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Social dimensions of health address the conditions in which people are born, live, work and age beyond the biological and genetic level. It is increasingly clear that social, psychological, economic, and institutional inequalities act as powerful predictors of both health outcomes and quality of life. Health & Social Inequalities courses identify how important social factors influence individual health behaviors, health conditions, longevity and mortality, and provide a framework for thinking about health “outside the traditional box” of a medical model.

Courses by Subject

Aging (AGNG)

AGNG 200: Aging People, Policy and Management

Based in the life-course perspective, this course blends academic analysis of human aging in social context with more experiential learning, including exposure to literature on older adults, awareness exercises about aging in the news and talking with older adults in and out of class to debunk common myths and stereotypes regarding aging and older adults. Academic content is broadly social, in terms of understanding family and community contexts of aging, the individual experience of aging including productivity, spirituality and typical engagement, normal changes and diseases common in physical and psychological health, and a focus on how society views aging. Finally, students will be encouraged to identify themselves as aging individuals, on a trajectory toward later life.

6W1 – ONLINE
GEP - SS
Dorothea Johnson

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Anthropology (ANTH)

ANTH 311: Urban Anthropology

ANTH 311 explores community engaged anthropology and ethnographic fieldwork with a focus on social and environmental justice in Baltimore City. Learn first-hand about the role of urban public art and gardens, housing opportunities through Habitat for Humanities, community health center Marian House, the urban environmental agency Biohabitats, and a community food bank and garden in East Baltimore.

This course provides a broad perspective of human life in an urban context through cross-cultural comparisons of topics such as social justice, environment, language, race and ethnicity, economics, gender, politics, ritual, art, and religion. Learn about the history of anthropological research in urban centers and current issues in the anthropology of cities. Examine various anthropological approaches to understanding human behavior, and gain insights to other cultures as well as our own. Discussions include topics of health, urban social subgroups, communities, education, environment, art and media.

4W1 – Tues/Thurs/Fri 9-12:10 pm
Lion Bldg
GEP - SS
Jana Rehak

PREREQUISITE WAIVER: This course is open to all majors. Prior SOCY or ANTH course prerequisite requirements will be waived for this class. For a waiver please contact Amy Barnes at amyb@umbc.edu.

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Emergency Health Services (EHS)

EHS 200: Concepts of Emergency Health Services

This is a survey course that provides an overview of the operation of emergency health service systems. The history of EMS, the interface of public and private organizations, and review of the various personnel who constitute these systems are examined in relation to their impact on the health care delivery system.

4W1 – ONLINE
4W2 – ONLINE
GEP - SS
Jaeyoung Yang

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Health Administration and Policy Program (HAPP)

HAPP 398: Health Care Marketing

This course focuses on the unique needs of marketing in healthcare from the perspective of the physician, patient, healthcare facilities and health systems. The four main components include: The foundation of healthcare marketing, the five P’s of healthcare marketing, interpersonal skills of the healthcare marketer, and strategic actions of the healthcare marketer.

6W1 – Tues/Thur 1-4:10 pm
Paul Coakley

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HAPP 405: Contemporary Issues in Long Term Care

This course surveys a very important service and policy component of the health care system. A brief history of the evolution of long-term care provides the foundation to analyze issues such as social, economic and political environments, as well as credentialing, insurance and reimbursement. Various management functions will be examined, including financing, regulation, staffing and education. Case studies will introduce the student to community profile, demographics and housing alternatives.

6W1 – Tues/Thur 6-9:10 pm
Paul Coakley

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HAPP 420: Epidemiology

This course studies health and disease in populations and compares groups within populations, including age, sex, race, and ethnic groups. The course examines the sources of data and the methods used by public health researchers. It also studies methods used in public health programs to measure and control diseases and to evaluate programs.

6W1 - Tues/Thur 1–4:10 pm
Jamie Trevitt

PREREQUISITE WAIVER: This course is open to all majors. Prior HAPP or SOCY course prerequisite requirements will be waived for this class. SOCY 301 recommended. For a waiver please contact Prof. Jamie Trevitt at trevitt@umbc.edu.

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Language Literacy & Culture (LLC)

LLC 606: Social Inequality and Social Policy

This course examines poverty and inequality in modern society. The focus is on describing the extent of poverty and inequality, examining theories that attempt to explain these phenomena and discussing the policies that have been employed to mitigate them. The course also considers racial and gender inequality.

6W1 – Tues/Thur 6-9:10 pm
Nicole Cousin-Gossett

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Psychology (PSYC)

PSYC 285: Abnormal Psychology

Mental, emotional and personality disorders. Classification of abnormal behavior, its causes and treatment.

6W1 – Mon/Wed 1-4:10 pm
GEP- SS
Robert Anderson

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PSYC 340: Social Psychology

Analysis of theories and research in the scientific study of human social phenomena, focusing on the relationship between the social environment and individual behavior.

4W2 – Tues/Thur/Fri 1-4:10 pm
S. Peter Resta

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PSYC 342: The Psychology of Aggression and Antisocial Behavior

Topics include theories of violence and aggression; the classification, treatment and modification of anti-social behavior; and the development of conscience and pro-social behavior.

6W2 – HYBRID Tues 1-4:10 pm
David Schultz

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PSYC 360: Psychology of Motivation

Study of theory and experimentation concerned with the concepts of drive and reward and their effects on perception, learning and behavior.

6W1 – SHADY GROVE Tues/Thur 1-4:10 pm
Edward Rudow

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PSYC 385: Health Psychology

The course presents a comprehensive review of the role of behavioral variables in the maintenance of health and in the prevention, etiology and treatment of disease. Special attention is paid to behavioral variables in coronary heart disease, hypertension and cancer. Other topics include pain management, the treatment of obesity and alcoholism and the management of the dying patient.

6W1 – Tues/Thur 1-4:10 pm
Robert Anderson

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Sociology (SOCY)

SOCY 204 Diversity and Pluralism: An Interdisciplinary Perspective

An analysis of race, ethnicity, class, gender and sexual orientation in society. The goal of the course is to have students understand the sociocultural nature of human identity and diversity. In addition, the course will explore ways of enhancing communication across the boundaries that divide groups in a pluralistic society. Small group discussion of course material will take place throughout the semester.

6W2 – Tues/Thur 1-4:10 pm
GEP - C and SS
Bryan Ellis

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SOCY 300: Methodology of Social Research

Principles of social research, including examination of issues in research design, measurement, sampling and computer applications. Course considers both issues in the logic of science and practical problems of data collection.

6W1 – HYBRID Tues/Thur 1-4:10 pm
Dena Smith

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SOCY 321: Race and Ethnic Relations

Sociological analysis of the types of minority-majority group relations and the effects of these relationships on society and the groups and the individuals involved. Recommended Preparation: SOCY 101 or ANTH 211.

6W1 – Mon/Wed 6-9:10 pm
GEP - SS
Karon Phillips

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SOCY 351: Medical Sociology

Introduction to the field of health and illness behavior and health care institutions, including the sociocultural context of health orientations. Recommended Preparation: SOCY 101 or ANTH 211 or consent of instructor.

6W1 – ONLINE
John Schumacher

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SOCY 355: The Sociology of Women

Women in society, social roles and socialization, women in the labor force, class and lifestyle differences among women as a minority group, and women's social movement. Recommended Preparation: SOCY 101 or ANTH 211.

6W2 – ONLINE
GEP - SS
Elizabeth Salisbury

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SOCY 397: Sociology of the Death Penalty

In this course, we will cover the social and political history of the death penalty, in addition to current issues related to capital punishment, including innocence, mental illness, race, class, gender and geography. We will also touch on capital punishment in other countries and talk about US cases that have shaped capital punishment as it is practiced today.

6W2 – ONLINE
Sarah Archibald

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SOCY 606: Social Inequality and Social Policy

This course examines poverty and inequality in modern society. The focus is on describing the extent of poverty and inequality, examining theories that attempt to explain these phenomena and discussing the policies that have been employed to mitigate them. The course also considers racial and gender inequality.

6W1 – Tues/Thur 6-9:10 pm
Nicole Cousin-Gossett

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SOCY 698: Health and Human Rights

In the last couple of decades health professionals around the world have promoted human rights-based approaches to guide health system analysis and health policy. In this course, students will learn components of health and human rights programs and understand principles of and links between health and human rights. Students will evaluate health policies and programs from a human rights perspective. Examples of human rights approaches to health will be given in both developed and developing countries. In addition, students will examine the benefits of health and human rights programs as well as the problems and conflicts associated with such programs.

6W2 – HYBRID Mon 6-9:10 pm
Ilsa Lottes

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Lion Brothers Building

Some classes will regularly meet downtown in The Lion Brothers Building (UMBC’s new city classroom near Hollins Market) where you can actively learn and discover first-hand what makes Baltimore such a unique and special city. The Lion Brothers Building is located at 875 Poppleton Street and Hollins; across the street from the James McHenry Elementary School and Recreation Center. The building is also close to Café Gourmet, Zella’s Pizzeria, Cup’s Coffee House, and a branch of Harbor Bank.

Transportation

Just two blocks from Martin Luther King Jr. Boulevard (MLK), with easy access to I-295, I-95, and I-83, the Lion Brothers Building is accessible from campus by UMBC’s Downtown Shuttle, local bus lines, as well as the Charm City Circulator. There is also street parking (free and metered) along the residential roads around the Lion Brothers Building. Students may also park on the UMBC campus (with valid parking permit) and ride the Downtown Shuttle.