in Biomechanics - Biomechanics [3]

ENME 815 - Special Topics in Solid Mechanics

Special topics include:

  • Macromechanics Of Composites [3]
  • Elastic-Plastic Wave Propagation [3]
  • Advanced Ceramics [3]
  • Intro/Material Processes/MEMS [3]
  • Finite Element Analysis Design [3]

Engineering, Computer Science & IT Courses: Systems Engineering

ENEE 660: Systems Engineering Principles [3]

This course provides the foundational framework to understand the system engineering (SE) process, selection of specialized SE tools and the execution of SE under differing design or acquisition philosophies. The course addresses: (1) SE principles (2) SE processes and methodologies (3) integration of technical disciplines and (4) SE management. Prerequisite: B.S. degree in EE or related field.

ENEE 661: System Architecture and Design [3]

This course covers the development of a system architecture and hardware/software system design within the overall systems engineering(SE) process. Major topics include development of an operational concept, functional decomposition, requirements allocation and partitioning, interface definition, inclusion of integrity, reliability, and maintainability within the design concept, validation and verification, technical performance budgeting, quality function deployment techniques, and statistical and linear models. Prerequisite: B.S. degree in EE or related field. ENEE 660 (SE Principles) may be taken concurrently.

ENEE 662: Modeling, Simulation, and Analysis [3]

This course addresses simulation architectures. Topics addressed include cost and risk analysis;experimental design; simulation control and interfaces; requirements and architecture definition; simulation design and implementation; verification, validation, and accreditation; estimating, planning and controlling simulation efforts. Prerequisites: B.S. degree in EE or related field and a working knowledge of C/C++ or a similar programming language. ENEE 660 and ENEE 661 or consent of instructor.

ENEE 663: System Implementation, Integration, and Test [3]

This course covers the translation of design specifications into product elements, integration of these elments into a system, and the verification that the resulting system performs as intended in it operational environment. Prerequisites: ENEE 660 and ENEE 661 or consent of instructor.

** A student who completes the above four Systems Engineering courses plus ENEE 670 - Systems Engineering Project will earn the Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Systems Engineering, as described at Systems Engineering - Post-Baccalaureate Certificate.

ENEE 670: Systems Engineering Project [3]

This course is either an individual or group project on an approved topic in the Systems Engineering (SE) Certificate, the SE track within the Master’s in Electrical Engineering or the SE track within the Master's of Computer Science, non-thesis option. The project serves as an integrating mechanism to allow the student to demonstrate a working level understanding by applying the knowledge gained in the coursework leading up to this capstone course. The "project" requires a sequence of tasks required to achieve an end result that requires the use of multiple EE domains, disciplines and tools. Underlying the need for the result of the project are the essential lessons learned from case studies of major programs. The project will be tailored to allow completion and submission as partial satisfaction for a Certificate in Systems Engineering.

ENEE 664: Advanced Systems Architecture [3]

This course emphasizes the many partitioning alternatives that can be employed when developing physical systems architectures, including hierarchical partitioning, federated partitioning, scalable architectures, high availability architectures, and collaborative systems.  The course also deals with methods for architecting successful systems, such as achieving data integrity, managing system workflow, and constructing representation models.

Prerequisites: It is assumed that the student is familiar with the systems engineering process and the various development methodologies. ENEE 660: Systems Engineering Principles and ENEE 661: Systems Architecture and Design

ENEE 672: Decision and Risk Analysis [3]

This course provides an overview of decision and risk analysis techniques. It focuses on how to make rational decisions in the presence of uncertainty and conflicting objectives. It covers modeling uncertainty, the principles of rational decision-making, representing and solving decision problems using influence diagrams and decision trees, sensitivity analysis, Bayesian decision analysis, deductive and inductive reasoning, objective and subjective probabilities, probability distributions, regression analysis, defining and calculating the value of information, modeling risk attitudes and utility functions. Concepts will be illustrated through case studies and practiced by students through homework.




© UMBC Division of Professional Studies · 1000 Hilltop Circle, Sherman Hall East 4th Floor, Baltimore, MD 21250 · 410-455-2336 · dps@umbc.edu