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Introduction to an Honors University (IHU) Seminar
Fall 2014 Faculty Profiles

 


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Ms. Raji J. Baradwaj

Senior Lecturer, Department of Mathematics and Statistics


How long have you been at UMBC?

I have been here since 2001.


Why did you choose to have a Y section associated with your course MATH 106?

Math, especially algebra, is a subject that many students do not have a strong foundation in. Some are even afraid of math. I want to make sure that my students know about all the resources available on campus. Many of the students in this course are freshmen and have to get used to the way of teaching in college. I think the IHU helps them to be comfortable and to know that they are not alone here. I think I started teaching this Math 106Y in 2003.


What connections do you have with students outside the classroom?

Students are always welcome to stop by my office to ask questions.


What else should students know about you as an instructor?

I am easily approachable. Students should seek my help if they are having any problem. I am there to help them.

 

In spring 2014, Ms. Baradwaj will be teaching Math 106Y: Algebra and Elementary Functions.


 

Robert Bouton

Associate Professor, History Department

Mr. Bouton will be teaching HIST 102Y: American History, 1877 to the Present.



 

Kathy Bryan

Lecturer, American Studies


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Dr. Meryl Damasiewicz

Adjunct Faculty, Department of Sociology and Anthropology


How long have you been at UMBC?

I started teaching at UMBC in August 2008 and have been here ever since! I also earned my graduate degree here in Applied Sociology in the 1990s.


Why did you choose to have a Y section associated with your course SOCY101?

I've been teaching SOCY101 with an IHU section for several years. I love the Y section as it allows students to form a genuine connection with the University and it allows them to develop relationships with classmates and to network with others who they might not easily encounter and are often a wealth of knowledge.


What connections do you have with students outside the classroom?

Because I teach SOCY 101 I have been able to watch students grow and mature as they go through their educational careers. I also get to work directly with those who have been selected as peer mentors for the course. As faculty we get to wear a variety of different hats when working with students!


In fall 2014, Dr. Damasiewicz will be teaching SOCY 101Y: Basic Concepts in Sociology.


 

James Grubb

Professor, History Department

How long have you been at UMBC?

Since 1983

Why did you choose to have a Y section associated with your course Western Civilization, 1700 to the Present?

I have chosen to have a Y section because I want to support the program. So many of our students come to UMBC without the skills taught in the Y section; that section provides badly needed academic skills.

And I meet with many students -- of all majors -- outside the classroom. I know the university as a whole pretty well, and can help with academic advising. Additionally, some students don't yet have majors, or have majors where advising isn't very good, and I'm glad to help.

In fall 2014, Mr. Grubb will be teaching HIST 111Y: Western Civilization, 1700 to the Present.


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Tammy Henderson

Lecturer, Department of Africana Studies.

How long have you been at UMBC?
Since 2011

Why did you choose to have a Y section associated with your course, Introduction to the Black Experience?
What connections do you have with students outside the classroom? I am the faculty adviser for the student organization Bethel Campus Fellowship. I also mentor students personally and professionally outside of the classroom.

In spring 2014, Ms. Henderson will be teaching AFST100Y: Introduction to the Black Experience.


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Margaret Knisley

Lecturer, Sociology and Anthropology



In spring 2014, Ms. Knisley will be teaching ANTH 211Y: Cultural Anthropology.


Galina Madjaroff

Galina Madjaroff communicates a passion for teaching through her efforts to innovate in the classroom, utilize technology effectively, and create a positive learning environment. She is a graduate of the Erickson School’s Management of Aging Services M.A. program and serves as Clinical Assistant Professor, mentor to undergraduate students, and Undergraduate Program Director for the Erickson School's Management of Aging Services Program. Ms. Madjaroff is also engaged in research to improve the lives of older adults through the use of technology. Her deep interest in technological innovation and cross-cultural perspective, along with her awareness and knowledge of the salient issues in aging, management, and policy, contribute to her research and teaching.

 

In spring 2014, Ms. Madjaroff will be teaching AGNG 100Y: So You Say You Want a Revolution: How Boomers are Revolutionizing Aging, and AGNG 200Y: Aging People, Policy and Management.



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Jana Rehak
Visiting Lecturer
jrehak@umbc.edu

In spring 2014, Ms. Rehak will be teaching ANTH 211Y: Cultural Anthropology.


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Dr. Howard Smead

Adjunct Associate Professor, History


How long have you been at UMBC?

Almost 20 years.


Why did you choose to have a Y section associated with your course?

I thought it would be a great opportunity to combine study skills with course material so students could see quick results from their labors.


What connections do you have with students outside the classroom?

I often meet with students after class or during my office hours to discuss course-related material. Many of these conversations are continued then via email.


What should students know about you as an instructor?

I place a high value on students interpreting the material presented in my history courses, reaching their own conclusions, and being able to support those conclusions.


In spring 2014, Dr. Smead will be teaching HIST 102Y: American History, 1877 to the Present.






Ask your advisor about taking one of these courses or for more Information, please contact:
Jill Randles
Assistant Vice Provost of Undergraduate Education
jrandles@umbc.edu | (410) 455-3715