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November 2008 Archives

Exciting TV Programming/Production Internship!

Posted on November 12, 2008 2:58 PM |Permalink |Comments (0)

Television Programming Internship

Retirement Living TV is seeking an intern for the Programming Department. The Programming Intern will work to support the Programming Department by communicating with the in-house production teams, as well as researching competitive programming strategies. The Programming Intern will attend and participate in the Production Development meetings and the Program Strategy meetings.

Duties

• Track Nielsen rating results
• Research competitive program strategies
• Update program software with episode descriptions
• Compile weekly program descriptions
• Track and document commissioned show delivery
• Communicate with the in-house production teams on planned studio dates and delivery of completed episodes
• Light general administrative duties

Qualifications

• Ability to prioritize workload and meet deadlines
• Attention to detail
• Ability to work independently
• Interest in the Production/Programming division of television

About the Learning Experience

The Programming Intern will gain experience by attending the Production Development meetings and Program Strategy meetings, as well as have the opportunity to contribute to the program planning. In a rapidly growing company, this internship presents an ideal learning environment for the daily procedures behind running a television network

Contact: Kathy Raab (kraab@rl.tv)

INSIDE LACROSSE EDITORIAL INTERNS NEEDED

Posted on November 20, 2008 1:38 PM |Permalink |Comments (0)

Inside Lacrosse Multimedia Spring 2009 Internships
Multimedia
InsideLacrosse is looking for video interns for the spring semester of
2009.We are looking for students and/or professionals to help create content
thatwill be uploaded to our video player. Specifics tasks will include
filminglacrosse games and interviews with coaches and players, editing
footage intogame highlights or features, and uploading to ILTV. Applicants
must have some previous experience with Final Cut Pro editing software.
This is a great opportunity to build college credit and a demo tape for your
future. This is an unpaid internship with an emphasis on providing college
internship hours, so we are flexible with tight schedules. Please send
resumes to joe.sweeney@insidelacrosse.com.

Editorial
Inside Lacrosse magazine and InsideLacrosse.com are seeking editorial
interns for spring 2009. We are looking for students and/or young
professionals to provide editorial content for both Inside Lacrosse magazine
and InsideLacrosse.com with a focus on the ’09 NCAA season.
This is a great opportunity to build college credit and a writing portfolio
in a competitive environment.
This is an unpaid internship with an emphasis on providing college
internship hours, so we are flexible with tight schedules. Please send
resumes and appropriate writing clips to gshannon@insidelacrosse.com.

TV Watching the Key to Unhappiness? We Report, You Decide

Posted on November 22, 2008 8:35 PM |Permalink |Comments (0)

The New York Times
Printer Friendly Format Sponsored By

November 20, 2008
What Happy People Don’t Do
By RONI CARYN RABIN

Happy people spend a lot of time socializing, going to church and reading newspapers — but they don’t spend a lot of time watching television, a new study finds.

That’s what unhappy people do.

Although people who describe themselves as happy enjoy watching television, it turns out to be the single activity they engage in less often than unhappy people, said John Robinson, a professor of sociology at the University of Maryland and the author of the study, which appeared in the journal Social Indicators Research.

While most large studies on happiness have focused on the demographic characteristics of happy people — factors like age and marital status — Dr. Robinson and his colleagues tried to identify what activities happy people engage in. The study relied primarily on the responses of 45,000 Americans collected over 35 years by the University of Chicago’s General Social Survey, and on published “time diary” studies recording the daily activities of participants.

“We looked at 8 to 10 activities that happy people engage in, and for each one, the people who did the activities more — visiting others, going to church, all those things — were more happy,” Dr. Robinson said. “TV was the one activity that showed a negative relationship. Unhappy people did it more, and happy people did it less.”

But the researchers could not tell whether unhappy people watch more television or whether being glued to the set is what makes people unhappy. “I don’t know that turning off the TV will make you more happy,” Dr. Robinson said.

Still, he said, the data show that people who spend the most time watching television are least happy in the long run.

Since the major predictor of how much time is spent watching television is whether someone works or not, Dr. Robinson added, it’s possible that rising unemployment will lead to more TV time.


Copyright 2008 The New York Times Company