Education (EDUC)


Department of Education

EUGENE SCHAFFER, Chair
SUSAN M. BLUNCK, Associate Chair

Professors
CRANDALL, JOANN, Ph.D., Georgetown University; Language arts/ESOL
HRABOWSKI, FREEMAN A., III, Ph.D., University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign; Mathematics education
SCHAFFER, EUGENE C., Ed.D., Temple University; Curriculum and instruction, educational leadership

Associate Professors
BERGE, ZANE L., Ph.D., Michigan State University; Training systems, distance education
KINACH, BARBARA M., Ed.D., Harvard University; Curriculum philosophy, teacher preparation reform, mathematics and higher education
LEE, DIANE M., Ph.D., University of Maryland, College Park; Human learning and cognition, research methods
RIVKIN, MARY S., Ph.D., University of Maryland, College Park; Early-childhood education
SCULLY, PATRICIA A., Ph.D., University of Maryland, College Park; Early-childhood education
SHIN, SARAH, Ph.D., University of Michigan; ESOL/bilingual education
SINGER, JONATHAN, Ph.D.

Associate Clinical Professors
BLUNCK, SUSAN M., Ph.D., University of Iowa; Science education, curriculum, systemic reform, science education professional development
HUANG, YI PING, Ph.D., University of Maryland, Baltimore County; Ethno-musicology, assessment
SMALL, SUE E., Ed.D., University of Maryland, College Park; Education policy and administration, professional development schools

Assistant Professors
SHELTON, NANCY RANKIE, Ph.D., University of Florida; Elementary education, literacy
YOUNG, PATRICIA, Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley; Literacy and technology, culture in instructional technology and design

Assistant Clinical Professors
MURDOCK, JOHN, Ph.D., George Washington University; Science education
NELSON, JOHN, Ph.D., McGill University; ESOL
OLIVA, LINDA, Ph.D., Boston University; Education psychology, technology
Affiliate Professor
BERMAN, LOUISE M., Ed.D., Teachers College, Columbia University; Curriculum

Lecturers
BEVERLY, BICKEL, Ph.D., University of Maryland, Baltimore County; English Language Center
BOURNE, BARBARA, M.A, University of Maryland, Baltimore County; Field experience, education policy, environmental education
FRICK, JERRI, M.A., Virginia State University; Mathematics education
GRAY, WILLIAM L., Ph.D., University of Maryland, College Park; Mathematics education, curriculum
NORTH-COLEMAN, CHERYL, M.A., Towson University; Secondary literacy education
SCHWARTZ, ANA MARIA (Modern Languages and Linguistics), Ph.D., University of Maryland, College Park; Language teaching and curriculum development, learning strategies, heritage Spanish speakers
SHIN, JOAN, M.A., University of Maryland Baltimore County; ESOL
SOKOLOVE, PHILIP G. (Biological Sciences), Ph.D., Harvard University; Science education, neurobiology, biological rhythms, invertebrate physiology

Degrees/Certificates Offered

Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.)

Master of Arts in Teaching Accelerated Program (open only to UMBC undergraduate students)

Master of Arts in Education (M.A.E.)

  • Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Science Education
  • Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
  • Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Secondary Physical Science
  • Post Baccalaureate Certificate in Secondary Science Inquiry
  • Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Mathematics Education
  • Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Mathematics Instructional Leadership (K-8)

Note: Courses taken for these certificate programs are transferable to the Master of Arts in Education degree program upon admission to the program.

Master of Arts in Instructional Systems Development: English for Speakers of Other Languages

  • Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in ESOL

Note: Courses taken for this certificate program are transferable to the ISD M.A. program upon admission to the program.

Master of Arts in Instructional Systems Development: English for Speakers of Other Languages Accelerated Program (open only to UMBC undergraduate students)

Master of Arts in Instructional Systems Development: Training Systems

  • Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Distance Education
  • Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Web-Based Instruction
  • Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Instructional Technology

Note: Courses taken for these certificate programs are transferable to the ISD M.A. program upon admission to the program.

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Language, Literacy and Culture

(See the Language, Literacy and Culture (LLC) listing in this catalog for program description. The LLC degree is jointly administered by the Department of Education and other academic departments.)

The teacher certification programs of the UMBC Department of Education are required to meet the standards set by the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) and the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). In addition, there is a continuing analysis of all departmental programs to determine whether modifications are necessary to improve their quality and efficiency. When a standard is changed, a requirement is added or a modification is made after the publication of the catalog, a change in one, or all, of our programs may be necessary. Changes of this type will be made to the program descriptions on the Department of Education Web site. Please check www.umbc.edu/education periodically for updates on existing programs, or contact program advisor Vickie Williams at 410-455-2327 or vwilli5@umbc.edu with your questions. Also, refer to the Web site for information on any new programs and courses that may have been added to the department’s offerings.

Program Description

Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.)

The Master of Arts in Teaching (M.A.T.) is an initial teacher certification/licensure program. The M.A.T. program provides talented liberal arts college graduates with a program of study within their academic discipline while preparing them for careers as teachers. Students successfully completing the M.A.T. and passing PRAXIS I and PRAXIS II will be recommended for the Maryland Standard Professional Certificate I. The program is open to students with undergraduate degrees in a variety of disciplines who are interested in certifications in early childhood, elementary or secondary education or English as a second language. Secondary certifications is available in art, dance, English, foreign languages, mathematics, music, sciences, social studies and theater. Scholarships are available through the department. Consult program advisors listed below to get more information on the scholarships.

All M.A.T. program experiences combine graduate-level work in the teaching field with education courses, field experiences and an extended (at least 100 days) internship under the direction of carefully selected and trained mentor teachers at UMBC. The M.A.T. is a 36- credit-hour degree program, and courses are offered primarily during evening hours. Some summer courses are offered. The M.A.T. meets the standards set by the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) and the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). As professional standards continue to evolve and affect programmatic requirements, please refer to the Department of Education Web site, www.umbc.edu/education, for further information and updates. Please contact the UMBC Department of Education Office of Student Services, Dr. Vickie Williams, 410-455-2327 or vwilli5@umbc.edu, for general information on all UMBC education graduate programs. Contact program coordinators are listed below for more specialized information.

Early Childhood Education M.A.T. Coordinator:
Pat Scully, 410-455-2307,
pscull1@umbc.edu

Elementary Education M.A.T. Coordinator:
Barbara Bourne, 410-455-2308,
bbourn1@umbc.edu

Secondary Education M.A.T. Coordinator:
Linda Oliva, 410-455-2382,
oliva@umbc.edu

English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL/ESOL) M.A. ISD Coordinators:
John Nelson, 410-455-2379,
jnelson@umbc.edu
and
Sarah Shin, 410-455-2485,
shin@umbc.edu

Graduate Program Director:
Susan M. Blunck, 410-455-3388,
blunck@umbc.edu

Administrative Assistant:
Cheryl Blackwell, 410-455-3388,
blackwel@umbc.edu

Teacher certification programs offered by the UMBC Department of Education have the approval of the Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) and the National Council for the Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE). All persons who complete these program requirements are eligible for certification in more than 30 states. The program is intended to produce teachers who are certified and highly qualified to teach in Maryland schools. See the Master of Arts in Teaching Program Web site, www.umbc.edu/education, for more details on the program requirements and admissions criteria.

Master of Arts in Education (M.A.E.)

The Master of Arts in Education is a 36-credit-hour advanced degree program for educators who have teaching experience and hold a teaching certificate. The program is intended to help experienced teachers prepare for roles in educational and curricular leadership, curriculum development and in-service teacher professional development. Coursework focuses on academic content preparation; revising and assessing curricula; as well as developing, implementing and evaluating professional development programs for teachers. The M.A.E. produces teachers who are highly qualified in their content specialty areas. All students enrolled in the M.A.E. program complete the 18 credits of core education course requirements and 18 credits in a cognate area.

Core Education Courses:
The Study of Teaching
Analyzing Educational Research
Mentoring and Supervision
Assessment and Evaluation
Advanced Education Elective
Capstone Project Seminar
Cognate Area Requirement

Beyond the M.A.E. program’s core education courses, students complete 18 credits of coursework in an approved cognate area. The cognate area work is overseen and approved by the cognate faculty committee that is composed of three graduate faculty from the Department of Education and other academic departments.

  • If the student is a member of a defined cohort group, the cognate area courses will be established by the M.A.E. program director and the cohort advisors.
  • If the student is seeking to complete a degree with a cognate emphasis with courses from other UMBC academic departments (e.g. biology, history, mathematics), an advisor from that discipline will be identified. That advisor will also agree to serve as a reader for the student’s capstone project.
  • If the M.A.E. student teaches elementary school or seeks to develop skills that will equip him or her for work that requires inter-disciplinary expertise (e.g., international education, specialist in curriculum integration or literacy), the student will be assigned an advisor whose responsibility will be to make sure that the student creates a coherent program that results in a master’s-level capstone project.
  • Students’ cognate area proposals must outline their goals and interests and be approved by the cognate faculty committee by the end of their second semester of enrollment in the program.

Post-baccalaureate Certificate Programs

For those who already hold a master’s degree, or for the student interested in developing a specialized area of expertise rather than earning a master’s-level degree, post-baccalaureate certificates are available through this program. These certificates are:

  • Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Science Education
  • Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics (STEM)
  • Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Secondary Physical Science
  • Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Secondary Science Inquiry
  • Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Mathematics Education
  • Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Mathematics Instructional Leadership (K-8)

Courses taken for these certificate programs are transferable to the Master of Arts in Education program upon admission.

M.A.E. Program Coordinator:
Eugene C. Shaffer
410-455-2465,
schaffer@umbc.edu

Administrative Assistant:
Cheryl Blackwell
410-455-3388
blackwel@umbc.edu

Program Web site:
www.umbc.edu/education

Master of Arts in Instructional Systems Development (ISD)

Instructional systems development (ISD) is a theoretically based process of analysis, design and development of instruction, training programs and curricula. Knowledge, performance, instructional objectives, instructional strategies and evaluation of learning are viewed as inter-related components of a total instructional system. The Department of Education provides two professional tracks within the 36-credit-hour Master of Arts in ISD degree program: the ESOL/bilingual track and the training and development track.

ESOL/Bilingual Teacher Track
The ESOL/Bilingual concentration prepares students for a wide variety of ESOL-related careers. The program provides academic and professional training for teaching ESOL in universities, community colleges and language institutes in the United States and abroad; administering and/or teaching in K-12 ESOL and bilingual programs in public, private and international schools; working with refugee, migrant and immigrant groups, cross-cultural training organizations, and for state and government agencies that work with bilingual/bicultural groups. With the continual influx of non-native English speaking students in public schools, the need for specially trained instructors to teach ESOL is growing rapidly. The concentration provides graduate students with an opportunity to acquire unique competencies and develop new strategies as current and future teachers of ESOL/ bilingual students. The concentration also allows graduate students to integrate these new skills with the ISD process to design and implement curricula in school settings.

The M.A. Program
The program offers a 36-credit master’s degree. The ESOL M.A. program consists of 12 courses; students may opt to add Maryland State K-12 Certification. This requires an additional six credits of coursework, including a state-approved internship in a public school system. Students can also choose to write a thesis on a particular area of interest in the field.

The basic course requirements for the M.A. program are as follows:
EDUC 601: Human Learning and Cognition
EDUC 602: Instructional Systems Development I
EDUC 688: Methodology of Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language
MLL 625: Intercultural and Cross-Cultural Communications
or
EDUC 666: Cross-Cultural Communication for ESOL Educators
EDUC 644: Linguistics for ESOL/Bilingual Educators
EDUC 625: Teaching Reading and Writing to ESOL/Bilingual Students I
EDUC 792: Internship
and
EDUC 794: Project Seminar (non-thesis option)
EDUC 771: Research Designs
and
EDUC 799: Thesis Research (thesis option)

Twelve elective credits
Elective courses include:
EDUC 636: ESOL Testing and Evaluation
EDUC 655: Teaching Reading and Writing to ESOL/Bilingual Students II
EDUC 689E: Advanced Special Topics in Education: Educational Technology for ESOL Teachers
MLL 670: Second Language Acquisition and Learning: From Theory to Practice
LING 694: The Grammar of American English for ESOL Teachers

*Note: EDUC course descriptions are listed in this section. MLL and LING course descriptions are listed under Intercultural Communication.

The Certificate Program
The graduate certificate program in ESOL (CESL) consists of four courses (12 credits). The two required courses are: Methodology of Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language and Intercultural and Cross-Cultural Communications. The two elective courses are selected on the basis of student background, interest and goals. Courses taken in the CESL program are transferable to the M.A. program upon admission.

Online Courses
The program offers several of its courses, including the required certificate courses online as well as face-to-face.

Program Co-Directors:
John Nelson, 410-455-2379
jnelson@umbc.edu
and
Sarah Shin, 410-455-2485
shin@umbc.edu

Online and Cohort Programs Coordinator:
Joan Shin, 410-455-1392
jshin2@umbc.edu

ESOL/Bilingual M.A. Office:
Phone: 410-455-3061
Fax: 410-455-8947

Program Web site:
www.umbc.edu/esol

Training Systems Track
There is a growing demand for people who have acquired competencies in the ISD process. These people are needed to support the rapidly expanding need for the training of adults in business, industry, government and the non profit sector. This is an applied graduate program for people who design, deliver, support and measure training, learning and performance within organizations. This track will enable graduates of the ISD program to work as ISD/training design specialists in business and industry. This 36-credit-hour program gives a solid grounding in the theory of ISD while providing students with opportunities to apply what they have leaned in real projects with real clients. Throughout the program, students build a professional portfolio demonstrating the competencies and projects they have developed en route to the degree.

Training Systems Course Requirements
The Adult Learner
Instructional Systems Development I
Instructional Systems Development II
Principles of Training and Development
Research Designs in Education
ISD Internship
ISD Project Seminar

Training Systems (21 hours)
For those who already hold a master’s degree or for the student interested in developing a specialized area of expertise rather than earning a master’s-level degree, three post-baccalaureate certificates are available through this program. They are:

  • Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Distance Education
  • Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Instructional Technology
  • Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Instructional Systems Development

Courses taken for these certificate programs are transferable to the Master of Arts in ISD upon admission to the program.

Program Director:
Greg Williams
410-455-6773
gregw@umbc.edu

Program Coordinator:
Sharese Essien, 410-455-8670

Program Web site:
www.umbc.edu/isd

Departmental Advising

All students seeking a degree through the Department of Education will be assigned an academic advisor. It is important for prospective students to meet as soon as possible with an advisor to develop a coordinated, long-range plan of study. Advising appointment books are available at the front desk in the department. For students seeking initial teacher certification, an undergraduate transcript analysis is required to determine specific content requirements needed to be taken in addition to the core course of the program.

Facilities and Special Resources

Students have access to the education department’s Curriculum Laboratory and to the Resource Center for Language and Culture. The department has established working relationships with schools and corporations that welcome those students enrolled in the program internship experiences.

Admission Process

All original application documents must be sent directly to the Graduate School at:

UMBC
Graduate School
1000 Hilltop Circle
Baltimore, MD 21250

Financial Assistance

A limited number of graduate assistantships are available through the department. Please check www.umbc.edu/education for information and deadlines pertaining to these assistantships.

COURSE LISTING

Upper-division courses that may be taken for graduate credit:

EDUC 404, 405
Seminar in Early Childhood Education I and II [3, 1-3]
Selected topics in early childhood education: curriculum, intellectual development, individual differences and self-concept as related to organizing and teaching at the early childhood level. The major focus of the seminar will be determined in accord with the needs of the registrants and recent research in this field. Prerequisites: Course in child psychology, growth and development and consent of department.

EDUC 465
Computer Literacy [1-3]
This course is an introduction to computers: their types, functions, limitations and applications. Emphasis is placed on acquiring the computer literacy required for management applications and decisions related to computer use. Laboratory applications with the computer are included as part of the course. Note: Not open to IFSM, computer science or mathematics majors. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 487
Mainstreaming [3]
A course designed to examine PL 94-142 and its implications for teachers and teaching and school administration. The course of study includes (a) legal aspects for schools and teachers; (b) characteristics of handicapping conditions; (c) social-psychological-cultural perspectives; and (d) school and teaching strategies for mainstreaming. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 491
Advanced Special Topics in Training [1-3]
Topics of current interest in training chosen to suit the interests of the faculty member and the students. Note: May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 496
Information Systems [3]
Principles and techniques pertaining to the designing and operating of information storage, retrieval and display systems. Emphasis will be placed on multi-media presentation systems used for educational processes. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 498
Media Services Management [3]
The study of administrative policies and practices pertaining to the operation of media centers. Planning, budgeting, staffing, supervising and evaluating will be the major topics discussed. Prerequisite: Consent of department. Course for graduate students only.

EDUC 601
Human Learning and Cognition [3]
This course emphasizes major principles of human learning and cognition viewed from empiricist, nativist and constructivist perspectives. Topics such as conditioning, memory, information processing, motivation, problem-solving and metacognition will be investigated systematically. Principles of learning as applied to special populations (the gifted and talented, the handicapped, the adult learner) and models of teaching (e.g. discovery, inquiry, cooperative) also are emphasized. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 601E
Human Learning and Cognition Early Childhood Education [3]
Teacher candidates learn to observe young children; to plan, implement and evaluate activities to foster children’s development; and to use naturalistic assessment, including work sampling. Teacher candidates begin to construct their professional portfolios using NAEYC standards that will be used throughout the early childhood program. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 601E LAB
Process Seminar in Early Childhood Education: Creative Media [1]
This seminar involves experiential learning, using creative materials and activities appropriate for the early childhood curriculum. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 602
Instructional Systems Development I [3]
This course includes the elements of analysis, design, development, implementation and evaluation. An emphasis is placed on micro-level design issues, including analysis, design and evaluation. Learners work through the ISD process to assemble a training or education project that is ready for implementation. A design plan and lesson plan is constructed to allow learners real-world experience in the ISD process. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 603
Instructional Systems Development II [3]
The course focuses on theoretical macro- and micro-models of instructional systems and their applications in public school systems, higher education, government agencies and industry. Learning experiences will include the opportunity to design processes for solving educational and training problems. Students will develop a management proposal for an instructional system based upon a selected model. Prerequisites: EDUC 601, EDUC 602 and/or consent of the department.

EDUC 604
Education: Policies, Issues and Practices [3]
This is the first course for students seeking elementary or secondary teacher certification at the graduate level. The course is designed to provide teacher candidates the opportunity to explore the profession of teaching and to affirm their decision to seek a license to teach. To this end, students will examine literature on educational policy, the culture of schooling, present and emerging school organizations, current trends in curriculum and teaching practices and the role and status of teachers. In addition, students will study the impact of social issues on current practices in schooling, especially as they relate to changing school demographics, the practice of inclusion and school reform efforts. A comprehensive research paper is required that focuses on a specific dilemma of schooling. Complementary school observations, constructed teaching experiences and tutoring will be arranged so theory will be linked to practice.

EDUC 605
The Adult Learner [3]
This course covers adult learning theories, instructional strategies and other aspects of adult learning and human performance improvement, with a special emphasis on the implications for design, delivery, evaluation and the application of learning. Other selected topics include alternative methods to traditional learning/training and the characteristics, motivation and learning preferences of adult learners. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 606
Curriculum Integration—Theory and Practice [1-3]
Students investigate theoretical and practical aspects of curriculum integration relevant to grades K-8. Participants will meet and work with subject experts, educators and other professionals in the field related to the selected topics. They will engage in discussions, writing and reflection and will explore metacognitive strategies used in curriculum planning, site-specific decision-making and in-service instruction. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 607
Processes and Acquisition of Reading [3]
This course addresses the processes related to children’s literacy acquisition. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the theoretical and philosophical underpinnings of literacy education, young children’s literacy development and the instructional elements of comprehensive programs. They will demonstrate an understanding of reading comprehension; reading in the content areas; reading fluency and word analysis strategies, including the use of phonics, context and rapid recognition. They will examine practices related to conducting authentic assessments and planning for the needs of diverse learners.

EDUC 608
Instruction of Reading [3]
This course addresses methods, materials and strategies for reading and writing instruction in the elementary school. Students will demonstrate knowledge of balanced literacy programs; reading, writing and comprehension strategies in the content areas; vocabulary acquisition and word-recognition strategies. They will demonstrate knowledge of appropriate assessment and the needs of diverse learners. Developing as writers equipped to engage children in authentic writing is a major focus.

EDUC 611
Constructing Race, Class and Gender [3]
This course provides an interdisciplinary examination of the complex array and interplay of structural and cultural limitations on individual and group mobility in contemporary American society. Using a range of approaches, the course defines and clarifies the limitations of these dominant social categories by problematizing and interrogating four important social categories: race, class, gender and schooling. Note: Also listed as LLC 611.

EDUC 612
Message Design [3]
This course is concerned with the theory and practice of designing instructional messages. Emphasis is placed on combining the basic message components—purpose, text design, typography, graphics and color—to create effective visual and oral messages. The student will design, present and critique a variety of messages for cognitive, psycho-motor and affective domains. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 613
Development of Multi-Media Instruction [3]
The course includes developing instructional materials combining audio and visual media to produce a system of instruction. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 615
Materials for Teaching Reading [3]
This course addresses the selection and evaluation of instructional materials for the elementary classroom. Students will demonstrate an understanding of the role of children’s literature in the curriculum and strategies to promote the construction of meaning and authentic literary responses. They will demonstrate knowledge of implementing the elements of a comprehensive literacy program, including read-aloud, shared reading and independent reading. They will demonstrate knowledge of instructional materials, the role of assessment and strategies for creating a reading community.

EDUC 616
Analysis of Learner Variables [3]
A study of learning styles, learning disabilities, exceptionality, self-concept, maturation and skills acquisition as variables affecting instructional decision-making. Prerequisites: EDUC 601 and consent of department.

EDUC 617
Principles of Systematic Observation [3]
This course focuses upon the study and use of selected observation instruments and methods for recording and analyzing teacher and student behaviors in the teaching/learning process. Prerequisite: Consent of instructor.

EDUC 618
Clinical Supervision [3]
An in-depth study of clinical supervision in action. Extensive use of the model in school settings will be supplemented by on-campus lecture-discussions and seminars. Continuing feedback on progress in the field will be provided. The course is designed for supervising teachers, department chairs, supervisors and administrators. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 619
Instructional Supervision [3]
This course explores the nature and functions of supervision, analyzes the technical skills of supervision and places a major emphasis on the clinical supervision process. Included will be the clinical supervision model, human relations considerations, conferencing skills, evaluation instruments, behavior description and measures of teacher competence. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 621
Instructional Strategies for an Integrated Early Childhood Curriculum [3]
Students will examine the theoretical and research base for the early childhood integrated curriculum. In accordance with this study, students will design curriculum projects to develop children’s critical thinking and problem-solving skills appropriate for children’s varying developmental levels, cultural backgrounds and special needs. Prerequisites: EDUC 601 (may be concurrent) and consent of department.

EDUC 622
Instructional Strategies for Teaching Elementary Mathematics [3]
The purpose of this course is to develop skills in teaching elementary mathematics and to analyze and synthesize current research in this field. All teaching materials and strategies will be developed through the use of an instructional systems development model. Prerequisites: EDUC 601, EDUC 602 and consent of department.

EDUC 623
Instructional Strategies for Teaching Elementary Science [3]
The purpose of this course is to develop skills in teaching elementary science and to analyze and synthesize current research in this field. All teaching materials and strategies will be developed through the use of an instructional systems development model. Prerequisites: EDUC 601, EDUC 602 and consent of department.

EDUC 624
Instructional Strategies for Teaching Problem-Solving in Social Studies [3]
Students will apply current theory and research in developing a repertoire of instructional strategies to teach problem-solving and critical thinking in social studies. They will participate in and critique demonstration lessons; develop an instructional unit; and write a paper discussing patterns and styles in student problem-solving strategies in terms of their cognitive development, socio-economic background, gender and handicapping conditions. This course is designed for teachers and prospective teachers of grades K-12. Prerequisites: EDUC 601 and consent of department.

EDUC 625
Teaching Reading and Writing to ESOL/Bilingual Students: Part I [3]
An investigation of literature that contains approaches and techniques to teaching reading to the bilingual student will be provided through lectures, class discussions, film, video presentations, research and field observations. Psycho-linguistic models of the bilingual reader will be reviewed. Information concerning techniques and activities for teaching reading and writing in the content areas will be examined. Methods of evaluation and assessment will be demonstrated. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 626
Instructional Strategies for the Teaching of Reading and Writing [3]
This course explores ways theory and research in literacy instruction may be adapted to classroom use. To this end, students will study varying conceptions of reading and writing, models of instruction, evaluation strategies and methods of addressing pupils’ differing developmental and cultural needs. Prerequisites: EDUC 601 and consent of department.

EDUC 627
Instructional Strategies for Teaching Foreign Languages in Secondary Schools [3]
An investigation of the traditional and modern techniques in teaching foreign languages will be provided through lectures, class discussions, demonstrations, research and field observations. The nature of language and theories of first- and second language acquisition/learning will be studied. The students will analyze current theory, research and classroom practices of foreign language methodology and curriculum to develop instructional strategies. Prerequisites: EDUC 601 and consent of department.

EDUC 628
Instructional Strategies for Teaching Secondary Mathematics [3]
The purpose of this course is to develop skills in teaching secondary mathematics and to analyze and synthesize current research and trends in mathematics education. All teaching materials and strategies will be developed through the use of an instructional systems development model. Prerequisites: EDUC 601, EDUC 602 and consent of department.

EDUC 629
Instructional Strategies for Teaching Secondary Science [3]
The purpose of this course is to develop skills in teaching secondary science and to analyze and synthesize current research and trends in science education. All teaching materials and strategies will be developed through the use of an instructional systems development model. Prerequisites: EDUC 601 or EDUC 602 and consent of department.

EDUC 631
Seminar in Early Childhood Education [3]
Selected topics related to major issues in early childhood education. The specific topic will be announced before the semester the course is offered. Note: This course may be repeated once for additional graduate credit. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 632
Instructional Strategies for the Teaching of Secondary English [3]
Students analyze current theory, research and classroom practices of the secondary English curriculum to formulate instructional strategies and means of student assessment. Prerequisites: EDUC 601 or EDUC 602 and consent of department.

EDUC 634
Seminar in Children’s or Adolescent Literature [3]
Students will examine the various strategies used in analyzing literature for children and young adults, as well as readers’ responses to literature. An in-depth examination of one of the approaches will be studied each term. Students will become acquainted with the range and depth of children’s and adolescent literature and with the bibliographic tools for selecting and researching these books. Choosing one area of children’s or adolescent literature, students will design a research problem or proposal using an in-depth model discussed during the semester. Students may take the course twice when offered under a different rubric. Prerequisites: EDUC 414, EDUC 615 or equivalent course and consent of department.

EDUC 635
Socio-Cultural Theories of Learning and Human Interaction [3]
This seminar examines the process of human learning from an ecological, or socio-cultural, perspective across diverse contexts, including the effects of differences in cultural, ethnic and linguistic backgrounds of student and teacher; differences in learning styles and educational assumptions; and institutional catalysts or barriers to student achievement. The role of social interaction in learning also is addressed. Note: Also listed as LLC 635.

EDUC 636
ESOL Testing and Evaluation [3]
This course is concerned with the theory and methodology appropriate for ESOL and EFL testing. Course content includes an investigation of literature containing theoretical foundations of and research for second-language testing. Students will be expected to use research findings in the practical application of test construction, administration and evaluation. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 637
Teaching With Innovative Technologies [3]
In this course, the effectiveness of using computers and other innovative technologies to deliver instruction will be examined. The appropriate use of software and other instructional materials in tutorial, simulation, practice with feedback and other modes will be investigated, with an emphasis on evaluation and selection. Strategies for integrating new technologies into an instructional system also will be explored. Note: This is a companion course to EDUC 638. Prerequisites: EDUC 602 and consent of department.

EDUC 638
Classroom Management With Innovative Technologies [3]
The management of instructional systems at the classroom level will be examined in this course. The appropriate use of generic and specialized software to aid in maintaining student and grade records, generating and grading tests and fulfilling other classroom management functions will be investigated, with an emphasis on evaluation and selection. Strategies for implementing new technologies also will be explored. Note: This is a companion course to EDUC 637. Prerequisites: EDUC 602 and consent of department.

EDUC 639
Interactive Video Systems and Conferencing [3]
This course builds skills for delivering successful interactive video courses and seminars. Hands-on exercises and role-modeling facilitate individual practice sessions. Information will be provided about common configurations of distance-learning systems, including auxiliary hardware and support equipment. Site planning, production issues and instructional materials development for this medium also are addressed.

EDUC 641
Online Classroom [3]
In this course, various aspects of computer-mediated communication and instruction will be examined. A broad range of distance education issues and applications will be explored from a theoretical and practical standpoint. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 642
Instructional Strategies for Processes in Early Childhood Education, Math and Science [2]
This seminar involves experiential learning with materials, equipment and processes related to mathematics and science curricula. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 643
Principles of Distance Education [3]
This course provides students with a foundation in the history, theory, organization, technologies and instructional procedures used in distance education. Students will gain experience with several distance education delivery systems. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 644
Linguistics for ESOL/Bilingual Educators [3]
This course provides an introduction to the basic analytic methods of several core subfields of linguistics, including phonetics, phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics, as well as an introduction to the history of English, socio-linguistics and bilingualism. Throughout the course there will be opportunities to analyze language data and discuss various language-related issues. No previous training in linguistics is required or assumed. This course will help participants to see language as both a social and cognitive phenomenon.

EDUC 645
Quantitative Research Methods I [3]
This is a course in the application of basic statistics in a variety of educational research settings. Emphasis is placed on the use of descriptive statistics, the interpretation and construction of data collection instruments and the application of basic research paradigms. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 646
Quantitative Research Methods II [3]
Special problems arising in implementing educational research designs are examined. Instrumentation to measure attitudes and the collection of questionnaire data are part of the course content. Statistical procedures in addition to those taught in EDUC 645 and appropriate to analyzing educational research designs are introduced. Problem experiences in instrumentation construction and analysis, as well as research design are emphasized. Prerequisite: EDUC 645 and consent of department.

EDUC 647
Corporate Distance Training [3]
This course is designed to identify how to maximize use of organizational technology to deliver distance training. Students will examine case studies to explore current practices and future trends in business applications of distance learning. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 648
Issues in Consulting for Training and Development [3]
This course identifies how to maximize use of organizational technology to deliver distance training. Students will examine case studies to explore current practices and future trends in business application of distance learning. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 649
Best Practices in ISD in Training and Development [3]
This course offers strategies to use instructional systems development in solving training and development problems. Designed for students to explore multiple perspectives of real-world applications and the skills required to be a practitioner in the field of training and development. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 650
Education in Cultural Perspective [3]
Graduate-level seminar that will focus on the research and theory relating to the cycles of educational reform from the Colonial period to the present. The emphasis will be on the historical shift in attitudes toward children, women and minorities; the rise of and challenges to a tradition of common schooling and teachers; teacher training; and professionalization. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 650E
Internship Seminar in Early Childhood Education [3]
Teacher candidates will critically examine current issues in early childhood education and how they relate to the social, intellectual, physical and personal development of young children. These issues will be evaluated from a child-centered perspective and within the contexts of family, school, community and society.

EDUC 651
Intermediate Statistics in Education [3]
Review of t-tests, chi-square analysis, distributional theory, one- and two-way analysis of variance and introduction to multiple correlation and regression. Prerequisites: EDUC 646 or equivalent and consent of department.

EDUC 652
Law-Related Education [3]
The course offers a series of specialized methodologies for elementary, middle and secondary social studies teachers, including study of and practice in case studies, mock trials, moot courts and simulation. Topics to be addressed include the Bill of Rights, the Constitution, civil law, due process, critical Supreme Court decisions and juvenile justice. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 653
Materials for Teaching Reading [3]
The course is focused on developing knowledge of children’s literature and a variety of texts and other media, including technology, for young children, as well selecting and evaluating developmentally appropriate materials to assess children’s reading interests and needs. Issues pertaining to parent involvement and community resources to support the goals of the reading program also will be discussed.

EDUC 654
Processes and Acquisition of Reading [3]
This course focuses on the ongoing relationship among the communication skills (listening, speaking, writing and reading) within young children’s lives in their families, educational settings and communities. Teacher candidates will study children’s development of language and literacy within diverse economic, ethnic and language contexts to better understand and appreciate the contributions families make to their children’s earliest learning. Throughout the course, teacher candidates will have opportunities to reflect on their beliefs about how children acquire literacy, develop their personal knowledge of language and literacy acquisition and increase their skills in helping all young children succeed as readers and writers.

EDUC 655
Teaching Reading and Writing to ESOL/Bilingual Students: Part II [3]
This course analyzes theories, research and approaches to teaching writing to second-language learners. Included are discussions of academic, professional and expressive writing; cultural contrasts in rhetorical styles and tradition; and the use of modern technology (computer, e-mail and the Internet) in teaching writing.

EDUC 656
Teaching of Reading and Writing in Early Childhood Education [3]
Various philosophies of teaching reading are examined. Students study and develop specific techniques in teaching children decoding skills, comprehension skills, appreciation for reading as a lifelong habit and the relationship of reading to other language arts. Various ways of diagnosing children’s reading levels are examined, as well as grouping children for reading experiences. Prerequisite: EDUC 304 or consent of department.

EDUC 658
Reading in the Content Areas I [3]
Participants examine developmental strategies for reading, writing, assessment, vocabulary building, comprehension and special-needs adaptations. The reading/teaching behaviors the secondary teacher candidate should be able to demonstrate as a result of taking this course: knowledge of seminal and contemporary theory, research and wisdom of practice; modeling and analysis; and protected practice.

EDUC 659
Reading in the Content Area II [3]
This course is designed for students who have completed Teaching Reading in the Content Areas: Part I (EDUC 658). Through performance assessment, participants will demonstrate competency in using reading and writing strategies, assessments, vocabulary-building strategies, comprehension and special-needs adaptations. The reading/teaching behaviors the secondary teacher candidate should be able to demonstrate as a result of taking both reading courses are knowledge of seminal and contemporary theory, research and wisdom of practice; modeling and analysis; and protected practice.

EDUC 660
Accommodating Special News in Early Childhood Education [3]
For teacher candidates, this course offers the history of early childhood special education, the basic characteristics of various disabilities, child development, and addressing needs of young children with disabilities in literacy, math, cognition, social development and play.

EDUC 661
Mathematics Processes in Early Childhood [3]
This course focuses on how young children learn mathematics, and how to foster their mathematical thinking. Concepts about whole numbers, geometry, spatial relationships, and measurement align with the Maryland Common Core State Standards. As part of their Internship (Phase I) students will learn how to encourage, and support children┐s mathematics learning in their field placement classrooms (3 hours/week).

EDUC 662
Science Processes in Early Childhood [3]
Exploration of science processes in the early childhood years, using an experiential, reflective, and expressive approach. Students will practice teaching science in their field placements. This course reflects the UMBC Department of Education┐s Conceptual Framework, NAEYC professional standards, and MSDE professional standards.

EDUC 663
Instructional Strategies for Teaching Problem-Solving in Social Studies [3]
This course provides analysis of the social studies curriculum in elementary schools. Aims of the social studies curriculum, along with its trends, methods and evaluation, are emphasized. Field experiences are required in this course. Prerequisites: EDUC 312 and consent of the department.

EDUC 664
Methods of Teaching Secondary Social Science [3]
This course seeks to introduce participants to the concepts, issues and methods relevant to teaching social studies at the secondary level. Teacher candidates will gain conceptual knowledge and practical experience with planning, materials development, instructional approaches and assessment use in multiple-ability classrooms. The course also provides participants with an introduction to various audio-visual and computer technologies for use in curricular planning and instruction. Field experiences are required in this course.

EDUC 666
Cross-Cultural Communication for ESOL [3]
The Purpose of this online course is to study communication within the context of the cultural setting. The three main goals are: 1) to provide the students with materials, both cognitive and experimental, with which they can develop an awareness of their own cultural identity; 2) to increase their knowledge of the special communication problems to be expected in a cross-cultural situation; and 3) to offer students the opportunity to apply new insights to cross-cultural encounters. The course is an online version of MLL 625 - Intercultural and Cross-Cultural Communication [3].

EDUC 667
The Grammar of American English for ESOL Teachers [3]
The course examines the syntactical, phonological and morphological systems of modern American English, with particular attention to areas most relevant to teachers of English as a second or foreign language. The course focuses on English features that are particularly difficult for English language learners. Simplified ways of describing their features and techniques for teaching them are presented. Note: Also listed as LING 694.

EDUC 668
Creating an Electronic Portfolio [3]
Participating teachers will learn how to generate, evaluate and celebrate their own performance and accomplishments, as well as document their students' creative productions and academic achievements through the development and publication of an ePortfolio. Course activities include rigorous exploration of theories and processes of ePortfolio in the context of teaching and learning, and hands on experience using technology and new media to maximize effectiveness and efficiency.

EDUC 669
Assessment for Reading Instruction [3]
This course addresses the use of ongoing assessment to identify children’s reading needs and to plan for instruction. Students will demonstrate knowledge of the processes of learning to read, reading assessment within a balanced literacy program and creating classrooms that promote reading development. They will demonstrate the use of guided reading lessons and explicit instruction in word analysis, including children’s use of grapho-phonemic knowledge.

EDUC 670
Theories of Language Learning in the ESOL Classroom [3]
This course will cover current theories of how second language is learned, providing participants a greater understanding of the processes involved in language acquisition and how English language learners' (ELL's) personal characteristics influence this process. This understanding will allow participants to effectively differentiate instruction for each ELL as well as plan instruction and strategically utilize TESOL methodologies and techniques.

EDUC 671
Principles of Training and Development [3]
This course will examine key principles relevant to training and development, including the role of training in an organization, adult-learning theory, needs assessment, training methodology, organizational support, resources and constraints, evaluation of training and managing the training function. Issues that influence training implementation, such as ethics and interpretation, also will be addressed. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 672
Bilingualism [3]
This course is an introduction to the social and educational aspects of bilingualism. It offers an overview of the broad range of sociolinguistic and political issues surrounding bilingualism, examines the language mixing behavior of bilingual speakers, and explores the use of two or more languages in popular music, advertising, and online social spaces. The course covers such key topics as language maintenance and shift, attitudes toward bilingualism, bilingual identity, multilingual educational models and policies, and bilingual parenting. This course is cross-listed as EDUC 672/LLC 672.

EDUC 675
Interactive Languages for Computers [3]
The course will examine the strengths and limitation of one or more languages or authoring systems used in training, computer-based instruction on the World Wide Web or in other instructional systems. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 678
Instructional Strategies/Students With Diverse Needs [3]
This course is designed to introduce students to strategies for differentiating instruction within general education classrooms. The course examines the legal, philosophical and programmatic underpinning of inclusion, broadly defined. Addressed in the course are approaches for adapting the curriculum, especially in the content areas, to meet the needs of socio-culturally, linguistically, cognitively (e.g., dyslexia, dyscalculia) and behaviorally diverse student populations, including students identified traditionally as having special needs (e.g., gifted and talented, physically challenged). The course of study includes a) legal aspects for schools and teachers; b) characteristics of handicapping conditions; c) social-psychological-cultural perspectives; d) teaching strategies for including diverse populations; and e) differentiating instruction to meet the various learning needs of students. The course includes small/large groups, case studies/scenarios, lecture, video presentations, reflections, inquiries and group presentations. The class will focus on student-centered learning.

EDUC 679
Observation and Assessment in Early Childhood Education [3]
This course is characterized by an interdisciplinary approach through the integration of the historical, physical and psychological foundations in relation to the growth and development of young children from birth to age eight, curriculum, and teaching methods including technology. Basic observation techniques will be practiced and used to plan, implement and reflect on appropriate activities. Naturalistic assessment of children's development will be a focus for developing beginning skills in action research. Maryland Teacher Technology Standards as well as NAEYC Professional Standards will be explored. Graduate teacher candidates will further explore the processes in the "Descriptive Review of the Child" (Himley & Carini).

EDUC 680
Seminar in Teacher Research [1-3]
This course is premised on the notion that teachers and students are best served by classrooms in which questions about language and learning are formulated, reflection is considered germane to delivery and the experiences of other practitioners are evaluated critically. Teachers attempt to rethink and change their own classroom practice as they examine relevant epistemological, political and methodological issues. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 681
Survey of Instructional Technology Applications [3]
First in a series of three instructional technology courses, this course exposes students to a range of multi-media tools used to design interactive instruction, including computer-based training (CBT) and Web-based training (WBT) products. Through analysis and hands-on experience with each tool, the students identify the properties of each tool, describe the strengths and limitations and evaluate their application for different learning events. This course formerly was EDUC 640.

EDUC 682
Instructional Technology Design and Development [3]
Second in the series of instructional technology courses, this course continues a student’s development process as he or she applies ISD principles to developing and delivering instruction using a computer-based training model. This course formerly was EDUC 610. Prerequisites: EDUC 640 or 681 and consent of department.

EDUC 683
Multi-Media Project Management [3]
The last of three instructional technology courses, this lab-based course allows students to apply project development and multi-media design skills by completing an industry-based design project. The course is divided into four or more discrete modules that teach specific multi-media development applications required to execute and complete the design project. By the conclusion of the course, each student possesses comprehensive knowledge of the applications and how to apply them to a multi-media design project. This course formerly was EDUC 620. Prerequisites: EDUC 610 or 682 and consent of department.

EDUC 684
Qualitative Research Methods in School and Community [3]
This course focuses on the application of selected field research methods to problems of educational practice. Students will study issues pertaining to the role and responsibility of the field investigator working in schools and in other community groups. Students will plan and conduct a field study using qualitative field techniques. Prerequisites: Consent of department.

EDUC 685
The Teaching of Writing [3]
An introduction to theories and techniques of writing instruction. Current theory and research will be applied in developing a repertoire of approaches to writing instruction and curriculum development. Students will examine research that analyzes writing from linguistic, psychological and developmental perspectives. Direct experience in personal writing will reinforce theoretical study of the processes of composition and enable prospective teachers to improve their own writing skills. Each student will design a model writing program or course, including rationale for choices made, and he or she will demonstrate how specific features of the course or program will be taught. Prerequisite: A course in literature or education and consent of department.

EDUC 686
Methods of Teaching Foreign Language: FLES and Exploratory Courses [3]
(FLES: Foreign Language in the Elementary School.) Theories of and research on teaching foreign languages at an early age are examined. Students study and then develop various strategies and techniques for teaching foreign language under different conditions. Prerequisites: Foreign language competence, including at least one 300-level course in a modern foreign language; EDUC 301 or equivalent; and consent of department.

EDUC 687
Teaching Geography: Advanced Special Topics [1-6]
This course focuses on developing strategies for teaching geography at the elementary and secondary levels. Strategies include using maps, graphs, charts, artifacts, retrieval charts, computers, primary sources, texts and literature in the social studies. Geographic topics include tropical deforestation, food problems, resources, population and trade. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 688
Methodology of Teaching English as a Second or Foreign Language [3]
The course investigates traditional and modern approaches and techniques for teaching English as a second or foreign language; theories of second-language acquisition/learning; curriculum and materials design of ESOL/EFL for academic, social/survival and professional purposes. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 689
Advanced Special Topics in Education [1-3]
Topics of current interest in education chosen to suit the interests of the faculty member and the student. Note: May be repeated for a maximum of six credits. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 690
Individual Projects in Education [1-3]
This course is open to students who have special projects and who have applied to the instructor who will supervise the experience. Note: A written request to register in the course must be submitted to the ISD graduate program director for approval. The request will include a brief description of the project, number of credits sought and the instructor’s signature. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor and department.

EDUC 691
Individual Projects in Computer Education [1-3]
This course is open to students who have special computer education projects and who have applied to the instructor who will supervise the experience. A written request to register in the course must be submitted to the ISD graduate program director for approval. The request will include a brief description of the project, number of credits sought and the instructor’s signature. Prerequisites: Consent of instructor and department.

EDUC 693
Media Technology Seminar [1-3]
An in-depth study of selected topics concerned with theories, principles, trends, use, selection and/or evaluation of media technology. Note: Topics subject to change each semester. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 694
Instructional Materials [3]
Principles pertaining to selecting and organizing print and non-print instructional materials in various subject fields and levels of education. Emphasis will be placed on reading and language art skills as they relate to the selection process. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 710
Culture & The Design Information & Communication Technologies [3]
This course investigates theories of culture and how culture can influence the design of information and communication technologies (ICTs). It seeks to evaluate frameworks that focus on culture and the design of ICTs, critique existing ICTs that propose a cultural context and engage in design and analytic work that brings culture to the center of the design process. Theory and research gathered across fields (i.e., business, industry, schools) and disciplines (e.g., Information Systems, Learning Science & Cognition, Educational Science & Technology, Information Science, Industrial Engineering, Literacy, Instructional Design & Technology). Participants in this course are encouraged to investigate the design of ICTs in their related disciplines.

EDUC 771
Analyzing Educational Research [3]
This course provides an overview of designs used in educational research. Topics include, but are not limited to, experimental, quasi-experimental, historical, ethnographic and phenomenological modes of inquiry. Emphases are on the assumptions, applications, tools and procedures associated with each of the varied designs. For example, study of experimental and quasi-experimental design will attend to issues such as validity, randomization and multivariate statistics. Prerequisites: EDUC 601, EDUC 602 and/or consent of department.

EDUC 772
Assessment and Evaluation [3]
This course is designed to help middle school teachers acquire deeper understandings of evaluation and assessment. Students will come to realize that effective educational programs are linked to dynamic assessment schemes that help individual students grow and succeed. The primary goal of the course is to help teachers realize that improving assessment in the classroom leads to higher quality student work on all levels and that making these improvements is not a merely a matter of introducing new procedures, frameworks, techniques, rubrics or guidelines. Expanding ideas on assessment is intricately rooted in how a teacher sees one’s self and is seen by the students. A teacher, along with the students, becomes not only a judge of quality, but also a designer of the plans necessary to meet the standards. For achievement to be raised, teachers must help the students learn how to make better judgments about the quality of their own work. The course is focused on helping teachers develop models for assessment that align with the needs of their students, as well as local, state and national standards. The course is taught using a variety of active learning approaches, including inquiries, discussions, debates, collaborative review of student work, descriptive studies, action research projects and clinical trials. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 781
Teacher Leadership [3]
The course offers experienced teachers an opportunity to design, implement and assess a leadership experience for their own professional growth. Drawing on their own knowledge, skills and resourcefulness in the critical teaching areas of planning, instruction, classroom organization and assessment, experienced teachers develop expertise in adult learning, observation, feedback and instructional improvement, curriculum development and department or grade-level leadership. Extensive use of case studies, classroom observations, clinical supervision and lesson study provides the experienced teacher with tools to work with other teachers while supporting their own growth as a resource and leader in their school. Concepts, methods and practices used by effective teacher-leaders in collaborative leadership and mentorship activities to solve problems at the classroom, school, school system and community levels will be examined in the course. Prerequisite: Consent of department.

EDUC 785
Advanced Instructional Leadership Internship [3]
This course is designed primarily for in-service teachers who are working to earn the Master of Arts in Education (MAE) degree. The course will result in the completion and presentation of the Capstone Project for the MAE program. The Capstone Project has three options for completion either: 1) a School-based Internship, 2) a School-based Action Research Project or 3) a Content-based Curriculum Development Project. Students seeking MSDE Endorsement as either a PreK-6 Mathematics, PreK-6 STEM or 4-9 Mathematics Instructional Leader must complete option 1, the school-based internship, which involves working with adults and a range of students from the designated grade levels.

EDUC 791
Practicum in School Instructional Systems Development [1-6]
This course is designed to provide the student practical experience in observing and analyzing teaching practices and learner development. Students will be expected to demonstrate their understanding of how research and theory affect practices in the classroom by applying basic instructional principles in a carefully supervised setting. Prerequisite: EDUC 601, EDUC 602 (may be concurrent) or consent of department.

EDUC 791P
Secondary Teacher Practicum in Schools [3]
This course intends to engage students in the study of teaching and learning as it happens in the wonderful world of education with its complexities, challenges, fulfillments and responsibilities. We will be observing (a) classroom management practices; (b) preventive and intervention discipline strategies; (c) how teachers treat student diversity issues; and (d) ways that technology is used to contribute to learning. Students will be offered the opportunity to study a phenomenon, observe it, reflect about it and share their thoughts in discussions with classmates. Through study together, students may realize the power of a community of professionals working on common understandings. Prerequsite: Consent of department.

EDUC 791S
ESOL Practicum in Schools [3]
This course constitutes part of Phase I of a two-phase student teaching internship for those seeking K-12 ESOL certification. The primary purpose of this practicum is to provide those planning to teach ESOL in the public schools with an opportunity to observe and interact with ESOL teachers and students in the classroom and to gain an understanding of the real world of school; of the challenges confronting teachers, administrators and students; and of the resources available to deal with these. In addition, students will observe how the knowledge and skills developed in the M.A. program in ESOL/Bilingual Education can inform and facilitate teacher decision-making and practice and be able to take a closer look at themselves as future ESOL teachers. Through a series of readings, structured observations, interviews and seminar discussion, students will have an opportunity to build on their current understanding of the teaching-learning process and the roles ESOL teachers play. They also will be able to integrate the knowledge obtained in other classes and contexts with the practical world of teaching. In addition, through opportunities to tutor, co-teach or present portions of lessons, the student will develop skills in ESOL teaching.

EDUC 792
ISD Internship [1-6]
A field-oriented experience in which the student designs and implements a system of instruction, an analysis technique or evaluation design in a setting consistent with the student’s professional preparation. Prerequisites: Full graduate status, prerequisite courses per program map of student’s selected certification/concentration and consent of department. Multiple sections will appear in class schedule. Students must check with their advisor to determine appropriate section for each concentration/certification.

EDUC 794
ISD Project Seminar [3]
This course will provide the advanced graduate student in ISD the opportunity to analyze an educational or training problem and apply the complete instructional systems development process to the design and development of a comprehensive instructional program to meet the needs determined by the analysis. Students will be expected to design a critical path management action plan and follow the plan as they design and develop all the instructional material necessary to deliver the comprehensive instructional system. It is expected that the instructional system will include an evaluation component and will reflect the proper application of ISD principles in the overall design. Prerequisites: Prerequisite courses per program map of student’s selected concentration and consent of department.

EDUC 795
Seminar in the Study of Teaching [3]
Intended for the advanced graduate student in education, the seminar will examine the knowledge base on teaching and learning as it applies to solving selected teaching and instructional problems. Participants will analyze theoretical perspectives, research and informed practice related to their selected problems. They then will design and develop a strategy for addressing the problem. Prerequisites: EDUC 771 and consent of department.

EDUC 796
Human-Performance Technology [3]
This course will focus on a synergistic examination of the current issues related to designing, developing, delivering and evaluating of training systems for employee training in industry and business. Corporate organization and financial, social and political factors will be analyzed in terms of their effect upon the efficacy and efficiency of such training programs. The student will be expected to research such factors and their synergistic effect upon corporations’ internal efforts to respond to training needs. Prerequisites: EDUC 602 and consent of department.

EDUC 797
Secondary Teacher Seminar [1]
The course provides a learning community for secondary interns to reflect on learning experiences with their cohort peers and faculty. There are three objectives. Objective one is to provide the support necessary to ensure the success of your student teaching/ internship experience. This will require class members to be prepared to listen to one another and work as a team, share experiences, solve problems and offer advice. Objective two is to prepare class members for the inevitable interview by acquiring valuable interview skills and developing an effective e-portfolio. Objective three is to provide each teacher candidate the opportunity to integrate the necessary teaching skills to maximize the learning experiences for students.

EDUC 798
Elementary Teacher Seminar [1]
The course provides a learning community for elementary interns to reflect on learning experiences with their cohort peers and faculty. There are three objectives. Objective one is to provide the support necessary to ensure the success of your student teaching/ internship experience. This will require class members to be prepared to listen to one another and work as a team, share experiences, solve problems and offer advice. Objective two is to prepare class members for the inevitable interview by acquiring valuable interview skills and developing an effective e-portfolio. Objective three is to provide each teacher candidate the opportunity to integrate the necessary teaching skills to maximize the learning experiences for students.

EDUC 799
Master’s Thesis Research [2-9]
Note: Six credit hours are required for the master’s (with thesis) degree program. Prerequisites: Consent of the student’s advisor, prerequisite courses per program map of student’s selected concentration and permission of the department.

Graduate Courses
Master of Arts in Education (M.A.E.)

Science Education Courses (SCIE)—the following 500-level courses are M.A.E. content course options

SCIE 501
Physics Concepts, Principles and Applications [3]
Through a series of investigative, laboratory studies and computer modeling, students will develop a deeper understanding of forces and motion, conservation of energy and increase in disorder, interactions of energy and matter, energy transformations, electricity and magnetism. Prerequsite: Consent of department and admission to M.A.E. program.

SCIE 502
Chemistry Concepts, Principles and Applications [3]
Through a series of investigative laboratory studies and computer modeling, students will develop a deeper understanding of chemical and physical properties of matter, chemical periodicity/periodic trends, kinetic theory and states of matter, structure of the atom, chemical bonding and reactions, atomic and nuclear forces, solutions and solubility. Prerequsites: Consent of department and admission to M.A.E. program.

SCIE 503
Life Science Concepts, Principles and Applications [3]
Through a series of investigative laboratory studies and field studies, students will develop a deeper understanding of the cell; living organisms and their behaviors; molecular basis of heredity; biological evolution; interdependence of organisms among themselves and with the environment; matter, energy, information and organization in living systems. Prerequsites: Consent of department and admission to M.A.E. program.

SCIE 504
The Environment (Chesapeake Bay) [3]
The Chesapeake Bay Foundation, in partnership with UMBC and Anne Arundel County public schools, offers this summer course designed to provide teachers with the skills and knowledge necessary to integrate lessons and projects on the Chesapeake Bay into their classrooms. This field experience includes a week-long summer experience and two one-day, fall follow-up experiences. Students enrolled in the course will explore research topics centered on real-world questions, issues and problems related to the bay. A strong emphasis is placed on developing teachers’ abilities to apply understandings in middle school classrooms. Prerequsites: Consent of department and admission to M.A.E. program.

SCIE 505
Earth/Space Science Concepts, Principles and Applications [3]
This course is designed as an interdisciplinary science experience that integrates biology, chemistry and physics within an earth science context. Students enrolled in the course will develop content understandings connected to five areas of study: atmosphere, biosphere, geosphere, hydrosphere and space science. Prerequsites: Consent of department and admission to M.A.E. program.

SCIE 506
The Designed World [3]
Drawing upon the idea that the natural world is understandable and predictable, and that science is durable but cannot provide complete answers to all questions, students will examine their own world views of science. This course will assist students with the fundamental abilities and concepts to do scientific inquiry, including designing a solution or product, implementing a proposed design, evaluating completed technological designs or products, and communicating the process of technological design.

SCIE 520
Physics Concepts, Principles and Applications II [3]
Students will use mechanics, electricity and magnetism concepts taught in Physics, Concepts and Applications I to build an understanding of waves, light, modern physics, fluids and thermodynamic concepts in a lab-based setting. Through asking their own physics questions, performing meaningful experiments, and applying mathematics to make meaning out of observations, students will develop a deep understanding of accepted physics concepts, principles, and applications in a way clearly connected to their work in schools.

SCIE 528
Biotechnology Applications [3]
This course is designed to help the in-service teachers prepare to incorporate concepts of advanced applications of science, education, curriculum, learning, and methodology through the use of new and emerging concepts of biotechnology. The course will assist teachers to develop a stronger knowledge base in molecular and cell biology, biochemistry to understand how biotechnology applications interact with all science content areas.

SCIE 531
Inquiry I [3]
This course provides an overview of theories and research related to promising inquiry-based science teaching practices. This course will provide teachers with experiences intended to develop an understanding of inquiry-based science teaching at the secondary grade level. Teachers will examine the current theories and research, promising practices, and historical perspectives linked with inquiry-based science teaching. The course will include reflections on current teaching practices, mini-implementations with inquiry-based instruction, and analysis of the instructional experiences. The course is a prerequisite to SCIE 532 Inquiry II.

SCIE 532
Inquiry II [3]
This course will provide science teachers with the opportunity to apply and extend the knowledge gained in the Inquiry I course. Teachers will develop an expanded inquiry-based experience, aligned to HCPSS curriculum and appropriate for their discipline and grade level. This course will involve teachers in designing and analyzing the experiences as they relate to promising science inquiry-based practices.

SCIE 533
Culturally Responsive Science Teaching [3]
Culturally responsive teaching involves using students' cultural experiences and background as a medium for helping them learn science content and skills. This course provides an overview of theories and research related to culturally responsive science teaching practices. Students in this course will examine culturally responsive teaching strategies designed to help all students excel and improve student achievement. Students will learn how to design, apply and assess practices embedded in the cultural proficiency continuum into their classroom, department and school. The goal of the course is to identify and examine issues pertinent to building science programs that are culturally responsive in terms of design of curricula, instruction, and assessment.

SCIE 534
Experimental Design [3]
This course provides teachers with the opportunity to apply their science content knowledge to an inquiry-based science experiment of their choosing. Teachers will develop a scientific question, gather evidence in response to the question, formulate explanations from the evidence, evaluate their explanations in light of alternative explanations and communicate their proposed explanations. The course will involve teachers in designing and analyzing their experiments in a collaborative setting relating it to their current teaching assignments and interests.

SCIE 539
Inquiry into Practice [3]
This course is intended to create a community of secondary science teacher leaders. Teachers will enroll in this course when they begin the Secondary Science Inquiry-Based Pedagogy Certificate Program. This course is one of four courses required for this certificate. The course will run concurrently with the other three certificate courses with students registering for one semester hour along with each of the three required certificate courses. The courses will be delivered primarily via online platforms with a small number of face to face meetings. The teachers will select an area or areas of interest related to inquiry-based science teaching and develop expertise in those areas. Teachers will be required to complete a long term project focused on their area of interest. The project will be developed in stages alongside the other certificate courses.

Master of Arts in Education
M.A.E.—Mathematics Education Courses

MAED 501
Rational Number Operations and Problem-Solving [3]
This course will be an interactive exploration and development of problem-solving skills and strategies. A problem may be solved by several approaches; two problems that seem solvable by a similar approach may use very different forms of that approach. To that end, problems and their solutions are unique. Confidence and skill in problem-solving, then, are built through practice. The class time and the related assignments will be structured around this practice. A variety of strategies will be suggested and modeled; however, the focus will be on student-generated solutions. Participants will be expected to work both individually and cooperatively in small groups in this process.

MAED 502
Geometry and Spatial Reasoning [3]
This course will examine the major topics of geometry, including inductive and deductive reasoning; area, perimeter and volume; similarity, congruence and proportional reasoning; application and proofs of the Pythagorean theorem; symmetry and transformational geometry; comparisons and proofs. A major project is required.

MAED 503
Algebraic Reasoning [3]
This course is designed to help the participants improve their technical skills in algebra while deepening their understanding of the major concepts and principles underlying algebraic reasoning. Graphing calculators will be used to develop conceptual understanding of algebraic concepts, procedures and problem-solving strategies.

MAED 504
Statistics, Data Analysis and Probability [3]
This course is an introduction to the basic concepts of statistics and probability, including measures of central tendency and variability, sampling distributions, correlation and regression, and the empirical determination of probabilities. Much of the course is spent on the analysis of data, the examination measures of center spread and correlation and the mathematics involved with drawing inferences and making predictions. Calculator-based methods for data collection and display, statistical calculation and simulation of probability experiments are also explored.

MAED 505
Advanced Algebra and Trigonometry [3]
This course is designed to help the participants improve their technical skills in advanced algebra and trigonometry while deepening their understanding of the major concepts and principles underlying algebraic and trigonometric reasoning. This course is a prerequisite for MAED 506: Concepts and Applications of Calculus.

MAED 506
Concepts and Applications of Calculus [3]
Calculus is the study of how things change mathematically. It also studies how continuous data can be accumulated and manipulated. In this course, participants will learn to use derivatives and integrals to calculate rates of change, areas and volumes, velocity and acceleration, growth and decay and to produce sketches of unknown objects. Through class discussions and problem sessions participants will learn to use the tools of calculus to understand and quantify the physical world.

MAED 521
Mathematical Reasoning [3]
This course examines different types of mathematical reasoning. Topics include but are not limited to arithmetic, proportional, algebraic, probabilistic, geometric/spatial, analogical, deductive, inductive, and axiomatic thinking. Inquiry experiences provide course participants with the opportunities to experience and compare these different forms of reasoning and a variety of problem-solving strategies. Research on learning and teaching mathematical reasoning in school mathematics will be explored and applied through a case study of students' mathematical reasoning.

MAED 527
Culturally Responsive Teaching in Mathematics [3]
Culturally responsive instruction is a dynamic form of teaching which considers students' culture to choose and implement instruction in a way that builds and supports the culture and individual characteristics of all students in the mathematics classroom. Culturally responsive instruction includes but is not limited to the following instructional strategies: relating mathematics to real-life experiences, creating a safe and supportive learning community within the classsroom which is student-centered and teacher facilitated, and helping students develop the language and concepts of mathematics.

MAED 531
Number, Number Systems and Operations [3]
This course examines the foundations of number, number systems and operations. Emphasis is on whole number, integers, and rational numbers. Teachers use manipulatives, calculators and a variety of visual technologies to represent number concepts and processes. Emphasis is on inquiry to develop students' number sense. Focus on student thinking samples and diagnosis and development of student thinking.

MAED 535
Managing Cybersecurity Operations [3]
This course is intended to provide managers and cybersecurity professionals with an understanding of how to plan, develop, manage, and implement cybersecurity programs in highly networked organizations. Topics include an evaluation of government and commercial security management models; security program development; risk assessment and mitigation; threat/vulnerability analysis and risk remediation; cybersecurity operations; cybersecurity incident handling; business continuity planning and disaster recovery; security policy formulation and implementation; large scale cybersecurity program coordination; management controls related to cybersecurity programs; cybersecurity management issues (i.e., staffing, professional development, etc.) information-sharing and privacy, legal, compliance, and ethical issues.

MAED 551
Inquiry I: Patterns, Functions and Algebra [3]
This course uses an inquiry approach to investigate essential and advanced algebraic concepts. Topics include but are not limited to patterns, functions, relations, variables, equality, algebraic representation, justification, and proof. Course participants learn how to use manipulatives graphing calculators, and other visual technologies to create active learning classroom communities. Research on learning and teaching algebra, with emphasis on linear, quadratic, and exponential functions is the foundation for developing research-based teaching practices in algebra. Course participants assess student work samples in algebra, and design intervention strategies to deepen students' algebraic understanding.

MAED 552
Inquiry II: Probability, Data Analysis, and Statistics [3]
This course uses an inquiry approach to investigate essential concepts from probability, data analysis, and statistics including descriptive and inferential statistics topics. Course participants learn how to use manipulatives, graphing calculators, software, and other analogical reasoning tools to create active learning classroom communities. Research on learning and developing students' probabilistic and statistical reasoning is the foundation for developing research-based teaching practices in probability and statistics. Course participants assess student work samples in probability, data analysis, and statistics, and design instructional activities and intervention strategies to move students' mathematical thinking forward.

MAED 553
Inquiry III: Spatial Reasoning, Geometry, and Proof [3]
This course uses an inquiry approach to investigate essential and advanced geometric concepts and spatial reasoning. This course is designed for secondary mathematics teachers who want to boost their content and pedagogy knowledge by exploring Euclidean, Non-Euclidean, and finite geometries to develop an appreciation of axiomatic systems and proof. Additionally, students will use manipulatives, graphing calculators, dynamic geometry drawing tools to create inquiry experiences and active learning classrooms. Exposure to research on learning and teaching geometry, measurement and proof as the foundation for the developing research-based teaching and assessment practices in geometry. Course participants assess student work samples in geometry, and design intervention strategies to move the thinking of geometry students forward using the Van Hiele Levels of Geometric Understanding. Applications to geometry in art, architecture, nature, computer graphics, and other fields are incorporated.

MAED 556
Discrete Mathematics and Problem Solving [3]
This course explores discrete mathematics and its applications in science and technology. Topics include logic and proof, induction and recursion, number theory, set theory, combinatorics and discrete probability, algorithms, algorithm analysis, and discrete structures. Students will use a variety of problem solving strategies and reflect upon the mathematical process of problem solving. Students will also investigate how discrete mathematics concepts are embedded in the national standards of K-12 mathematics courses and ways to teach discrete mathematics in the K-12 classroom. Prerequisite: Admission to the MAE program or permission of the Education Department

L-8 Mathematical Instructional Leadership
The graduate certificate program in K-8 Mathematics Instructional Leadership (ILM) consists of six courses (18 credits). Courses taken in the ILM program are transferable to the M.A.E. program upon admission.

The following courses are required:
  1. Culturally Responsive Instruction in Mathematics
  2. Teacher Leadership
  3. Mathematical Reasoning
  4. Number, Number Systems and Operations
  5. Algebraic Reasoning
  6. Geometry and Spatial Reasoning