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Team Members

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Top Row: Emily Foxen-Craft; Daniel Knoblach; Taylor Berens; Michele Crisafulli; Carlo DiClemente; Katie Wright; Lior Miller; Angela Petersen Bottom Row: Meagan Graydon; Cate Corno; Shayla ThrashDivider

Director

Carlo C. DiClemente, Ph.D.

CarloDiclemente

Carlo DiClemente completed his doctorate in clinical psychology at the University of Rhode Island in 1978. He joined the faculty at UMBC as Professor of Psychology and Department Chair in 1995 after several years as an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology at the University of Houston and at the University of Texas Medical School and the Texas Research Institute of Mental Sciences. Dr. DiClemente's research examines the stages of the process of human intentional behavior change particularly as related to health and addictive behaviors. He is the co-developer of the Transtheoretical Model of change which has been used by researchers in the areas of cancer prevention, HIV risk reduction, dietary change, exercise, occupational safety, and rehabilitation of health and addictive behaviors. He has co-authored several books, The Transtheoretical Model and Changing for Good as well as numerous articles and book chapters. Dr. DiClemente serves as a consultant to a number of institutions and research projects and has an active grant funded program of research in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Maryland at Baltimore and at University of Maryland College Park, University of Texas Health Sciences Center, University of Houston and other institutions.

E-mail: diclemen@umbc.edu More details...

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Associate Director of MDQuit

Janine Delahanty, Ph.D.

Janine Delahanty is a Research Scientist.  Dr. Delahanty is the Associate Director of the Maryland Quitting Use and Initiation of Tobacco (MDQuit) Resource Center (visit www.mdquit.org for more information) and is also the Program Evaluator of a 5 year SAMHSA / CSAT medical residency training grant for Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment.  She graduated in May of 2005 with a degree in Human Services Psychology (Behavioral Medicine Track) from UMBC.  Her interests include: substance use prevention and cessation, with an emphasis on smoking and other illicit drug use among adolescents.

E-mail: delahan1@umbc.eduDivider

Graduate Students

Taylor Berens, M.A.

Taylor is a third year graduate student in the in the Clinical/Behavioral Medicine track of the Human Services Psychology program at UMBC. She received her B.S. in Psychology and Spanish from Virginia Tech in 2010, where she conducted research on the efficacy of personalized normative interventions in reducing alcohol use among heavy-drinking college students. She then worked at Virginia Commonwealth University's School of Medicine in the Office of Assessment and Evaluation Studies, where she was involved in research and program evaluation in the medical school. At UMBC, Taylor is interested in how various biopsychosocial factors and processes influence health behavior change, particularly risky alcohol use. Her master's thesis research concerned the interactive roles of self-efficacy and behavioral change processes in predicting drinking behaviors after alcohol treatment. She works on the MD3 (Maryland MDs Making a Difference) project, where she has been particularly involved in the development and implementation of a coding tool to evaluate the fidelity of the SBIRT protocol.

E-mail: tberens1@umbc.edu

Catherine Corno, B.A.

Cate is a second year graduate student in the Clinical/Community-Applied Social Psychology track of the Human Services Psychology doctoral program at UMBC. She received her B.A. in Psychology from Georgetown University in 2008, where she conducted research on Alzheimer’s disease and the coping process of those caring for Alzheimer’s sufferers. She then worked at Brown University’s Center for Alcohol and Addiction Studies (CAAS) on brief motivational interventions for non-college attending young adults’ heavy alcohol use and adults’ heavy alcohol use and related sexual risk behaviors. Currently, Cate works as a graduate assistant for the No Wrong Door project as part of the Center for Community Collaboration (CCC) and as a center specialist for the MDQuit Resource Center for Quitting Use and Initiation of Tobacco (MDQuit). She is interested in studying the processes of change for heavy substance use and related risk behaviors (in particular, sexual risk) among at-risk community samples.

E-mail: ccorno1@umbc.edu

Michele Crisafulli, M.A.

Michele is a third year graduate student in the Clinical Psychology/Community and Applied Social Psychology track of the Human Services Psychology doctoral program at UMBC. She received a Bachelor's degree in psychology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in 2007 and a Master's degree in psychology from Boston University in 2008. While at UNC and BU, Michele studied eating disorders, with a particular emphasis on understanding the stigma associated with them. From 2009 to 2011, Michele worked as a research assistant in the Division of Alcohol and Drug Abuse at McLean Hospital. Currently, Michele works as a graduate assistant for the Prevention Research Institute. She is especially interested in the prevention of substance abuse, as well as the stigma associated with it.

E-mail: mcris1@umbc.edu

Michael Earley, M.Ed.

Michael, a sixth year graduate student at UMBC, is currently completing his internship at the American Lake Veterans Affairs Hospital in Tacoma, WA. After completing his B.A. in 2000 and his M.Ed. in 2002, Michael returned to graduate school after five years of high school teaching and three years of work in addiction, anxiety, and mood disorder research. Michael's research is broadly focused on better understanding the role that empathic attentive listening plays in psychotherapy, and more specifically on how improved listening skills may increase the efficacy of motivational interviewing and other empirically supported treatments.

E-mail: earley1@umbc.edu

Meagan Graydon, B.A.

Meagan is a second year graduate student in the Clinical/Behavioral Medicine track of the Human Services Psychology doctoral program at UMBC. She received her B.A. in Psychology from the University of Virginia in 2010 where she worked at the Center for Addiction Research and Education investigating the pharmaceutical interventions on cravings for both alcohol and cocaine users. In the two years before graduate school she worked at the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center conducting triage assessments for behavioral health services in an integrated primary care mental health setting. At UMBC she is interested in interventions for substance use and co-occurring disorders, particularly PTSD. Meagan is currently working on the No Wrong Door project as part of the Center for Community Collaboration (CCC) and a resource center specialist at the Maryland Resource Center for Quitting Use & Initiation of Tobacco (MDQuit).

E-mail: mgraydo1@umbc.edu

Preston Greene, M.A.

Preston is a currently a psychology intern at the VA San Diego Healthcare System. He received his B.S. in Psychology from Virginia Commonwealth University in 2005. His Master's thesis utilized Latent Growth Modeling (LGM) to examine within treatment changes in drinking, self-efficacy, and use of the processes of change using Project MATCH data. Preston's dissertation research, titled "How and When Implicit Attitudes About Smoking Affect Decision Making in the Personal Process of Smoking Cessation," integrates implicit cognition and behavioral economics perspectives on substance use with the personal change process of the Transtheoretical Model.

E-mail: greenep1@umbc.edu

Daniel Knoblach, M.A.

Dan is a first year graduate student in the Clinical/Behavioral Medicine track of the Human Services Psychology doctoral program at UMBC. For the past six years Dan worked on a team at Treatment Research Institute in Philadelphia aiming to improve the translation of evidence based practices in community behavioral health centers by developing curricula focused on CBT skill development, 12-step facilitation, and better matching of client needs to community services. While at UMBC, Dan hopes to continue research focused on implementation science and the role positive, strength-based activities play in long-term recovery. Prior to joining TRI in 2007, Dan has held teaching and clinical positions in Minnesota and Massachusetts. Dan received his B.A. in Natural Science at Saint John’s University in Collegeville, MN, his M.A. in Counseling Psychology at the University of Minnesota, and continues to be a die-hard Minnesota Twins fan.

E-mail: kdan11@umbc.edu

Lior Miller, MSc.

Lior is a first year graduate student in Clinical Psychology within the Human Services Psychology doctoral program at UMBC. She received a Bachelor’s degree in psychology from McGill University, and a Master’s of Science degree from the London School of Economics in Health, Community, and Development. Prior to starting her studies at UMBC, she worked as a Country Officer for the Elizabeth Glaser Pediatric AIDS Foundation in Los Angeles, California, managing prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and HIV care and treatment programs in Cameroon and Rwanda. Currently, Lior works as a teaching assistant. Lior is particularly interested in the social determinants of mental health and substance abuse, the development of Screening, Brief Intervention, Referral and Treatment tools, and service integration.

E-mail: lior1@umbc.edu

Angela Petersen, M.A.

Angela is a fifth year graduate student in the Clinical/Behavioral Medicine track of the Human Services Psychology program at UMBC. She received a B.A. in Psychology from the University of Montana in 2007 where she participated in research focused on etiology of substance use disorders, substance abuse in sexual minority groups, and co-occurring disorders. She is currently working as a resource center specialist at the Maryland Resource Center for Quitting Use & Initiation of Tobacco (MDQuit). Angela is interested in extending our understanding of how TTM constructs, psychological distress, and smoking are related in populations with co-occurring disorders. She is also interested in how treatment variables such as the therapeutic alliance affect treatment outcomes for behavioral health populations.

E-mail: angel13@umbc.edu

Shayla Thrash, M.A.

Shayla is a fourth year graduate student in the in the Clinical/Behavioral Medicine track of the Human Services Psychology program at UMBC. She received her B.S. in Psychology from Michigan State University in 2010, where she conducted research on motivation to change health behaviors among college students (specifically, smoking cessation and dietary change). Shayla is interested in studying health behavior change as it pertains to addictive behaviors, obesity, and eating disorders.

Email: sthrash1@umbc.edu

Katherine Wright, M.A.

Katie is a sixth year graduate student in the Clinical/Behavioral Medicine track of the Human Services Psychology program at UMBC. She received her B.A. in Neuroscience from Middlebury College in 2004. In the four years before graduate school, she studied the neural correlates of learning, memory, and emotion in animal models at a neuropsychology lab in the NIMH and later, worked in schizophrenia and addiction research, coordinating collaborative projects between the Maryland Psychiatric Research Center and NIDA. Now she works as a graduate research assistant on the Maryland M.D.s Making a Difference (MD3) project. Her master's thesis research concerned the roles of self-efficacy and impulsivity in the prediction of drinking outcomes following treatment for alcohol dependence. Her dissertation research involves examining and updating a scale measuring the Processes of Change for smoking to reflect the changes that the landscape of tobacco use has undergone in the 25 - 30 years since the measure's initial development.

E-mail: wright6@umbc.edu 

For information about HABITS Dissertations and Theses, please click here.