INFORMATION SYSTEMS

Department of Information Systems

ARYYA GANGOPADHYAY, Department Chair
GEORGE KARABATIS, Associate Chair for Academic Affiars
ZHIYUAN CHEN, Graduate Program Director, IS
ANITA KOMLODI, Graduate Program Director, HCC
DONGSONG ZHANG, Graduate Program Director, IS online MS

Professors
GANGOPADHYAY, ARYYA, Ph.D., Chair, Rutgers University; privacy preserving data mining, knowledge discovery in structured and unstructured data, health information systems
NORCIO, Anthony F., Ph.D., The Catholic University of America; theoretical interests: human-computer interfaces, complex systems design, health informatics, application interests: adaptive/personalized interfaces, air traffic control, internationalization of interfaces, usability, user modeling
RADA, ROY, Ph.D., University of Illinois; evolutionary computation; intelligent agents for financial investing; ontologies

Associate Professors
CANFIELD, GERALD, Ph.D., University of Utah; Medical informatics, networks, databases
CHEN, ZHIYUAN, Ph.D., Cornell University; database systems and data mining, including privacy preserving data mining, data exploration and navigation, data integration, XML, automatic database administration, and database compression
EMURIAN, HENRY H., Ph.D., American University; virtual team collaboration, online tutoring systems, information technology education, and internet citizenship
KARABATIS, GEORGE, Ph.D., University of Houston; database systems, cyber-security, semantic integration of enterprise systems, data integration, mobile data management
KOMLODI, ANITA, Ph.D., University of Maryland, College Park; human-centered computing, information storage and retrieval, computer supported cooperative work
KORU, A. GUNES, Ph.D., Southern Methodist University; health information technology, privacy, data mining, measurement, quality improvement, project management, and open source systems
LUTTERS, WAYNE, Ph.D., University of California, Irvine; computer supported cooperative work (CSCW), human-centered computing (HCC), knowledge management (KM), online communities
OZOK, A. ANT, Ph.D., Purdue University; School of Industrial Engineering; human-centered computing, human-technology interaction in health care, human factors in patient safety, user aspects of e-commerce, survey design and implementation, usability design evaluation methodologies, multiple-method approaches in human factors
SEAMAN, CAROLYN, Ph.D., University of Maryland, College Park; software engineering, software maintenance, knowledge management, software development organizations, qualitative research methods
ZHANG, DONGSONG, Ph.D., University of Arizona; context-aware mobile applications, mobile Web adaptation, social computing, computer-mediated communication and collaboration, E-business
ZHOU, LINA, Ph.D., Beijing University; deception detection, computer-mediated communication, intelligent decision support, social network analysis, ontology, and knowledge management

Assistant Professors
GETHERS, MALCOM, Ph.D, College of William and Mary; software engineering, software maintenance and evolution, program comprehension, software measurement, mining software repositories
HURST, AMY, Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; human-centered computing, assistive technology, interaction design, context-aware computing, democratizing technology
JANEJA, VANDANA, Ph.D., Rutgers University; spatial data mining, anomaly detection, disease informatics, data mining for e-government and homeland security applications
KANE, SHAUN, Ph.D., University of Washington; human-centered computing, accessibility, gesture-based interaction techniques, adaptive user interfaces, mobile human-computer interaction, context-aware computing
KUBER, RAVI, Ph.D., Queen's University Belfast, Northern Ireland; human-centered computing, universal access to technology, haptic and multimodal interface design and evaluation
SAMPATH, SREEDEVI, Ph.D., University of Delaware; software engineering, software testing, testing web applications, software maintenance, program analysis
ZHOU, BIN, Ph.D., Simon Fraser University, Canada; privacy preserving data publishing and data mining, web search and mining, social network analysis, database systems

Research Assistant Professor
ANTHONY, LISA, Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University; human-centered computing, pen and finger gesture interfaces, multimodal interaction, assistive technology, context-aware computing, empirical evaluation

Degrees Offered

M.S., Ph.D.
Accelerated Bachelor's/Master's

Program Description

The Information Systems Department offers MS and PhD degrees in Information Systems (IS) and in Human-Centered Computing (HCC).

Prospective MS students can choose from two campus-based MS degrees (IS and HCC) or one completely online MS degree (IS only). All programs are designed for students who wish to further their knowledge and experience in the area of Information Systems or Human-Centered Computing. These programs may also be of interest to individuals whose undergraduate academic backgrounds are not in a computer or information systems discipline but who meet the department's admission requirements.

The IS department offers two Ph.D. programs. They are research oriented and intended for graduate students who desire to make research contributions to the field of Information Systems (IS) or Human-Centered Computing (HCC).

The MS programs in IS (campus-based or online) focus on using computer technologies to provide methods, practices, and algorithms that transform data into information and knowledge desired by, and useful for, individual and group users in organizations.

The MS program in HCC is interdisciplinary in nature, building on significant strengths within the Information Systems Department while leveraging strengths from other UMBC departments. Human-Centered Computing focuses on the design, implementation, and evaluation of interactive information technologies and to use this information to improve the lives of individuals, groups and societies.

Research Areas

The department's faculty and programs have a broad view of information systems. Research areas include, but are not limited to:

  • Artificial Intelligence/Knowledge Management
  • Database/Data Mining
  • Health Informatics
  • Human-Centered Computing
  • Systems and Software
Program Admissions for the Campus-based and Online Curriculum for all Graduate Programs in IS and HCC

Admissions decisions are based on the following criteria:

  • Bachelor's degree: A four-year bachelor's degree from a regionally accredited college or university or an equivalent degree from a comparable foreign institution.
  • Language requirements: All applicants are expected to read, speak, write and understand English fluently upon entering the program. A TOEFL (Test of English as a Foreign Language) or an IELTS test is required for students who have earned an undergraduate degree from a non-English-speaking college or university. Applicants whose native language is not English, but who have a post-secondary degree from an English-speaking institution will not be required to take the TOEFL or IELTS. The minimum acceptable TOEFL score established for admission into the program is 550 (written), 213 (computerized), or 80 (iBT). The minimum acceptable IELTS score is 6.5. TOEFL information and applications are available from Educational Testing Service (ETS) at TOEFL, Educational Testing Service, P.O. Box 6151, Princeton, NJ 08541-6151, Phone: 609-771-7100 or online at www.toefl.org. IELTS information can be obtained from www.ielts.org
  • GRE scores are not required for any of the MS programs. However, all applicants for either doctoral program must submit their GRE Aptitude Test scores before the application deadline.
  • The majority of successful applicants have an undergraduate GPA well above 3.0 (on a 4.0 scale). Applicants with GPA slightly under 3.0 may be granted for conditional acceptance, depending on their past working experience and other evidence that shows applicantsí potential in succeeding in the M.S. program.
  • The application deadline dates for the programs are as follows:
    • Campus Based Master's Programs - Fall: May 1, Spring: October 1
    • Online Masters Program - See website (http://www.onlinems.umbc.edu/) for specific semester dates
    • Ph.D. Programs - Fall: February 1, Spring: September 1

Note: All original application documents for the Campus Based Programs must be sent directly to the Graduate School, rather than to the graduate program. UMBC's assigned TOEFL code is 005835. TOEFL test must have been within 2 years of matriculation to be valid.

For details on all of our graduate level programs, please visit the department's website at www.is.umbc.edu

Degree Requirements

Master of Science in Information Systems

The MS program requires satisfactorily completing 39 credits (13 3-hour courses) at the graduate level. One or more of the fundamental courses may be waived at the time of admission based on prior academic experience. As a result students entering this program will complete between 30 and 39 credit hours of graduate studies depending on their background. All MS students are required to take five core courses and then can choose five electives from the department's course offerings.

Fundamentals
 IS 600 - Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming Concepts
 IS 610 - Database Program Development
 IS 650 - Data Communications and Networks
Core
 IS 601 - Foundations of Information Systems
 IS 603 - Decision Technology Systems
  (If you took IS 425 at UMBC - Replace with an elective)
 IS 620 - Advanced Database Project
 IS 636 - Structured Systems Analysis and Design
  (If you took IS 436 at UMBC - Replace with an elective)
 IS 651 - Distributed Systems
Electives (some of the electives are):
 IS 651M LAN Management Using Microsoft Windows
 IS 651U LAN Management Using UNIX
 IS 651W Server-Side Web Systems
 IS 652 Internetworking
 IS 654 Survey of Telecommunications
 IS 660 Health Care Informatics I
 IS 661 Health Care Informatics II
 IS 698 Special Topics in IS
 IS 700 Independent Study in IS
 IS 707 Applications of Intelligent Technologies
 IS 721 Semi-Structured Data Management
 IS 722 Systems and Information Integration
 IS 727 Computer-Supported Cooperative Work
 IS 733 Data Mining
 IS 755 Advanced Artificial Intelligence
 IS 764 Advanced Systems Design
 IS 765 Project Management
 IS 799 MS Thesis Research

A student may elect to do a Master's Thesis, in which case two electives may be used for thesis research credits. If a student elects to do a thesis, the student must choose a thesis advisor from the department and form a three member committee that oversees and accepts the thesis.

Online Master of Science in Information Systems
The graduate degree program comprises 34 credit hours of coursework.
Fundamentals Course:(May be waived based on experience and is determined during the admissions review process)
 IS 607 Introduction to Information Systems (4 credits)
Core Courses:
 (All four are required of all students)
 IS 631 Management Information Systems (3 credits)
 IS 632 Networks (3 credits)
 IS 633 Database Management Systems (3 credits)
 IS 634 Structured Systems Analysis and Design (3 credits)
Advanced Courses:
 (All students must complete a total of six advanced courses)
 IS 667 Interaction Design (3 credits)
 IS 668 Enterprise-Wide Computing (3 credits)
 IS 669 Project Management Operations (3 credits)
 IS 670 Health Informatics (3 credits)
 IS 671 Electronic Commerce (3 credits)
 IS 672 Computer and Network Security (3 credits)
 IS 674 Information Architecture for the Web (3 credits)
 IS 673 Readings in Human-Centered Computing Research (3 credits)
 IS 675 Introduction to Data Mining (3 credits)
 IS 701 Independent Study for ISFU (3 credits)

Special Topics Courses:
Periodically, our faculty offer courses that cover topics addressing specific issues within information systems. These ďspecial topicsĒ courses offer our online masterís students a unique opportunity to delve into subject matter that is closely relevant to particular areas of interest within the IT professional community and is derived from research conducted by faculty here in the IS department of UMBC. Special topics courses, when offered, meet advanced course requirements and count toward your degree. These courses are subject to limited enrollment and prerequisite requirements. Students can also choose a MS thesis option, which is equivalent to two elective courses. At the end, students are required to come to the campus to defend their MS thesis.

Master of Science in Human-Centered Computing (HCC)

Students have to complete 30 credits (10 courses). Fifteen credits of core courses have to be complete by all students. For the remaining 15 credits, students can choose from the following options:

  • complete five elective courses (all 15 credits in coursework),
  • complete an independent study (3 credits) and four elective courses (12 credits),
  • complete a Masterís thesis (6 credits) and three elective courses (9 credits)
Core courses (15 credits)
 HCC/IS 613 - Graphical User Interface Design & Implementation
 HCC 629 - Fundamentals of Human-Centered Computing
 HCC 636 - Structured Systems Analysis and Design
 HCC 710 Graphic Design for Interactive Systems
 HCC 729 - Human-Centered Design

Electives (15 credits)
As stated above, students can choose to complete five courses, one independent study and four courses, or a Masterís thesis and three courses. The following courses are examples of elective courses, other courses can be taken as electives with permission from your adviser. If you choose HCC 710 or HCC/IS 760 to be a core course (old version of core course requirements), it cannot be also counted as an elective.
 HCC/IS 698 - Special Topics
 HCC 700 - Independent Study in Information Systems
 HCC 706 - Interfaces for Information Visualization and Retrieval
 HCC 727 - Computer-Supported Cooperative Work
 HCC 728 - Online Communities
 IS 731 - Electronic Commerce
 HCC 760 - Human-Computer Interaction
 HCC 761 - Information Systems in Human Behavior
 IS 765 - Project Management
 HCC 710 - Graphic Design for Interactive Systems
 SOCY 616 - Cyberspace, Culture and Society

Doctor of Philosophy in Information Systems
An admitted doctoral student is strongly encouraged to identify a mentor by the end of the first semester in the program. All doctoral students must have a mentor and a tentative committee by the end of their second semester in the program. Doctoral students are also expected to attend all research seminars, doctoral proposals and dissertation defenses, and any colloquia with guest speakers as part of their learning experience.

First Year Dossier: At the end of the doctoral student's first year, a dossier must be prepared which includes all significant work/papers written that year, a statement of learning specific to the program of doctoral study and a statement describing future plans: areas needing more course work and preliminary dissertation areas, if available. The dossier should include a list of all courses, grades received, and the name of the studentís advisor who may or may not chair ultimately the studentís dissertation committee. The dossier will be evaluated by the Graduate Program Director to assess the student's progress in the program, and to determine if the student should proceed into the second year of doctoral study.

Open Seminar: New doctoral students are required to attend the Open Seminar, which presents the different research areas in the IS department.

Minimum Course Requirements:
The studentís mentor can add more course requirements to the ones below depending on the studentís level of competence, research productivity, and progress

  • Doctoral students must complete the required two (2) methodology courses during their first year of study.
  • In addition, doctoral students must take 5 area courses.
  • All doctoral students must take two Independent Studies.

Comprehensive Examination: The Comprehensive Examination is an integral component of the PhD Program. Through this examination a doctoral student demonstrates the requisite knowledge of the discipline as well as the competencies that are necessary to continue doctoral studies by conducting original research.

Dissertation: While course work is required, it is important to understand that satisfactorily completing course work is not the goal of a doctoral program. A doctoral candidate is required to produce a publishable doctoral dissertation based upon the candidate's original research. The dissertation must necessarily advance the body of scientific knowledge that underlies the discipline of Information Systems. A critical component of a doctoral candidate's development is the dissemination of scientific information. Doctoral candidates are routinely expected to author by themselves or co-author with their professors and fellow students scholarly papers for submission to scientific journals and conference proceedings. Doctoral candidates should also be prepared to present these research results at various national and international conferences.

Doctor of Philosophy in Human-Centered Computing (HCC)

An admitted doctoral student is strongly encouraged to identify a mentor by the end of the first semester in the program. All doctoral students must have a mentor and a tentative committee by the end of their second semester in the program. Doctoral students are also expected to attend all research seminars, doctoral proposals and dissertation defenses, and any colloquia with guest speakers as part of their learning experience.

First Year Dossier: At the end of the doctoral student's first year, a dossier must be prepared which includes all significant work/papers written that year, a statement of learning specific to the program of doctoral study and a statement describing future plans: areas needing more course work and preliminary dissertation areas, if available. The dossier should include a list of all courses, grades received, and the name of the studentís advisor who may or may not chair ultimately the studentís dissertation committee. The dossier should be submitted electronically to the Graduate Program Director. The dossier will be evaluated by the Graduate Program Director. The purpose of the review is to assess the student's progress in the program, and to determine if the student should proceed into the second year of doctoral study. The student will be informed by email if their progress is satisfactory, not satisfactory and needs specific improvement, or is not satisfactory to continue.

Comprehensive Review: After completing three offerings of the HCC 810 reading seminar but before the end of the studentís sixth semester of studies, the student must complete the Comprehensive Review. As part of the review, the student has to take a written exam and prepare a comprehensive dossier. The dossier includes a statement that details the student's intellectual and scholarly growth as well the student's research directions and intentions, all papers written to satisfy course requirements, including the independent study courses and all papers published in conference proceedings and scholarly journals, a list of all courses and grades, and the name of the studentís advisor. A three-member committee evaluates the student's dossier and overall progress, and determines whether the student should continue toward the doctorate.

Course requirement:
Required foundation Courses (9 credit hours):
 HCC 810 Reading Seminar: to be completed as a series of three (3) one-credit seminars during the first three semesters of the studentís doctoral studies.
 Two (2) Methodology Courses: Most students would take IS 804 (Advanced Experimental Design Methodology) and IS 805 (Advanced Field Research Methods), but other courses may be approved by their advisor as appropriate.
Required Core courses (15 credit hours):
 HCC 629 - Fundamentals of Human-Centered Computing
 HCC 729 - Human-Centered Design
 HCC 760 - Human-Computer Interaction
Psychology course requirement:
 IS/HCC 761 Information Systems in Human Behavior (Credits: 3)
 HCC 710 - Graphic Design for Interactive Systems

Advanced Required Core courses (24 credit hours):
IS 801 - Independent Study (3 credit hours)
Three (3) Electives (9 credits total. At most one of these electives can be satisfied by taking IS 801. At most one of these electives can be an additional methodology course. All courses must be approved by the studentís advisor)
IS 899 - Doctoral Dissertation Research (12 credit hours)

Dissertation: While course work is required, it is important to understand that satisfactorily completing course work is not the goal of a doctoral program. A doctoral candidate is required to produce a publishable doctoral dissertation based upon the candidate's original research. The dissertation must necessarily advance the body of scientific knowledge that underlies the discipline of Information Systems.

A critical component of a doctoral candidate's development is the dissemination of scientific information. Doctoral candidates are routinely expected to author by themselves or co-author with their professors and fellow students scholarly papers for submission to scientific journals and conference proceedings. Doctoral candidates should also be prepared to present these research results at various national and international conferences.

Financial Assistance

A limited number of graduate teaching assistantships are available to students enrolled in the Information Systems and Human-Centered Computing Ph.D. programs. Interested students are asked to apply the semester before.

For More Information

Visit:
www.is.umbc.edu

Contact:
Zhiyuan Chen
Graduate Program Director for IS Programs
410-455-8833
zhchen@umbc.edu

Shannon Keegan
Graduate Program Manager
410-455-2650
keegan@umbc.edu

Anita Komlodi
Graduate Program Director for HCC Programs
410-455-3212
komlodi@umbc.edu

Dongsong Zhang
Graduate Program Director, IS Online
410-455-2851
zhangd@umbc.edu

UMBC Graduate School
1000 Hilltop Circle
Baltimore, MD 21250
410-455-2537
www.umbc.edu/gradschool/
umbcgrad@umbc.edu

Human-Centered Computing (HCC) Courses

HCC 629
Fundamentals of Human-Centered Computing (Credits: 3)
This course is designed to introduce the student to the fundamentals of human-centered computing, including perceptual and cognitive psychology theories, human-centered computing models, theories, frameworks, and interaction paradigms.

HCC 636
Structured Systems Analysis and Design (Credits: 3)
Advanced study of structures systems development. Emphasis on strategies and techniques of structured analysis and structured design for producing logical methodologies for dealing with complexity in the development of information systems.

HCC 700
Independent Study in Human-Centered Computing (Credits: 1 - 3)
This is a course in independent reading for masters students, and is supervised by a member of the Information Systems faculty. The purpose of this course is to give students the opportunity to study a topic of interest which is not available from the existing course offerings. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Note: A particular faculty member must agree in writing to supervise the proposed study before the student may register for this course. The approval of the Department is required before the student registers.

HCC 706
Interfaces For Info. Visualization & Retrieval (Credits: 3)
Providing access to large amounts of information is an important function of information systems. This course discusses the design of user interfaces that allow users to search for, browse, and interact with information. Specifically, students will be introduced to human information-seeking behavior and its implications for user interfaces, including user interfaces for information retrieval systems and a wide variety of information visualization tools. Information retrieval systems enable users to search for and browse information. Information visualization is the application of computer-supported graphical tools to the presentation of large amounts of abstract information. Prerequisite: IS 629 or permission of the instructor.

HCC 710
Graphic Design for Interactive Systems (Credits: 3)
This course focuses on visual communications is the presentation of information through the use of type and image. Students in this course would get an understanding of how visual principles can be used, gain experience in working through the design process towards the creation and evaluation of both typographic and image based form, reinforce certain technical and computer skills, and refine your ability to critique and discuss relevant issues both individually and in group situations. In this course, the objective is to create forms that can be both read as well as seen. We consider issues ranging from visual clarity and the needs of the user, creating hierarchy in a non-linear reading order, to the semantic/pragmatic, implicit/explicit characteristics of form.

HCC 727
Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (Credits: 3)
This course will provide students with an introduction to the discipline of Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW). Groupware systems, ranging from two people to enterprise-level, are exceedingly complex due to the interplay between social dynamics and distributed computing. This course will engage students with contemporary research and industry best practices in the design, development, and evaluation of collaborative information systems.

HCC 728
Online Communities (Credits: 3)
Social interaction via the Internet is becoming increasingly important. People are gathering in online communities of interest and communities of practice to discuss health, hobbies, games, education, politics and professional issues. In this class students will analyze the technology and social support needed to make these social interactions successful; they will discuss and debate current research in this field and either develop an online community or carry out a small research project.

HCC 729
Human-Centered Design (Credits: 3)
This course explores the main factors, methods, and processes that underlie the user-centered design of the information systems. The course focuses on conceptualizing and understanding the fundamental human-computer interaction issues as well as user testing and interaction design processes. The course also provides students the opportunity to apply these concepts through the design, evaluation, and implementation of interface prototypes in real-world environments. Prerequisite: IS 629 and IS 636.

HCC 760
Human-Computer Interaction (Credits: 3)
This course examines and analyzes cognitive and software concepts that underlie human-computer interaction. The concepts include cognitive theories of memory organization, problem solving strategies, and linguistic comprehension. Interaction software technologies that are examined include menu selection systems, command languages, and direct manipulation techniques. This course is intended to introduce the student to the current literature, and to prepare the student for conducting independent research and for designing appropriate interaction software.

HCC 761
Information Systems in Human Behavior (Credits: 3)
This course addresses the impact of information systems on individuals, groups, organizations, and societies. Topics will include studying the effects of information systems on phenomena such as human-centered computing, learning, development, cognition, personality, social interactions, problem solving, task performance, organizational effectiveness, consumer behavior, process control, and decision making. The information systems under investigation and analysis will encompass the full range of interrelated components from graphical user interfaces to global enterprise systems, as those factors relate to a systemís use and consequence. The course is structured as a reading and writing seminar having the objective of teaching students the process of developing a publishable article and making a professional presentation of their work. Content mastery is to be understood as a by-product of developing general problem-solving and scholarship skills.

HCC 799
Master's Thesis Research (Credits: 1 - 6)

HCC 801
Independent Study in Human-Centered Computing (Credits: 3)
This is a course in independent reading for doctoral students, and is supervised by a member of the Information Systems faculty. The purpose of this course is to give students the opportunity to study a topic of interest which is not available from the existing course offerings. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Note: A particular faculty member must agree in writing to supervise the proposed study before the student may register for this course. The approval of the Department is required before the student registers.

HCC 810
HCC Seminar (Credits: 1)

HCC 898
Pre-Candidacy Doctoral Dissertation Research (Credits: 1 - 6)
Research on doctoral dissertation conducted under the direction of a faculty advisor before candidacy.

HCC 899
Doctoral Dissertation Research (Credits: 1 - 6)

Information Systems (IS) Courses (On-Campus)

IS 600
Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming Concepts (Credits: 3)
This course introduces the student of information systems to fundamental object-oriented programming concepts. A student of this course will learn the principles of programming, and in particular object-oriented programming principles. Programming principles and constructs, such as data types, common control flow structures, basic data structures, console input/output, and file input/output will be presented. We will also learn several key object-oriented principles, such as inheritance and exception handling. We will use the Java programming language to learn and implement the basic programming and object-oriented principles described above.

IS 601
Foundations of Information Systems (Credits: 3)
This course is an introduction to the role of information and information systems in organizations. Characteristics of organizations, e.g., structure, culture, decision making, are analyzed as to how they affect and are affected by information systems development and use. Strategic planning, information architecture design, competitive value, career paths, ethical issues, legal issues, and trends in information technology development and in information management practice are examined for both public and private organizations. Emerging technologies are also assessed for potential strategic value to an organization.

IS 603
Decision Technology Systems (Credits: 3)
A broad overview of decision making and the systems that are designed to support the process. The management process, computer support for management, the technology of management, decision technology system types, including artificial intelligence, decision support systems, executive and geographic information systems, and idea processing systems, system architectures, system integration considerations, system design and development methodologies, system performance measurement and evaluation, management of decision technology systems, organizational and user issues.

IS 610
Database Program Development (Credits: 3)
An introduction to computer databases which examines the basic functions and capabilities of database management software (DBMS). Emphasis is placed on the use of this software in solving information processing problems which may include laboratory work as well as database design case studies. Topics include a discussion of data structures, host language programming, indirect and direct file organization, and DBMS models including hierarchical, network, and relational. Also examined are storage devices, data administration, and database administration, as well as database analysis, design, and implementation.

IS 613
Graphical User Interface Design & Implementation (Credits: 3)
This course has the objective of introducing the student to graphical user interface systems using the most current version of Java. Students will learn to implement a series of interactive stand-alone or web-based interfaces. Event handling and multi-threaded Java programs will be studied. Image and data transmission via the internet will be presented. Students will read articles from the current research literature that offer guidelines in interface design. Familiarity with UNIX file and directory manipulation is recommended.

IS 620
Advanced Database Project (Credits: 3)
In this course students design and implement a realistic database using software tools such as PRISN, EXCELERATOR, and INGRES. Working in teams, students proceed through all phases of a database development project including assembling and organization's data requirements, graphically modeling and implementing the database using an SQL-based interface. The principles of project management, planning, and control are also covered. Prerequisite: IS 410 or IS 610.

IS 625
Decision Support Systems (Credits: 3)
Analysis of the highest level of information support systems which serves the manager- user. This system provides quantitative-based information derived from one or more databases within and/or external to an organization and used to aid management in the decision-making process. Theoretical concepts are applied to real world application.

IS 630
Information Resources Management (Credits: 3)
The relationships between organizational policy and institutional information requirements are analyzed in this course. The conditional influence of the structure of the administrative organization, and the design of the information system upon organizational policy affecting access and use of databases are examined in detail. Prerequisite: IS 601.

IS 636
Structured Systems Analysis and Design (Credits: 3)
Advanced study of structures systems development. Emphasis on strategies and techniques of structured analysis and structured design for producing logical methodologies for dealing with complexity in the development of information systems.

IS 642
Information System Analysis (Credits: 3)
Applications of the computer in organizational management are the objectives of this course. Principles of systems analysis as related to organizational productivity are developed, and a means for including productivity measures in systems analysis are addressed. Prerequisite: IS 636.

IS 643
Electronic Government (Credits: 3)
In 2002, half of all Americans and three-quarters of all American Internet users have visited a government web site to find information and/or conduct transactions (Council for Excellence in Government April 14, 2003). Three-quarters of the American e-government users believe that having government available on the Internet has made it much easier and more convenient for them to stay informed about government programs and policies; two-thirds of these e-government users believe that it is also now more convenient and easier to conduct transactions with government. This course examines the policy framework that enables and electronic government in the U.S. at the federal, state, and local levels of government. Government-2-Citizen, Government-2-Business, and Government-2-Government processes to provide information and services through electronic media are analyzed and evaluated using the policy framework and the context of current U.S. government issues and activities. Critical concerns such as privacy, security, e-democracy, and access in an electronic environment are addressed throughout the course.

IS 650
Data Communications and Networks (Credits: 3)
This course provides a in-depth analysis of data communications, network designs, and distributed mainframes, mini and microcomputer information systems. The underlying concepts essential to the design of both communication hardware and software are examined. As the theory is developed, laboratory demonstrations and exercises reinforce the applicability of various tools and paradigms to real world problems.

IS 651
Distributed Systems (Credits: 3)
This course covers distributed computing architectures (emphasizing service-oriented architectures) and web services. You are assumed to have taken IS650 or equivalent, have an elementary knowledge of web technology, and have taken elementary object-oriented programming. A major focus of the course is on doing technical, hands-on labs. We learn XML basics and XML Web Services in this course. We also take an architectural look at Java server-side frameworks for web services. Prerequisite: IS 650.

IS 651M
LAN Management Using Microsoft Windows (Credits: 3)
A hands-on course using the latest version of the Microsoft Server which covers the design, building, management, security and technical issues involved in a local area network. Prerequisite: IS 651. Note: Only one lab is allowed for credit towards the Master's Degree.

IS 651U
LAN Management Using UNIX (Credits: 3)
A hands-on course taught in a computer classroom in Unix operating system management and networking. The design, building, management, security and technical issues involved in a local area network will be covered. Prerequisite: IS 651. Note: Only one lab is allowed for credit towards the Master's Degree.

IS 651W
Server-Side Web Systems (Credits: 3)
Server-side Systems covers advanced topics in Web-based application architectures. Example recent topics include: the semantic web, the asynchronous web, programming for web services, and web application frameworks. Prerequisite: IS 651.

IS 652
Internetworking (Credits: 3)
This course covers network routing and other topics in internetworking. This will be a project-oriented course that will consist of lectures and hands-on laboratory experience creating projects that simulate real-world networks. Prerequisite: IS 651.

IS 654
Survey of Telecommunications (Credits: 3)
This course examines the design and management issues in communications beyond the local area, including wide-area networks, high speed data transfer, integrated voice and data communications, distributed processing and internetworking. Prerequisite: IS 650.

IS 660
Health Care Informatics I (Credits: 3)
The focus of this course is on health care information systems. Examples of topics covered include: requirements and design, providers and payers, regulations, ecommerce, privacy and security, personnel and vendors, knowledge and diffusion.

IS 661
Health Care Informatics II (Credits: 3)
The focus of this course is on health care information systems. Examples of topics include E-commerce standards, government regulation of privacy and security, and cancer information systems. Prerequisite: IS 660.

IS 698
Special Topics in Information Systems (Credits: 3)
This course explores advanced topics in Information Systems that are not covered in other courses. Since the topics vary each semester, this course may be repeated for credit.

IS 700
Independent Study in Information Systems (Credits: 1 - 3)
This is a course in independent reading for masters students, and is supervised by a member of the Information Systems faculty. The purpose of this course is to give students the opportunity to study a topic of interest which is not available from the existing course offerings. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Note: A particular faculty member must agree in writing to supervise the proposed study before the student may register for this course. The approval of the Department is required before the student registers.

IS 705
Simulation and Visualization (Credits: 3)
In order to efficiently manage and operate many of the systems that pervade our lives, it is often necessary to apply simulation to study their performance when closed-form analytical solutions do not exist for such problems. This cource deals with discrete-event systems such as transportation networks, event scheduling, and pollution control systems. Topics will include modeling techniques (including information visualization and object-oriented modeling), random number generation, discrete-event simulation approaches, model validation and simulation software.

IS 706
Interfaces For Info. Visualization & Retrieval (Credits: 3)
Providing access to large amounts of information is an important function of information systems. This course discusses the design of user interfaces that allow users to search for, browse, and interact with information. Specifically, students will be introduced to human information-seeking behavior and its implications for user interfaces, including user interfaces for information retrieval systems and a wide variety of information visualization tools. Information retrieval systems enable users to search for and browse information. Information visualization is the application of computer-supported graphical tools to the presentation of large amounts of abstract information. Prerequisite: IS 629 or permission of the instructor.

IS 707
Applications of Intelligent Technologies (Credits: 3)
Intelligent technologies explore the fundamental roles and practical impacts of artificial intelligence and knowledge management in various paradigms. The purpose of this course is to offer students an in-depth understanding of concepts, methodologies, techniques, applications, and issues of a variety of intelligent technologies. The topics include, but are not limited to, intelligent agents, semantic Web, ontology, information retrieval and reasoning, social network analysis, and Web mining. Intelligent technologies will be discussed in the context of popular information system applications such as search engines, e-commerce, computer-mediated communication, and intelligent user interface. Prerequisite: Graduate student standing and permission of the instructor.

IS 708
Knowledge Management and Knowledge Organizations (Credits: 3)
Knowledge management is the process of creating value from an organization's intangible assets. It deals with how to best leverage knowledge internally within the organization, and externally to the customers. In this regard, the course will cover the major functions of knowledge management (e.g., creating, combining, securing, distributing, coordinating, and retrieving knowledge) and organizational learning. It will discuss techniques, concepts, technologies, and applications dealing with knowledge management and knowledge organizations. Building a supportive culture to encourage knowledge sharing is an integral part of knowledge management. This topic and others will also be discussed.

IS 720
Mobile Data Management (Credits: 3)
This course focuses on the impact of mobile computing on data management beyond the networking level, while at the same time provides a hands-on experience on the design and implementation of mobile applications for handheld devices. The course offers a technical understanding of the latest technologies in the field and an exploration of the research issues in mobile data management. Topics include, but are not limited to, mobile architectures, mobility and connectivity, data caching, concurrency control, replication, synchronization, location management, mobile DBMS, and user interfaces. Students will keep abreast of the latest research innovations in the field. In addition, they will create applications in Micro Java (J2ME) and the MIDP profile using record management libraries, user interface libraries, event-driven application launch, application security, and deployment.

IS 721
Semi-Structured Data Management (Credits: 3)
Database Management Systems (DBMS) have been dominated by relational systems (RDBMS) for over 30 years. Due to changes in hardware, bandwidth, and use case, systems are changing. Multiple processors, gigabit network speeds, and the Internet as a platform for distributed systems are changing the way computing gets done. RDBMS is not being superseded, but many so-called 'non-standard' system architectures are now being developed and deployed for specific application classes. We will look at a developing category of such systems sometimes referred to as 'NoSql' systems that are becoming important for semi-structured information in web applications. We will cover current systems from conceptual and practical standpoints. We will read papers on representative systems and do simple programming against the databases. Students should have taken a relational database class, a programming class, and be familiar with elementary web development with html and javascript. Prerequisite: IS 651.

IS 722
Systems and Information Integration (Credits: 3)
The integration of systems and the seamless exchange of information stored in them provides an answer to a very common problem when organizations merge and inherit information systems that are not compatible with each other. Data systems and information should easily interoperate for the success of the organization. This course investigates the various technologies in the field of information integration with an emphasis on semantic interoperation of systems. Topics that are covered include: Modeling Data Semantics, Semantic Interoperability, Metadata, Semantic Integration Patterns, Context-Awareness, Semantic Networks, Mediation and Wrapper techniques, Data Warehouses, Integration Servers, etc. Students will keep abreast of the latest technologies and research on data semantics, information integration, and also gain practical experience integrating information from disparate and heterogeneous systems. Prerequisite: IS 620.

IS 725
Planning and Forecasting (Credits: 3)
Planning for the future takes various forms in both private and government institutions. Necessary prerequisites to effective planning for the future are effective forecasting and decision making. This course will address issues involved with both long and short range planning that support basic organizational functions and strategies for generating more accurate forecasts, and the use of unbiased decision making and forecasts as essential inputs to planning. Prerequisite: STAT 351 or its equivalent and permission of the instructor.

IS 727
Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (Credits: 3)
This course will provide students with an introduction to the discipline of Computer-Supported Cooperative Work (CSCW). Groupware systems, ranging from two people to enterprise-level, are exceedingly complex due to the interplay between social dynamics and distributed computing. This course will engage students with contemporary research and industry best practices in the design, development, and evaluation of collaborative information systems.

IS 728
Online Communities (Credits: 3)
Social interaction via the Internet is becoming increasingly important. People are gathering in online communities of interest and communities of practice to discuss health, hobbies, games, education, politics and professional issues. In this class students will analyze the technology and social support needed to make these social interactions successful; they will discuss and debate current research in this field and either develop an online community or carry out a small research project.

IS 730
Decision Sciences (Credits: 3)
The study of decision making has become extremely important as goods and services available in the market have grown exponentialy in variety and complexity, and transportation and communication advances have connected national and international economies. This course will introduce methodologies for effective decision making. Topics will include decision analysis, decision trees, utility and value theory, cost benefit analysis, decision making under uncertainty, risk perception and assessment, and multiple-criteria decision making, math programming, network models, operations management.

IS 731
Electronic Commerce (Credits: 3)
This course will analyze how organizations are using electronic commerce to streamline operations, reach customers, and increase profitability. The technologies involved in electronic commerce will be examined. The organizational, behavioral, social, legal, security, and international aspects of EC will be discussed. The primary emphasis will be on Web based technologies and issues. This course will reflect the most current research and application.

IS 732
Decision Systems Integration (Credits: 3)
A detailed examination of the strategies, methodologies, systems, and issues involved in providing comprehensive and integrated decision making support. The motivation for system integration, integration strategies, integrated systems, including executive support systems, intelligent decision support systems, whole-brained decision support systems, management support systems, and decision technology systems, integrated system architectures, intelligent agents, object-oriented methodologies, and other design and development tools, the virtual team and the virtual organization. Prerequisite: IS 603 or any DSS course.

IS 733
Data Warehousing and Data Mining (Credits: 3)
The purpose of this course is to provide a comprehensive discussion on using organizational databases to enable decision support through warehousing and mining of data. THis course will provide an in depth understanding of the technical, business, and research issues in each of these two areas. Issues in data warehousing include designing multi-dimensional data model, cleansing and loading of data, determing refresh cycles and methods, administrative aspects of running a data warehouse including efficient data retrieval using bitmap and join indexes, reporting, ad hoc querying, and multi-dimensional operations such as slicing, dicing, pivoting, drill-down, and roll-up operations. Areas with data mining will include justifying the need for knowledge recovery in databases, data mining methods such as clustering, classification, Bayesian networks, association rules, and visualization. New areas of research and development in data mining warehousing will also be discussed. Prerequisite: IS 620.

IS 755
Advanced Artificial Intelligence (Credits: 3)
This course introduced advanced AI techniques. In particular, we will be focusing on machine learning based techniques such as neural networks, genetic algorithms, evolutionary programming, and intelligent agents. We will be discussing various neural network architectures, the effective design and use of a neural net topology for various domains, and the testing and validation of neural networks. In the domain of genetic algorithms, the course will explore the use of genetic algorithms for search and optimization, and classifier systems for learning. Finally, this course will discuss fuzzy logic, evolutionary programming, hybrid systems, and intelligent agents in a more conceptual manner. Prerequisite: IS 707.

IS 764
Advanced Systems Design (Credits: 3)
This course is an advanced study of structured systems development. Emphasis on strategies and techniques of structured analysis and structured design for producing logical methodologies for dealing with complexity in the development of information systems.

IS 765
Project Management (Credits: 3)
This course covers the manner in which a system project is planned, scheduled and controlled during the project's life. The use of project management techniques such as PERT (Project Evaluation and Review Technique) and Gantt charts will be examined in depth as will be other techniques of planning, scheduling and controlling projects. Prerequisite: IS 601.

IS 799
Master's Thesis Research (Credits: 1 - 6)

IS 800
Special Topics in Information Systems (Credits: 3)
This course explores advanced topics in Information Systems that are not covered in other courses. Since the topics vary each semester, this course may be repeated for credit.

IS 801
Independent Study in Information Systems (Credits: 3)
This is a course in independent reading for doctoral students, and is supervised by a member of the Information Systems faculty. The purpose of this course is to give students the opportunity to study a topic of interest which is not available from the existing course offerings. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor. Note: A particular faculty member must agree in writing to supervise the proposed study before the student may register for this course. The approval of the Department is required before the student registers.

IS 804
Advanced Experimental Design Methodology (Credits: 3)
This course has the objective of acquainting the advanced student of information systems with the experimental methods and procedures required to undertake original research and to evaluate the growing scientific literature in this field of study. The course will include decision-based concepts and rules from evaluative issues pertaining to the use of information systems. Particular emphasis will be directed toward experimental designs appropriate for small and large-N research projects that compare alternative information systems as they affect the user of such systems under both laboratory and field conditions.

IS 805
Advanced Field Research Methods (Credits: 3)
This course trains the advanced student of Information Systems in the research methodologies required to successfully undertake original field research and to evaluate the growing scientific literature based on this approach. The course will engage the interpretivist paradigm and the qualitative research traditions within IS. Specifically, it will address the research design theory (e.g. Grounded Theory), data collection techniques (e.g. observation, interviewing, focus groups, surveys), analysis methods (e.g. coding for content and protocol), and reporting frameworks (e.g. case study, ethnography). This material is concretized via student-designed research projects. Additionally, contemporary IS field research will be critiqued, training students in publishing their own field research in this discipline. IS 899 Doctoral Dissertation Research (Credits: 1 - 6)

Information Systems Courses (Online)

IS 607
Introduction to Information Systems (4 credits)
IS 607 will give you a hands-on introduction to the major basic technologies used in the field of Information Systems. These technologies are: Networking and data communications, programming, databases, HTML, JavaScript and server-side processing. This course will require you to develop web pages and sites. This course uses only client-side technology that requires a web browser. You will also have to FTP files up to servers at UMBC. All details of this process are included in the course materials. Some lectures include movies that require QuickTime or an open source equivalent. As of Spring 2009, IS 607 is the equivalent to IS 605 and IS 606.

IS 631
Management Information Systems (3 credits)
This course presents the applications of information systems in business processes and operations, in managerial decision-making, and in the strategic planning of organizations. The course covers information systems management fundamentals to include such factors as:

  • The information environment,
  • Decision-making,
  • The systems approach,
  • The management of information systems, and
  • The integration of information systems with an organization's management systems.
CO-requisite: IS 607.

IS 632
Networks (3 credits)
This course provides the fundamentals of network technologies, such as public-switched network, wide area networks, and local area networks, from the perspective of the current and future needs. The course also covers network architectures, networking standards, digital and analog signaling, the various transmission media, as well as equipment, applications, and services.

IS 633
Database Management Systems (3 credits)
The course covers most of the major advancements in database technology that have taken place recently. It does not assume any prior background in the field of databases, and hence starts with basic introductory concepts along with more advanced topics. The course will cover both conceptual and hands-on material in the area of database management, thus enabling student to have the maximum amount of comprehension and retention of the material covered in the course. Pre-requisite: IS 607.

IS 634
Structured Systems Analysis & Design (3 credits)
All of the activities required to progress from the initial identification of an organizational problem to the design of an IT-based solution are covered, as well as specific techniques for carrying out those activities. The emphasis will be on both learning the mechanics of the techniques and applying them to real projects. CO-requisite: IS 607.

IS 667
Interaction Design (3 credits)
The course starts by discussing fundamental psychological concepts needed to understand how humans interact with computer systems and how those systems can be better designed to support that interaction. Design and evaluation methods are presented to achieving this goal. This module builds on earlier courses, particularly Systems Analysis and Design (IS634), but adds much more material about how to design for human interaction. These concepts are important for any information system in which human interaction is required. Students must successfully complete IS 634 prior to enrolling for this course.

IS 668
Enterprise-Wide Computing (3 credits)
The emphasis of this course is on distributed computing architectures and web services. You are assumed to have taken IS 632, have an elementary knowledge of server-side and client-side web technology, and have taken elementary programming. A major focus of the course is on doing technical, hands-on exercises and so one should enjoy that type of learning.

IS 669
Project Management Operations (3 credits)
This course is designed to give students both practical and academic insights into modern practices in the area of information systems project management. A general introduction to project management is followed by readings and exercises for topics that include:

  • Integration and scope management,
  • Time/cost/quality management, and
  • Human resource and risk management.
  • The traditional management aspects of initiating, panning, executing and controlling will also be examined.
The course will conclude with discussions involving what is involved in closing a project. Students must successfully complete IS 631, and IS 634 prior to enrolling for this course.

IS 670
Health Informatics (3 credits)
The health care industry in the United States consumes about 20% of the Gross National Product, touches everyone, and is information intensive. Information systems have spread slowly from the billing room to the examination room, but the pace of change is accelerating. Successful information systems applications must be managed by people knowledgeable in the issues relevant to both health care and information systems. This course examines those special issues and covers: Requirements and Design Providers and Payers Fraud Transactions Standards Privacy Security Personnel and Vendors Integration. Students must successfully complete IS 631 prior to enrolling for this course.

IS 671
Electronic Commerce (3 credits)
This course will analyze how organizations are using electronic commerce to streamline operations, reach customers, and increase profitability. The technologies involved in electronic commerce will be examined. The organizational, behavioral, social, legal, security, and international aspects of EC will be discussed. The primary emphasis will be on Web based technologies and issues. This course will reflect the most current research and application. The course will mainly focus on e-commerce from a B2B and CRM point of view. Students must successfully complete IS 634 prior to enrolling for this course.

IS 672
Computer and Network Security (3 credits)
This course surveys threats to computer and network security and methods for preventing incursions at a graduate level. We study how vulnerabilities to these threats arise in the development and use of computer systems and survey the controls that can reduce or block these threats. The course will consist of weekly readings, homework questions, and hands-on labs. Students must successfully complete IS 632 prior to enrolling for this course.

IS 673
Readings in Human-Centered Computing Research (3 credits)
This course examines and analyses cognitive and software concepts that underlie human-centered computing. The concepts include cognitive theories of memory organization, problem solving strategies, and linguistic comprehension. Interaction software technologies that are examined include menu selection systems, command languages, and direct manipulation techniques. This course is intended to introduce the student to the current literature and to prepare the student to prepare the student for conducting independent research and for designing appropriate interaction software.

IS 674
Information Architecture for the Web (3 credits)
As the web matures, so do users' expectations about what a site should do. In addition to a pleasing design and working links, they also want sites that are clearly organized, relevant, accurate, up-to-date, and have interesting and easy-to-find content. This course will focus on the principles and practices of the user-centered information architecture design of websites that address these needs. We will study the creation and organization of web content that meets the information needs of end-users and serves the intentions or purposes of a site's sponsors or creators. We will learn about the basic principles of writing and labeling web content and the usable design of websites. We will also learn about users' web browsing and searching behavior and the design of search and navigation systems to support this behavior. We will explore options to set up search within sites and optimizing the findability of a site through search engines. This course, however, is NOT a web graphics design, HTML or Web programming class, we will not build a website. Students will be researching the content and context of websites and the needs of users and sponsors. They will develop the purpose and strategy for a specific site of their choosing. They will design the information organization and labeling systems and develop the navigation system of the website. They will design page layouts and create content for the selected website. The will achieve these goals by planning and creating information architecture deliverables for the site prototype that facilitates consensus building among stakeholders and guides a designer or programmer in the production of a working web site. Students will also analyze the information architecture, navigation structure, audience awareness and usability of good and bad web sites.

IS 675
Introduction to Data Mining (3 credits)
This course is designed to provide an introduction to data mining concepts and techniques. The course will include both theoretical foundations of commonly used data mining methods as well as hands-on exercises using data mining tools. Topics will include techniques such as association rules, classification, and clustering. Various algorithms on each of these techniques will be covered in the course. Examples of such algorithms include the apriori algorithm for association rules; Bayesian classifiers, networks, and decision trees for classification; and k-means, its variants, and hierarchical algorithms for clustering. Several real-life applications will be discussed for each of these techniques. The course will include regular class discussions based on the materials from a textbook, quizzes and assignments, and one examination. Students must successfully complete IS 633 or an equivalent prior to enrolling in this course.

IS 701
Independent Study for IFSU (3 credits)
This is a course in independent reading for masterís students, and is supervised by a member of the Information Systems faculty. The purpose of this course is to give students the opportunity to study a topic of interest which is not available from the existing course offerings. Prerequisite: Consent of the instructor.