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August 21, 2003

UMBC Department of Music Presents Fall 2003 Concerts and Events

The UMBC Department of Music presents its fall 2003 season, featuring an array of contemporary classical music concerts by world renowned artists, including the So Percussion Group, Pamela Z, and the Hoffmann/Goldstein Duo.

Professional Artist Series

September 13
Sonic Circuits, presented in cooperation with the American Composers Forum Washington, D.C. Chapter, a concert of new and experimental electroacoustic music from area composers. The American Composers Forum’s Sonic Circuits: International Festival of Electronic Music and Art provides exposure for composers and performers working in electronic media. Arguably the largest festival of its kind, Sonic Circuits consists of a curated pool of works that forms the basis of events occurring across the U.S. and abroad. Sonic Circuits is committed to supporting the best electronic art, without regard for “style” or “genre.”
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

September 25
Saxophonist Matthew Burtner. His program, entitled Disembodied Forms: Music for Metasaxophone, Virtual Strings, and Singing Bowls, will include S-Trance-S (2001), the United States premiere of (dis)Appearances (2003), and S-Morphe-S (2002) by Matthew Burtner; Questions and Fissures (1999) by Christopher Burns; and Grito de Corazon (2001) by Judith Shatin. Matthew Burtner spent his early childhood in a small village on the Arctic Ocean, the mountains outside of Anchorage, and on fishing boats on Alaska’s southwest coast. His earliest acoustic memories include the sound of the Arctic wind, and of storms on the ocean. As a sound artist his work is guided by an interest in natural acoustic processes, and music as the sonic activation of imagination through environment. Composed for a variety of instrumental, electroacoustic and mixed media, his music explores ecoacoustic processes, and extended polymetric and noise-based musical systems. Currently Burtner is an Assistant Professor of composition and computer music at the University of Virginia where he is also Associate Director of the VCCM Computer Music Center. He studied composition, computer music, saxophone and philosophy at St. Johns College, Tulane University (B.F.A. summa cum laude), Iannis Xenakis’ UPIC/CEMAMu, the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University (M.M.), and Stanford University/CCRMA (D.M.A.). He has been composer-in-residence at the Banff Centre, Simon Fraser University in Vancouver and the IUA/Phonos Institute in Barcelona. An active saxophonist, he developed the Metasaxophone, a project exploring the integration of the saxophone and electronics through sensor technology and imbedded systems research. Burtner has received numerous prizes and grants for his work including first prize in the 2000 Musica Nova International Electroacoustic Music Competition. His music, commissioned by performers such as the Spectri Sonori Ensemble, MiN Ensemble, Phyllis Bryn-Julson, the Peabody Trio, Trio Ascolto, Haleh Abghari, Noise Ensemble and others, has been performed throughout North America and Europe, as well as in Japan, Australia, China, Korea, Uruguay and Brazil at festivals such as ICMC, ISCM, Gaudeamus, SEAMUS, Darmstadt, Bourges, ILIOS, KEAMS, Autunnale, GEMS, Musica Nova, ICMF, Spectri Sonori, Sala Hal and others. His commercial CD releases include Incantations on the German DACO label, Portals of Distortion on Innova Recordis, and Arctic Contrasts on the Norwegian Eurudice label.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

October 2 & 3
A screening of the film Forbidden Planet and a lecture on its electronic sound score by Stephan Prock. This 1956 film featured the first full-length electronic sound score, created by Louis and Bebe Barron, two early pioneers in electroacoustic music.
The screening will be held at 8 pm on 2nd at the Commons Grill; the lecture will be at 1 pm on the 3rd in Fine Arts Building Room 011.
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

October 16
The Hoffmann/Goldstein Duo, featuring the artistry of pianist Paul Hoffmann and percussionist Tom Goldstein. Their program will include the premiere of Crystal: A Cycle of Names and Memories by Elliott Schwartz, the world premiere of James Romig’s Islands that Never Were, Robert MorrisStruck Sound, Anneliese Weibel’s Still for J.S.B., and Fluxus artist Dick HigginsHaydn in the Forest, Sparks, and Touch #1 for Piano. Over the past dozen years, the Hoffmann/Goldstein Duo has appeared in dozens of concerts and new music festivals in the U.S. and in Europe, and recently released their first CD on Capstone Records, Crossfade. As a New York City freelance percussionist for over twenty years, Tom Goldstein performed extensively with groups such as the Orchestra of St. Luke’s and the Brooklyn Philharmonic, as well as chamber groups, Broadway shows and in nightclubs. Especially active in contemporary music, he has premiered dozens of solo and chamber works, many of which were written expressly for him. From 1980-1990 he served as Artistic Director of the new-music group GAGEEGO. He has toured with Steve Reich, played with Pauline Oliveros, and the ensemble Continuum. Mr. Goldstein composed and performed percussion soundtracks for NBC World Series and U.S. Tennis Open documentaries. Mr. Goldstein has published articles in Perspectives of New Music and Percussive Notes. He has recorded on Neuma, Vanguard, Polydor, Opus 1, OO Discs, CD Tech, Capstone and CRI. Paul Hoffmann, pianist and conductor, made his debut at the Vienna Konzerthaus in 1973 while on a Fulbright grant, and has since concertized extensively in the U.S. and abroad. Hoffmann has recorded solo piano and chamber music for Capstone, Orion, CRI, Northeastern, Composers Guild of New Jersey, Contemporary Record Society, OO Discs, Spectrum, and Vienna Modern Masters labels and has made numerous radio broadcasts in the U.S. as well as for Voice of America, Radio Cologne, Radio Frankfurt, and Radio France. He is currently working on recordings for Capstone and NUEMA Records. Most recently he has performed at new music festivals in Italy (“Spaziomusica” in Cagliari and “Musiche in Mostra” in Turin), National Sun Yat-sen University in Taiwan, Goucher College in Baltimore, Merkin Hall in New York City and The 8th International Symposium on Electronic Art at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago. He has served on the jury of many piano competitions including the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra Concerto Competition, and was the first U.S. judge to be invited to the prestigious Concours International de Musique Contemporaine pour Piano in 1983 and 1986. Mr. Hoffmann has degrees from Eastman School of Music, and did further study at the Peabody Conservatory. He attended both the Salzburg “Mozarteum” and the Hochschule für Musik in Vienna. His principal teachers have been Leon Fleisher, Cecile Genhart, Dieter Weber, Kurt Neumuller, and Brooks Smith. Mr. Hoffmann is currently Professor of Music at Mason Gross School of the Arts, Rutgers University, where he teaches piano, chamber music and directs the contemporary music ensemble, HELIX!, which he founded in 1990.
8:30 pm, immediately following a concert in the same location by Fluxus artists Alison Knowles and Larry Miller, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

October 25
The UMBC Faculty Chamber Ensemble, featuring clarinetist E. Michael Richards, flutist Lisa Cella, violinist Airi Yoshioka, cellist Franklin Cox, oboist Erin Gittelsohn, guitarist Troy King and pianist Rachel Franklin.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

November 6
Ruckus, the professional contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC, at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Part of the BMA’s free First Thursdays program, the performances will enhance the BMA’s Work Ethic exhibition. The Ruckus ensemble, which includes flutist Lisa Cella, cellist Franklin Cox, percussionist Tom Goldstein, clarinetist E. Michael Richards, and violinist Airi Yoshioka, will be joined by guest artists.
A family event at 6:30 will feature works by Fluxus composers and will include audience participation opportunities.
A concert at 8:00 will include Variations II by John Cage and other works.
The Baltimore Museum of Art is located at 1 Art Museum Drive in Baltimore.
For more information about First Thursdays and the Work Ethic exhibition, the public may call the BMA at 410-396-6314.
Public information for Ruckus: 410-455-MUSC.

November 9
Tabla, featuring Larry Williams on French horn and Bryan Young on bassoon, in a program of multimedia works. The Washington Post has called Bryan Young a bassoonist who “makes his music dance with lightness and grace, as well as with a sparkle uncommon for his instrument.” The Maine Sunday Telegram has described Larry Williams as “a phenomenally good horn player, with the brilliance for solo work.” These acclaimed artists have joined forces to create Tabla, a new and exciting duo whose innovative performances shatter the traditional barriers between classical, jazz, contemporary and world music. Williams and Young combine digital video and sound, costume, and lighting with virtuosic live performance to create a stunning concert experience.
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

November 13
The So Percussion Group. Their concert will feature Shifty by Dennis DeSantis, Each Moment an Ending by Stuart Saunders Smith, Third Construction by John Cage, and The So-called Laws of Nature by David Lang. So Percussion (Douglas Perkins, Adam Sliwinski, Jason Treuting, and Lawson White) is a captivating young group that can always be counted on to astound. Founded in New Haven in 1999, the group has recently been featured at the Bang on a Can Marathon, the BAM Next Wave Festival, the Norfolk Chamber Music Festival, the Percussive Arts Society International Convention, Miller Theater, the Roundtop Festival, and has been heard on WNYC’s New Sounds and Soundcheck. So has also worked closely with student musicians and composers, resulting in residencies at The University of Texas at Austin, Williams College, King’s College, and performances with the Harvard Group for New Music and Columbia Composers. With a breadth extending to both established and emerging composers, So Percussion Group has embarked on an ambitious commissioning project that has led to several other world premieres, including works by composers Kathryn Alexander, Dennis DeSantis, David Lang, and Ken Ueno.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

November 16
Pianist Kazuko Tanosaki, who will present a program of music by Berio, Beethoven and Takemitsu. Born in Japan and and educated at the Kunitachi College of Music, Kazuko Tanosaki received an MA in piano under full scholarship from the University of California, San Diego, and completed a DMA in piano performance and literature from the Eastman School of Music. She studied piano with Kazuko Abe, Cecil Lytle, Jean-Charles François, Frederick Marvin, and Rebecca Penneys. Ms. Tanosaki was a first prize winner in the 1982 La Jolla Orchestra Young Artist Competition (San Diego), and a finalist in the 1982 Ventura Young Artists Competition. Ms. Tanosaki has presented solo recitals throughout Japan, Europe, and the United States, including performances at the 1989 Piano Panorama of Twentieth Century Music in Rotterdam, Holland, the 1989 International Electronic Music Plus Festival (Oberlin College), the 1990 Kobe International Festival of Contemporary Music (Japan), the Tokyo American Center, and recitals at the Camargo Foundation in Cassis, France, the Civic Center in San Diego, California, and Lemoyne College in Syracuse, New York.
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

November 17
Pamela Z, a San Francisco-based composer/performer and audio artist who works primarily with voice, live electronic processing, and sampling technology. She creates solo works combining operatic bel canto and experimental extended vocal techniques with found percussion objects, spoken word, “MAX MSP” on a PowerBook, and sampled concrête sounds triggered with a MIDI controller called The BodySynth™ which allows her to manipulate sound with physical gestures. Her performances range in scale from small concerts in galleries to large-scale multi-media works in proscenium halls and flexible black-box venues. Pamela Z has toured extensively throughout the United States, Europe, and Japan. She has performed in numerous festivals, including Bang On A Can at Lincoln Center in New York, the Interlink Festival in Japan, Other Minds in San Francisco, and Pina Bausch Tanztheater’s 25 Jahre Fest in Wuppertal, Germany. She has composed, recorded and performed original scores for choreographers and for film and video artists, and has done vocal work for other composers (including Charles Amirkhanian and Henry Brant). Her large-scale, multi-media performance works, Parts of Speech and Gaijin, have been presented at Theater Artaud in San Francisco, and her audio works have been included in exhibitions at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York and the Erzbischöfliches Diözesanmuseum in Cologne. Ms. Z has composed commissioned works for new music chamber ensembles the Bang On A Can Allstars, the California E.A.R. Unit, and the Left Coast Chamber Ensemble. Since 1986 she has been producing “Z Programs,” an ongoing series of interdisciplinary events in which her own work has been featured along with that of other artists doing experimental work in various genres. She is a member of the electroacoustic ensemble sensorChip (with Miya Masaoka and Donald Swearingen) and the interdisciplinary performance ensemble The Qube Chix. She has done several concerts and experimental theater pieces with Zakros New Music Theatre (including their John Cage festivals), and has performed with The San Francisco Contemporary Music Players. She is the recipient of numerous awards including the CalArts Alpert Award in the Arts, the ASCAP Music Award, and the NEA and Japan/US Friendship Commission Fellowship. She holds a music degree from the University of Colorado at Boulder.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

December 4
Composer and trombonist James Staley, whose concert will feature trombone improvisations. Staley studied composition with Morgan Powell, Ben Johnston and Salvatore Martirano. For the past twenty years he has specialized in improvisation, attempting to work “at the edge of understanding.”
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

 

Student Recital Series

October 19
The UMBC Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Wayne Cameron.
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

November 15
The UMBC Concert Choir under the direction of David Smith.
7:30 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

November 20
The UMBC Jazz Big Band under the direction of Jari Villanueva.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

November 24
The UMBC Chamber Players under the direction of E. Michael Richards.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

December 5
The UMBC Saxophone Quartet under the direction of Anjan Shah.
7 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

December 6
The UMBC Guitar Ensemble under the direction of Troy King.
5 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

December 6
The Jubilee Singers under the direction of Janice Jackson.
7 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

December 7
The Maryland Camerata under the direction of David Smith.
7:30 pm, Charlestown Chapel, Charlestown Retirement Community Catonsville. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

December 9
Departmental Honors Recital.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

December 11
The UMBC Percussion Ensemble under the direction of Tom Goldstein.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

December 12
The UMBC Jazz Improv Ensemble under the direction of Rick Hannah.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

December 13
The Collegium Musicum under the direction of Joseph Morin.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

December 14
The UMBC Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Wayne Cameron.
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

December 14
The Maryland Camerata under the direction of David Smith.
7:30 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

 

Additional Information

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/
or by email or postal mail.

Telephone
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
General Department of Music information: 410-455-2942
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Department of Music website: http://www.umbc.edu/music

Directions
• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

• Evening parking is available in Lot 16, adjacent to the Fine Arts Building, for 50¢. Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

• Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

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Posted by dwinds1 at August 21, 2003 12:00 AM