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Introduction to an Honors University (IHU) Seminar
Spring 2014 Faculty Profiles

 


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Jacqueline Aliotta


How long have you been at UMBC?

2.5 years

How long have you been teaching a Y-section?

This spring is my fifth semester teaching a Y-section.

What is your regular role or job at UMBC?

I am the Events Coordinator for Event and Conference Services within The Commons. I work specifically with student organizations and help them plan their large-scale events. I also chair The Commons Student Employee Recognition Committee, a group that plans training, on-going development, and recognition for the 100+ Commons student employees.

Why do you teach this Y-section in addition to your regular role at UMBC?

I love teaching the Y-section! I want to help students with their transition to college and specifically to UMBC so that they can be as successful as possible. I really enjoy serving as a resource to students and teaching them everything I know about the college experience and UMBC so that they can make the most out of their college years.

What else should students know about you?

My office is located in The Commons, Suite 335. Come visit me!

 

In spring 2014, Ms. Aliotta is teaching AMST 100Y: Introduction to American Studies.


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Ms. Raji J. Baradwaj

Senior Lecturer, Department of Mathematics and Statistics


How long have you been at UMBC?

I have been here since 2001.


Why did you choose to have a Y section associated with your course MATH 106?

Math, especially algebra, is a subject that many students do not have a strong foundation in. Some are even afraid of math. I want to make sure that my students know about all the resources available on campus. Many of the students in this course are freshmen and have to get used to the way of teaching in college. I think the IHU helps them to be comfortable and to know that they are not alone here. I think I started teaching this Math 106Y in 2003.


What connections do you have with students outside the classroom?

Students are always welcome to stop by my office to ask questions.


What else should students know about you as an instructor?

I am easily approachable. Students should seek my help if they are having any problem. I am there to help them.

 

In spring 2014, Ms. Baradwaj is teaching Math 106Y: Algebra and Elementary Functions.


Dan Barnhart

Dr. Dan Barnhart
Director of Off Campus Student Services

How long have you been at UMBC?

2 years.


How long have you been teaching a Y-section?

This is my first semester teaching a Y section of IHU, but I just taught a Transfer Seminar course in the Fall.


What is your regular role or job at UMBC?

I coordinate the co-curricular engagement of our commuter students, transfer students, and student veterans. We have a large commuter and transfer population, as well as a growing veteran population, and my office works to get these students involved in student events, mentoring relationships, and study groups.


Why do you teach this Y section in addition to your regular role at UMBC?

Getting students engaged in campus is my main goal, and doing it as part of a classroom is a great way to reach students where they are. This past semester I had 3 veterans and 5 commuters in my class, so it's another opportunity for me to inform them about the services we have for them. I can also take the opportunity to show all students how important it is to get involved on campus and to take ownership of their college experience.


What else should students know about you?

I am constantly telling people that if they want to be successful in college, they should get actively involved in at least one out-of-class experience - research shows that people who do this are more likely to graduate. Also, people that I work with should know that I was also a commuter, a transfer, and a veteran student, so I understand the challenges of being successful in college even though you are a nontraditional student. The Off Campus Student Services Office is located next to the Bookstore on the first floor of the Commons if anyone ever wants to stop by and chat or learn more about what we do.


In spring 2014, Dr. Barnhart is teaching ANTH 211Y: Cultural Anthropology.


David Clurman

David Clurman

Assistant Director of Residential Education, Office of Residential Life


How long have you been at UMBC?

Seven years.


How long have you been teaching a Y-section?

I started teaching this course in Fall 2013.


What is your regular role or job at UMBC?

I supervise the staffing and programmatic efforts that occur within the residential areas


Why do you teach this Y section in addition to your regular role at UMBC?

I want to interact with students in a way that is different than in my day-to-day work. I also believe strongly in the connections between Academic Affairs and Student Affairs work and I believe that we can accomplish more for the students when we work collaboratively.


What else should students know about you?

I love the students here. They are committed to their studies in a way that is not found most other campuses. I also love to travel and have been to 43 countries on five continents thus far. More are on the way!

 

In spring 2014, Mr. Clurman is teaching SOCY 101Y: Basic Concepts in Sociology.


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Dr. Nicole Cousin-Gossett

Lecturer of Sociology, Department of Sociology and Anthropology


How long have you been at UMBC?

Five years


Why did you choose to have a Y section associated with your course?

I want to see UMBC students succeed. I believe that a Y section is a fantastic way for new UMBC students to become acquainted with the university and gain knowledge that will help them succeed as college students.


What connections do you have with students outside the classroom?

One of the most rewarding things for me about teaching is getting to know my students. It is always a joy when students want to continue a scholarly discussion outside of the classroom. I have also had the pleasure of working with numerous undergraduates and graduate students on individualized projects, theses, and dissertations.


What else should students know about you as an instructor?

I am truly passionate about sociology! I aspire as an instructor to pass some of that passion on to my students.

 

In spring 2014, Dr. Cousin-Gossett is teaching SOCY 101Y: Basic Concepts in Sociology.


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Julie Crosby

Academic Advisor, College of Natural and Mathematical Sciences


How long have you been at UMBC?

Two years as staff in addition to four years as a student


How long have you been teaching a Y-section?

Since fall, 2012.


What is your regular role or job at UMBC?

Academic Advisor for Life Science Majors.


Why do you teach this Y section in addition to your regular role at UMBC?

I am dedicated to the success of UMBC students, especially those students in transition. Teaching a Y section allows me to work with students across campus as they find their spot here at UMBC. I truly enjoy having the opportunity to teach students about UMBC and what the university has to offer from the fun social events to the excellent academic resources.


What else should students know about you?

I came to UMBC as a transfer student from CCBC. I completed both my Bachelor’s degree (Sociology) and Master’s degree (Applied Sociology) at UMBC. I truly know what it means to be a UMBC student. Go Retrievers!

 

In spring 2014, Ms. Crosby is teaching SOCY 101Y: Basic Concepts in Sociology.


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Dr. Meryl Damasiewicz

Adjunct Faculty, Department of Sociology and Anthropology


How long have you been at UMBC?

I started teaching at UMBC in August 2008 and have been here ever since! I also earned my graduate degree here in Applied Sociology in the 1990s.


Why did you choose to have a Y section associated with your course SOCY101?

I've been teaching SOCY101 with an IHU section for several years. I love the Y section as it allows students to form a genuine connection with the University and it allows them to develop relationships with classmates and to network with others who they might not easily encounter and are often a wealth of knowledge.


What connections do you have with students outside the classroom?

Because I teach SOCY 101 I have been able to watch students grow and mature as they go through their educational careers. I also get to work directly with those who have been selected as peer mentors for the course. As faculty we get to wear a variety of different hats when working with students!


In spring 2014, Dr. Damasiewicz is teaching SOCY 101Y: Basic Concepts in Sociology.


Jessica Deane

Jessica Deane

First Year Graduate Student, History


How long have you been at UMBC?

This is my second semester here at UMBC. I graduated from Salisbury University with a Bachelor's in History: Secondary Education.

How long have you been teaching a Y-Section?

This is my second semester teaching a Y-Section and I'm hoping it goes as great as my last semester!

What is your regular role or job at UMBC?

I am a first year graduate student in the History Department. In addition, I work at the Circulation Desk at the UMBC Library as a student employee.

Why do you teach this Y-Section in addition to your regular role at UMBC?

I remember being a freshman in college and how there were so many things that I had to learn on my own through experiences (often learning through errors). These experiences could have been easily avoided if Salisbury had offered something like a Y-Section. I want to offer UMBC students these opportunities and hopefully make their college experiences easier.

What else should students know about you?

I absolutely love history and, being connected to HIST 102: American History, 1877 to the Present, I would love to not only help my students as first year students here at UMBC, but also within their history class specifically.

 

In spring 2014, Ms. Deane is teaching HIST 102Y: American History, 1877 to the Present.


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Joanna Gadsby

In spring 2014, Ms. Gadsby is teaching HIST 200Y: Themes In World History.


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Katie Heird

Assistant Director of Study Abroad, International Education Services


How long have you been at UMBC?

I came to UMBC in August 2008 to pursue a master’s degree in Intercultural Communication (INCC) and began working in the Study Abroad Office as a graduate assistant. I was hired as a full-time study-abroad advisor in May 2009 and have been working here ever since. I completed my INCC degree in May 2011, just two months after becoming a mother.


How long have you been teaching a Y section?

I started teaching this semester, all 2013. I am surprised by personal connections that are being made between students in the classroom. The Y section is a great way to ensure new students build a network of peers necessary for success at UMBC. The Y section helps new students get acclimated by introducing them to various resources on campus that they might not otherwise know about.


What is your regular role or job at UMBC?

As the Assistant Director of Study Abroad at UMBC, my main role is working one-on-one with students as they plan their study abroad experience. I also work with UMBC faculty as they plan to lead short-term study-abroad programs. I work with our international faculty and researchers in obtaining visas to work in the US. I also coordinate most of our outreach events. Working in a small office ensures that I am always wearing lots of hats at the same time.


Why do you teach this Y section in addition to your regular role at UMBC?

I decided to teach the IHU class because I wanted to be connected with a cohort of students on a regular basis and try something new.

What else should students know about you?

Students should know that I practice what I preach. Study abroad is not just a job for me; it's a way of life. I have lived in Mexico and Ecuador and also spent time exploring to Peru, England, Wales, Denmark, France, Canada, Spain, Italy, Germany, Switzerland, Morocco and the Caribbean. They should also know that I love to hear stories from my students about their experiences abroad because it helps me to be a better advisor.


In spring 2014, Ms. Heird is teaching ANTH 211Y: Cultural Anthropology.


Nicole King

Dr. Nicole King is the director of the Orser Center for the Study of Place, Community, and Culture at UMBC. Her research and teaching focus on issues of place, economic development, identity, and power. King’s scholarship analyzes changes to the social and built environment during the rise of consumer culture in the twentieth century—such as the development of vernacular landscapes of tourism in the U.S. South and the decline of industrial neighborhoods in Baltimore. Her current research is on an industrial community in the southernmost tip of Baltimore, referred to as Baybrook—a merging of the names of the two remaining residential neighborhoods in the area, Brooklyn and Curtis Bay. King explores the cultural history of Baltimore neighborhoods in the context of trans-industrialization and shows how national and global issues are embedded in places on a very local level.

How long have you been at UMBC?

Since 2006.


Why did you choose to have a Y section associated with your course?

I wanted to assist with keeping first year and transfer students engaged at UMBC in hopes that they can finish their degrees in a timely and successful manner. I have been working with IHU since 2007.


What connections do you have with students outside the classroom?

All my students have to attend three outside cultural events throughout the semester in AMST 100. Students also visit me during my office hours for individual help with written assignments or to improve their work in the course.

 

In spring 2014, Dr. King is teaching AMST 100Y: Introduction to American Studies.


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Margaret Knisley



In spring 2014, Ms. Knisley is teaching ANTH 211Y: Cultural Anthropology.


Galina Madjaroff

Galina Madjaroff communicates a passion for teaching through her efforts to innovate in the classroom, utilize technology effectively, and create a positive learning environment. She is a graduate of the Erickson School’s Management of Aging Services M.A. program and serves as Clinical Assistant Professor, mentor to undergraduate students, and Undergraduate Program Director for the Erickson School's Management of Aging Services Program. Ms. Madjaroff is also engaged in research to improve the lives of older adults through the use of technology. Her deep interest in technological innovation and cross-cultural perspective, along with her awareness and knowledge of the salient issues in aging, management, and policy, contribute to her research and teaching.

 

In spring 2014, Ms. Madjaroff is teaching AGNG 100Y: So You Say You Want a Revolution: How Boomers are Revolutionizing Aging, and AGNG 200Y: Aging People, Policy and Management.



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Michelle Massey

Associate Director, International Student Services


How long have you been at UMBC?

Seven years.


How long have you been teaching a Y-section?

This is my third semester.


What is your regular role or job at UMBC?

I work with international students pursuing their degrees at UMBC. I help them with all aspects of their immigration status, such as applying for work authorization. I do my best to make sure students get off to a good start in a new culture with orientations and cultural events. It's a really fun job, and I love it!


Why do you teach this Y section in addition to your regular role at UMBC?

I started teaching an IHU section as a way to broaden my experience across UMBC's campus and get to know new students at UMBC beyond the group I already work with. However I've had such good experiences teaching it, that I keep doing it because it's really fun, and I've really come to appreciate the improved experience it can help students have at UMBC. I love UMBC, and I'm very happy to do anything I can to make sure everyone loves this place as much as I do!


What else should students know about you?

I do my best to make IHU engaging, interactive and fun - something you would look forward to on a Friday afternoon! I believe people in general learn best when they are having fun and being interactive, so this is what I strive for. On the side, I am also an avid swing dancer and Lindy hopper, which are dance styles from the 1930's and 40's, and I have recently become a parent to a very sweet adopted dog, a pitbull named Quinn.


Describe a great moment from the last time you were involved with a Y section: My favorite moments have always been classroom discussions. We had some wonderful discussions last semester that started out concerning an assignment and ended up addressing the very roots of our system of education and what a solid liberal arts curriculum should look like. Our conversation carried over the course of the semester, and culminated with a facilitated discussion with the Dean of Undergraduate Education, Dr. Diane Lee!



In spring 2014, Ms. Massey is teaching Math 106Y: Algebra and Elementary Functions.



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Jana Rehak
Visiting Lecturer
jrehak@umbc.edu

In spring 2014, Ms. Rehak is teaching ANTH 211Y: Cultural Anthropology.


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Dr. Howard Smead

Adjunct Associate Professor, History


How long have you been at UMBC?

Almost 20 years.


Why did you choose to have a Y section associated with your course?

I thought it would be a great opportunity to combine study skills with course material so students could see quick results from their labors.


What connections do you have with students outside the classroom?

I often meet with students after class or during my office hours to discuss course-related material. Many of these conversations are continued then via email.


What should students know about you as an instructor?

I place a high value on students interpreting the material presented in my history courses, reaching their own conclusions, and being able to support those conclusions.



In spring 2014, Dr. Smead is teaching HIST 102Y: American History, 1877 to the Present.



Lauren Tabbachino

Lauren Tabbacchino
Coordinator, Off-Campus Student Services (OCSS)

How long have you been at UMBC?

I came to UMBC in January 2013.

What is your regular role or job at UMBC?

OCSS provides services for UMBC commuters, transfers and veterans. We primarily assist students with off-campus housing and navigating public and UMBC transportation. While our work is very much a team effort, my specific role is to work with our student employees, known as Commuter Assistants, to create events that invite and encourage our target student groups to get involved on campus. In addition to my regular role, and my newest role as an IHU instructor, I also serve on the Women's Center Advisory Board, the Alcohol and Other Drug Committee, and am a Green Dot Trainer.


Why did you decide to teach this Y section in addition to your regular role at UMBC?

I really enjoy teaching. Before I came to UMBC I taught for a short time in K-12 education, so when the opportunity arose to get back in the classroom, I was excited to pursue it. I also really believe in the work we do in Student Affairs engaging students in campus activities, providing them with personal and professional development, and helping them make real-world applications of the lessons they're getting in the classroom. Teaching the Y section offers me the perfect blend of all the jobs I love to do.


What else should students know about you?

Have you seen my Real Person Profile? Co-create is a UMBC initiative to promote civic engagement among our campus community. From time to time the blog's writers, David Hoffman and Craig Berger, reach out to campus staff, faculty and students and ask them to share their experiences. If you're curious about my favorite childhood dance, you're in luck – I've divulged the secret on my Real Person Profile



In spring 2014, Ms. Tabbacchino is teaching HIST 111Y: Western Civilization 1700 to the Present.



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Dr. Elizabeth Tapscott

In spring 2014, Dr. Tapscott is teaching HIST 111Y: Western Civilization 1700 to the Present.



tatarewics

Dr. Joseph N. Tatarewicz (“Prof.T.”)
Associate Professor of History, and Director, Human Context of Science and Technology program


How long have you been at UMBC?

I began as an adjunct in 1991, went full time in 1997. With only 22 years, that makes me a newbie at UMBC. Teaching history and philosophy of science and technology, and directing our Human Context of Science and Technology program keeps me roaming all over the university and interacting with colleagues and students from most departments.


What can you tell us about this course?

Themes in World History looks at the big picture through a variety of lenses, depending on the particular faculty member. In my case, we explore the biggest questions about our identity and our home, how we have seen ourselves in relation to the whole cosmos—“Planets and Worlds, Earth and Home.” This has varied over time and across cultures. Everybody has heard of Copernicus, and the switch from an earth-centered to a sun-centered system, Galileo and his telescope, etc; however, few appreciate the gut-wrenching implications and where this all led. I like to use something like the “Berlitz” immersion method from language learning—we’ll try to live in those prior versions of the cosmos, look at the sky and earth through their eyes, and experience the dramatic revelations and shifts in our understanding. I get the students outside, looking at the earth and sky.


What connections do you have with students outside the classroom?

The classroom is important, and the focus of what we do as educators—but it’s only one venue among many. We each have numerous undergraduate and graduate advisees in touch through personal and virtual contact; we are constantly reading and commenting on drafts of theses and dissertations, and shepherding them to completion; our undergraduate History Student Council engages us to lead tours, present our favorite movies at special events, and speak at topical meetings; and, we all do “guest shots” in colleagues’ courses, presenting in our specialties. I wind up appearing in various science and engineering courses and events, talking about the history and policy of the areas students are studying.


What else should students know about you as an instructor?

I’m a blue-collar guy from East Baltimore whose destiny was to move cargo on the docks or work in the steel mill. I was rejected first by every graduate school, grant or fellowship, and job for which I applied (often multiple times), but wouldn’t take “no” for an answer. My education was always simultaneous with working as a motel night clerk, mechanic, plumber, electrician, or whatever would pay the bills. That got me graduate degrees in philosophy and in history and philosophy of science, and a career that ranged from exhibiting a full-scale Hubble Space Telescope in the Smithsonian to working in some pretty scary areas of nuclear history. So, I expect students to do the work; and, I promise that if they do, they will discover amazing and transforming things that make it all worthwhile.



In spring 2014, Dr. Tatarewicz is teaching HIST 200Y: Themes In World History.





Ask your advisor about taking one of these courses or for more Information, please contact:
Jill Randles
Assistant Vice Provost of Undergraduate Education
jrandles@umbc.edu | (410) 455-3715