Additional Graduate Courses

In addition to the previously mentioned graduate programs, the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) offers a large number of 400-level courses and some 600-level courses in other fields. The 400-level courses listed below have been approved for graduate credit. Students already admitted to the University of Maryland Graduate School, Baltimore may apply a limited number of these courses toward a graduate degree with the approval of their academic advisor. Full descriptions of the 400-level courses listed below may be found in the UMBC Undergraduate Catalog.

AMERICAN STUDIES 410-455–2106
Department of American Studies (AMST)

AMST 400
Independent Projects in American Studies [1-3]

AMST 610
Theorizing Identity in Multi-Cultural Contexts [3]

This seminar examines the changing dynamics of identity formation and transformation as they are mediated through contemporary experiences of race, gender, ethnicity, class, sexuality and nationality. In particular, it will ask what is at stake personally and politically when dominant societies assign identities to marginalized groups and when marginalized people represent themselves. Cross-listed as LLC 610.

AMST 620
The Production of Culture [3]

This course looks at the manufacture and consumption of mass culture. Who creates, processes, distributes and buys the dreams and ideals that influence our daily lives? How are values, insights, information and myths converted into marketable commodities? What are the political implications of culture production? Taking a variety of interdisciplinary approaches, the course will examine a number of culture industries, including television, popular music, advertising, art museums, tourism and mass-market literature, as well as general culture theory. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

AMST 622
Seminar in Mass Media [3]

An intensive research seminar that will investigate a special problem in mass media and popular culture. A different topic will be addressed each semester offered, e.g. children and television, television news, advertising, gender and mass media. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

AMST 630
Cultural Policy and the Politics of Culture in the United States [3]

This course examines the historical development of cultural policy in the United States, especially in relation to the practical problem of achieving cultural equity within the public and private institutions of a multi-cultural political democracy. Special attention is paid to the cultural dynamics of certain periods and to interactions between the cultural systems and characteristics of various racial and ethnic groups, of cultural areas and regions and of occupational groups and socio-economic classes. Illustrative cultural materials embrace the graphic and plastic arts, dance, music, literature and various segments of popular culture. Analytical perspectives draw upon the disciplines of anthropology, cultural geography, folklore, history and linguistics. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

AMST 680
Community and Culture [3]

An interdisciplinary examination of the nature and varieties of community in American culture, past and present, focusing upon the analytical conceptions of community as place, social structure and culture. The course will consider classic and contemporary literature of community studies, including perspectives from sociology and anthropology, social and cultural history, social psychology, creative writing and related interdisciplinary fields. Students will apply concepts from the course to the study of a particular local community, developing specific research skills through the investigation of its historical and contemporary character. Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ANCIENT STUDIES 410-455-6265
Department of Ancient Studies (ANCS)

The Department of Ancient Studies participates in the M.A. and in the five-year B.A./M.A. program in Historical Studies by offering courses at the 600 and 700 levels. Students interested in pursuing a part of their historical studies graduate program in the area of classical antiquity should consult with the faculty of the departments of History and of Ancient Studies.

ANCS 604
Ancient Trade [3]

An exploration of trade in the ancient Mediterranean through literary and archaeological sources used by modern scholars to trace it. Attention will be focused upon international trade by the Greeks and the Romans and its interconnection with political, legal and social entities within classical civilization.

ANCS 644
Seminar in the Age of Caesar [3]

The political and social world and the dominating personalities (especially Julius Caesar) of the last century of the Roman republic. Topics will be drawn from these general areas: Caesar’s wars (Gallic or civil), Caesar himself (his political career or his reforms) and the age of Caesar (political and social life). A knowledge of Latin is not required.

ARCH 624
Seminar in Classical Archaeology [3]

An intensive examination through readings and discussion of a particular period or problem of ancient civilization. Topics will vary from year to year. Note: May be repeated for credit.

ARCH 697
Field Experience in Archaeology [1-6]

Archaeological field work. Students may earn academic credit by arrangement with the ancient studies department by working at an approved excavation, museum, laboratory or field school in the United States, or abroad. Written work, in addition to practical experience, will be included. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

GREK 601
Special Author Seminar [3]

Translation of the works of a single author chosen by the instructor.

HIST 653
Ancient Greece [3]

Greece from the earliest times to the death of Alexander. Topics include the Aegean Bronze Age, Greek colonization and the tyrants, Sparta, Athens, the Persian Wars, the classical age, the Peloponnesian War, the rise of Macedonia and Alexander the Great and his impact.

HIST 655
The Roman Republic [3]

Ancient Rome from the earliest times to 31 B.C.E. Topics include Roman imperialism in Italy and the Mediterranean, the conflict of the orders, the Punic Wars and the collapse of the republic.

HIST 656
The Roman Empire [3]

Ancient Rome from the Augustan Age to the disintegration of the empire in the West. Topics include the Pax Romana, the military monarchy and anarchy, the reorganization of the empire by Diocletian and Constantine, the rise of Christianity and the final collapse of the empire.

HIST 724
Applications of Theory in Archaeology [3]

This course will analyze archaeological theory as applied to sites for which historical or documentary evidence is available. Basic concepts of archaeology and the reconstruction of cultural history will be examined, using case studies from the New World and the Old World.

HUM 610
Humanities: Origins in Classical Antiquity [3]

Consideration will be given to those ideas embodied in classical antiquity that form the genesis of the conventionally accepted concept of the humanities and that generate the intellectual pursuits and academic disciplines categorized under that heading.

LATN 602
Special Author Seminar [3]

Translation of the works of a single author chosen by the instructor.

LATN 622
The Age of Caesar [3]

With an emphasis on literary analysis and attention to the events of the time as a matrix in which it developed, the great Latin literature of the first 60 years of the first century B.C.E. will be surveyed. Various genres will be studied with readings from such authors as Cicero, Varro, Nepos, Catullus, Lucretius, Sallust and Caesar.

LATN 688
Topics in Latin Literature: Cicero [3]

An intensive study of the life and writings of Cicero and a study of the prominent individuals and spectacular events in Cicero’s Rome. Major attention will be given to a close analysis of Cicero’s letters.

DANCE 410-455-2952
Department of Dance (DANC)

DANC 400
Independent Studies in Dance [1-3]

ECONOMICS 410-455-2160
Department of Economics (ECON)

See the PUBLIC POLICY and ECONOMIC POLICY ANALYSIS programs for more economics courses.

ECON 403
Economic Growth and Cycles [3]

ECON 408
Managerial Economics [3]

ECON 413

ECON 421-4222
Introduction to Econometrics [3,3]

ECON 426
Economic Theory and Operations Analysis [3]

ECON 433
Urban Economics [3]

ECON 437
The Economics of Natural Resources [3]

ECON 442
European Economic History [3]

ECON 443
History of Economic Thought I [3]

ECON 444
History of Economic Thought II [3]

ECON 453
Household Economics [3]

ECON 454
Economics of Education and Human Capital [3]

ECON 455
Comparative Economic Systems [3]

ECON 457
The Economy of the Soviet Union [3]

ECON 464
State and Local Public Finance [3]

ECON 467
Health Economics [3]

ECON 471
Money and Capital Markets [3]

ECON 474
Cases in Corporation Finance [3]

ECON 482
International Finance [3]

ECON 486
Topics in Economic Development [3]

ECON 493
Individual Research in Economics [3]

ENGLISH 410-455-2384
Department of English (ENGL)

ENGL 403
Seminar in Literary Criticism: A Historical Survey [3]

ENGL 405
Seminar in Literary History [3]

ENGL 410
Seminar in Genre Studies [3]

ENGL 417
Seminar in Literature and the Other Arts [3]

ENGL 419
Seminar in Literature and the Sciences [3]

ENGL 431
Seminar in Contemporary British and American Literature [3]

ENGL 448
Seminar in Literature and Culture [3]

ENGL 451
Seminar in Major Writers [3]

ENGL 461
Seminar in Minority Literature [3]

ENGL 471
Advanced Creative Writing: Fiction [3]

ENGL 473
Advanced Creative Writing: Poetry [3]

ENGL 480
Seminar in Advanced Journalism [3]

ENGL 491
Seminar in Topics in the English Language [3]

ENGL 619
Literature and the Sciences [3]

An intensive study of the relationships between literature and some aspect of the physical, biological or social sciences. Topics to be announced each semester offered Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ENGL 630
The Interpretation of Literary Masterworks [3]

This course will examine a selection of important works from the world literary tradition in the light of enduring ideas, themes and interpretive problems. Topics, which will vary from semester to semester, may deal with such concerns as the conception and uses of time in narrative, the poetry of political engagement or changing concepts of the hero. Note: Also listed as HUM 630. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ENGL 631
Contemporary Issues: Texts and Contexts [3]

Focuses on an issue of current importance and examines its representation in selected works of modern and contemporary literature. Topics, which will vary from semester to semester, may deal with such problems as ethos and action, politics and culture, the representation of the natural environment, contemporary self-consciousness, masculine and feminine in modern fiction, relativity in art and science and society. Note: Also listed as HUM 631. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

ENGL 641
Literature, Values and Social Responsibility [3]

This course treats literary texts as vehicles of value in a variety of cultures: national, ethnic, gendered, privileged and oppressed. It examines the way in which values survive in the language and literature of particular peoples and how such values form part of their broad social identity. In particular, the course focuses on how literature can be applied to specific political, economic and education problems. Note: Also listed as LLC 641. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ENGL 648
Seminar in Literature and Culture [3]

Study of the relationships between literature and culture with emphasis on literature as a product and manifestation of cultural forces. Topics are announced each semester. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ENGL 686
Teaching Composition: Theory and Practice [3]

This course examines our changing understanding of the teaching of composition during the past 30 years by tracing key theories and pedagogies across this period. These sometimes-conflicting approaches to teaching writing include the following orientations: cognitive, expressivist, social constructionist and political. The course is intended for current and prospective teachers of English at elementary, secondary and post-secondary levels. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.

ENGL 688
Teaching Writing with Computer-Assisted Instruction [3]

This course introduces the methods of computer-assisted writing instruction to current and prospective teachers across the curriculum. It allows participants to practice these methods in class and provides opportunities for discussion and investigation. Designed for educators in all disciplines and at all levels, this course invites participants to explore ways of integrating technologies into their own classrooms and curricula. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ENGL 690
Topics in the English Language[3]

A study of various aspects of the English language. These might include a historical survey of the structure of the language from Old English through Middle English to Modern English; contemporary varieties of English, both standard and non-standard; and the development of new Englishes around the world. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ENGL 692
Topics in Rhetoric and Composition [3]

This course will emphasize one of two ways for students to examine theories of speaking and writing. The first, historical in emphasis, will trace current models of the writing process to their traditional sources in Greek and Latin rhetoric. The second, contemporary in emphasis, will examine present trends in writing research, the problems of different methodologies and new developments that influence how researchers study writing. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

ENGL 693
American English Structure for ESOL/FL Teachers: Syntax and Morphology [3]

An overview of the syntactic and morphological system of modern American English. An in-depth examination of the most productive and important rules of English grammar from the point of view of English as a second language and English as a secondary foreign language. Practice in detecting and diagnosing the errors, explaining rules simply and clearly and employing effective instructional techniques will be provided. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

HUM 630
The Interpretation of Literary Masterworks [3]

See ENGL 630.

HUM 631
Contemporary Issues: Texts and Concepts [3]

See ENGL 631.

FRENCH 410-455-2109
Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics (MLL)

See the INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION program for more French courses.

FREN 400
Special Topics in French [3]

FREN 401
Studies in French Language [3]

FREN 409
Business French II [3]

FREN 421
Studies in French Literature [3]

FREN 471
Studies in French-Speaking Culture and Society [3]

FREN 481
Seminar in French [3]

GENDER AND WOMEN’S STUDIES 410-455-2001
Gender and Women’s Studies Program

GWST 680
Theories of Feminism [3]

This course examines the major theories of feminism through the study of works by central feminist thinkers considered in their social, historical and intellectual contexts. Such topics as reproduction and sexuality; the sexual division of labor; political rights; identity and subjectivity; and the intersection of class, race, nation, sexual orientation and gender will be explored from the dominant theoretical perspectives of feminism. Prerequisite: GWST 100, GWST/AMST 310 or permission of instructor.

GWST 690
Advanced Topics in Gender and Women’s Studies [3]

An intensive study of a specialized topic or problem involving gender and/or women’s studies using interdisciplinary methodologies. Topics to be announced each semester offered.

GEOGRAPHY AND ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS 410-455-2002
Department of Geography and Environmental Systems (GEOG)

GEOG 400
Selected Topics in Geography [3]

GEOG 410
Coastal Morphology [3]

GEOG 411
Fluvial Morphology [3]

GEOG 413
Seminar in Biogeography [3]

GEOG 415
Climate Change [3]

GEOG 416
Hydrology [3]

GEOG 429
Seminar in Geography of Disease and Health [3]

GEOG 433
Sustainability, Land Use and Natural Resources [3]

GEOG 435
Global Patterns of Production and Trade [3]

GEOG 438
Selected Topics in Transportation Geography [3]

GEOG 442
Seminar in Metropolitan Baltimore [3]

GEOG 450
Seminar in Social Geography [3]

GEOG 480
Advanced Cartographic Applications [3]

GEOG 482
Cartographic Internship [3]

GEOG 485
Field Research in Geography [3]

GEOG 486
Advanced Applications of Geographic Information Systems [3]

GEOG 491
Independent Study [1-3]

GEOG 498
Internship [3]

GERMAN 410-455-2109
Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics (MLL)

See the INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION program for more German courses.

GERM 400
Special Projects in German [3]

GERM 401
Studies in German Language [3]

GERM 421
Studies in German Literature [3]

GERM 481
Seminar in German [3]

HUMANITIES

For courses in the humanities, see listings for ANCIENT STUDIES, ENGLISH and PHILOSOPHY.

MODERN LANGUAGES AND LINGUISTICS 410-455-2109
Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics (MLL)

See the INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION program for more MLL and linguistics courses.

MLL 400
Special Projects in Modern Languages and Linguistics [3]

PHILOSOPHY 410-455-2103
Department of Philosophy (PHIL)

HUM 601
The Nature and Uses of the Humanities [3]

PHIL 400
Independent Study in Philosophy [1-4]

Independent study on an approved topic in philosophy.

PHIL 445
Philosophy of Language [3]

A study of philosophical problems concerning the nature of language. This course considers, among other things, what the nature of meaning is, what communication is, what it is for a word to refer to or name something and what the relationship is between thought and language.

PHIL 454
Environmental Ethics and Policy [3]

A critical examination of moral and political values relating to the environment and the policy and administrative arrangements that have been proposed to promote these values.

PHIL 470
Philosophy of Mind [3]

Among the questions investigated by this course: Are human beings computers? Is the mind the same as the brain? What is the relation between thought and action? Are there laws of human behavior?

PHIL 498, 499
Advanced Topics in Philosophy [3, 3]

A detailed examination either of a major area of philosophical inquiry (such as metaphysics, theory of knowledge) or of a specialized topic within one of these areas (such as the philosophy of space and time, the nature of causality, mathematical logic).

PHIL 600
Proseminar in Applied Ethics [1]

The proseminar is a course structured around public lectures and colloquia, with participation from faculty and the community. The proseminar will be organized around topics relating to public needs served by professionals and to faculty research interests. Note: Repeatable credit.

PHIL 640
Scientific Reasoning [3]

An introduction to the methods of scientific reasoning. Central topics will be selected from among the following: inductive reasoning, the nature and history of science, the role of models prediction and evidence in the justification of scientific theories.

PHIL 650
Moral Theory [3]

A critical examination of a range of major ethical theories, chosen from among virtue theories, divine command theories, utilitarian theories, contractualist theories, existentialism and Kantianism. Readings may be drawn from both historical and contemporary texts.

PHIL 652
Topics in Contemporary Ethical Theory [3]

Intensive study of a contemporary ethical theory, such as consequentialism, contractarian or “care ethic,” exploring its strengths and weaknesses as a basis for personal morality, social policy and professional conduct. In opposition to the impartial application of abstract principles stressed in mainstream “justice” ethics, “care” ethics stresses personal responsibility and solicitude for identified others. Associated with a “feminine” philosophical perspective, “care ethics” is claimed by some health professionals to be particularly applicable to biomedical ethical issues.

PHIL 653
Ethical Issues in Medicine [3]

Beginning with a brief introduction to some major ethical theories, this seminar examines a range of central topics in bioethics. Areas of focus will be selected from among the following: physician-assisted suicide and euthanasia, medical futility, genetic testing, cloning, organ transplantation, experiments with human subjects, the physician-patient relationship, autonomy and trust and confidentiality.

PHIL 655
Topics in Applied Ethics [3]

An examination of applied and professional ethics, including their relationship to ethical theory, the attempt to codify ethical rules for different professions, the use of case studies as a method of moral reasoning and the dilemmas faced by moral agents who also are acting in a professional role.

PHIL 701
Directed Independent Research

An independent research project for master’s students, under the supervision of a faculty member. Intended for students who are not writing a thesis or for those who wish to study an aspect of bioethics or professional responsibility that is not covered by coursework. Note: Repeatable credit.

PHIL 790
Applied Ethics Practicum [2]

The practicum places the student in a working situation—such as a participant on an ethics committee, an attendee on medical rounds or a member of a policy-making committee—in which the student must exercise ethical judgment and expertise. The practice is intended to help students develop a sensitivity to professional and applied issues in ethics as they arise in practice. Students will observe, analyze and assess these situations in writing at the end of the placement.

PHIL 799
Master’s Thesis Research [1-6]

Master’s thesis research under the direction of a faculty member. Note: Six credit hours are required for the M.A. degree.

POLITICAL SCIENCE 410-455-2568
Department of Political Science (POLI)

See the PUBLIC POLICY program for more political science courses.

POLI 405
Seminar in Political Science [3]

POLI 429
Selected Topics in American Government and Politics [3]

SPANISH 410-455-2109
Department of Modern Languages and Linguistics (MLL)

See the INTERCULTURAL COMMUNICATION program for more Spanish courses.

SPAN 400
Special Projects in Spanish [3]

SPAN 401
Studies in Spanish Language [3]

SPAN 421
Studies in Hispanic Literature [3]

SPAN 471
Topics in Spanish Civilization [3]

SPAN 472
Topics in Latin-American Civilization [3]

SPAN 481
Seminar in Spanish [3]

THEATRE 410-455-2179
Department of Theater (THTR)

THTR 400
Theater Studies [1-6]

THTR 470
Drama Seminar [1-4]

THTR 471
Advanced Writing for the Theater [3]

THTR 490
Production Workshop [6]

THTR 421
Acting Shakespeare [3]

SUPPLEMENTARY COURSES FOR INSTITUTIONAL CREDIT

ENGLISH LANGUAGE CENTER

English Language Center (ELC) courses enhance international students’ English language fluency and accuracy, preparing them to confidently communicate as academic writers and speakers. These courses are required for students entering UMBC as conditional admission students. In addition any students seeking advanced English skill development may choose to enroll. Placement in appropriate courses is determined by the Learning Resources Center and the ELC. The courses carry institutional credit, applicable to student hours but not to degree credit.

ELC 041
Writing and Grammar for Academic Purposes

This course is designed for high-intermediate English students to develop academic writing skills. Students in this class will learn to write successful academic papers through outlining ideas, writing first drafts, peer editing and revising. Students progress from writing well-formed paragraphs to longer essays with clear topic sentences, appropriate support materials and logical conclusions. Students also will learn about the different styles of academic writing, including the use of references and citations. Prerequisites: Permission of the department. Notes: Three institutional credits are awarded.

ELC 042
Reading and Vocabulary for Academic Purposes

This course is designed for high-intermediate English students to improve reading comprehension and general language skills. Students will develop advanced comprehension skills, understand figurative language and recognize a writer’s intent. Texts include fiction and nonfiction materials, emphasizing reading for both information and pleasure. Students are encouraged to participate in discussions and prepare presentations for class. Prerequisites: Permission of the department. Notes: Three institutional credits awarded.

ELC 043
Speaking and Listening for Academic Purposes

This course increases the spoken fluency and listening comprehension of high-intermediate English students, and introduces them to English appropriate to an academic environment. Students will develop their skills in notetaking, lecture comprehension, creating presentations and participating in class discussions. In addition to class work, students will attend two UMBC lectures to test their strengths and weaknesses in these areas. Prerequisites: Permission of the department. Notes: Three institutional credits are awarded.

ELC 051
Advanced Writing and Grammar for Academic Purposes

This course gives advanced students the opportunity to perfect their writing skills and prepares them to write in English with university-level competence and accuracy. Students will practice the use of terminology and grammatical structures appropriate to the academic assignments they are likely to encounter. This course also helps to develop skills necessary for analysis, presentation of research topics and persuasive writing. Prerequisites: Permission of the department. Notes: Three institutional credits are awarded.

ELC 052
Advanced Reading and Vocabulary for Academic Purposes

In this course, students develop advanced critical reading skills using a variety of source materials. Readings may include articles, non-fiction writing and data presentations. Students will be able to identify major points and types of support, separate fact from opinion and analyze vocabulary used in the text. Students are encouraged to participate in critical thinking exercises and class discussions. Prerequisites: Permission of the department. Notes: Three institutional credits are awarded.

ELC 053
Advanced Speaking and Listening for Academic Purposes

This course provides advanced students with extensive practice in English communication skills and strategies in an academic environment. Students improve listening comprehension and pronunciation skills, and they participate in group discussions. As part of the course, students also will attend academic lectures and campus activities and prepare presentations for the class. Prerequisites: Permission of the department. Notes: Three institutional credits are awarded.

ELC 054
Cross-Cultural Communication and University Life

This course is designed to assist international students in adapting to the culture of an American university campus. Students will have the opportunity to improve their intercultural communication skills and learn about cultural diversity in the United States. Language and study skills are reinforced by readings, discussions, presentations and written assignments involving current issues and different cultural perspectives. Prerequisites: Permission of the department. Notes: Three institutional credits are awarded.

ELC 061
ESL Special Topics: Writing for Research and Professional Purposes I

In this course, students will work with published materials in their own disciplines and develop their own writing projects in the context of disciplinary and professional expectations and audiences. Students may be developing writing for scholarly papers, journal articles, research proposals, theses or dissertations. The focus of the work will be on refining writing within specific disciplinary discourses, organization of argument, rhetorical styles, grammatical patterns common to the discipline, and strategies and resources for successful academic and professional writing. Students will work individually with the instructor, in groups and as peer reviewers for each others’ work. Prerequisites: Permission of the department. Notes: This course is designated as ELC 061 in the fall semester and ELC 071 in the spring semester. One to three institutional credits are awarded.

ELC 063
ESL Special Topics: Advanced Presentation/Discussion II

This course will help highly advanced students to develop fluency in expressing their ideas in both the classroom and other university interactions. Activities include individual and group presentations, role-playing, discussion of current issues, individual pronunciation, interacting with faculty and peers, analyzing lengthy spoken material and other challenges facing advanced ESL students. Students enrolled in the class will present topics to their peers relevant to their intended discipline. Prerequisites: Permission of the department. Notes: This course is designated as ELC 063 in the fall semester and ELC 073 in the spring semester. Three institutional credits are awarded.

ELC 071
ESL Special Topics: Writing for Research and Professional Purposes III

In this course, students will work with published materials in their own disciplines and develop their own writing projects in the context of disciplinary and professional expectations and audiences. Students may be developing writing for scholarly papers, journal articles, research proposals, theses or dissertations. The focus of the work will be on refining writing within specific disciplinary discourses, organization of argument, rhetorical styles, grammatical patterns common to the discipline, and strategies and resources for successful academic and professional writing. Students will work individually with the instructor, in groups and as peer reviewers for each others’ work. Prerequisites: Permission of the department. Notes: This course is designated as ELC 061 in the fall semester and ELC 071 in the spring semester. 1-3 institutional credits are awarded.

ELC 073
ESL Special Topics: Advanced Presentation/Discussion IV

This course will help highly advanced students to develop fluency in expressing their ideas in both the classroom and other university interactions. Activities include individual and group presentations, role-playing, discussion of current issues, individual pronunciation, interacting with faculty and peers, analyzing lengthy spoken material and other challenges facing advanced ESL students. Students enrolled in the class will present topics to their peers relevant to their intended discipline. Prerequisites: Permission of the department. Notes: This course is designated as ELC 063 in the fall semester and ELC 073 in the spring semester. Three institutional credits are awarded.

Academic Resources

The ELC offers courses for students admitted to the University who require additional academic English. Students who begin in the ELC and successfully complete upper-level academic preparation courses are eligible for conditional admission to undergraduate or graduate programs without taking the TOEFL exam. The ELC also offers courses for prospective students and a noncredit, year-round Intensive English Program with 20+ hours per week of integrated language instruction. The Center provides:

  • Face-to-face, online and hybrid classes
  • Individual and group tutoring
  • A multimedia lab with English software
  • Student advising
  • A variety of programs including: conversation partners, field trips and student activities

The Center’s Professional Development Programs include non-credit courses for academics and professionals and are focused on training English teachers who live and work abroad.
For more information, call 410-455-2831 or go to www.umbc.edu/elc.