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This page contains a single entry from the blog posted on October 11, 2011 1:14 PM.

The previous post in this blog was PhD Proposal - Amanda Dotson.

The next post in this blog is Seminar: Wednesday, Oct. 12, 2011 at 3:30pm.

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PhD Defense - Aboubakar Traore

Abou successfully defended his PhD dissertation on October 11, 2011.

TITLE:
Measurement of the nonlinear refractive index of TeO2 fiber by using IGA technique.

ABSTRACT:
Nonlinear phenomena in optical fibers have been attracting considerable attention because of the rapid growth of the fiber optics communication industry. The increasing demand in internet use and the expansion of telecommunications in the developing world have triggered the need for high capacity and ultra-fast communication devices and also the need to increase the number of transmission channels in the fibers. Wavelength Division Multiplexing (WDM) and Dense Wavelength Division Multiplexing (DWDM) systems are capable of transmitting large volumes of data at very high rates into huge numbers of optical transmission channels. This ability is limited by the gain bandwidth of Silica based fiber optics amplifiers already installed in the communication networks. Tellurite based fiber amplifiers offer the necessary bandwidth for amplification of WDM and DWDM channels.

This research is for measuring accurately the nonlinear refractive index of Tellurite fibers using the Induced Grating Autocorrelation (IGA) Technique. To investigate these emerging fibers in the telecommunication field, a 10 picoseconds Nd:Vanadate ( Nd:YVO4) laser operating at 1342nm will be used. The goal of this work is to provide accurate and reliable information on the nonlinear optical properties of Tellurite glass fibers, novel fibers with promising future for developing ultrafast and high transmission capacity communication devices.

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