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August 2010

Keisha Findley Ph.D. (M12) Earns Degree from Duke University

Posted on August 30, 2010 11:02 AM |Permalink

Dr. Keisha Findley (M12), '04, biochemistry and molecular biology, recently earned her Ph.D. in Molecular Genetics and Microbiology from Duke University.

Dr. Findley applied and was accepted as the only trainee for the NIH/NHGRI health disparities postdoctoral fellowship program. She will conduct research and study the human skin microbiota in health and disease.

Lekelia Jenkins Ph.D. (M5) Receives NSF Grant

Posted on August 30, 2010 11:11 AM |Permalink

Dr. Lekelia Jenkins (M5), '97, biological science, recently received her first major NSF grant of $350k for a project entitled, "International Adoption of Conservation Technologies (IntACT): Towards a New Theory of Transferring Technology in the Face of Conservation Crisis."

Dr. Jenkins earned her Ph.D. from Duke University in 2006.

Akua Bonsra Ph.D. (M12) Earns Degree from Stony Brook University

Posted on August 30, 2010 11:15 AM |Permalink

Dr. Akua Bonsra-Roach (M12), '04, biochemistry and molecular biology, recently earned her Ph.D. in Molecular Biology and Cellular Pharmacology from Stony Brook University in New York.

BUILDING YOUR HOUSE

Posted on August 30, 2010 3:54 PM |Permalink |Comments ( 7 )

As a new academic year gets underway, I want to share with the students an outstanding parable entitled the Carpenter's Tale.

An elderly carpenter was ready to retire. He told his employer-contractor of his plans to leave the house-building business to live a more leisurely life with his wife and enjoy his extended family. He would miss the paycheck each week, but he wanted to retire. They could get by.

The contractor was sorry to see his good worker go and asked if he could build just one more house as a personal favor. The carpenter said yes, but over time it was easy to see that his heart was not in his work. He resorted to shoddy workmanship and used inferior materials. It was an unfortunate way to end a dedicated career.

When the carpenter finished his work, his employer came to inspect the house. Then he handed the front-door key to the carpenter and said, "This is your house... my gift to you."

The carpenter was shocked! What a shame! If he had only known he was building his own house, he would have done it all so differently.

So it is with us. We build our lives, a day at a time, often putting less than our best into the building. Then, with shock, we realize we have to live in the house we have built - wishing that f we could do it all over.

But, you cannot go back. To all my students, please, please, please remember, that YOU are the carpenter, and every day you hammer a nail, place a board, or erect a wall. Your attitude, and the choices you make today, help build the "house" you will have to live in tomorrow. Therefore, it would behoove you to build wisely.

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