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SMOKING STATUS, DIETARY CONSUMPTION, AND STAGES OF CHANGE FOR DIETARY BEHAVIORS AMONG WIC WOMEN.

Janine C. Delahanty, M.A.*, Carlo C. DiClemente, Ph.D, University of Maryland, Baltimore County;

Stephen Havas, M.D, Patricia Langenberg, Ph.D.,University of Maryland, Baltimore

Corresponding Author:
Janine Delahanty*
Psychology Department
UMBC
1000 Hilltop Circle
Baltimore, MD 21250
delahan1@umbc.edu

This study examined dietary behaviors and attitudes in relation to smoking status among women (n=2,043) enrolled in the Maryland WIC Food For Life (FFL) Program. This study assessed dietary behaviors and stage of change for eating a low fat diet, a high fiber diet, and 5 or more servings of fruits and vegetables daily (Havas et al., 2003).  Participants identified their smoking status: Never (NS), Current (CS) or Former (FS).   Compared to FS and NS, CS were significantly more likely to be single, receive food stamps, have lower incomes and less education.  As expected, CS (M = 27.3, SD = 6.8) had significantly lower body mass indices (BMI) than FS (M = 28.9, SD = 7.5) and NS (M = 29.3, SD = 7.4). Relative to CS, FS and NS reported consuming significantly less total fat and lower percentages of calories from fat and sweets.  FS and NS were more likely to be eating more fruits and vegetables (p < .001), low fat diets (p < .001) and diets high in fiber (p < .001) and were in later stages of change for these dietary behaviors relative to CS.   Although FS have been thought to substitute high calorie foods and problematic diets for their smoking habit, current findings suggest that FS are similar to NS and in some cases more involved in changing dietary behaviors.  Greater attention should be paid to the relation between smoking cessation and changes in dietary behaviors.

 

This study was supported by NCI grant # R01 CA59725-06