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Learn how to make a difference - make this summer count!


Courses in Culture & Social Justice help us to understand and analyze structural inequalities while challenging us to envision and actively pursue a more just and better future.  This summer, explore a variety of timely courses that focus on the theme of culture and social justice. They offer a view of social issues and practices from various perspectives, including the intersectional analysis of race, class, and gender.

Courses by Subject

Africana Studies (AFST)

AFST 100: Introduction to the Black Experience

AFST 100 surveys the historical and sociocultural ties that link people of African descent worldwide and explores African roots in world civilizations. Learn about the black experience in the African Diaspora, with particular attention to North America, the United States, Maryland and specifically, Baltimore.

Students will have the opportunity to visit the National Great Blacks in Wax Museum, the Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African American History & Culture, and/or the Frederick Douglass-Isaac Myers Maritime Park Museum. Museum visits are for Extra Credit enrichment on the student's own time. The majority of the regular work will either be in class or online.

Note: The course will meet in person on Wednesdays, May 31, June 7, July 12, July 19, Aug 2 and Aug 16. The online sessions will be held on June 14, 21, 28, July 26 and Aug 9.

12W1 – HYBRID Wed 6-9:10 pm
GEP - AH
Karen Sutton

Register

AFST 213: AFRICA: Culture and Development

A general introduction to Africa’s culture and development using an interdisciplinary approach. It surveys African peoples and their cultures, languages, societies, and development. AFAST 213/MLL 210 emphasizes the interrelationship between Africa’s diverse geographical features, sociocultural practices and norms, languages, and its development. It presents an opportunity to examine the various forms of cultural and creative practices in contemporary Africa and how they have influenced socioeconomic and political transformation and development of the continent. Issues related to African environment, family and marriage, social organization, language, religion, political economy, as well as gender relations and how they have been shaped by internal and external forces/factors are discussed.

Note: In-class instruction: Mon/Wed/Fri week 1, 3; Monday in week 4. Online instruction: Mon/Wed/Fri week 2 and Wed/Fri in week 4.

4W1 – HYBRID Mon/Wed/Fri 9-12:10 pm
GEP – AH
Gloria Chuku

Register

AFST 245: Introduction to Black Music

AFST 245 surveys the traditional music of Africans and delineates elements utilized in Black music of the western hemisphere. The course outlines the musical heterogeneity of Africans and allows students to gain greater understanding of African music and culture, its impact on the development of Black music in the Americas, and its influence on international trends in music. In this way, the humanist impulse at the center of African people's musical propensity will be revealed, and students' awareness will broaden and deepen in regards to the many genres, contexts, functions, and meanings of traditional African music.

6W2 – Tues/Thur 1–4:10 pm
GEP – AH
Kwame Ansah-Brew

Register

AFST 347: Gender, Race, and Media

This course critically examines how ideologies of gender, race, class, ethnicity and sexuality are produced and disseminated in a range of media genres and forms such as film, television, music, advertising, news, visual and performing arts, the Internet, radio, and print media. As consumers and producers of media, students will learn to assess how media articulates, creates, and enforces identities and power. Students will practice tools of critical reading and thinking, such as textual analysis, visual discourse analysis, and the basics of media literacy. Recommended Preparation: GWST 100 and (200 or 210).

6W1 – HYBRID Tues 1–4:10 pm
GEP - AH and C
Kathryn Kein

Register

AFST 370: Black Women in Cross-Cultural Perspective

A comparative examination of racialized gendered violence. Specifically, we will examine how violence personally and systemically impacts Black women’s lives. The use of the term “Black” is meant to be inclusive of a global Blackness, not just American concepts. To this point, Black women suffer violence at unprecedented rates in comparison to their white counterparts. The instances of violence are varied and are physical and psychological. We will explore the multiple ways that Black women encounter/suffer violence through the criminal justice system, educationally, economically, and culturally. We will also explore the varied representations of Black women as the perpetrators of violence and analyze the notion of whether or not women can achieve empowerment by use of violence.

Note: The first two weeks will be online; the last two weeks will meet in person.

4W2 – HYBRID Tues/Thur/Fri 9–12:10 pm
GEP - C
Tammy Sanders Henderson

Register

American Studies (AMST)

AMST 210: Intro to Critical Sexuality Studies

An introduction to the field of critical sexuality studies. Using an interdisciplinary approach, the course conducts a critical inquiry into the historical precedents and theoretical frameworks necessary to understand the role of sexuality in shaping personal, social, economic, and political life. It focuses on patterns of subordination and exclusion based on individuals’ sexual practices and identities, explains the origins and persistence of those patterns, and considers ways of challenging them. Throughout the course, special attention will be given to intersections of sexuality with gender, race, ethnicity, religion, class, and disability.

6W1 – HYBRID Wed 1–4:10 pm
GEP - C
GEP - SS
Kate Drabinsky

Register

AMST 310: Gender and Inequality

Explore core concepts in gender studies and histories of inequality through a series of case studies rooted in issues facing Baltimore City: housing and city development; labor, immigration, and incarceration; and LGBT neighborhood cities. You’ll learn about these current issues through applied experiences in the city while examining the ways in which gender roles and gender relations are constructed and experienced in American society. Special attention is paid to the ways in which gender-based experiences are divided by other social relations, particularly those of class, race and age. Recommended preparation: One lower-level social sciences or humanities course focused on American society or culture.

6W1 – HYBRID Mon 1-4:10 pm
Lion Brothers Bldg
GEP - AH
Kate Drabinski

Register

AMST 325: Studies in Popular Culture

The interplay of the popular arts and American society, using American studies interdisciplinary methodologies. Emphasis will be placed on the modern era from the 1890s to the present, with greatest weight placed upon mass and popular culture of the last quarter of this century. Recommended Preparation: One lower-level social sciences or humanities course focused on American society or culture.

6W1 – SHADY GROVE/HYBRID Tues 1–4:10 pm
GEP - AH
GEP - AH
Dabrina Taylor

Register

AMST 352: American Culture in a Global Perspective: War and Terrorism in American Popular Culture

How are war and terrorism reimagined and imbricated into popular culture? What are the effects of aestheticizing violence? This course will examine the proliferation of artistic forms that seek to address the issue of war and the attendant concern about terrorism in America by looking at both historical and contemporary conflicts and their impact on texts including literature, film, television, media, video, and music.

6W2 – Mon/Wed 9–12:10 pm
GEP – AH or C
Ellen Gorman

Register

Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 211: Cultural Anthropology

An introduction to the central concepts and issues in cultural anthropology. The course employs a worldwide comparative perspective that examines topics such as: the concept of culture, cultural-ecological systems and family organization; magic, religion and witchcraft; socialization, personality and mental illness; conflict resolution and warfare.

6W2 – Tues/Thur 6–9:10 pm
GEP - C
GEP - SS
Bambi Chapin

Register

ANTH 326: American Indian Cultures

Drawing on contemporary ethnographic studies, this course explores the cultural diversity of peoples indigenous to the Americas. It focuses in particular on North American Indians' political and economic adaptation in response to social change.

6W2 – SHADY GROVE/HYBRID Wed 1–4:10 pm
GEP - C
GEP - SS
Margaret Ellen Grieves Knisley

Register

Gender & Women's Studies (GWST)

GWST 210: Intro to Critical Sexuality Studies

An introduction to the field of critical sexuality studies. Using an interdisciplinary approach, the course conducts a critical inquiry into the historical precedents and theoretical frameworks necessary to understand the role of sexuality in shaping personal, social, economic, and political life. It focuses on patterns of subordination and exclusion based on individuals’ sexual practices and identities, explains the origins and persistence of those patterns, and considers ways of challenging them. Throughout the course, special attention will be given to intersections of sexuality with gender, race, ethnicity, religion, class, and disability.

6W1 – HYBRID Wed 1–4:10 pm
GEP - C
GEP - SS
Kate Drabinsky

Register

GWST 310: Gender and Inequality

Explore core concepts in gender studies and histories of inequality through a series of case studies rooted in issues facing Baltimore City: housing and city development; labor, immigration, and incarceration; and LGBT neighborhood cities. You’ll learn about these current issues through applied experiences in the city while examining the ways in which gender roles and gender relations are constructed and experienced in American society. Special attention is paid to the ways in which gender-based experiences are divided by other social relations, particularly those of class, race and age. Recommended preparation: One lower-level social sciences or humanities course focused on American society or culture.

6W1 – HYBRID Mon 1-4:10 pm
Lion Brothers Bldg
GEP - AH
Kate Drabinski

Register

GWST 322: Gender, Race, and Media

This course critically examines how ideologies of gender, race, class, ethnicity and sexuality are produced and disseminated in a range of media genres and forms such as film, television, music, advertising, news, visual and performing arts, the Internet, radio, and print media. As consumers and producers of media, students will learn to assess how media articulates, creates, and enforces identities and power. Students will practice tools of critical reading and thinking, such as textual analysis, visual discourse analysis, and the basics of media literacy. Recommended Preparation: GWST 100 and (200 or 210).

6W1 – HYBRID Tues 1–4:10 pm
GEP - AH and C
Kathryn Kein

Register

GWST 370: Black Women in Cross-Cultural Perspective

A comparative examination of racialized gendered violence. Specifically, we will examine how violence personally and systemically impacts Black women’s lives. The use of the term “Black” is meant to be inclusive of a global Blackness, not just American concepts. To this point, Black women suffer violence at unprecedented rates in comparison to their white counterparts. The instances of violence are varied and are physical and psychological. We will explore the multiple ways that Black women encounter/suffer violence through the criminal justice system, educationally, economically, and culturally. We will also explore the varied representations of Black women as the perpetrators of violence and analyze the notion of whether or not women can achieve empowerment by use of violence.

Note: The first two weeks will be online; the last two weeks will meet in person.

4W2 – HYBRID Tues/Thur/Fri 9–12:10 pm
GEP - C
Tammy Sanders Henderson

Register

Health Administration and Policy Program (HAPP)

HAPP 358: Bioethics

A survey of the ethical constraints on the practice of medicine, on biomedical research using human and non-human animals, and on the delivery of health care. Specific topics will include doctor-patient confidentiality; autonomy, competence and medical decision-making; ethical issues at the beginning and end of human life; and controversial biomedical technologies such as cloning and stem cell research. This course is repeatable for credit.

6W1 – HYBRID Thur 1–4:10 pm
GEP - AH
Elizabeth Picciuto

Register

History (HIST)

HIST 355: Selected Topics in History: Atlantic Revolution on Film

This course uses film to explore myth and reality in the "Age of Revolution" during the late 18th to early 19th centuries. Students will compare depictions of independence and nation building in films on the American, French, Haitian, and Latin America Revolutions. Movies about these different founding moments will be used to examine how film can convey historical accuracy, perpetuate "creation story" mythology, and impose modern political ideals onto the past. Although the course will be taught completely online, it will rely heavily on student discussion and interaction through Blackboard.

4W1 – ONLINE
Robert Bouton

Register

HIST 381 From Samurai to "Salariman": Japanese History through Film and Literature

A study of Japanese history from 1600 to the present through the media of film and literature. It also explores the relationship between history and drama, in particular how they can illuminate or conceal basic truths and values of the past. Views of life and modern times, obsessions with honor and suicide, the changing role of women in society, the encounter between Japanese and foreign cultures, and themes of war and pacifism will be investigated. Recommended Preparation: Any 100-level social science course.

4W1 – ONLINE
GEP - C
Constantine Vaporis

Register

HIST 402: The American South Since Reconstruction

This course will examine the contours of life in the American South since the end of the Civil War. Given the South's history of segregation, race is central to understanding Southern identity. We will explore life on both sides of the color line, and will consider ways in which racial identity interacted with class and gender to inform economic development, political and social change, and popular culture in the nineteenth and twentieth century South. Recommended Preparation: HIST 101 or HIST102, plus junior/senior status.

4W2 – SHADY GROVE Mon/Thur/Fr 1–4:10 pm
Andrew Nolan

Register

Language Literacy & Culture (LLC)

LLC 606: Social Inequality and Social Policy

This course examines poverty and inequality in modern society. The focus is on describing the extent of poverty and inequality, examining theories that attempt to explain these phenomena and discussing the policies that have been employed to mitigate them. In addition to class inequality, the course also considers racial and gender inequality.

6W1 – Tues/Thur 6–9:10 pm
Nicole Cousin-Gossett

Register

Modern Languages and Linguistics (MLL)

MLL 210: AFRICA: Culture and Development

A general introduction to Africa’s culture and development using an interdisciplinary approach. It surveys African peoples and their cultures, languages, societies, and development. AFST 213/MLL 210 emphasizes the interrelationship between Africa’s diverse geographical features, sociocultural practices and norms, languages, and its development. It presents an opportunity to examine the various forms of cultural and creative practices in contemporary Africa and how they have influenced socioeconomic and political transformation and development of the continent. Issues related to African environment, family and marriage, social organization, language, religion, political economy, as well as gender relations and how they have been shaped by internal and external forces/factors are discussed.

Note: The course will meet in person on Wednesdays, May 31, June 7, July 12, July 19, Aug 2 and Aug 16. The online sessions will be held on June 14, 21, 28, July 26 and Aug 9.

12W1 – HYBRID Wed 6-9:10 pm
GEP - AH
Karen Sutton

Register

MLL 322: Gender, Race, and Media

This course critically examines how ideologies of gender, race, class, ethnicity and sexuality are produced and disseminated in a range of media genres and forms such as film, television, music, advertising, news, visual and performing arts, the Internet, radio, and print media. As consumers and producers of media, students will learn to assess how media articulates, creates, and enforces identities and power. Students will practice tools of critical reading and thinking, such as textual analysis, visual discourse analysis, and the basics of media literacy. Recommended Preparation: GWST 100 and (200 or 210).

6W1 – HYBRID Tues 1–4:10 pm
GEP - AH and C
Kathryn Kein

Register

Music (MUSC)

MUSC 215: Introduction to Black Music

AFST 245 surveys the traditional music of Africans and delineates elements utilized in Black music of the western hemisphere. The course outlines the musical heterogeneity of Africans and allows students to gain greater understanding of African music and culture, its impact on the development of Black music in the Americas, and its influence on international trends in music. In this way, the humanist impulse at the center of African people's musical propensity will be revealed, and students' awareness will broaden and deepen in regards to the many genres, contexts, functions, and meanings of traditional African music.

6W2 – Tues/Thur 1–4:10 pm
GEP – AH
Kwame Ansah-Brew

Register

Philosophy (PHIL)

PHIL 150: Contemporary Moral Issues

An introduction to the problems and concepts of moral philosophy that focuses on current moral issues. This course introduces students to moral theories and their implications, the nature of moral reasoning and argument, and the meaning and justification of moral concepts such as obligation and rights. Topics may include free speech, abortion and euthanasia, environmental ethics, the rights of animals, and distributive and compensatory justice.

6W1 – HYBRID Mon 1–4:10 pm
GEP - AH
Daniel Jenkins

Register

PHIL 152: Introduction to Moral Theory

An introduction to philosophical theories of morality, which address such questions as: What ought we do? How ought we to live? Is there any right answer to such questions? If there are any right answers, upon what are they based, and how do we come to know them? What makes it the case that we should or should not lie, kill other people or eat animals? Various theoretical positions are covered and may include moral skepticism or relativism, Aristotelianism or virtue ethics, utilitarianism, Kantianism and other forms of non-consequentialism. Readings may include both historical and contemporary sources. Critical and charitable reading, argument analysis and writing are emphasized.

4W2 –Mon/Wed/Fri 1–4:10 pm
GEP - AH
James Thomas

Register

PHIL 358: Bioethics

A survey of the ethical constraints on the practice of medicine, on biomedical research using human and non-human animals, and on the delivery of health care. Specific topics will include doctor-patient confidentiality; autonomy, competence and medical decision-making; ethical issues at the beginning and end of human life; and controversial biomedical technologies such as cloning and stem cell research.

6W1 – HYBRID Thur 1–4:10 pm
GEP - AH
Elizabeth Picciuto

Register

Political Science (POLI)

POLI 270: Culture & Politics

An introduction to the relationships among politics, culture and human diversity throughout the world. Can cultures and human diversity be judged by independent standards of justice? When does cultural diversity endanger political unity? Must religious nationalism endanger, and can secularism protect, cultural diversity?

4W2 – ONLINE
GEP – C and SS
Sunil Dasgupta

Register

Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC 230: Psychology and Culture

Building on students' familiarity (from PSYC 100) with basic concepts and research methods in contemporary American psychology, this course explores the ways in which these ideas are related to cultural variation, both internationally and within the United States. The findings of cross-cultural research are examined in four major fields of psychology: cognitive, develop- mental, personality and social. Implications are considered for interpretation of personal experience and for applications of psychology in professional practice and public policy.

6W1 – Tues/Thur 9–12:10 pm
GEP – C and SS
Donald Knight

Register

Sociology (SOCY)

SOCY 201: Social Problems in American Society

A survey of American social problems designed for the general student. Topics typically include race and ethnic conflict, crime and delinquency, population and inequality.

6W2 – ONLINE
GEP - SS
Margaret Ellen Grieves Knisley

Register

SOCY 204: Diversity & Pluralism: An Interdisciplinary Perspective

An analysis of race, ethnicity, class, gender and sexual orientation in society. The goal of the course is to have students understand the sociocultural nature of human identity and diversity. In addition, the course will explore ways of enhancing communication across the boundaries that divide groups in a pluralistic society. Small group discussion of course material will take place throughout the semester.

6W2 – Tues/Thur 1–4:10 pm
GEP - C and SS
Bryan Ellys

Register

SOCY 321: Race and Ethnic Relations

Sociological analysis of the types of minority-majority group relations and the effects of these relationships on society and the groups and the individuals involved. Recommended Preparation: SOCY 101 or ANTH 211.

6W1 – Mon/Wed 6-9:10pm
GEP - SS
Karon Phillips

Register

SOCY 606: Social Inequality and Social Policy

This course examines poverty and inequality in modern society. The focus is on describing the extent of poverty and inequality, examining theories that attempt to explain these phenomena and discussing the policies that have been employed to mitigate them. The course also considers racial and gender inequality.

6W1 – Tues/Thur 6–9:10 pm
Nicole Cousin-Gossett

Register

Social Work (SOWK)

SOWK 374: Social Work with Immigrants and Refugees

This course provides an introduction to the information and skills necessary for generalist social work practice with immigrants and refugees. Its purpose is defined as the restoration, maintenance, and enhancement of the social functioning of individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities and the promotion of social justice. Recommended Preparation: SOWK 200 or SOWK 260.

4W2 – HYBRID Wed/Thur 9–11:15 am
GEP - C
Joshua Okundaye

Register