DEPARTMENT OF PHILOSOPHY




Contact Us
UMBC Department of Philosophy
Fine Arts Bldg. Room 539
1000 Hilltop Cir.
Baltimore, MD 21250
Department Chair: Dr. Steve Yalowitz (yalowitz@umbc.edu)
Contact the Department at  410-455-2103 (fax 410-455-1070)
Dr. Yalowitz received his B.A.in Philosophy and in Intellectual History at Oberlin College, and his M.Phil and Ph.D. in Philosophy at Columbia University. His research interests are primarily in Philosophy of Mind, in particular on issues concerning the nature and status of psychological explanation in relation to the harder natural sciences. Dr.Yalowitz has been focusing on the topics of free action, free will, responsibility, rationality and irrationality, and has long standing interests in self-understanding, first-person authority, rule-following skepticism and mental causation. His advanced courses rotate through and explore theses various interests. He has published on these topics in Philosophical Studies, Philosophy and Phenomenological Research, The Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy, and other places.
Dr. Steve Yalowitz
Associate Professor
& Department Chair
(yalowitz@umbc.edu)
Fine Arts 537
410-455-2108

Dr. Pfeifer received a B.A. in Philosophy and Government at Wesleyan University and in 1999 completed her Ph.D. in Philosophy/Science Studies at the University of California, San Diego. The primary focus of her research has been on the nature of modal notions, and in particular the natural necessity involved in lawful relations. She has also done related work on the nature of properties, the distinction between natural and artificial kinds, and John Stuart Mill's views about natural laws and experimentation. More recently she has focused on questions in the philosophy of biology, such as the use of information theory in various biological contexts and the use of probability in the theory of natural selection. Dr. Pfeifer is co-editor (along with Sahotra Sarkar) of the two volume Philosophy of Science: An Encyclopedia (forthcoming). She has also been a Visiting Fellow and is currently an Associate Fellow at the Pittsburgh Center for Philosophy of Science.
Jessica Pfeifer
Associate Professor
(pfeifer@umbc.edu)
Fine Arts 540
410-455-2014





Stephen E. Braude is Emeritus Professor of Philosophy Department at the University of Maryland Baltimore County. He is Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Scientific Exploration.

He studied Philosophy and English at Oberlin College and the University of London, and in 1971 he received his Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst.

Andrew Bridges
Adjunct Faculty
(Andrew.Bridges@umbc.edu)
Fine Arts 522
410-455-3282
Stephen E.Braude
Emeritus Professor
(braude@umbc.edu)



John M. Titchener is Emeritus Associate Professor of Philosophy Department at the University of Maryland Baltimore County.
John M.Titchener
Emeritus Associate Professor
(titchene@umbc.edu)

Evelyn Masi Barker (1927-2003) received her B.A. from Wheaton College and her Ph.D. in Philosophy from Harvard University.

Dr. Barker was the charter member of the Department of Philosophy and a founding member of the UMBC faculty.
Evelyn Masi Barker
Emerita Associate Professor


The Philosophy Department Administrative Assistant, Nafi, can answer many of the questions you may have about the Philosophy Department or the courses being offered at any time. She can also put you in touch with other faculty members, with whom you may wish to speak further.
Nafi Mirahmadian Shahegh
Administrative Assistant
(shahegh@umbc.edu)
Fine Arts 539
410-455-2103

Mike Nance received his B.A. in Philosophy and German at Hendrix College (2004), and his Ph.D. in Philosophy from the University of Pennsylvania (2011).
He focuses on the German philosophical tradition, especially Kant and German Idealism, as well as issues in social and political philosophy. Recently he has
written about recognition and the nature of the person in Fichte and Hegel. His article, "Recognition, Freedom, and the Self in Fichte's Foundations of Natural Right"
is forthcoming in the European Journal of Philosophy. More information about Dr. Nance's research can be found at: Nance
Michael Nance
Assistant Professor
(nance@umbc.edu)
Fine Arts 542
410-455-2005
Dr. Schwab received a B.A. in Philosophy from Cornell University (2005), a BPhil in Philosophy from Oxford University (2007), and a Ph.D. in Philosophy from Princeton University (2013). His research interests lie mainly in ancient Greek and Roman philosophy, particularly in ancient epistemology, metaphysics, and ethics. He is currently working on various issues related to the distinction between ignorance, opinion, knowledge, and understanding, the nature of explanation, skepticism, the origin of the concept of knowledge, and the nature of akrasia (lack of self-control). His paper, "Skepticism, Belief, and the Criterion of Truth" is forthcoming in Apeiron: A Journal for Ancient Philosophy and Science .
Whitney Schwab
Assistant Professor
(wschwab@umbc.edu)
Fine Arts 526
410-455-2155
I have a dual appointment in Philosophy and Computer Science/Electrical Engineering. My primary interest is in applied ethics, including Engineering Ethics and Computer Science Ethics, as well as traditional topics such as Business, Medical and Environmental Ethics. I have also worked in the area of Police Ethics. Most recently, I have developed the required ethics courses for both Engineering and Computer Science majors at UMBC and, along with a lawyer, a graduate Engineering Management Law and Ethics class. I continue to be interested in 20th century French and German Philosophy and have a strong background in the History of Philosophy in general, and a life long interest in German Idealism, specifically in the Philosophy of Immanuel Kant. According to my view, all of these concerns should move each of us to strive to change the world into a better place for all of us every day of our lives. I believe that a philosophical outlook is crucial to the success of this project.

Book Publications: Logic: Deductive, Inductive and Informal Analysis; Logic, Values and Ethical Analysis; Business Ethics and Contemporary Issues; Forthcoming: Engineering and Information Technology Ethics and Computer Science Ethics.
Richard Wilson
Instructor
(rwilso4@umbc.edu)
Fine Arts 521
410-455-3843
Mr. Ealick received his B.A. in Philosophy from UMBC. He received a Master's from The William Rice Institute for his work on the metaphysics of formal rationality theory. He currently is completing his Ph.D. at College Park, where his research involves implications evolutionary theory has for the philosophy of mind.
Greg Ealick
Adjunct Faculty
(ealick@umbc.edu)
Fine Arts 525
410-455-2010
James Thomas
Adjunct Faculty
(jathomas@umbc.edu)
Fine Arts 521
410-455-3843
Jim Thomas has been teaching at UMBC for a number of years. His interests include Philosophy of Humor, Philosophy of Biology, Philosophy of Mind, and Metaphysics.
Elizabeth Picciuto received a BA from Columbia University in film studies, an MA in cinema studies from NYU Tisch School of the Arts, and a PhD in philosophy from the University of Maryland, College Park in 2013. Her areas of specialization are empirically-informed philosophy of mind and aesthetics, with a particular focus on imagination and supposition, creativity, fiction, and the emotions. Areas of teaching competence include philosophy of disability, applied ethics, and ethical theory.
Andrew Bridges received a B.A. in Philosophy from UMBC in 2002, and a Masters in Applied and Professional Ethics from UMBC in 2004. His primary interest has been biomedical ethics, particularly end-of-life issues, but he has also done work in the field of journalistic ethics. He has written and presented specifically on the ethical implications of embedded reporters. Other interests include philosophy of mind and early existentialism. He currently teaches Critical Thinking.
Elizabeth Picciuto
Adjunct Faculty
(epicci@umbc.edu)
Fine Arts 540
410-455-2025