Engineering Management (ENGM)


TED FOSTER, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, Graduate Program Director

Adjunct Professors

SHELDON BROEDEL, Ph.D., Microbial Genetics, UMBC, M.S., Microbial Genetics, UMBC
ROBERT FENTON, M.S., Electrical Engineering, U.S. Naval Postgraduate School, M.E.A., Engineering Administration, George Washington University, M.S., Management (Sloan Fellow), MIT, M.A., International Affairs, Salve Regina University
TOBY GOUKER, Applied Management and Decision Sciences, Walden University, MBA, University of Houston
ANITA GRINER, M.B.A., University of Baltimore
JOSHUA HERRING, M.S., Engineering Management, UMBC
ILLYSA IZENBERG, M.B.A., Harvard Graduate School of Business
JOHN MACCARTHY, Ph.D., Physics (Program in Biophysics and Biochemistry), University of Notre Dame, M.S., Systems Engineering, George Mason University
MICHAEL OLIVER, J.D., University of Baltimore
ALEX PAVLAK, Ph.D., Fluid Mechanics, Stevens Institute of Technology, M.E., Mechanical Engineering, Stevens Institute of Technology
SANDRA PETERSON, M.B.A., Loyola College, CPA
JEFFREY RAY, J.D. University of Maryland School of Law, M.S. Engineering Management, George Washington University, M.S. Civil Engineering, University of Maryland
LAWRENCE STOUT, Ph.D., Electrical Engineering, Arizona State University, M.S., Electrical Engineering, Kansas State University
RICHARD WILSON, M.A., Philosophy
JAMES ZIEZLER, M.B.A., Finance Concentration, Towson University

Degrees Offered

M.S. in Engineering Management (ENGM)
Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Engineering Management (EMAN)

Program Description

The Engineering Management Program at UMBC combines a practical business approach with an in-depth technical track and emphasizes how to manage people and complex projects. The aim of the program is to provide students with a basic and focused set of advanced business/management skills coupled with advanced skills in a specifc technical area commensurate with students’ interests and likely technical employment. The combination of these advanced skills and knowledge will help students assimilate and integrate practical technical experience for the management of technology-based enterprises or government functions. Although not required for participating in this program, it is expected that students are, or intend to be, employed in a technology- oriented enterprise or government program.

For more information on the engineering management programs, contact Ted Foster, Ph.D. at 410.455.1564 or tfoster@umbc.edu or visit www.umbc.edu/engm.

Degree Requirements
Core Management Courses[12]
Elective Management Courses[6]
Engineering or Information Technology Track [12]
30 credits


Required Core Management Courses (12 credits)

ENMG 650: Project Management Fundamentals
OR
ENMG 668: Project and Systems Engineering Management
ENMG 652: Management, Leadership and Communication
ENMG 656: Engineering Law and Ethics
ENMG 658: Financial Management for Science Professionals
OR
ENMG 662: Financial Decision-Making in Engineering

Elective Management Courses (6 credits)

UMBC Management Courses:
ENMG 654: Leading Teams and Organizations
ENMG 657: Competition and Strategy
ENMG 659: Strategic Management
ENMG 660: Systems Engineering Principles
ENMG 661: Leading Virtual Global Teams
ENMG 664: Quality Engineering and Management
ENMG 672: Decision and Risk Analysis
ENMG 690: Innovation and Technology Entrepreneurship
ENMG 698: Engineering Management Project
CYBR 620: Introduction to Cybersecurity
CYBR 621: Cyber Warfare
CYBR 622: Global Cyber Capabilities and Trends
CYBR 623: Cybersecurity Law and Policy

Engineering or Information Technology Specializations (12 credits)

The following is a list of specializations, or options, that are available.

Before enrolling in any of the courses in the engineering or information technology specializations, students must meet the prerequisites for the course or receive permission of the instructor of the course. Some of the courses in the specializations listed below are offered on a two-year rotation. To achieve technical depth in a discipline, students are advised to take four courses from one of the following specializations. However, students may take courses from multiple specializations.

The descriptions of all the courses listed below may be found in the Graduate School Catalog under the respective department headings. The individual departments offering these courses may be consulted for further information.

CHEMICAL/BIOCHEMICAL REGULATORY ENGINEERING *
ENCH 660: Regulatory Issues in Biotechnology
ENCH 662: Good Manufacturing Practices for Bioprocesses
ENCH 664: Quality Control and Quality Assurance of Biotech Products
ENCH 666: Biotechnology GMP Facility Design, Construction and Validation

CHEMICAL ENGINEERING
ENCH 610: Chemical Engineering Thermodynamics
ENCH 630: Transport Phenomena
ENCH 640: Advanced Chemical Reaction Kinetics
ENCH 682: Biochemical Engineering

COMPUTER ENGINEERING
Four computer engineering courses from the following list:

CMPE 640: Advanced VLSI Design
CMPE 642: Principles of Mixed Signal Design
CMPE 645: Computer Arithmetic Algorithms and Implementation
CMPE 646: VLSI Design Verification and Test
CMPE 650: Digital Systems Design
CMPE 684: Wireless Sensor Networks
CMPE 685: Principles of Communication Networks
CMPE 691: Special Topics in Computer Engineering

COMPUTER SCIENCE
Four computer science courses from the following list of eight courses:

CMSC 611: Advanced Computer Architecture
CMSC 621: Advanced Operating Systems
CMSC 635: Advanced Computer Graphics
CMSC 645: Advanced Software Engineering
CMSC 661: Principles of Database Systems
CMSC 665: Introduction to Electronic Commerce
CMSC 671: Principles of Artificial Intelligence
CMSC 681: Advanced Computer Networks

CYBERSECURITY
The following courses are recommended electives for the Cybersecurity specialization:
CMSC 626: Principles of Computer Security or CYBR 620: Introduction to Cybersecurity
CMSC 687: Introduction to Network Security
CMSC 691: Computer Forensics and Intrusions

One elective from the following set:
CMSC 611: Computer Architecture
CMSC 621: Advanced Operating Systems
CMSC 628: Introduction to Mobile Computing
CMSC 641: Design and Analysis of Algorithms
CMSC 644: Information Assurance
CMSC 645: Advanced Software Engineering
CMSC 652: Cryptography and Data Security
CMSC 661: Principles of Database Systems
CMSC 671: Principles of Artificial Intelligence
CMSC 681: Advanced Computer Networks
CMSC 684: Wireless Sensor Networks
CMPE 685: Principles of Communication Networks
CMSC 691: Data Mining

ELECTRICAL ENGINEERING
Four electrical engineering courses from the following list of eight courses:

ENEE 630: Solid-State Electronics
ENEE 631: Semiconductor Devices
ENEE 680: Electromagnetic Theory
ENEE 683: Lasers
ENEE 601: Signal and Linear Systems Theory
ENEE 610: Digital Signal Processing
ENEE 620: Probability and Random Processes
ENEE 621: Detection and Estimation Theory

HUMAN CENTERED COMPUTING
Four HCC courses from the follow list of ten courses:

HCC 613: Graphical User Interface Design & Implementation
HCC 629: Fundamentals of Human-Centered Computing
HCC 636: Structured Systems Analysis and Design
HCC 706: Interfaces for Information Visualization & Retrieval
HCC 710: Graphic Design for Interactive Systems
HCC 727: Computer-Supported Cooperative Work
HCC 728: Online Communities
HCC 729: Human-Centered Design
HCC 760: Human-Computer Interaction
HCC 761: Information Systems in Human Behavior

INFORMATION SYSTEMS
Four information systems courses from the following list of thirteen courses:

IS 603: Decision Technology Systems
IS 607: Introduction to Information Systems - Online
IS 620: Advanced Database Project
IS 629: Human Factors in Information Systems
IS 633: Database Management Systems
IS 634: Structured Systems Analysis and Design
IS 636: Structured Systems Analysis and Design
IS 651: Network Design and Management
IS 668: Enterprise-Wide Computing
IS 707: Application of Intelligent Technologies
IS 728: Online Communities
IS 731: Electronic Commerce
IS 765: Project Management

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING
MATH 404: Introduction to Partial Differential Equations I
ENME 631: Advanced Conduction and Radiation Heat Transfer
ENME 640: Fundamentals of Fluid Mechanics I
ENME 645: Computational Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer
ENME 662: Linear Vibrations
ENME 664: Dynamics
ENME 670: Continuum Mechanics
ENME 677: Applied Elasticity
Special Topics in Mechanical Engineering:

  • Biomechanics
  • Macromechanics of Composites
  • Elastic-Plastic Wave Propagation
  • Advanced Ceramics
  • Intro/Material Processes/MEMS
  • Finite Element Analysis Design

SYSTEMS ENGINEERING **
ENEE 660 Systems Engineering Principles
ENEE 661 System Architecture and Design
ENEE 662 System Modeling, Simulation and Analysis
ENEE 663 System Implementation, Integration and Test
ENEE 670: Systems Engineering Project

* A student who completes the Chemical/Biochemical Regulatory Engineering specialization will earn the post-baccalaureate certificate in that area.
**A student who completes the five courses in Systems Engineering listed above will receive the post-baccalaureate certificate in Systems Engineering

M.S. PROGRAM ADMISSION:
To apply for admission to the M.S. in Engineering Management program, a student should have:

  • A B.S. degree in Engineering, Computer Science, Information Systems, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, or other physical science that provides the appropriate background to meet the prerequisites of the courses in their chosen engineering track. Professional work experience is desirable, but not required.
  • Applicants should have an overall grade point average of 3.0 or higher (on a 4-point grading system) in their B.S. course work and any previous graduate courses. A slightly lower GPA might be sufficient for admission, based on work experience and letters of recommendation
  • GRE scores and letters of recommendation are not required of students who earned an undergraduate degree from an accredited U.S. university and maintained a GPA of at least a 2.9 on a 4-point scale.
  • International applicants should have a minimum Graduate Record Exam (GRE) score of 306. Verbal Reasoning should be at least 153 and Analytical Writing at least 4.5. TOEFL Scores: Minimum score 99 (iBT). Scores must be less than 2 years old. iBT Score Breakdown: Writing (23), Listening (23), Reading (25), and Speaking (28). (A Speaking score of 23 is acceptable if you have two years of experience in a supervisory or management position in the U.S.).
  • All original application documents must be sent directly to the Graduate School, not to the graduate program.

Post-Baccalaureate Certificate in Engineering Management (EMAN)

The Post-Baccalaureate Certificate program in Engineering Management is designed to provide students with business skills to complement existing technical skills. This program is designed for engineers employed in technology-oriented enterprises or government programs. All of the courses in the certificate program can be applied to the Master of Science in Engineering Management. Management classes are conveniently scheduled in the early evening at the UMBC campus.

Required Certificate Courses
Students must complete four of the following courses:

  • ENMG 650: Project Management Fundamentals
    OR
  • ENMG 668: Project and Systems Engineering Management
  • ENMG 652: Management, Leadership, and Communication
  • ENMG 656: Engineering Law and Ethics
  • ENMG 658: Financial Management for Science Professionals
    OR
  • ENMG 662: Financial Decision-Making in Engineering

Post-Baccalaureate Certificate Admission

  • Applicants should have a B.S. degree in Engineering, Computer Science, Information Systems, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, or other physical science that provides the appropriate background to meet the prerequisites of the courses in their chosen engineering track. Professional work experience is desirable, but not required.
  • Applicants should have an overall grade point average of 2.7 or higher on a 4-point grading scale in their B.S. course work and any previous graduate courses. A slightly lower GPA might be sufficient for admission, based on work experience and letters of recommendation.
  • GRE scores and letters of recommendation are not required of students who earned an undergraduate degree from an accredited U.S. university and maintained a GPA of at least a 2.7 on a 4-point scale.
  • International applicants should have a minimum Graduate Record Exam (GRE) score of 306. Verbal Reason should be at least 153 and Analytical Writing at least 4.5. TOEFL Scores: Minimum scores 99 (iBT). Scores must be less than 2 years old. iBT Score Breakdown: Writing (23), Listening (23), Reading (25), and Speaking (28). (A Speaking score of 23 is acceptable if you have two years of experience in a supervisory or management position in the U.S.).
  • All original application documents must be sent directly to the Graduate School, not to the graduate program.
Financial Assistance

Student financial aid is not available directly from the M.S. program or the post-baccalaureate certificate program. Because these programs are designed primarily for working professionals, graduate assistantships are not available. International students must provide their own support for full-time enrollment in this program. For details on international student financial requirements, see the International Education Services Web site, www.umbc.edu/ies/.

Course Listing

Descriptions of the courses in the engineering concentrations may be found elsewhere in the UMBC Graduate Catalog. The individual departments offering these courses may be consulted for further information.

ENMG 650
Project Management Fundamentals [3]
In this course, students learn the fundamentals of managing projects in a systematic way. These fundamentals can be applied within any industry and work environment and will serve as the foundation for more specialized project management study. Principles and techniques are further reinforced through practical case studies and team projects in which students simulate project management processes and techniques.

ENMG 652
Management, Leadership, and Communication [3]
In this course, students learn effective management and communication skills through case study-analysis, reading, class discussion and role-playing. The course covers topics such as effective listening, setting expectations, delegation, coaching, performance, evaluations, conflict management, negotiation with senior management and managing with integrity.

ENMG 654
Leadership and Team Development [3]
In this course, students analyze leadership case studies across a wide range of industries and environments to identify effective leadership principles that may be applied in their own organizations. Students learn how to influence people throughout their organization, lead effective teams, create an inclusive workplace, use the Six Sigma process, implement and manage change and develop a leadership style.Prerequisite: ENMG 652: Management, Leadership and Communication

ENMG 656
Engineering Law and Ethics [3]
This course provides a comprehensive overview of all important legal principles affecting engineers, engineering sciences and corporate management, with a focus on the intersection of these legal principles with business ethics. The student will learn how to think through and process legal problems consistent with ethical norms, and how to analyze business risks in light of operative legal constructs, taking into consideration ethical issues, to arrive at a range of correct business decisions. Throughout the class, the student will learn substantive legal principles including an overview of constitutional, contract, tort, corporate and regulatory law. Students will work in groups during certain exercises, role play in real and hypothetical case studies, and make a final presentation of a comprehensive legal and ethical engineering problem.

ENMG 657
Competition and Strategy [3]
This course is for any graduate student in a science, engineering, or technology discipline who wishes to provide high-level value to his or her organization by being able to assess the industry and competitive forces on the organization and to delineate a strategic plan that will enable that organization to optimize its position. This course is a complement to ENMG 659: Strategic Management, which is intended to be a capstone course that builds on learning that Masters candidates gained in other courses. This course will teach critical thinking skills and practical tools that students will apply immediately to their workplaces.

ENMG 658
Financial Management [3]
This course covers the fundamentals of setting up, reading and analyzing financial statements and reports in a business setting. Course topics include: project budgeting, profit planning, return on investment and basic corporate finance. Students analyze case studies from specific industries.

ENMG 659
Strategic Management [3]
This course is intended to integrate the learning from the previous management courses and to focus it on the perspective and problems of the Chief Executive Officer and other organizational strategic managers. The theme of the course is that any organization improves its chances of sustained success when its managers formulate an action-oriented strategic business plan based on the strategic management process. Case studies are included to illustrate the concepts and their applications.Prerequisite: Minimum of three engineering management courses

ENMG 660
Systems Engineering Principles [3]
This course provides a survey introduction to the discipline of Systems Engineering (SE) and Systems Architecting (SA). Key industry standards for SE and SA and a standard definition for the “The Systems Engineering (SE) Process” are provided and are used throughout the course. The course describes how the SE process is implemented in standard life cycle models and through various standard organizational structures. Key SE technical process topics include: Requirements Definition, Requirements Analysis, Architectural Design, Implementation, Integration, Verification, Validation, and Transition. Key SE management process topics include: Decision Analysis, Technical Planning, Technical Assessment, Requirements Management, Risk Management, Configuration Management, Interface Management, and Technical Data Management. Other topics will include: IPTs, Model-Based Systems Engineering, DoDAF, Structured Analysis, UML, SysML, requirements allocation, traceability, specialty engineering, technology readiness assessment, technical performance measurement, earned value measurement, and work breakdown structures. Students will develop a requirements document, and integrated architecture, and a System Engineering Plan (SEP). Homework and Exams are designed to provide the opportunity to practice the concepts learned in class.

ENMG 661
Leading Virtual Global Teams [3]
This course is designed to help the student apply managerial concepts and skills to managing and leading virtual and/or global work teams. Geographically dispersed work teams have great challenges: tone is difficult to convey electronically, time zones limit audio communication opportunities, work oversight requires more reposting, and teambuilding is exceedingly difficult using technological - rather than in-person - tools. Language and culture differences in multinational teams compound these challenges. Students will learn to empower others, build credibility, communicate appropriately and adapt quickly across cultures and technologies.

ENMG 662
Financial Decision-Making in Engineering [3]
This course examines decision-making in engineering organizations based on comparisons of the investment worth of alternative courses of action with respect to their costs and/or incomes. The early part of the course focuses on the conventional mathematics of money. This mathematics is then applied to consideration of practical investment decisions, such as replacement, public sector investments, service industry investments, and decision making under incertainty. The course presents the overlapping aspects of accounting, finance, and investment analysis.

ENMG 664
Quality Engineering and Management [3]
This course provides an overview of the basic principles and tools of quality and their applications from an engineering perspective. The primary quality schools of thought or methodologies, including Total Quality Management, Six Sigma and Lean Six Sigma, and quality approaches from key figures in the development and application of quality as a business practice, including W. Edwards Deming and Joseph M. Juran will be analyzed. Some of the key mathematical tools used in quality systems will be discussed, including Pareto charts, measurement systems analysis, design of experiments, response surface methodology, and statistical process control. Students will apply these techniques to solve engineering problems using the R software. Reading assignments, homework, exams, and the project will emphasize quality approaches, techniques, and problem solving. This course can be counted as either a management course or an engineering course for the M.S. in Engineering Management.

ENMG 668: Project and Systems Engineering Management [3]

This course will cover fundamental project control and systems engineering management concepts, including how to plan, set up cost accounts, bid, staff and execute a project from a project control perspective. It provides an understanding of the critical relations and interconnections between project management and systems engineering management. It is designed to address how systems engineering management supports traditional program management activities to break down complex programs into manageable and assignable tasks.

ENMG 672
Decision and Risk Analysis [3]
This course provides an overview of decision and risk analysis techniques. It covers modeling uncertainty, the principles of rational decision-making, representing and solving decision problems using influence diagrams and decision trees, sensitivity analysis, Bayesian decision analysis, deductive and inductive reasoning, objective and subjective probabilities, probability distributions, regression analysis. This course can be counted as either a management course or an engineering course for the M.S. in Engineering Management.

ENMG 690
Innovation and Technology Entrepreneurship [3]
This course offers an overview of innovation and its role in entrepreneurial ventures, both in new companies and within existing corporations. Additionally, the basics of entrepreneurship with specific emphasis on technology-based business start-up will be investigated. For the purposes of this course, technologies include IT, engineering and bio-tech. The course covers where to find innovative ideas and how to determine if a business idea is feasible, along with a high- level discussion of the critical success factors in new venture start-up.

ENMG 698: Engineering Management Project [3]
In a post fossil fuel environment how will we get electricity, or fuel our cars? Planning starts with a purpose, a goal, an end state such as large carbon emission reduction. Given the goal, the next step is strategic scenarios, simple system or architectural models to estimate and compare cost and performance of feasible alternatives. In this project course students will start with a blank sheet of paper and imagine what energy systems might look like in 2050. The focus is on feasibility, the numbers, ignoring legacy systems and current policy. Students will learn strategic thinking, systems thinking, and discover opportunities for projects, theses and careers. Students will be encouraged to publish final reports as appropriate.

UMBC MANAGEMENT COURSES IN CYBERSECURITY

CYBR 620/CMPE 620: Introduction to Cybersecurity [3]
This course introduces students to the interdisciplinary field of cybersecurity by discussing the evolution of information security into cybersecurity, cybersecurity theory, and the relationship of cybersecurity to nations, businesses, society, and people. Students will be exposed to multiple cybersecurity technologies, processes, and procedures, learn how to analyze the threats, vulnerabilities and risks present in these environments, and develop appropriate strategies to mitigate potential cybersecurity problems.

CYBR 621: Cyber Warfare [3]
This course addresses some of the unique and emerging policy, doctrine, strategy, and operational requirements of conducting cyber warfare at the nation-state level. It provides students with a unified battlespace perspective and enhances their ability to manage and develop operational systems and concepts in a manner that results in the integrated, controlled, and effective use of cyber assets in warfare.

CYBR 622: Global Cyber Capabilities and Trends [3]
This course focuses on four general areas of cyber capabilities and trends in the global community: the theory and practice of cybersecurity and cyber war; cyber capabilities of nation-states as well as non-state actors; trends in cyber-related strategies and policies; and cyber-related challenges facing the U.S. government. The course concludes with a national cybersecurity policy exercise that helps demonstrate the challenges and complexities of the dynamic and global cybersecurity environment.

CYBR 623: Cybersecurity Law and Policy [3]
Students will be exposed to the national and international policy and legal considerations related to cybersecurity and cyberspace such as privacy, intellectual property, cybercrime, homeland security (i.e., critical infrastructure protection) and cyber warfare, and the organizations involved in the formulation of such laws and policies. Broader technology issues also are discussed to demonstrate the interdisciplinary influences and concerns that must be addressed in developing or implementing effective national cybersecurity laws and policies.