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February 20, 2007

UMBC Presents Pianist Noel Lester in Concert

Thursday, March 8, 2007
8 p.m.
UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall

Featuring a Historical Survey of Ragtime

Contact: Thomas Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

Note: You may view or download this release as a pdf file.

Noel LesterThe UMBC Department of Music’s PRIME Series presents pianist Noel Lester in concert on Thursday, March 8, 8 p.m., in the Fine Arts Recital Hall. Noel Lester has delighted audiences and critics alike for his performances throughout the United States, Europe, Asia, and through his recordings and radio broadcasts. He appears regularly as a soloist, chamber pianist, and soloist with orchestra. Noel Lester made his European debut in 1991 at the Ernst Barlach Haus in Hamburg and he has since performed extensively throughout the U.K., Germany, France, Switzerland, Holland, and Poland. He has participated in international festivals at Maastricht and Belfast. In November of 2000, he made his Asian debut with recitals in Sendai and Tokyo.

His radio recitals include NPR, the BBC, RTE Dublin, SDR Stuttgart, Radio France, on the nationally-syndicated show, A Note to You, produced by WGBH-Boston, over WQED Pittsburgh, WNYC, and many others. As a recording artist, he may be heard on the Centaur, Elan, Koch International, Museum of Modern Art, RWYA, and Sonora labels.

The first half of the pianist’s program will feature classical works by Scarlatti, Haydn and Schubert; the second half will focus on the history of ragtime, from its precursors to works by modern masters:

Sonata in F Minor, Longo 187 Domenico Scarlatti
Sonata in C Major, Longo 3 Domenico Scarlatti
Sonata in F Major, Hob. XVI/23 Joseph Haydn
Three Impromptus: Franz Schubert
B-flat Major, Op. 142, No. 3
E-flat Major, Op. 90, No. 2
A-flat Minor, Op. 90, No. 4
“The Riches of Rags”
Precursors:
“Old Folks at Home” Variations (1856) Stephen Foster
Pasquinade (1863) Louis Moreau Gottschalk
The King of Ragtime:
Maple Leaf Rag (1899) Scott Joplin
Solace (1909)
The Next Wave:
The Baltimore Todolo (1908) Eubie Blake
Dill Pickles (1906) Charles L. Johnson
Novelty Rags:
Kitten on the Keys (1921) Zez Confrey
Dizzy Fingers (1923)
European Imitators:
Ragtime (1920) Igor Stravinsky
Ragtime (1921) Paul Hindemith
Golliwog’s Cakewalk (1908) Claude Debussy
Modern Masters:
The Graceful Ghost Rag (1971) William Bolcom
Spring Beauties (1997) Brian Dykstra

Admission
Admission is $7 general, $3 for senior citizens, free for all students, and free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or by calling MissionTix at 410-752-8950.
Tickets will also be available at the door (cash or check only) immediately prior to the concert.

Telephone
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
MissionTix: http://www.missiontix.com
Online News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news

Directions
• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Administration Drive Garage.
• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Administration Drive Garage.
• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Administration Drive Garage.
• Visitor parking is available in the Administration Drive Garage. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/
or by email or postal mail.

Posted by tmoore

February 15, 2007

UMBC Department of Visual Arts Presents Spring 2007 Visiting Artists

Vincent Grenier, Filmmaker, March 8
Micki Spiller, Sculptor, April 4

Contact: Thomas Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

Note: You may view or download this release as a pdf file.

The UMBC Department of Visual Arts presents its Fall 2006 series of Visiting Artist Lectures, featuring Vincent Grenier and Micki Spiller.

Vincent Grenier
Filmmaker
March 8, 7 pm, Fine Arts Building Room 221
Vincent Grenier was born in Quebec City, Canada. He has made experimental films and videos since the early 1970s when he received an MFA at the San Francisco Art Institute. Grenier’s films have been shown in the United States, Canada and Europe at showcases such as the Museum of Modern Art in New York, the Anthology Film Archives, the Pacific Film Archives, the Collective for Living Cinema and Cinéma Parallel in Montréal. His films and videos have earned him production grants from the Canada Council and elsewhere.

His films and videos include: Tabula Rasa (2004), 2nd prize Media City Festival, Windsor, Canada, Views from the Avant Garde, New York Film Festival and Onion Film & Video Festival; Here (2002), Awarded Gold for best Experimental film, New York Film Expo; Color Study (2000), Rotterdam Film festival, London and Toronto Film Festivals, Lincoln Center, second prize at the Black Maria Film Festival; Material Incidents (2001), Rotterdam Film Festival & New York Video Festival; Feet (1994) 2nd prize at the 1995 Black Maria; Out in the Garden (1991), Best Documentary, 1992 Ann Arbor Film Festival, Best Experimental Documentary, 16th Atlanta Film/Video Festival, shown on WNET and London Film Festival; You (1990), Black Maria Festival; Time’s Wake (1987), prize winner, Black Maria Festival.

Seven of Grenier’s films & videos were curated in the Whitney Museum of American Art 1970-2000 American Century Film program. Films by Grenier are in the collections of the Donnell Media Library in NYC, the National Film Archive, Ottawa, the National Gallery of Canada, Ottawa, and AGO, Toronto. Grenier is on the faculty in the Cinema Department at Binghamton University and lives in Ithaca, New York.

Micki Spiller
Sculptor
April 4, 12 noon, Fine Arts Building Room 215
Micki Spiller is an artist whose work examines the curiosities of space. She will speak about a recent project, Lost and Found in the Stacks, exploring the imaginary spaces created in books. In this project, Spiller breaks down barriers between libraries and museums by creating works that can be checked out of the Brooklyn Public Library. From the outside, these works resemble books, however when opened they reveal an elaborate miniature architectural world inspired by particular books. For example, one project replicates period rooms from the Metropolitan Museum of Art, as inspired by E.L. Konigsberg’s mystery From the Mixed-up Files of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler.

Spiller has exhibited her work at such venues as the Islip Art Museum (East Islip, New York), Indiana University Gallery (Terre Haute, Indiana), Spaces (Cleveland, Ohio), Franklin Furnace Archives (New York City), and at the Brooklyn Museum of Art. Spiller has participated in artist residency programs at the Smack Mellon Studios (Brooklyn, New York), The Evergreen House (Baltimore, Maryland), Henry Street Settlement (New York City), the AIM program at the Bronx Museum of Art (Bronx, New York), Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts (Omaha, Nebraska), and at the World Views Studios in the World Trade Center (New York City). She has been the recipient of numerous grants such as the Pollock-Krasner Grant, Art Matters Grant, and New Jersey State Council on the Arts Grant. Spiller received her BFA from the Kansas City Art Institute, and her MFA from Ohio State University in sculpture. Currently, she serves on the faculty at Parsons School of Design and The Pratt Institute.

Admission
All events are free and open to the public.

Telephone
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
Online News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news

Directions
• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to Visitor Parking.
• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to Visitor Parking.
• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to Visitor Parking.
• Visitor parking is available in the Administration Drive Garage and the Commons Garage. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/
or by email or postal mail.

Posted by tmoore

February 13, 2007

UMBC Department of Theatre presents the “IN 10” Theatre Festival and National Play Competition

Five Short Plays Presented Each Evening,
Including the Premiere of a New Work by Heather McDonald

March 1-4, 2007
UMBC Theatre

Contact: Thomas Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

Note: You may view or download this release as a pdf file.

The UMBC Department of Theatre presents the IN 10 Theatre Festival and National Play Competition, March 1-4 at the UMBC Theatre. Each evening, theatergoers will enjoy five short plays, including the premiere of a new work by Baltimore area playwright Heather McDonald.

Inaugurated in 2006, the annual IN 10 National Play Competition seeks to address the scarcity of strong roles for young women in contemporary American plays. By creating a national competition for 10-minute long plays that feature solid acting opportunities for young actresses, the UMBC Department of Theatre hopes to help commence a new era in contemporary American playwrighting. The national winner is awarded a $1,000 cash prize and performances at the Festival. Additionally, each year the IN 10 Festival and National Play Competition commissions a new work by a noted American playwright.

The winner of the 2007 IN 10 Competition is EM Lewis, whose work, The Edge of Ross Island, will be staged along with the work of three other finalists: Ruth McKee's Otherwise Engaged, Ira Gamerman’s A Girl with a Black Eye, and Mark Young’s The Final Movement. The commissioned playwright for 2007 is Maryland resident Heather McDonald, whose play, The Two Marys, will receive its premiere during the Festival.

Susan McCully, IN 10’s artistic director and member of the faculty of UMBC’s Department of Theatre, said, “A very concrete intent drives the IN 10 Festival. University theatre departments throughout the United States tend to have more women than men in their programs, but most of the stronger roles in contemporary theatre are for men. Young actresses need to work on plays in which their characters drive the action.”

Lynn Watson, chair of UMBC’s Department of Theatre, added, “When we first did IN 10 last season, it was very gratifying to see the effect that producing those plays had on our young female cast. At rehearsal discussions and talk-backs with audiences, we could hear and see the actors' exhilaration at finally occupying the center of the dramatic action, rather than reflecting it or revolving around it, as is all too often the case. In our acting classes, young woman often search in vain to find contemporary scenes where issues that engage them are addressed with complexity and subtlety, if they’re addressed at all. So much of the time, young female characters are two-dimensional and ‘functionary’—the girlfriend, the daughter, the co-worker—serving to advance the story or provide a foil to respond to male concerns. Last year, the young women in IN 10 responded with tremendous pleasure and pride as they took on characters and issues written expressly for them. And we are seeing the same response this year in the cast of IN 10 2007.”

About the Playwrights

IN 10 Competition Winner:

EM Lewis: The Edge of Ross Island
EM Lewis’ work has been read and produced around the country. Her new full-length play, HEADS—a hostage drama set against the war in Iraq—was read at Pacific Resident Theatre, and will be included in New York University’s hotINK International Festival of New Plays in January 2007. Infinite Black Suitcase, a large ensemble piece set in rural Oregon, was developed and received a workshop production at Moving Arts in 2005. The play was named a semi-finalist for the O’Neill Playwrights Conference in 2006 and a finalist in the Hinton Battle Theatre Lab’s “Diverse Voices” playwriting contest. Lewis is a writer-in-residence at Moving Arts Theatre Company in Los Angeles and a member of the Dramatists Guild and the Alliance of Los Angeles Playwrights. Outside the theatre world, Lewis is co-founder and editor of the online literary journal Sunspinner. She lives in Santa Monica, California and is originally from Oregon.

IN 10 Competition Finalists:

Ruth McKee: Otherwise Engaged
Ruth McKee’s plays include The Nightshade Family, which was a finalist in the Kendeda Graduate Playwriting Contest, Alliance Theatre, Atlanta, and was recently read at Playwrights Horizons; Security Check, presented at Six Figures Theatre Company’s Artists of Tomorrow Festival 2006; 500 Words, produced in the 2005 Baldwin New Play Festival at the University of California, San Diego; Cargo, produced in BNPF 2004; Mail Returned, produced at UCSD and in the Six Figures AOT Festival 2004; The Noise Room, developed at HB Playwrights Foundation; Development, produced at Access Theater and Chashama in New York. Originally from Canada by way of Bangladesh and Kenya, Ruth has a BFA in Dramatic Writing from NYU and an MFA in Playwriting from UCSD, San Diego. She currently lives in Los Angeles and teaches playwriting at UCSD and Idyllwild Arts Academy.

Ira Gamerman: Girl with a Black Eye
Ira Gamerman received his BA in theatre from Towson University. His plays have been performed in Maryland, California, Alaska, and at such prestigious venues as the Kennedy Center. In 2005, he participated in the Kennedy Center’s summer playwriting intensive, where he studied under such nationally/internationally known playwrights as Lee Blessing, Roberto Aguirre Sacassa, and Gary Garrison. Gamerman is the founder of The Playwrights Group of Baltimore, a group dedicated to developing new plays in Baltimore. His first full-length play, No One Told You..., received a Maryland State Arts Council grant for playwriting in 2005. His second full-length play, Split, won first place production and third place play at the 2006 Baltimore Playwrights Festival. Ira was voted “Best Playwright Of Baltimore” by Baltimore’s City Paper in 2006. As a songwriter/guitarist, Ira fronts local indie band, EVEN SO.

Mark Young: The Final Movement
Mark Young is a Chicago playwright and Resident Playwright at Chicago Dramatists, where many of his plays have been developed. He has twice been a finalist for the Heideman Award at the Actors Theatre of Louisville for his plays Night (2004) and Black And White (2002). In 2002, his play They All Fall Down was a finalist for the Arts & Letters Prize, selected by John Guare. They All Fall Down subsequently appeared at the Source Theatre in Washington D.C., along with his one-act play New Orleans, as part of the 2002 Washington Theatre Festival. Both They All Fall Down and New Orleans received the Source Theatre’s H.D. Lewis New Play Award, as an evening of one acts titled Young Love. He is a graduate of St. John’s College and received his M.A. from the University of Chicago.

Commissioned Playwright:

Heather McDonald: The Two Marys
Heather McDonald was commissioned by Houston Grand Opera and composer Jake Heggie (Dead Man Walking) to write the libretto for an opera based on Graham Greene’s novel The End of the Affair. The opera, also titled The End of the Affair, had its world premiere at Houston Grand Opera in March 2004 directed by Broadway director Leonard Foglia and starring Australian soprano Cheryl Barker and New Zealand baritone Teddy Tahu Rhodes. The opera received a second production at Madison Opera, and a third production will be in Seattle at Opera Pacifica fall 2005. Subsequent productions are planned for Pittsburgh, New York and Australia.

Heather McDonald’s play An Almost Holy Picture was produced on Broadway starring Kevin Bacon and directed by Michael Mayer. It was nominated for the 2002 Pulitzer Prize. The play premiered at the La Jolla Playhouse starring David Morse and was named Best New Play of the Year by the Los Angeles Times. Ms. McDonald received the Kesselring Award for Best New American Play from the National Arts Club. The play has subsequently been produced at Center Stage in Baltimore, Round House Theatre in Washington, D.C., the McCarter Theatre in Princeton, Berkeley Repertory Theatre, Indiana Repertory Theatre and in numerous other theatres around the country. Holy Picture has been translated into Spanish and produced in Mexico and Spain.

Her play When Grace Comes In received joint World Premieres at The La Jolla Playhouse and Seattle Repertory Theatre. The play was a finalist for The Susan Smith Blackburn Prize and was developed at The Sundance Theatre Laboratory, Seattle Repertory Theatre, and The New Harmony Project. Ms. McDonald has continued to work on Grace and a new version received a workshop through FirstLook Productions in New York directed by Rebecca Taichman and starring Marcia Gay Harden.

The production Ms. McDonald directed of her play Dream of a Common Language for Theatre of the First Amendment was nominated by The Washington Theatre Awards Society for eight Helen Hayes Awards and won four including Outstanding Resident Production. Dream premiered at Berkeley Repertory Theatre and was produced Off-Broadway at The Judith Anderson Theatre. It has had many other productions.

Ms. McDonald directed her play Available Light, a play with music, at Signature Theatre, which was supported by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. The NEA support allowed for the commissioning and recording (at the NPR studios) of a full score by composer David Maddox. Available Light premiered at The Actors Theatre of Louisville in the Humana Festival.

Other plays include Faulkner’s Bicycle, The Rivers and Ravines (commissioned and produced by Arena Stage), Available Light, and Rain and Darkness: Hitting for the Cycle. They have been produced at many theatres including Yale Repertory Theatre, The Actors Theatre of Louisville – Humana Festival of New Plays, Berkeley Repertory Theatre, Center Stage, the McCarter Theatre, the La Jolla Playhouse, Arena Stage, Indiana Repertory Theatre, Rivendell Theatre, the Magic Theatre, New Playwrights Theatre and Off Broadway in New York.

Recent and new projects include a commission from Signature Theatre for a new play, tentatively titled The Suppressed-Desire Ball, directing Michele Lowe’s play The Smell of the Kill at Round House Theatre, The J. M. Barrie Project, a collaborative piece with the MFA Acting students at Case-Western Reserve University and The Cleveland Playhouse, and a commission to adapt Gerda Lerner’s memoir FIREWEED: A Political Biography for Madison Repertory Theatre.

She has three times been awarded NEA Playwriting Fellowships and been nominated for the Pulitzer Prize. She has been a finalist for the Susan Smith Blackburn Prize and won the First Prize Kesselring Award. She has been the recipient of a TCG Extended Collaboration Grant and a McKnight Fellow, and in 2005 an NEA/TCG Playwriting Residency Award. Her plays are published by the Dramatists Play Service, Samuel French, Inc., American Theatre Magazine, and in several collections.

Ms. McDonald has had a long commitment to teaching and as associate professor and playwright-in-residence at George Mason University’s College of Visual and Performing Arts - Institute of the Arts for the past fourteen years. She has taught many other workshops around the country in various graduate playwriting programs and is on the faculty of the Kennedy Center Summer Playwriting Intensive. She received her MFA from NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts’ Dramatic Writing Program.

Performances
Thursday, March 1, 4 pm (preview) (free admission to UMBC campus community)
Friday, March 2, 8 pm (opening night)
Saturday, March 3, 8 pm (with talkback following performance)
Sunday, March 4, 4 pm

Note: Plays contain adult language and subject matter that may not be appropriate for children.

Admission
$10 general admission; $5 students and seniors; $3 for the preview.
The performance on Thursday, March 1st is free for the UMBC campus community.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or by calling MissionTix at 410-752-8950.

Telephone
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Directions
• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.
• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Theatre.
• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.
• Visitor parking is available in the Commons Garage. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/
or by email or postal mail.

Posted by tmoore

February 12, 2007

UMBC Theatre Faculty in the News

UMBC's Department of Theatre faculty and alumni recently received favorable reviews in the Baltimore Sun, Washington Post and the Washington City Paper.

A production directed by Xerxes Mehta, professor of theatre, was reviewed in the Baltimore Sun and Washington Post. The double bill of one-act plays by Harold Pinter--The Collection and The Lover--also included set and costumes by Elena Zlotescu, associate professor of theatre, and Lynn Watson, chair and associate professor of theatre, was dialect consultant.

The Pinter plays were produced by Rep Stage, the professional theatre company in residence at Howard County Community College. The new artistic director of Rep Stage is theatre alumnus Michael Stebbins.

In addition, Assistant Professor of Theatre Colette Searls' direction of Vigils at Woolly Mammoth Theatre in Washington, DC was favorably reviewed in the Washington Post and Washington City Paper.

Posted by elewis

February 9, 2007

UMBC Department of Theatre Presents Lecture by Lee Breuer

Prize-Winning Writer and Director
Friday, March 9, 7 p.m., UMBC Theatre

Contact: Thomas Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

Note: You may view or download this release as a pdf file.

Lee BreuerThe UMBC Department of Theatre presents a lecture by writer and director Lee Breuer on Friday, March 9, 7 p.m., at the UMBC Theatre.

Lee Breuer was founding artistic director of Mabou Mines theatre company in New York City, which he began in 1970 with colleagues Philip Glass, Ruth Maleczech, JoAnne Akalitis, David Warrilow, Frederick Neuman and Bill Raymond. He is a writer, director and lyricist who also works outside the company in film, on Broadway and on a variety of theatrical projects in Europe, Africa, Asia and North and South America.

Breuer’s most recent work with Mabou Mines is the puppet opera Red Beads, created in collaboration with puppeteer Basil Twist and composer Ushio Torikai. Of the September 2005 New York City premiere, The New York Times said, “...theater as sorcery; it is a crossroads where artistic traditions meet to invent a marvelous common language. It is a fairy tale, a puppet play and a chamber opera...amazing work.”

Breuer’s best known work is The Gospel at Colonus, a Pentecostal Gospel rendering of Sophocles’ Oedipus at Colonus created with composer Bob Telson and starring Morgan Freeman and Clarence Fountain and the Blind Boys of Alabama, which premiered at The Brooklyn Academy of Music's Next Wave Festival, and was performed on Broadway at the Lunt-Fontanne Theater in 1988 for which he was nominated for a Tony Award. The Gospel at Colonus was televised on the PBS series Great Performances. The production received numerous awards, including a Pulitzer Prize nomination (1988), the Obie for Best Musical (1984), and an Emmy Television Award.

In 1988 Lee Breuer was awarded the prestigious John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Fellowship, popularly referred to as the “Genius” grant. He has also been awarded playwriting grants and fellowships from CAPS, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Rockefeller Foundation, the Guggenheim Foundation, and the McKnight Foundation.

In April and May 2007, Breuer will direct the Arena Stage (Washington, D.C.) production of Mabou Mines’ Peter & Wendy.

Admission
Admission is free, but seating is limited. Reservations are strongly recommended by calling 410-455-2476 or visiting www.umbc.edu/arts.

Telephone
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Directions
• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.
• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Theatre.
• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.
• Visitor parking is available in the Commons Garage. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/
or by email or postal mail.

Lee Breuer

###

Posted by tmoore

February 2, 2007

UMBC Presents Edgeworks Dance Theater in Concert

February 21, 2007
8 p.m., UMBC Theatre

Contact: Thomas Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

Note: You may view or download this release as a pdf file.

UMBC presents Edgeworks Dance Theater in performance on Wednesday, February 21st, at 8:00 p.m. in the UMBC Theatre.

Edgeworks Dance Theater will present the Baltimore premiere of its new work, Project: Cold Case, the hard-hitting critically-acclaimed component of the company's Negro Dance Theater Project, reflective of a continuing exploration of Black masculinity and image, identity, and representation in contemporary America. Commissioned by the John F. Kennedy Center through its Local Dance Commissioning Project Program, Cold Case goes beyond the surface to resurrect the past and to present the now, challenging audiences to emerge from their own prejudices and fears and to fearlessly move into the future with a greater sense of understanding and compassion. Cold Case moves from what is considered to be on the edge of society to venture into extreme conditions in the hopes of achieving humility and tolerance. Cold Case moves from the edge to the center, reaching out.

Edgeworks Dance Theater is an ensemble of American men, predominantly African-American men, that aims to break down stereotypes through dance utilizing a spectrum of performance, choreographic and teaching styles, reflecting the diversity of experiences and perspectives of both its members and guest artists.

“Movement contrast and counterpoint are deployed with confidence and clarity. Simpler motion is rich and resonant...”
--George Jackson, Dance View Times

“The strongest evidence that dance can communicate what even the most heartfelt words cannot.”
--Sarah Kaufman, The Washington Post

Admission
General admission: $15.00. Students and seniors: $7.00.
Box Office: www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950

Telephone
Box Office: 410-752-8950
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.
Photos on this release Copyright ©2007 Astrid Riecken.

Directions
• From I-95 take exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the UMBC Theatre. Parking is available in The Commons Garage.
• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the UMBC Theatre. Parking is available in The Commons Garage.
Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

###

Posted by tmoore

January 17, 2007

UMBC Presents Spring 2007 Music Concert Season

Contact: Thomas Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

Note: You may view or download this release as a pdf file.

The UMBC Department of Music presents its spring 2007 season, featuring three series: TNT (Then, Now, Tomorrow: Music for the Adventurous Listener), PRIME (Resounding Traditions) and a Student Concert Series. Returning this year is the bi-annual Music of Japan Today Festival on March 30th, 31st and April 1st.

TNT Series
(Then, Now, Tomorrow: Music for the Adventurous Listener)

Michael LipseyTuesday, February 6
Nota Bena Contemporary Ensemble
and the Queens College/Aaron Copland School of Music Percussion Ensemble
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall

Free admission
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

The Nota Bene Contemporary Ensemble and the Queens College/Aaron Copland School of Music Percussion Ensemble, both under the direction of percussionist Michael Lipsey, will perform Igor Stravinsky's L'Histoire de soldat and John Cage's The City Wears a Slouch Hat (1942), with text by Kenneth Patchen.

The Nota Bene Contemporary Ensemble is dedicated to the performance of twentieth-century music, including classics of the repertory, new music, and faculty and student works. Based at the Aaron Copland School of Music at Queen’s College, the ensemble has performed at New York University’s Black Box Theater, the Open Ears Festival Marathon, worked with violinist Todd Reynolds and improvised with Sylvan Leroux of the Fula Flute Ensemble. Recent performances have featured works by Louis Andreissen and Frederic Rzewski.

March 30, 31, and April 1
Music of Japan Today 2007 Festival and Symposium

Complete schedule to be announced.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

Western art music has existed for a relatively short time in Japan—it is only since the 1950s, countering Japan’s rush to adopt all that is “Western,” that some composers, led by Yuasa, Mayuzumi, Takemitsu and Ichiyanagi, began to move away from stylistic modeling of nineteenth-century European forms and twentieth-century dodecaphony towards a more individualistic approach. Concerned with reflecting philosophical and musical elements from their own culture, they began to discover and develop their “own music.” The music of these artists reflects a new global confluence of multiple cultures—a powerful cross-fertilization of aesthetics and musical characteristics from both East and West. The music is reflective of a variety of aspects of contemporary Japanese and Western societies, while at the same time deeply rooted in a traditional culture that has evolved over many years.

In Music of Japan Today 2007, UMBC will host a three-day symposium of performances, lecture-recitals, panel discussions, and paper presentations on topics that concern Japanese music from the widest possible range of disciplines and expertise.
Three guest composers of international stature will participate in the symposium: Hiroyuki Itoh, a winner of international composition prizes in Europe and Japan (including the prestigious Akutagawa Award), has been commissioned and performed by major ensembles including the New Japan Philharmonic, the Nieuw Ensemble, and the Arditti Quartet; Hiroyuki Yamamoto, whose works have been performed at Forum ’91 (Montreal), Gaudeamus Music Week ’94 (Holland), and ISCM World Music Days (2000 in Luxembourg and 2001 in Yokohama), has received prizes for his work, including the Japan Music Competition, Toru Takemitsu Composition Award, and Akutagawa Award; and Shirotomo Aizawa, winner of an Ataka Prize, and a composition prize from the National Theater in Japan. He has studied composition in Tokyo, Berlin, and Vienna, and conducting with Seiji Ozawa, among others.

Performances during the symposium will include a broad range of works for different genres (solo instrument, chamber music, computer and electronic music, traditional instruments) by Itoh, Yamamoto, and Aizawa, as well as other Japanese composers. They will include premieres of new works by the guest composers. The performers for these concerts will include faculty and students of the UMBC Department of Music, and guest musicians from the Baltimore/Washington DC area and other international new music centers. This symposium is the sixth in a series of events since 1992 to address Japanese and other Asian musics, organized by Kazuko Tanosaki and E. Michael Richards.

Franklin Cox (photo: Richard Anderson)Sunday, April 22
Franklin Cox, cello

3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

Cellist Franklin Cox has performed in numerous festivals and new music ensembles, including the Indiana University New Music Ensemble, the Group for Contemporary Music, and SONOR, as well as at the 1980 and 1982 Spoleto Festivals, the 1983 Banff Summer Chamber Music Festival, the Xenakis Festival and Darmstadt Revisited Festival at UCSD, and at the Darmstadt Festival since 1988, where he received a special citation for cello performance in 1990. He received a Bachelor of Music degree in composition from Indiana University, a Master of Arts degree in composition from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. in composition at the University of California, San Diego.

His program will include Time and Motion Study II by Brian Ferneyhough and the world premiere of Crutch by Aaron Cassidy.

Dr. Cox has studied with Brian Ferneyhough, Roger Reynolds, Joji Yuasa, Steven Suber, Fred Fox, Harvey Sollberger, Fred Lerdahl, and Jack Beeson. He received an Alice M. Ditson Scholarship and Dissertation Fellowship at Columbia University, Regent's Fellowship and a Dissertation Research Fellowship for Outstanding Research at UCSD, a full scholarship to the 1990 June in Buffalo Festival, and full scholarships for the 1988 and 1992 Darmstadt Festivals. He was awarded a Stipendium Fellowship at the 1990 Darmstadt Festival, won 2nd prize in the Los Angeles Arts Commission competition in the spring of 1991, and was co-winner of the Kranichsteiner Musikpreis (highest award for composition) in the 1992 Darmstadt Festival.

New Haven QuartetThursday, May 3
New Haven Quartet

8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Free admission
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

The New Haven Quartet is comprised of Ayano Kataoka (percussion), Steve Wilson (tenor), James Deitz (percussion), and Josh Quillen (percussion), all graduates of the Yale University School of Music in New Haven. They specialize in interpreting percussion classics by composers such as Toru Takemitsu and Stuart Saunders Smith (professor of music at UMBC) while commissioning new works from young composers such as Mark Dancigers. Their uniquely diverse backgrounds converge to create a group sound like no other.

The quartet's program will include:
Raintree by Toru Takemitsu
And Sometimes the Ears/When the Body Betrays by Stuart Saunders Smith
Lion Lying Down by Mark Dancigers
…And Points North by Stuart Saunders Smith
Songs 1-9/Polka in Treblinka by Stuart Saunders Smith

Allen and Patricia StrangeMonday, May 14
Allen and Patricia Strange

8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

Violinist Patricia Strange will present a program of music by composers Allen Strange and Larry Austin, including Strange's Goddess, Heroes: The Boys (Ghost Tracks), Elemental Vamp, SideShow: Six Gothic Images from the Darkside, and Quinault Cathedral, and Austin's Redux.

Allen Strange is one of the leading authorities on analogue electronic music; his Electronic Music: Systems, Techniques, and Controls (1972) is now a classic text. He also wrote Programming and Meta-Programming the Electro-Organism (1974), the operations manual for the Buchla Music Easel and has documented the 200 Series synthesizers made by Buchla. He co-founded two performance groups, Biome (1967-72), in order to make use of the EMS Synthi, and, with Buchla in 1974, the Electronic Weasel Ensemble. He was president of the International Computer Music Association (1993-98) and has appeared as a guest artist-lecturer throughout the world. With his wife, Patricia, they have recently published The Contemporary Violin: Extended Performance Techniques.

Strange composes for live electronic instrumental ensembles, for live and taped electronics with voices and acoustic instruments, and for the theatre; most of his works for acoustic instruments require extended performance techniques. He is particularly interested in linear tuning systems, spatial distribution of sound, the isolation of timbre as a musical parameter, and composing for groups of like instruments or voices (consorts). Elements of vaudeville, rock-and-roll, country-and-western music, and the guitar techniques of Les Paul are found in his works. His theatre pieces employ various media including film, video, and lighting effects. Strange lives on Bainbridge Island in the Puget Sound pursuing a full-time career composing and concertizing with his wife.

Patricia Strange is an active performer of contemporary violin literature and has concertized throughout the USA, Canada, Mexico and Europe. With her husband, Allen Strange, she co-founded two live electronic music ensembles, BIOME and The Electric Weasel Ensemble. She received a Bachelor of Music degree from California State University Fullerton and a Masters of Arts degree from the University of California, San Diego. Ms. Strange has held positions in the San Diego Symphony, Opera San Jose, San Jose Cleveland Ballet Orchestra, Mid Summer Mozart Orchestra and was principal second violin with the San Jose Symphony. She has also taught violin and viola at San Jose State University. She and her husband, Allen Strange, have published a book entitled The Contemporary Violin; Extended Performance Techniques, available from Scarecrow Press. She currently lives on Bainbridge Island in the Puget Sound and remains active as a performer, teacher and director of the SoundScape Contemporary Chamber Players.

 

PRIME Series
Resounding Traditions

Newberry’s Victorian Cornet BandSunday, January 28
Newberry’s Victorian Cornet Band

3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$10 general admission, $5 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available at the door, cash or check only.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

Newberry's Victorian Cornet Band, led by guest conductor and UMBC Director of Bands Jari Villanueva, presents a program entitled Music of the Gilded Age. The music of America's Gilded Age—the post-Civil War and post-Reconstruction years from 1865 to 1901—celebrated the country's unprecedented ecomonic, territorial, industrial and population expansions.

The program will feature music by Suppé, Grafulla, Sousa, Pryor, Verdi and others, and will feature solo performances by cornetist Elisa Koehler and trombonist Jared Denhard.

Franklin Cox and Rachel FranklinSunday, February 11
Franklin Cox, cello, and Rachel Franklin, piano

3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$10 general admission, $5 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

Cellist Franklin Cox and pianist Rachel Franklin join forces to present an afternoon of chamber music. Both artists are members of UMBC’s distinguished music faculty.

The duo's program will feature both Brahms cello sonatas, No. 1 in E minor, Op. 38, and No. 2 in F major, Op. 99.

Franklin Cox has performed in numerous festivals and new music ensembles, including the Indiana University New Music Ensemble, the Group for Contemporary Music, and SONOR, as well as at the 1980 and 1982 Spoleto Festivals, the 1983 Banff Summer Chamber Music Festival, the Xenakis Festival and Darmstadt Revisited Festival at UCSD, and at the Darmstadt Festival since 1988, where he received a special citation for cello performance in 1990. He received a Bachelor of Music degree in composition from Indiana University, a Master of Arts degree in composition from Columbia University, and a PhD. in composition at the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Cox has studied with Brian Ferneyhough, Roger Reynolds, Joji Yuasa, Steven Suber, Fred Fox, Harvey Sollberger, Fred Lerdahl, and Jack Beeson. He received an Alice M. Ditson Scholarship and Dissertation Fellowship at Columbia University, Regent's Fellowship and a Dissertation Research Fellowship for Outstanding Research at UCSD, a full scholarship to the 1990 June in Buffalo Festival, and full scholarships for the 1988 and 1992 Darmstadt Festivals. He was awarded a Stipendium Fellowship at the 1990 Darmstadt Festival, won 2nd prize in the Los Angeles Arts Commission competition in the spring of 1991, and was co-winner of the Kranichsteiner Musikpreis (highest award for composition) in the 1992 Darmstadt Festival.

As a Pro Musicis International Award winner, British pianist Rachel Franklin has given her solo debuts in Carnegie Recital Hall, New York, and Jordan Hall, Boston. The Boston Globe enthused about her “beautiful differentiations of color, touch and texture” and described a performance on her solo debut CD as “not inferior...to the recorded performances by Cortot and Rubinstein.” She has also given European Pro Musicis solo debuts in Paris and Rome. At the Wigmore Hall, London, where she has given several recitals, critics applauded her “stunning individuality,” “exquisite dynamic control,” and “amazing power and solidity of technique.” The Washington Post praised her “cool-headed bravura and panache.” In Dublin The Irish Times said: “Of the many qualities that distinguished Rachel Franklin's recital, it was perhaps the intelligence underpinning her creative interpretations that caused her to stand out from so many other young pianists...” She has been featured on NPR's Performance Today, with whom she has given frequent spoken broadcasts. Her recital broadcasts include BBC Radio 3, WQXR and WNYC in New York and WJHU in Baltimore, and Radio Telefis Eireann in Ireland.

Noel LesterThursday, March 8
Noel Lester, piano

8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$10 general admission, $5 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

Pianist Noel Lester has delighted audiences and critics alike for his performances throughout the United States, Europe, Asia, and through his recordings and radio broadcasts. He appears regularly as a soloist, chamber pianist, and soloist with orchestra. Noel Lester made his European debut in 1991 at the Ernst Barlach Haus in Hamburg and he has since performed extensively throughout the U.K., Germany, France, Switzerland, Holland, and Poland. He has participated in international festivals at Maastricht and Belfast. In November of 2000, he made his Asian debut with recitals in Sendai and Tokyo.

His radio recitals include NPR, the BBC, RTE Dublin, SDR Stuttgart, Radio France, on the nationally-syndicated show, “A Note to You,” produced by WGBH-Boston, over WQED Pittsburgh, WNYC, and many others. As a recording artist, he may be heard on the Centaur, Elan, Koch International, Museum of Modern Art, RWYA, and Sonora labels.

The program will feature works by Beethoven, Scarlatti, and Brahms, plus a historical survey of ragtime, from its roots to today.

Sunday, March 11
UMBC Symphony Orchestra

3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Free admission.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

The UMBC Symphony Orchestra performs under the direction of Wayne Cameron. The program will feature the winners of the High School Concerto Competition and the Department of Music Concerto Competition performing Edward Elgar's Cello Concerto in E minor, Op. 85; Beethoven's Violin Concerto in D major, Op. 61; Édouard Lalo's Symphonie Espagnole, Op. 21; and Béla Bartók's Violin Rhapsody No. 1.

Tiemann-Belzer DuoSunday, April 15
Tiemann-Belzer Duo

3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$10 general admission, $5 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

Exploding on the scene with their debut CD Crypto, the Tiemann-Belzer Duo is an unusual jazz ensemble featuring percussionist Scott Tiemann and saxophonist Matt Belzer. By boiling down a more traditional instrumentation to only the melodic and rhythmic placeholders, the group creates a distinctive sound—a disciplined and creative approach to performance. Featuring new compositions by Belzer, who recently joined the UMBC music faculty, this group is a collaborative effort by musicians who have developed that heightened awareness of each other for which jazz musicians strive.

Rachel FranklinSunday, May 6
UMBC Symphony Orchestra

3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Free admission.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

The UMBC Symphony Orchestra performs under the direction of Wayne Cameron. The program will feature Dvorak's Symphony No. 9 in E minor ("From the New World"), and pianist Rachel Franklin performing the Brahms Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor, Op. 15.

Monday, May 7
UMBC Chamber Players

8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Free admission.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

The UMBC Chamber Players perform under the direction of E. Michael Richards. The program will feature music of Beethoven, Rorem, Prokofiev, Matsudaira, and others.

 

Student Recital Series

March 2 & 3
The Vocal Arts Ensemble directed by David Smith.

7 pm both evenings, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

Thursday, April 26
The UMBC Jazz Ensemble (Big Band) directed by Jari Villanueva.

8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

Saturday, May 5
The Jubilee Singers directed by Janice Jackson.

7 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Donations accepted. 410-455-ARTS.

Tuesday, May 8
The UMBC Percussion Ensemble directed by Tom Goldstein.

8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

Wednesday, May 9
The UMBC New Music Ensemble directed by Stuart Saunders Smith.

8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

Thursday, May 10
The UMBC Wind Ensemble directed by Jari Villanueva.

8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

Saturday, May 12
The UMBC Camerata directed by David Smith.

8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

Tuesday, May 15
Department of Music Honors Recital.

8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

 

Additional Information

Telephone
MissionTix box office: 410-752-8950
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news
MissionTix: http://www.missiontix.com/

Directions
• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

Parking is available after 3:30 p.m. on weekdays and all day during weekends in gated Lots 16/9A for a 50¢ fee, quarters only. From any campus entrance, circle around Hilltop Circle (the road the encircles the campus) to Hilltop Road. Take Hilltop Road toward the center of campus. The Fine Arts Building will now be directly in front of you. Proceed through the stop sign. The road will curve to the right. If Lot 16 is full, you may also pay to park in Lot 9A, which sits on the hill immediately above Lot 16—return to the stop sign and turn left toward Lot 9A, and then to the gate.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

Posted by tmoore

January 12, 2007

UMBC Presents the Phoenix Dance Company

February 7, 8, 9 & 10, 2007
8 p.m., UMBC Theatre

Contact: Thomas Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

Note: You may view or download this release as a pdf file.

©2007 Enoch ChanUMBC presents the acclaimed Phoenix Dance Company, the professional dance company in residence at UMBC, in concert on February 7, 8, 9 and 10, 2007 at 8 p.m. in the UMBC Theatre.

Renowned for its revolutionary exploration of dance and technology, the Phoenix Dance Company features riveting choreography by Carol Hess and Doug Hamby (hailed as “bold and ambitious” by The Washington Post), and performances by the award-winning Sandra Lacy and other artists.

The program will include:

  • A hardcore/punk work by Carol Hess, In Fits and Starts/Scenes from a Personal Space, featuring the chaotic and thrashy music of Baltimore band Lilu Dallas.
  • Square Breath by Doug Hamby, first premiered at Dance Place in Washington, D.C., by Doug Hamby Dance, and now set to a new score by Ferdinand Maisel. Dancers, moving through a wired space, help create the sound score to this strong, powerful and percussive creation.
  • The extraordinary Sandra Lacy in two highly expressive solos, one of her own and one choreographed for her by Ting Yu-Chen.
  • 22 Dean Street by Doug Hamby, a soulful response to the music of Charlie Hayden.
  • …of no small use or advantage, a rich landscape of movement for seven women created through an choreographic process involving a radical interpretation of the graphic symbols of baroque dance scores, by Carol Hess.
  • The premiere of Persona by Carol Hess, a new solo about personal identities, performed by Jenifer Dobbins with a tiny wireless surveillance camera.

Admission
General admission: $15.00. Students and seniors: $7.00.
Box Office: www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950

Telephone
Box Office: 410-752-8950
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.
Photos on this release Copyright ©2007 Enoch Chan.

Directions
• From I-95 take exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the UMBC Theatre. Parking is available in The Commons Garage.
• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the UMBC Theatre. Parking is available in The Commons Garage.
Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

©2007 Enoch Chan

###

Posted by tmoore

January 8, 2007

Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery Presents Two Exhibitions:
Photographs of the Athenian Acropolis: The Restoration Project
and
Celebrating Samuel Beckett at 100

January 29 - March 24, 2007

Contact: Thomas Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

Note: You may view or download this release as a pdf file.

Opening on January 29th and continuing through March 24th, UMBC’s Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents two exhibitions: Photographs of the Athenian Acropolis: The Restoration Project and Celebrating Samuel Beckett at 100.

Significantly damaged by air pollution, earthquakes, wars, erosion and the rusting of iron used in previous restorations, most of the Acropolis monuments have been partially or entirely disassembled and subsequently reconstructed in an effort to preserve their architectural integrity. The Acropolis exhibition, featuring the photography of Socratis Mavrommatis, details these ongoing restorations carried out by the Acropolis Restoration Service since 1975. It was the role of Mavrommatis, chief photographer of the project for more than 25 years, to capture on film the incomparable beauty of the monuments, and, at the same time, the difficulty of working on large pieces of marble of artistic and historical importance.

Photographs of the Acropolis have usually been directed at an idealistic rendering and dramatization of the subject, romantically emphasizing the beauty of their abandoned state and damaged condition. The photographs of the restoration work carried out on the monuments, by contrast, show them as they are, as true to reality as possible. The exhibition images, photographically printed in black and white on large panels that also contain descriptive text, are chronologically arranged and depict four key areas of the restoration effort: the rationale for preservation, the preparation for intervention, the main restoration work in process, and images of the monuments themselves. The photographs include large panoramic shots of the buildings, sometimes encased in scaffolding; close-ups of architectural features such as columns, cornices and friezes; documentation of damage by pollution, explosions and other factors; and the disassembly and reconstruction of some of the monuments.

Photographs of the Athenian Acropolis: The Restoration Project was produced by the Acropolis Restoration Service of the Hellenic Ministry of Culture. The exhibition opened in Athens at the renowned Benaki Museum in 2002, and has traveled to Brussels, Paris, Rome and London. The North American tour is organized by the Thomas J. Walsh Gallery, Fairfield University. The presentation at UMBC is co-organized by Richard Mason, associate professor of Ancient Studies, and the Library Gallery.

Public Program
On February 14th from 4 to 5 pm, the Gallery will present Katherine A. Schwab, associate professor of art history at Fairfield University, who will speak on The Parthenon East Metopes: Technologies of the 21st Century and New Discoveries. This lecture will be held in the Gallery; admission is free.

The Glory of Ruins
Concurrently showing with Photographs from the Athenian Acropolis: The Restoration Project is The Glory of Ruins, on display in the nearby Library Rotunda and curated by a group of eight UMBC students taking part in an Ancient Studies/Honors College internship. This exhibition displays nineteenth and twentieth century photographs depicting classical Athens and Attica, all from the Special Collections of the Albin O. Kuhn Library & Gallery.

Portrait photograph of Samuel Beckett by Jane Brown. Gelatin silver print ©2007 Jane Brown, all rights reserved. Used with permission.Celebrating Samuel Beckett at 100
The Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery celebrates the centenary of Samuel Beckett, one of the leading writers and dramatists of the twentieth century, with the exhibition Celebrating Samuel Beckett at 100. The Irish-born author, whose stirring texts in French and English were recognized by the Nobel Prize in Literature in 1969, is considered by some the best writer of English since Shakespeare and the greatest French playwright since Molière. Curated by Angela Moorjani in association with the Library Gallery, the show will present Beckett’s words and images as filtered through the imaginative work of a number of visual and stage artists. On view will be select photographs, etchings, artists’ books, and rare editions of Beckett’s works.

Public Program for Celebrating Samuel Beckett at 100
On Thursday, February 8th, from 4:00 to 5:30 pm, a program will feature three of UMBC’s resident Beckett scholars—Xerxes Mehta, Angela Moorjani and Wendy Salkind—in readings, performances and discussions related to the works on display. The program will be held in the Library Gallery, free admission, with a reception to follow.

Gallery Information
The Albin O. Kuhn Gallery serves as one of the principal art galleries in the Baltimore region. Objects from the Special Collections Department, as well as art and artifacts from all over the world, are displayed in challenging and informative exhibitions for the University community and the public. Moreover, traveling exhibitions are occasionally presented, and the Gallery sends some exhibits on tour to other institutions nationwide. Admission to the Gallery and its programs is free.

Acknowledgements
Reflections from the Heart: Photographs by David Seymour is organized by the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery, University of Maryland, Baltimore County in collaboration with The Corcoran Gallery of Art and the George Eastman House. The exhibition is made possible by generous support from Ben Shneiderman.

Additional support is provided by the Maryland State Arts Council, an agency funded by the State of Maryland and the National Endowment for the Arts, the Baltimore County Commission on Arts & Sciences, the Friends of the Library & Gallery, the Libby Kuhn Endowment, the Judaic Studies Program at UMBC, and Epson USA Inc.

The presentation of both exhibitions is supported by an arts program grant from the Maryland State Arts Council, an agency funded by the State of Maryland and the National Endowment for the Arts. Additional support for Photographs from the Athenian Acropolis: The Restoration Project comes from the Friends of the Library & Gallery and the Department of Ancient Studies. Additional support for Celebrating Samuel Beckett at 100 comes from UMBC’s Office of the President, Office of the Provost, the Departments of Modern Languages and Linguistics, Theatre, and English, and the Humanities Forum. The reception is sponsored by the Friends of the Library & Gallery and the Libby Kuhn Endowment.

Hours
Sunday 1 P.M. – 5 P.M.
Monday 12 P.M. – 4:30 P.M.
Tuesday 12 P.M. – 4:30 P.M.
Wednesday 12 P.M. – 4:30 P.M.
Thursday 12 P.M. – 8 P.M.
Friday 12 P.M. – 4:30 P.M.
Saturday 1 P.M. – 5 P.M.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
General Gallery information: 410-455-2270

Web
UMBC Arts & Culture Calendar: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery: http://aok.lib.umbc.edu/gallery/
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/
or by email or postal mail.

Directions
UMBC is located approximately 10 minutes from downtown Baltimore and 20 minutes from I-495.
• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Walker Avenue Garage or Albin O. Kuhn Library.
• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Walker Avenue Garage or Albin O. Kuhn Library.
• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Walker Avenue Garage or Albin O. Kuhn Library.
• Daytime metered visitor parking is available in the Walker Avenue Garage. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days.

###

Posted by tmoore

December 4, 2006

UMBC Department of Music Presents a New Work by Carlo Alessandro Landini

December 12, 2006
UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall

Contact: Thomas Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

The UMBC Department of Music presents an Honors Recital, including the premiere of a new work by Carlo Alessandro Landini (pictured), performed by Ruckus, the professional contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC, on Tuesday, December 12th, at 8:00 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall.

Carlo Alessandro Landini, born in Milan, 1954, was unanimously awarded the Premier Prix of the Conservatoire National Supérieur de Musique in 1981. In the same year he received a Fulbright Award, which enabled him to teach at the University of California, San Diego from 1981 to 1983. Since then, he has lived in Italy and now holds the teaching chair in composition at the G. Nicolini Conservatory in Piacenza. He has won numerous competitions (Ennio Porrino, Valentino Bucchi, Città di Mestre, Franco Margola), and is the only composer ever awarded twice (2002 and 2004) the prestigious K. Serocki Prize in Warsaw, Poland. He is also a regular guest composer at the Ferienkurse für Neue Musik in Darmstadt.

His new work, Coming to Life. Generation, Transition, Interlocking of Phases, was commissioned by Ruckus to commemmorate UMBC's 40th Anniversary.

The composer has described the work in the following terms:

In thermodynamics, phase transition (also called phase change) is the transformation of a thermodynamic system from one phase to another. The distinguishing characteristic of a phase transition is an abrupt sudden change in one or more physical properties, in particular the heat capacity, with a small change in a thermodynamic variable such as the temperature. Under the Ehrenfest classification, phase transitions are labeled by the lowest derivative of the free energy that is discontinuous at the transition. First-order phase transitions – such as in Landini’s piece – exhibit a discontinuity in the first derivative of the free energy with a thermodynamic variable. The various transitions to be found in Coming to Life are classified as first-order transitions because they involve a discontinuous change in density (which is the first derivative of the free energy with respect to a chemical or physical potential). The first-order phase transitions are those that involve a latent heat (the repression of drives, not unlike that imagined by Freud, involves the idea of a typical “latency of emotions” as the self-containment and transformation of whatever aesthetic form into very few number of basic, even trivial elements and gestures). During such a transition, a system either absorbs or releases a fixed (and typically large) amount of energy. Because energy cannot be instantaneously transferred between the system and its environment, first-order transitions are associated with “mixed-phase regimes” in which some parts of the system have completed the transition and others have not. This phenomenon is familiar to anyone who has boiled a pot of water: the water does not instantly turn into gas, but forms a turbulent mixture of water and water vapor bubbles. In Wagner’s operas and Mahler’s symphonies the transition may require a considerable, never experienced before, amount of time. Mixed-phase systems are difficult to study, because their dynamics are violent and hard to control. However, they can be emulated by the artist. The presence of symmetry-breaking (or non-breaking) is important to the behavior of phase transitions as it is to the behavior of an artwork. It was pointed out by Landau that, given any state of a system, one may unequivocally say whether or not it possesses a given symmetry. Therefore, it cannot be possible to analytically deform a state in one phase into a phase possessing a different symmetry. Landau’s law receives its poignant application in Landini’s Coming to Life, whereas it is impossible for the solid-liquid phase boundary to end in a critical point like the liquid-gas boundary. Typically, like in the realm of physical world, also in Landini’s piece the more symmetrical phase is on the high-temperature side (the “passionate” side of growing layers of sound and increasing dynamics) of a phase transition, and the less symmetrical phase on the low-temperature side (where the form dramatically falls into the realm of entropy and of disintegration).

Admission
Admission is free.

Telephone
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
Online News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news

Directions
• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Administration Drive Garage.
• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Administration Drive Garage.
• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Administration Drive Garage.
• Visitor parking is available in the Administration Drive Garage. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/
or by email or postal mail.

###

Posted by tmoore

November 15, 2006

UMBC Department of Theatre Presents "The Faulkner Project: As I Lay Dying," Directed by Robert Allen

November 29 - December 9, 2006
UMBC Theatre

Contact: Thomas Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

Note: You may view or download this release as a pdf file.

The UMBC Department of Theatre presents The Faulkner Project: As I Lay Dying, directed by Robert Allen at the UMBC Theatre from November 29 through December 9.

What makes William Faulkner one of the truly visionary American writers of the 20th century? The Department of Theatre at UMBC takes on the world of Faulkner, focusing on his groundbreaking novel As I Lay Dying. More than a straightforward adaptation, The Faulkner Project seeks to unleash the haunted power of his provocative world and compelling characters.

The novel As I Lay Dying follows the adventures of the Bundren family as they embark on an extraordinary quest to bury their mother Addie in the town of her birth—her dying wish. This effort subjects the clan to nothing less than fire and flood, as well as tragedy and comedy on a scale comparable to James Joyce’s Ulysses. Written as a series of inner monologues from the perspectives of the different personalities, Faulkner’s text unfolds a macabre story that offers a profound revelation of the human soul. An epic journey lightly disguised as a funeral procession, the work explores the secret nature of character, hope, love, and the struggle of the artist.

Directed and conceived by Robert Allen, The Faulkner Project: As I Lay Dying was adapted by Justine Moore and features set design by Tamas Szalczer, costume and makeup design by Melanie Lester, light design by Terry Cobb, sound design by UMBC student Brian Rudell vocal and dialect coaching by Christopher Marino and dramaturgy by UMBC graduate Gedalya Chinn. UMBC Associate Professor Emeritus Larry Lasher provided expertise as a Faulkner scholar.

Performances
Wednesday, November 29, 8 pm (preview)
Thursday, November 30, 8 pm (opening night)
Friday, December 1, 8 pm
Saturday, December 2, 8 pm
Sunday, December 3, 4 pm
Thursday, December 7, 4 pm (free for the UMBC campus community)
Friday, December 8, 8 pm
Saturday, December 9, 8 pm

Admission
$10 general admission; $5 students and seniors; $3 for the preview.
The performance on Thursday, December 7th is free for the UMBC campus community.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or by calling MissionTix at 410-752-8950.

Telephone
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Tickets: 410-752-8950
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
Tickets: http://www.missiontix.com/
Online News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news

Directions
• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.
• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Theatre.
• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.
• Visitor parking is available in the Commons Garage. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/
or by email or postal mail.

###

Posted by tmoore

November 1, 2006

Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture Exhibition on MPT 11/1

The Center for Art, Design and Visual Culture's "Raymond Loewy:Designs for a Consumer Culture" exhibition will be featured on MPT's "ArtWorks This Week" on Wednesday, November 1. Professor David Yager, the Center's executive director, gives a tour of the exhibit and a look into the mind of industrial designer Raymond Loewy. For more information, visit www.mpt.org/artworks/thisweek.

For more information on the exhibition and upcoming arts events at UMBC, visit www.umbc.edu/arts.

Posted by elewis

September 27, 2006

UMBC Department of Visual Arts Presents Fall 2006 Visiting Artists

James Duesing, Animation, October 11
SKIF++, Music & Videography, October 16
Billie Grace Lynn, October 26
Hasan Elahi, Video & Internet Art, November 9

Contact: Thomas Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

Note: You may view or download this release as a pdf file.

The UMBC Department of Visual Arts presents its Fall 2006 series of Visiting Artist Lectures, featuring James Duesing, SKIF++, Billie Grace Lynn and Hasan Elahi.

James Duesing
Animation
October 11, 7 pm, Lecture Hall VII (ITE Building)
James Duesing is a computer animator and video artist. His work has been exhibited throughout the world in venues as diverse as the Sundance Film Festival, PBS, SIGGRAPH, the Berlin Video Festival, MTV, the Shanghai Animation Festival, Film Forum, the Seoul Animation Center and some of the finest rec rooms in the USA. His work is held in collections at the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Goethe Memorial Museum, Tokyo; the UCLA Film Archive, Los Angeles; and The Israel Museum. His work has received much recognition, including grants from Creative Capital, the National Endowment for the Arts, an American Film Institute Fellowship, an Emmy Award, the Deutscher Videokunstpreis, and a CINE Golden Eagle. He has been Co-Director of the STUDIO of Creative Inquiry, a center for interdisciplinary collaboration in art and science projects. He currently is a professor in electronic and time based art at Carnegie Mellon University’s School of Art.

SKIF++
Music & Videography
October 16, 12 noon, Fine Arts Studio A
Jeff Carey (laptop SuperCollider) and Robert van Heumen (laptop LiSa) are the electronic backbone of the electroacoustic sextet OfficeR that brings structured improvisation in a very unique way. As SKIF they work with similar structures, ranging from sonic bursts to melodic melancholy, using joysticks and selfmade controllers to keep it all in line (most of the time). SKIF++ is the collaboration of SKIF and Bas van Koolwijk's (laptop Max/MSP/Jitter) processing of the SKIF-sound into video and back again to audio. Playing music in many contexts, as a computer musician, electro-acoustic composer and improviser, Jeff Carey's music ranges many aspects of computer music from non real-time acousmatic composition, electro-acoustic composition, to improvisation and performs in a number of units such as Office-R(6), USA/USB, the acclaimed feedback project 87 Central, and N-Collective related projects.

Electronic musician Robert van Heumen is using STEIM's live sampling software LiSa with all kinds of controllers (some have called them sexy). He is active as a member of the electro-acoustic sextet OfficeR, part of the N Collective, and has shared the stage with Michel Waisvisz, Jeff Carey, Oguz Buyukberber, Anne LaBerge, Guy Harries, Daniel Schorno, Roddy Schrock and Nate Wooley. His soundworld is a mixture of environmental sounds, toys, voices, sounds from kitchen appliances, half of the time smashed beyond repair. He is the SampleMan of SKIF++.

The video of Bas van Koolwijk can be seen as an aggressive attack on the illusion of video itself. Through a rigorous and formalistic approach, Van Koolwijk exposes the face of the machine which lives behind the often-placating veil of the televised image.

Billie Grace Lynn
Sculpture & Performance Art
October 26, 7 pm, Fine Arts 215
Billie Grace Lynn is a sculptor whose work has been exhibited in group shows at the Yerba Buena Center for the Arts in San Francisco, SPACES Gallery in Cleveland, the Atlantic Center for the Arts in New Smyrna Beach, Florida, and the Museum of Contemporary Art in Atlanta, Georgia. She has had recent solo and two-person exhibitions at the Lowe Art Museum in Coral Gables, Florida, the Rochester Contemporary in Rochester, New York, and Deluxe Arts in Miami, Florida. Her work is represented in several private and corporate collections, including those of the Rene and Veronica DiRosa Foundation, the Gap/Banana Republic, and the UC San Francisco Health Care Center. She has received awards and grants from the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Art Matters, the NEA Artist Project Grant Program, and recently received a Florida Visual Artist Fellowship.

Lynn teaches at the University of Miami. Originally from Alexandria, Louisiana, she studied at the Newcomb College of Tulane University (BA, Philosophy and Religious Studies) and the San Francisco Art Institute (MFA, Sculpture).

Hasan Elahi
Video & Internet Art
November 9, 7 pm, Fine Arts 215
Hasan M. Elahi is an interdisciplinary artist with an emphasis on technology and media and their social implications. His research interests include issues of surveillance, simulated time, transport systems, and borders and frontiers. He has had numerous exhibitions nationally and internationally in venues such as PS122 and Exit Art in New York; the Kulturbahnhof in Kassel, Germany; the BBC Big Screen in Manchester, UK; and the Hermitage in St. Petersburg, Russia. He has also lectured at the American Association of Artificial Intelligence at Stanford University and the Tate Modern Gallery in London. His work has been supported with significant grants and numerous sponsorships from the Ford Foundation/Philip Morris, Creative Capital Foundation, DuPont Industries, the West Virginia Cultural Center and the Asociación Artetik Berrikuntzara in Donostia-San Sebastián in the Basque Country/Spain among others. Currently, he is an assistant professor at the Mason Gross School of the Arts at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, New Jersey.

Admission
All events are free and open to the public.

Telephone
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
Online News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news

Directions
• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to Visitor Parking.
• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to Visitor Parking.
• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to Visitor Parking.
• Visitor parking is available in the Administration Drive Garage and the Commons Garage. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/
or by email or postal mail.

Posted by tmoore

UMBC Department of Theatre presents
Problem Child by George F. Walker, directed by Colette Searls

October 17-22, 2006
UMBC Theatre

Contact: Thomas Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

Note: You may view or download this release as a pdf file.

The UMBC Department of Theatre presents Problem Child by George F. Walker, directed by Colette Searls at the UMBC Theatre from October 17 to 22.

Denise and R.J. want their baby back. Holed up in a cheap motel, they impatiently await a social worker's verdict while fending off the antics of a drunken innkeeper. With a wink to Jerry Springer, this strangely twisted comedy exposes the human desperation behind class prejudice and questions the reach of social control.

George F. Walker is one of Canada's most prolific playwrights, and also one of the most widely produced Canadian dramatists both in Canada and internationally. His screen credits include Due South, The Newsroom and This is Wonderland. In 1997, he published a cycle of six new plays, including Problem Child, all of which take place in the same suburban motel room.

The production features set design by Daniel Ettinger, costume design by Celestine Ranney-Howes, light and sound design by Terry Cobb and movement coaching by Wendy Salkind.

Performances
Tuesday, October 17, 8 pm (preview)
Wednesday, October 18, 8 pm (opening night)
Thursday, October 19, 4 pm (free for the UMBC campus community)
Friday, October 20, 5 pm (special performance for UMBC alumni)
Saturday, October 21, 8 pm
Sunday, October 22, 4 pm

Admission
$10 general admission; $5 students and seniors; $3 for the preview.
The performance on Thursday, October 19th is free for the UMBC campus community.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or by calling MissionTix at 410-752-8950.

Telephone
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Tickets: 410-752-8950
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
Tickets: http://www.missiontix.com/
Online News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news

Directions
• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.
• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Theatre.
• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.
• Visitor parking is available in the Commons Garage. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/
or by email or postal mail.

###

Posted by tmoore

September 20, 2006

Center for Art and Visual Culture presents
Raymond Loewy: Designs for a Consumer Culture

September 21 – November 25, 2006

Contact: Thomas Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

Note: You may view or download this release as a pdf file.

Raymond Loewy United Music Corporation UPB-100 Jukebox Introduced 1958 Metal, chrome, plastic, glass, paper, and wire 57 1/4 x 36 1/4 x 27 3/4 Collection Hagley Museum and LibraryUMBC’s Center for Art and Visual Culture (CAVC) presents Raymond Loewy: Designs for a Consumer Culture, opening on Thursday, September 21st and continuing through November 25th. The exhibition surveys the creativity of Raymond Loewy, arguably the most prominent industrial designer of the twentieth century.

Loewy (1893–1986) became involved in the emerging world of industrial design in the 1920s after a successful career in commercial illustration. His modern designs soon became ubiquitous in western culture, streamlining and modernizing silverware and fountain pens, supermarkets, department stores, lipsticks and locomotives. Loewy and his teams designed the color scheme and logo for Air Force One, the John F. Kennedy memorial stamp, the Greyhound Scenicruiser, the Avanti car and the interiors for NASA’s Skylab. He designed the well-known icons of Exxon, BP and Lucky Strike cigarettes.

Raymond Loewy: Designs for a Consumer Culture showcases his work, placing it in the wider context of the shaping of a modern look for consumer culture. The exhibition brings his work to life through an array of original drawings, models, products, advertisements, photographs, and rare film footage of Loewy at work. The presentation draws heavily on Loewy’s personal archives, a treasure collection of images and information not previously available to researchers or the public.

The exhibition is organized by the Hagley Museum and Library of Wilmington, Delaware, and toured by ExhibitsUSA. The exhibition is curated by Hagley Museum staff, including Glenn Porter, Director Emeritus, Lynn Catanese, Head of Manuscripts and Archives, and Jim Hinz, former Library Conservator.

Raymond Loewy Rosenthal china Charcoal line (6 pieces) 1950s China Coffee pot(no lid): 6 15/16 x 8 11/16 x 5  Coffee pot lid: 1 3/4 x 3 7/8 x 3 7/8  Coffee pot (with lid): 7 3/8 x 8 11/16 x 5  Sugar bowl: 3 x 4 1/2 x 4 1/2  Creamer: 4 1/8 x 4 1/4 x 3 1/4  Coffee cup: 2 5/8 x 4 3/8 x 3 1/2  Saucer: 3/4 x 6 x 6  Cup and saucer: 2 7/8 x 6 x 6 Collection Hagley Museum and LibraryEvents
On Thursday, September 21st from 5 to 7 pm, the CAVC will host an opening reception for Raymond Loewy: Designs for a Consumer Culture.

On Monday, October 16th at 6 pm, the CAVC will present a panel discussion, Designs for a Consumer Culture, moderated by Steve Ziger of Ziger/Snead, and featuring Antonio Alcala, creative director at Studio A; Abbott Miller of Pentagram; Tom Strong of Strong/Cohen Associates; and Tucker Viemeister of Studio Red at Rockwell Group. Admission to the panel discussion is free. University of Baltimore, Student Center, Multipurpose Room, 5th Floor. (21 West Mount Royal Avenue at the southeast corner of Maryland and Mount Royal Avenues. On street parking is available in addition to lot parking at 1401 N. Charles Street.)

On Saturday, November 18th, 2006, from 10 am to 12 pm at UMBC’s Commons, six to ten area high schools will participate in a High School Design Fair Competition in which students will re-design everyday objects selected by their instructors. Each high school class will visit the Raymond Loewy exhibition to discuss Loewy's strategies and standards for design before beginning their individual projects. Students will be asked to keep in mind Loewy's design goals of simplicity, ease of maintenance and repair, grace and beauty, convenience of use, economy, durability, and expression of the function in form.

Three judges will select first, second, and third place prizes as well as the best overall school. Judges include: Megan Hoolahan, Mens Designer, UnderArmor; David Yager, Executive Director, CAVC, and Director of the Center for Convergent Design; and a faculty member from UMBC’s Department of Visual Arts.

Raymond Loewy 1951 "bullet-nose" Studebaker Champion model c. 1951 (date of car release) Metal and plastic 3 1/2 x 11 1/4 x 4 Collection Hagley Museum and LibraryAbout the Center for Art and Visual Culture
The Center for Art and Visual Culture is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study of contemporary art and visual culture, critical theory, art and cultural history, and the relationship between society and the arts. The CAVC serves as a forum for students, faculty, and the general public for the discussion of important aesthetic and social issues of the day. Disciplines represented include painting, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, photography, digital art, video, film, television, design, architecture, advertising, and installation and performance art.

Since 1989, the CAVC has incorporated a number of public programs into its exhibition programming schedule to further impact the communities it serves. Symposia, lecture series, conferences, film series, visiting artist series, and residencies have all been fundamental in an effort to create an ongoing dialogue about contemporary art and culture. The Center has also initiated a number of projects with Baltimore and surrounding schools systems to integrate the contemporary artist and their concerns into the classroom. These projects take place on-site at both middle schools and high schools and are team taught by the instructors at these schools, professional artists, and students from the CAVC’s Internship Program.

The Center produces one to two exhibition catalogues each year. Each document is fully illustrated and contains critical essays on the given subject by a variety of distinguished professionals in the field. Recent publications include Postmodernism: A Virtual Discussion and Paul Rand: Modernist Design. These books and catalogues are published and are distributed internationally through Distributed Art Publishers.

Since 1992, the Center for Art and Visual Culture has actively pursued the organization of exhibitions that contain the aesthetic, theoretical, and educational potential to reach both a national and international audience. Over the years, the CAVC has traveled these exhibition projects to a broad spectrum of museums, professional non-profit galleries, and universities national and internationally. Recent traveling exhibitions include:

White: Whiteness and Race in Contemporary Art (2003)
Fred Wilson: Objects and Installations (2001)
Adrian Piper: A Retrospective (1999)
Bruno Monguzzi: A Designer’s Perspective (1998)
Minimal Politics (1997)
Kate Millet, Sculpture: The First 38 Years (1997)

Beyond the scope of these traveling exhibitions, the Center for Art and Visual Culture also undertakes an exhibition schedule that includes a Faculty Biennial, and projects such as the Joseph Beuys Tree Partnership. As part of the educational mission of the CAVC, one graduate thesis exhibition and one undergraduate senior exhibition are scheduled on a yearly basis.

This multi-faceted focus for presenting exhibitions, projects and scholarly research publications focused on contemporary art and cultural issues positions the Center for Art and Visual Culture in a unique position within the mid-Atlantic region.

Raymond Loewy Westinghouse skyscraper clock radio 1930 Wood, metal, and paper 62 x 13 3/4 x 10 3/4 Private collectionAcknowledgements
Raymond Loewy: Designs for a Consumer Culture is made possible by a generous grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. The exhibition is organized by ExhibitsUSA, the purpose of which is to create access to an array of arts and humanities exhibitions, nurture the development and understanding of diverse art forms and cultures, and encourage the expanding depth and breadth of cultural life in local communities.

ExhibitsUSA is generously supported by the Adair Margo Gallery Inc.; Altria Group Inc.; James H. Clement, Jr.; ConocoPhillips; the Cooper Foundation; Douglas County Bank/Ross and Marianna Beach; DST Systems Inc.; Edward Jones; the William Randolph Hearst Foundation; the Helen Jones Foundation; the William T. Kemper Foundation, Commerce Bank, trustee; the Richard P. Kimmel and Laurine Kimmel Charitable Foundation Inc.; Land O' Lakes Inc.; Mrs. Tom Lea; the National Endowment for the Arts; the National Endowment for the Humanities; SBC Missouri; the Society of North American Goldsmiths; Sonic, America’s Drive-In; Sterling Vineyards; the Summerlee Foundation; the Courtney S. Turner Charitable Trust; Valmont Industries; the Woods Charitable Fund; and the state arts agencies of Arkansas, Illinois, Kansas, Missouri, Nebraska, Oklahoma, and Texas. ExhibitsUSA is a national program of Mid-America Arts Alliance.

Hours and Admission
Sunday and Monday: Closed
Tuesday through Saturday: 10 A.M. – 5:00 P.M.
Admission is free.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Center for Art and Visual Culture: 410-455-3188

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
Center for Art and Visual Culture: http://www.umbc.edu/cavc

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/
or by email or postal mail.

Directions
UMBC is located approximately 10 minutes from downtown Baltimore and 20 minutes from I-495.
• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

• Daytime metered visitor parking is available in the Administration Drive Garage.
• Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Raymond Loewy 1953 Photograph Image: 13 15/16 x 11  Frame: 15 3/16 x 12 1/4  Courtesy Laurence Loewy, Loewy Design

###

Posted by tmoore

August 31, 2006

UMBC Department of Music Presents Fall 2006 Concert Series

The UMBC Department of Music presents its fall 2006 season, featuring woodwind master Roscoe Mitchell, oboist Jacqueline Leclair, the Rome Trio and other noted soloists and ensembles.

Contact: Thomas Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

TNT Series
(Then, Now, Tomorrow: Music for the Adventurous Listener)

 

inHaleSunday, September 17
inHale
, flutes, piccolos, alto flutes and bass flutes
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

The inHale duo presents an adventurous afternoon of flutes, piccolos, alto flutes, bass flutes, the human voice and performance art as they explore exciting new music. Flutists Kathleen Gallagher and Lisa Cella have between them premiered more than 200 works while building a new generation of repertoire.

Their concert will include:
Jane Rigler: Two Seaming
Dominik Karski: Glimmer
Sean Griffin: Pattycake
Ross Edwards: Ecstatic Dances
Toru Takemitsu: Masque
John Fonville: Mong Songs
Harvey Sollberger: Two Pieces for Two Flutes
James Erber: Trattenimento da Camera

Kathleen Gallagher is one of Australia's most renowned players of the contemporary flute. Her repertoire spans the gamut of the traditional through to the evocative and demanding world of the 21st Century. Ever the eclectic performer, she occasionally abandons her flute for vocal works by Cage, Berberian and Berio and embraces performance theatre through the likes of Globokar and Griffin.

As a champion of contemporary music, Lisa Cella (assistant professor of music at UMBC) has performed throughout the United States and abroad. She is Artistic Director of San Diego New Music and a founding member of its resident ensemble NOISE. With NOISE she has performed across the country premiering works of young composers. She is also a member of C2, a flute and cello duo that will tour through the 2006 season.

 

SKIF++Monday, October 16
SKIF++

12 noon to 1 pm, Fine Arts Studio A
Free admission
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

Jeff Carey (laptop SuperCollider) and Robert van Heumen (laptop LiSa) are the electronic backbone of the electroacoustic sextet OfficeR that brings structured improvisation in a very unique way. As SKIF they work with similar structures, ranging from sonic bursts to melodic melancholy, using joysticks and selfmade controllers to keep it all in line (most of the time). SKIF++ is the collaboration of SKIF and Bas van Koolwijk's (laptop Max/MSP/Jitter) processing of the SKIF-sound into video and back again to audio.

Playing music in many contexts, as a computer musician, electro-acoustic composer and improviser, Jeff Carey's music ranges many aspects of computer music from non real-time acousmatic composition, electro-acoustic composition, to improvisation and performs in a number of units such as Office-R(6), USA/USB, the acclaimed feedback project 87 Central, and N-Collective related projects.

Electronic musician Robert van Heumen is using STEIM's live sampling software LiSa with all kinds of controllers (some have called them sexy). He is active as a member of the electro-acoustic sextet OfficeR, part of the N Collective, and has shared the stage with Michel Waisvisz, Jeff Carey, Oguz Buyukberber, Anne LaBerge, Guy Harries, Daniel Schorno, Roddy Schrock and Nate Wooley. His soundworld is a mixture of environmental sounds, toys, voices, sounds from kitchen appliances, half of the time smashed beyond repair. He is the SampleMan of SKIF++.

The video of Bas van Koolwijk can be seen as an aggressive attack on the illusion of video itself. Through a rigorous and formalistic approach, Van Koolwijk exposes the face of the machine which lives behind the often-placating veil of the televised image.

 

Friday, October 27
Airi Yoshioka
, violin
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

Violinist Airi Yoshioka , joined by violist Maria Lambros and percussionist Sylvia Smith, presents a concert of music by Stuart Saunders Smith. Featured works include Minor for solo violin, 3 for 2 for violin and viola, Hearts for solo violin, and A River, Rose for violin and vibraphone.

Airi Yoshioka has concertized throughout the United States, Europe, Asia, and Canada as a recitalist, soloist and chamber musician. Deeply committed to chamber music, she is the founding member of the Damocles Trio and Modigliani Quartet and has performed and recorded with the members of the Emerson, Brentano and Arditti Quartets. The Damocles Trio’s debut disc of complete Piano Trios and Piano Quartet of Joquín Turina has won a four-star rating from the BBC Music Magazine, Le Monde de la Musique and Diapason. Her orchestral credits include performances with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, American Sinfonietta and engagements as concertmaster and soloist with the Manhattan Virtuosi and concertmaster of one of the festival orchestras at the Aspen Music Festival.

Stuart Saunders Smith’s compositions fall into four areas of creative research: 1) Inventing music of extreme rhythmic and melodic complexity, 2) Making musical mobiles where there is no fixed musical score but rather instrumental parts that freely interact, 3) Composing for spoken texts, 4) Creating trans-media systems for groups of performance artists (dancers, mimes, actors, etc.). Smith’s music is regularly performed throughout North America, Western Europe, and has had notable performances in Asia. His music is recorded on O.O. Discs, Capstone Records, and on European labels in Austria, France, and Germany. He has received the East/West Artist Award, the Maryland State Artists Fellowship, the Pittsburgh Film Forum Grant, the National Endowment for the Arts Composer's Fellowship, and the Atlantic Center for the Arts Master Artist Award. Smith's music is published by Sonic Art Editions. Articles on Stuart Saunders Smith's music have appeared in Percussive Notes Research Edition, Perspectives of New Music, Interface, and Ex Tempore. In 1997 The Music of Stuart of Saunders Smith, by John Welsh, was published by Excelsior Press, NYC, NY.

 

Friday, November 3
Alejandro Escuer
, flute
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

Alejandro Escuer is a Mexican flute soloist, composer, professor and concert producer of a wide variety of Latin American and international music projects. In fewer than seven years on the professional scene, Escuer has emerged as a driving force in Mexican music, having directed and produced more than 100 concerts with more than 40 premieres from Japan, the United States, Canada, Portugal, Germany, France and elsewhere. He has received numerous awards, including from the Rockfeller Foundation (1995), the National Interpreters Competition, and the National Award for the Arts. Currently he is a visiting professor at Columbia University.

 

Saturday, November 11
Roscoe Mitchell
, woodwinds
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

Roscoe Mitchell, internationally renowned musician, composer, and innovator, began his distinguished career in the spirited 1960s of Chicago, Illinois. His role in the resurrection of long neglected woodwind instruments of extreme register, his innovation as a solo woodwind performer, and his reassertion of the composer into what has traditionally been an improvisational form have placed him at the forefront of contemporary music for four decades. A leader in the field of avant-garde jazz and contemporary music, Mr. Mitchell is a founding member of the world renowned Art Ensemble of Chicago, the Association for the Advancement of Creative Musicians, and the Trio Space.

Mr. Mitchell has recorded 87 albums and has written more than 250 compositions. His compositions range from classical to contemporary, from wild and forceful free jazz to ornate chamber music. His instrumental expertise includes the saxophone family, from the sopranino to the bass saxophone; the recorder family, from sopranino to great bass recorder; flute, piccolo, clarinet, and the transverse flute. Also, for over 35 years, he has designed an elaborate percussion instrument called the Percussion Cage, consisting of instruments from America, China, Tibet, Africa, Australia, Switzerland, France, Germany, Italy, and Turkey, as well as many found instruments.

 

Thursday, November 16
Jacqueline Leclair
, oboe
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

The New York Times called this artist “astonishing” and praised her “electrifying agility.” Oboist Jacqueline Leclair, one of the foremost interpreters of new music, has presented solo and chamber music concerts throughout the United States and Europe. The New Yorker has praised Ms. Leclair as “lively” and “wonderful.”

Her program will include:
Six Metamorphoses for solo oboe by Benjamin Britten
Niobe for oboe and electronics by Thea Musgrave
The Island of Patymos for solo oboe by Judith Bingham
Paysage avec Pyrame et Thisbe for solo English horn by Gilles Silvestrini
Hawk for solo oboe by Stuart Saunders Smith
Parking Violation for solo oboe with reverb by Marc Mellits
Parable for solo English horn by Vincent Persichetti

A member of Alarm Will Sound and Sequitur, Jacqueline Leclair frequently can be heard performing with New York City ensembles such as Sospeso, Ensemble 21 and Carnegie Hall’s Zankel Band. She is on the faculty at Montclair State University, Hofstra University and Mannes College. Ms. Leclair has recorded extensively, receiving critical acclaim in particular for her premiere recording of Roger Reynolds's Summer Island. Luciano Berio’s Sequenza VIIa Supplementary Edition by Jacqueline Leclair is published by Universal Edition Vienna, and her recording of the work is on Mode #161/4, Berio: The Complete Sequenzas and Works for Solo Instruments (2006).

 

E. Michael RichardsSunday, November 19
E. Michael Richards
, clarinet
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

As a recitalist of new music, E. Michael Richards has premiered over 125 works throughout the United States, Japan, Australia, and Western Europe. Trained as a clarinetist at the New England Conservatory (B.Mus.) and Yale School of Music (M.Mus.), Richards earned a Ph.D. at the University of California, San Diego. He received a 1990 U.S./Japan Creative Artist Fellowship (sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts, U.S.-Japan Friendship Commission, and Japanese Government Cultural Agency) as a solo recitalist for a six-month residency in Japan, an NEH Summer Fellowship to study traditional Japanese music, and a residency grant (Cassis, France) from the Camargo Foundation to complete a book, The Clarinet of the Twenty-First Century.

For this performance, Richards will be joined by pianist Kazuko Tanosaki. Their program will include:
David Macbride: Lament
Akira Nishimura: Madoromi III
David Kim-Boyle: Whisps for bass clarinet and computer
Hiroyuki Itoh: premiere of a new work
Luciano Berio: Sequenza IV for solo piano

Richards has performed as concerto soloist with the Syracuse Symphony and Shinsei Japan Philharmonic (Tokyo), in chamber music performances with the Cassatt Quartet, Ying Quartet, SONOR, and the East-West Quartet, and in recital at eight international festivals and more than 20 universities, as well as at Lincoln Center, the Guggenheim Museum (New York), the American Academy in Rome, and the Tokyo American Center. He has also performed as a member of the Tanosaki-Richards Duo (with pianist Kazuko Tanosaki) since 1982. Richards has recorded on the NEUMA, Mode, CRI, Ninewinds, and Opus One labels. He has taught at Smith College; the University of California, San Diego; Bowdoin College; Hamilton College; and the Hochstein Music School in Rochester, New York; and completed short terms with Kazuko Tanosaki as visiting artists in residence at the University of Massachusetts, CNMAT (Center for New Music and Audio Technologies), at the University of California Berkeley, and San Jose State University.

 

 

PRIME Series
Resounding Traditions

 

Sunday, September 24
Tom Lagana Trio

3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

Throughout his 15 year career, Tom Lagana has played numerous jazz festivals including Long Island Guitar Festival, Oregon Ridge Park, The Mid-Atlantic Wine Festival, Federal Hill Festival, Kaufmann Music Series and The Annapolis Jazz Festival. Lagana has worked with such noteworthy musicians as Charlie Byrd, Craig Handy, Red Rodney, Bob Mintzer, and Marvin Stamm. Lagana recently shared the same bill with internationally renown jazz icon Herbie Hancock and The Dave Weckl Group.

Lagana graduated from Boston’s Berklee College of Music in 1992 and began his career as a musician in the Walt Disney Jazz Band. He was chosen to perform for classical composer/guitarist Carlo Domeniconi at the Long Island Guitar Festival in April 2005 and joined the Music faculty at UMBC the same year.

In early 2002, Tom Lagana released his first recording, Patuxent. After a sell out performance at the Ram’s Head Tavern National Showcase Mainstage, the CD began to climb the National Jazz Airplay charts, where it stayed for over nine consecutive weeks before peaking at 17th most-requested in the nation.

 

Rome TrioThursday, October 12
The Rome Trio

8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

The Rome Trio is the official faculty trio of the Benjamin C. Rome School of Music at The Catholic University of America, featuring violinist Jody Gatwood, pianist Marilyn Neeley and cellist Michael Mermagen.

Jody Gatwood has received critical acclaim in the U.S. and Europe as soloist with many orchestras, including the Pittsburgh, Houston, and Phoenix symphony orchestras, and with such conductors as Andre Previn and Leonard Slatkin. He has performed on the Kennedy Center’s Fortas Chamber Music Series, at the Library of Congress, Phillips Gallery, Smithsonian Institution, and the National Gallery of Art. As concertmaster of the National Philharmonic (formerly the National Chamber Orchestra), Jody Gatwood has performed numerous solo works, including the world premiere of Concerto for Violin and String Orchestra by Andreas Makris. As guest artist with the Smithsonian Chamber Players, he has recorded for Sony Classical and Deutsche Harmonia Mundi in chamber works by Mendelssohn, Gade, Spohr, Dotzauer, Franchomme, and Servais. Starting in 1984 he performed in and helped to organize numerous “Concerts to End Hunger” to awaken public commitment to the eradication of hunger and malnutrition in the world.

Marilyn Neeley, professor of piano and faculty adviser in chamber music and vocal accompanying at Catholic University was prize winner in the Van Cliburn, Leventritt, Michaels, and Geneva International Competitions, with solo appearances with over one hundred symphony orchestras, including the Chicago Symphony, the Boston Symphony, and the Los Angeles Philharmonic. Her recording of the complete Beethoven violin and piano sonatas with Robert Gerle received an Emmy award.

Cellist Michael Mermagen has enjoyed a versatile career as a soloist, chamber musician and teacher and has performed chamber music with such artists as Joshua Bell, Sarah Chang, Lynn Harrell, Robert McDuffie, Susanne Mentzer, Nadja Salerno-Sonnenberg and The Takács Quartet; collaborated with distinguished conductors, Comissiona, Conlon, Levine, Maazel, Marriner, McGegan, Roberston, Skrowaczewski, Zinman and has given numerous recitals and masterclasses across North America, Europe and Asia. Mr. Mermagen has participated in The Grand Canyon Music Festival, Prince Albert Music Festival in Kauai and the Bay Chamber Concerts. He has been heard on WQXR’s Concerts Plus, WNYC’s Around New York, and his performances are regularly broadcast on NPR’s Performance Today. Mr. Mermagen has collaborated with the San Francisco Ballet and was featured as the cello soloist for the New York premiere of two works by the renowned choreographer Mark Morris. He has also had the pleasure of performing live on A Prairie Home Companion with Garrison Keillor.

 

Sunday, October 15
UMBC Symphony Orchestra

3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

The UMBC Symphony Orchestra performs under the direction of Wayne Cameron.

 

Saturday, October 28
Faculty Chamber Ensemble

8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

The Faculty Chamber Ensemble features violinist Airi Yoshioka, flutist Lisa Cella, clarinetist E. Michael Richards, cellist Franklin Cox, pianist Rachel Franklin, guitarist Zane Forshee, and percussionist Tom Goldstein.

 

Monday, November 20
UMBC Chamber Players

8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

The UMBC Chamber Players performs under the direction of E. Michael Richards.

 

Sunday, December 10
UMBC Symphony Orchestra

3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

The UMBC Symphony Orchestra performs under the direction of Wayne Cameron.

 

 

Student Recital Series

 

Thursday, November 30
The UMBC Jazz Ensemble (Big Band) directed by Jari Villanueva.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

Saturday, December 2
The Jubilee Singers (followed in performance immediately by the UMBC Gospel Choir) under the direction of Janice Jackson.
7 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free (donations accepted). 410-455-ARTS.

Thursday, December 7
The UMBC Wind Ensemble under the direction of Jari Villanueva.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

Friday, December 8
The Vocal Arts Ensemble under the direction of David Smith.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

Saturday, December 9
The Maryland Camerata under the direction of David Smith.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

Tuesday, December 12
The UMBC Percussion Ensemble under the direction of Tom Goldstein.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

Wednesday, December 13
Department of Music Honors Recital
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

 

 

Special Event

Saturday and Sunday, October 28 and 29
Fifth Annual High School Chamber Music Festival and Concerto Competition
The Department of Music presents the Fifth Annual High School Chamber Music Festival and Concerto Competition, in which 25 selected students from the mid-Atlantic region will gather at UMBC for a weekend of performances, coachings and new musical experiences. For information contact Dr. Lisa Cella at 410-455-1405.

 


 

Telephone
Public information (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
Public information: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news

Directions
• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
• Daytime metered visitor parking is available in the Administration Drive Garage. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

Posted by tmoore

August 28, 2006

Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery Presents
Reflections from the Heart: Photographs by David Seymour

September 11 – December 10, 2006

Contact: Thomas Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

Note: You may view or download this release as a pdf file.

Opening on September 11th and continuing through December 10th, UMBC’s Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents Reflections from the Heart: Photographs by David Seymour.

Curated by Tom Beck and organized by the Library Gallery in partnership with the Corcoran Museum of Art and the George Eastman House, the project will provide the first real critical examination of imagery by the pioneering photojournalist David Seymour. This project will elevate the significance of work by Seymour, the least well-recognized master among the founders of Magnum Photos, and will better familiarize viewers with the symbolism and artistic roots of his imagery. A major publication on Seymour authored by Beck and published by Phaidon Press, Ltd. will accompany the show.

The retrospective is organized chronologically and showcases many of the photojournalistic black and white images for which Seymour is best known. Also exhibited for the first time are fifteen of Seymour’s color images. Last seen in the 1950s as individual images in disparate magazines, a selection of Seymour’s original transparencies were digitized, made into inkjet prints to be shown together in Reflections from the Heart for the first time. No previous exhibition of Seymour's work included his color work. This is the first exhibition of Seymour’s work since the 1996 retrospective organized by the International Center of Photography, New York.

When political and economic upheavals in 1930s Europe interrupted David Seymour’s science studies at the Université-Paris Sorbonne, he borrowed a camera and became a photojournalist. Over the next quarter-century, Seymour, who was also known as “Chim,” helped redefine photojournalism by inviting viewers to identify directly with the people he photographed. Ten years after he was killed in 1956 while covering the Suez Crisis in Egypt, Seymour was eulogized by his friend and colleague, photographer Henri Cartier-Bresson: “Chim picked up his camera the way a doctor takes his stethoscope out of his bag, applying his diagnosis to the condition of the heart. His own was vulnerable.”

Seymour felt deeply the wounds that plagued the human spirit during the 1930s and 1940s. He sought to show in his photographs that hope could prevail in times of turmoil. Many of his best known images introduced the world to the suffering and resilience of children in the aftermath of war. His humanitarian style established traditions still common in contemporary media. Both as a documentary photographer and as a co-founder of the seminal picture agency Magnum Photos, Seymour’s career inspired subsequent generations of socially concerned photographers and helped change the way people experience distant lives and historic events.

Public Program and Reception
On Wednesday, September 27th at 4:00 pm, the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery will present three 30-minute presentations on the work of David Seymour, followed by a public reception:
• Joshua Karlip, Baltimore Hebrew University, Between East and West, Hope and Despair: The Life and Times of David Seymour
• Tom Beck, Chief Curator, UMBC, Humanism and Photography: the Imagery of David Seymour
• Carole Naggar, poet and photographic historian, For Better and Worse: the Magnum Family

About David Seymour
Born in Warsaw, Poland, Dawid Szymin grew up surrounded by art, music and literature. After he moved to Paris in 1931, he soon became a photojournalist and adopted the professional moniker “CHIM,” a French phonetic abbreviation of his surname. He began a lifelong career as a photojournalist in 1934 for the left-leaning French magazine, Regards. At that time, Chim plunged into a world undergoing massive redefinition. Mass-appeal magazines proliferated photojournalism with the introduction of faster and cheaper production methods. The magazines also included more photographic illustrations than ever before in part due to the “picture story” concept and the use of the Leica camera. With this revolutionary, miniature camera, innovative photographers were able to capture the less formal, more spontaneous images that became popular during this era. At the start of World War II, Chim became a U.S. citizen and joined the United States Army as a photo-interpreter, taking the name David Robert Seymour to avoid Nazi reprisals against his family in occupied Poland.

Seymour was very well educated, fluent in several languages and had deep affinities for different countries and their peoples. In covering many important subjects and historical moments, including the plight of the French working class, organization of the socialist Front Populaire, the Spanish Civil War, World War II, post-war life in Italy and Greece, early evolution of the state of Israel and the Suez Canal crisis, Seymour aimed to inform his audience so that they might better understand the potential of the world. His images were published in leading magazines, such as Life, Paris Match, This Week and Regards from 1933 to 1956, and were noted as rarely posed and achieved without affectation or manipulation.

Seymour loved photographing people going about their lives, often under difficult circumstances such as war and its aftermath, and revealing their humanity. His photographs depicting the physically and spiritually maimed children of Europe attracted worldwide attention to the suffering of these forgotten victims of war. He is perhaps best remembered for his body of work referred to as Chim’s Children. UNESCO and UNICEF commissioned this body of work in 1948 dealing with the plight of children in post-war Europe. Many of these moving images were published in magazines around the world and earned Seymour a reputation as the quintessential empathetic photojournalist.

In 1947, with Robert Capa, Henri Cartier-Bresson, George Rodger and others, Chim became a founding member of Magnum Photos, Inc., the pioneering international photojournalist cooperative that continues to set standards in international photojournalism today. The company’s aim was editorial independence: to be first in concept, quality and timing, and to place their stories all over the world through their own offices.

Gallery Information
The Albin O. Kuhn Gallery serves as one of the principal art galleries in the Baltimore region. Objects from the Special Collections Department, as well as art and artifacts from all over the world, are displayed in challenging and informative exhibitions for the University community and the public. Moreover, traveling exhibitions are occasionally presented, and the Gallery sends some exhibits on tour to other institutions nationwide. Admission to the Gallery and its programs is free.

Acknowledgements
Reflections from the Heart: Photographs by David Seymour is organized by the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery, University of Maryland, Baltimore County in collaboration with The Corcoran Gallery of Art and the George Eastman House. The exhibition is made possible by generous support from Ben Shneiderman.

Additional support is provided by the Maryland State Arts Council, an agency funded by the State of Maryland and the National Endowment for the Arts, the Baltimore County Commission on Arts & Sciences, the Friends of the Library & Gallery, the Libby Kuhn Endowment, the Judaic Studies Program at UMBC, and Epson USA Inc.

Hours
Sunday 1 P.M. – 5 P.M.
Monday 12 P.M. – 4:30 P.M.
Tuesday 12 P.M. – 4:30 P.M.
Wednesday 12 P.M. – 4:30 P.M.
Thursday 12 P.M. – 8 P.M.
Friday 12 P.M. – 4:30 P.M.
Saturday 1 P.M. – 5 P.M.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
General Gallery information: 410-455-2270

Web
UMBC Arts & Culture Calendar: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery: http://aok.lib.umbc.edu/gallery/
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/
or by email or postal mail.

Directions
UMBC is located approximately 10 minutes from downtown Baltimore and 20 minutes from I-495.
• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Walker Avenue Garage or Albin O. Kuhn Library.
• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Walker Avenue Garage or Albin O. Kuhn Library.
• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Walker Avenue Garage or Albin O. Kuhn Library.
• Daytime metered visitor parking is available in the Walker Avenue Garage. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days.

###

Posted by tmoore

August 24, 2006

UMBC Presents Searls Puppetry's
"OM":
A groovy variety show of dancing puppetry

September 8-9, 2006, 8 p.m.
UMBC Theatre

Contact: Thomas Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

Note: You may view or download this release as a pdf file.

OMOn September 8th and 9th at the UMBC Theatre, Searls Puppetry presents the first showing of OM, a fusion of dance and found object puppetry that will forever change the way people look at their trash. A new collaboration between director Colette Searls and choreographer Doug Hamby, OM is a funky variety show where characters spring from garbage bags, plastic wrap, and recycled paper to unleash their inner groove in vignettes of whimsy. The project, which is suitable for audiences of all ages, is supported in part by a grant from the Jim Henson Foundation.

“…delightful and exuberant…the puppeteers give their refuse a broad range of emotions with the tiniest flick of a wrist.”
—Elizabeth Lawler, The Village Voice, on Searls Puppetry’s Basura!

About the Artists
Searls Puppetry specializes in a type of object theatre that brings everyday, disposable materials to life on stage. Director Colette Searls works with a wide range of theatrical material and plays, with a special interest puppetry for adult audiences. She has contributed to a number of productions with puppetry nationally, most recently as puppetographer for the world premiere of The Velvet Sky at Woolly Mammoth Theatre Company in Washington, D.C., director/creator of Basura! at the New York International Fringe Festival, puppet master for PCPA Theatrefest’s Fiddler on the Roof, and director for Lunatique Fantastique’s Fixed Boundary, (“Best of the San Francisco Fringe” 2003). She is assistant professor of Theatre at UMBC, where she has created three original puppet plays: Victor Frankenstein, BURIED (National Finalist, Kennedy Center American College Theater Festival, 2004) and Fanto, A Mysterious Vaudeville. She serves on the board of directors for the Union Internationale de la Marionnette- USA chapter (UNIMA-USA).

Doug Hamby is the artistic director of Doug Hamby Dance, a company that specializes in works created in collaboration with dancers, composers, visual and other creative artists. Hamby’s work has been presented in New York City at Lincoln Center Out-of-Doors, Riverside Dance Festival, New York International Fringe Festival and in Brooklyn’s Prospect Park. His work has also been seen at International Fringe Festivals in Edinburgh, Scotland and Vancouver, British Columbia, as well as in Anchorage Alaska by the Alaska Dance Theatre. In New York City, he performed in dance companies directed by Martha Graham, May O’Donnell, Rachel Lampert, Elizabeth Keen, Pearl Lang and Norman Walker. He has received choreography awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, Maryland State Arts Council, New York State Council for the Arts, Arts Council of Montgomery County, Maryland and the Baltimore Mayor’s Advisory Committee on Arts and Culture. He is an associate professor in Dance at UMBC. He has a MFA from Temple University an has appeared on national television as a giant slice of American Cheese.

OMAdmission
$8 general, $5 for students and seniors. Tickets will be available at the door beginning at 7 pm, cash or check only.

Telephone
Public information (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
Public information: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news

Directions
• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the UMBC Theatre.
• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the UMBC Theatre.
• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the UMBC Theatre.
• Daytime metered visitor parking is available in the Commons Garage. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

OM

###

Posted by tmoore

April 10, 2006

UMBC Department of Theatre presents "For a Better World" by Roland Schimmelpfennig, directed by Robert Allen

April 26 - May 6, 2006
UMBC Theatre

Media contact:
Tom Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
tmoore@umbc.edu
410-455-3370

Note: You may view or download this release as a pdf file (287 k).

For a Better World (photo by Rich Riggins)The UMBC Department of Theatre presents For a Better World by Roland Schimmelpfennig, translated by Jan Caspers and directed by Robert Allen. The production features set and costume design by Elena Zlotescu, light design by Terry Cobb, and sound design by Brian Rudell.

For a Better World (Für Eine Bessere Welt) explores the skewed reality experienced by soldiers—young men and women in uniform—doomed to remain in a state of constant warfare. The military conflict encompasses all modern warfare, the time frame for final victory is never, and the possibility of finding meaning in life outside of combat unthinkable. Beautiful and terrifying, For a Better World redefines what it means to survive a war. Roland Schimmelpfennig has been described as the hottest new playwright of his generation in Germany. His plays have been produced at the Royal Court in London, as well as throughout the rest of Europe and in Canada. This production is a North American premiere.

Performances
Wednesday, April 26, 8 pm (preview)
Thursday, April 27, 8 pm (opening night)
Friday, April 28, 8 pm
Sunday, April 30, 4 pm
Thursday, May 4, 4 pm (free for the UMBC students, faculty and staff)
Friday, May 5, 8 pm
Saturday, May 6, 8 pm

Admission
General admission: $10.00
Students and seniors: $5.00
Preview: $3.00
Box Office: www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950

Telephone
Box Office: 410-752-8950
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail. (Photos: Rich Riggins.)

Directions

  • From I-95 take exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the UMBC Theatre. Parking is available in The Commons Garage.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the UMBC Theatre. Parking is available in The Commons Garage.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

###

Posted by tmoore

March 31, 2006

UMBC Presents Pianist Marilyn Nonken in Concert

Thursday, April 13, 2006, 8 p.m.
Fine Arts Recital Hall

Media contact:
Tom Moore
tmoore@umbc.edu
(410) 455-3370

Note: You may view or download this release as a pdf file.

Marilyn Nonken (photo: Richard Termine)The UMBC Department of Music’s Contemporary Concert Series presents pianist Marilyn Nonken, whose program will include Milton Babbitt’s Three Compositions for Piano, Allegro Penseroso, Partitions and Post-Partitions; Jason Eckardt’s Echoes’ White Veil; and Salvatore Martirano’s Cocktail Music.

Marilyn Nonken has emerged as one of the most gifted young performers of modern piano music, having been described as “splendid” (New York Times), “superb” (Boston Globe), and “fearless” (Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel). She has commissioned several major works, including Milton Babbitt’s Allegro Penseroso, Mario Davidovsky’s Quartetto No. 3, Michael Finnissy’s North American Spirituals, Tristan Murail’s Les Travaux et les Jours, and most recently, a major new work from Pascal Dusapin. Her diverse discography features works by composers as varied as Alvin Lucier, David Rakowski, and Charles Wuorinen; a CD of pieces written for her is available from New World Records, and her recording of Morton Feldman’s Triadic Memories on Mode and Murail’s piano music on Metier were recently released. Also in her repertoire are works by Barraqué, Cage, Dallapiccola, Dillon, Harvey, Ligeti, Sciarrino, Seeger, and Stockhausen. In the past, she has toured with the complete piano works of Arnold Schoenberg and Pierre Boulez.

Admission
Admission is free.

Telephone
Public information (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
Public information: http://www.umbc.edu/arts

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/
or by email or postal mail.

Marilyn Nonken (photo: Sara Press)

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Posted by tmoore

Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery Presents Two Exhibitions by John Pfahl: Luminous River and Extreme Horticulture

April 2 – May 26, 2006

Media contact:
Tom Moore
tmoore@umbc.edu
410-455-3370

Note: You may view or download this release as a pdf file.

John Pfahl: Fern Garden/TopiaryOpening on April 2nd and continuing through May 26th, UMBC’s Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents two exhibitions of work by John Pfahl, a preeminent landscape photographer whose work concentrates on merging idealized landscape images with visual traces of human existence. On April 18th at 4:30 pm, the artist will give a public lecture in the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery. A reception will follow.

Luminous River: Photographs of the Susquehanna pays homage to the Susquehanna River, a waterway that has played a historic role in American transportation. Pfahl has systematically followed and photographed the river from its origins in Otsego Lake to its mouth in the Chesapeake Bay, documenting its picturesque qualities. The images reference early American landscape art and capture a similar stillness, clarity and sensitivity to light and timelessness.

Extreme Horticulture includes photographs taken over several years in private and public gardens around the United States. Subjects range from the sublimely beautiful Birch Allee at Stan Hywet Gardens in Akron, Ohio, to the ridiculous Fifty-foot Inchworm, an azalea topiary at Cypress Gardens, Florida. The series continues the artist’s interest in nature and humankind’s effects on nature.

John Pfahl: Morning Light on Railroad ViaductArtist’s Statement on the Luminous River Series
“I became captivated with the Susquehanna years ago while driving from my home in Buffalo to Washington, D.C. The highway follows the river for about fifty miles between Shamokin Dam and Harrisburg—fifty miles of constantly changing river views. Cutting through five mountain ridges, spotted with wooded islands large and small, and featuring wide glassy surfaces interspersed with riffles and rapids, the Susquehanna appeared to be a condensed catalog of classic river landscapes. The light on that first occasion, and on many subsequent visits, was transcendent. The river seemed to soften the air through which it flowed, conjuring up tones of 19th century American landscape painting.

“While the Susquehanna was, indeed, occasionally visited and painted by such Hudson River School artists as Jasper Cropsey and Thomas Doughty, it did not receive a fraction of attention paid to the Hudson itself. Not easily navigable because of rocks and rapids, and not in close proximity to major cities, it clearly proved more of a challenge for artists to explore and paint. It was, arguably, more "picturesque" than the Hudson. In fact, the Susquehanna closely resembled (and still resembles) the fabled River Wye in Wales, where William Gilpin, in the late 18th century, developed the landscape paradigms that so greatly influenced masses of English watercolorists. Nevertheless, the 448-mile long Susquehanna and its 240-mile long West Branch languished largely ignored by the heavy-hitters of 19th century landscape painting.

John Pfahl: Sunset Near Shickshinny Mountain“So here I come, in the early part of the 21st century, with my large view camera and sturdy tripod, to try and rectify the imbalance. My project references early American landscape art, particularly that of painters in the Luminist mode. The timelessness, stillness, clarity, and especially, the sensitivity to light in the paintings of John Frederick Kensett, Fitz Hugh Lane, and Martin Johnson Heade have been a particular source of inspiration. Two early photographers also proved relevant: William H. Rau, with his photographs of Susquehanna and other river scenes taken while he was working for the Pennsylvania Railroad, and Seneca Ray Stoddard, Luminist photographer of Lake George and the Adirondacks. Of course, my greatest inspiration was the Susquehanna itself, which I followed systematically from its origin in Otsego Lake to its mouth in the Chesapeake Bay, enticed, always, by what lay waiting around the next bend.”

John Pfahl: Banyon TreeAbout John Pfahl
John Pfahl was born on February 17, 1939, in New York, New York, and raised in New Jersey. He received a BFA from Syracuse University in the School of Art and his MA from Syracuse University in the School of Communications. He has appeared in over 100 group and solo exhibitions, and his work is represented in at least forty-five public and corporate collections, including the George Eastman House International Museum of Photography, the Cleveland Museum of Art, and the Art Institute of Chicago.

Gallery Information
The Albin O. Kuhn Gallery serves as one of the principal art galleries in the Baltimore region. Objects from the Special Collections Department, as well as art and artifacts from all over the world, are displayed in challenging and informative exhibitions for the University community and the public. Moreover, traveling exhibitions are occasionally presented, and the Gallery also sends some of its exhibits on tour to other institutions nationwide. Admission to the Gallery and its programs is free.

John Pfahl: Azalea MazeAcknowledgements
Luminous River and Extreme Horticulture are organized by Nina Freudenheim, Inc., in Buffalo, New York. Their presentation at UMBC have been supported in part from an arts program grant from the Maryland State Arts Council, an agency funded by the State of Maryland and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Hours of Operation (please note the Gallery is now open on Sundays)
Sunday 1 P.M. – 5 P.M.
Monday 12 P.M. – 4:30 P.M.
Tuesday 12 P.M. – 4:30 P.M.
Wednesday 12 P.M. – 4:30 P.M.
Thursday 12 P.M. – 8 P.M.
Friday 12 P.M. – 4:30 P.M.
Saturday 1 P.M. – 5 P.M.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
General Gallery information: 410-455-2270

Web
UMBC Arts & Culture Calendar: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery: http://aok.lib.umbc.edu/gallery/

Directions
UMBC is located approximately 10 minutes from downtown Baltimore and 20 minutes from I-495.
• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Walker Avenue Garage or Albin O. Kuhn Library.
• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Walker Avenue Garage or Albin O. Kuhn Library.
• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Walker Avenue Garage or Albin O. Kuhn Library.
• Daytime metered visitor parking is available in the Walker Avenue Garage. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days.

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/
or by email or postal mail.

John Pfahl: Jewell Reed Riverbank

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Posted by tmoore

March 17, 2006

UMBC Presents Art and the Creative Process: Lectures by Michael J. Gelb and Anne Bogart

April 6 & 7, 2006

Media contact:
Tom Moore
tmoore@umbc.edu
410-455-3370

The UMBC Department of Theatre and UMBC’s Alex. Brown Center for Entrepreneurship present Innovators in Art and the Creative Process, featuring lectures by Michael J. Gelb and Anne Bogart.

Mr. Gelb will speak on Thursday, April 6th at 7 pm in the UMBC Recital Hall; Ms. Bogart will speak on Friday, April 7th at 8 pm in the UMBC Theatre.

Michael GelbMichael J. Gelb
Michael J. Gelb is internationally recognized as a pioneer in the fields of creative thinking, accelerated learning, and innovative leadership. He leads seminars for organizations such as BP, Nike, Merck, IBM, Microsoft, DuPont, and KPMG, and brings more than 25 years of experience as a professional speaker, seminar leader and organizational consultant to his diverse, international clientele. He has led executive education programs at George Mason University and the Wharton School, and was recently awarded a Batten Fellowship at the University of Virginia's Darden Business School.

Michael J. Gelb's publications include Body Learning: an Introduction to the Alexander Technique and Present Yourself! Captivate Your Audience with Great Presentation Skills. His best selling audio programs include Mind Mapping: How to Liberate Your Natural Genius, Putting Your Creative Genius to Work, and Power Speaking. A retired professional juggler who once performed with the Rolling Stones and Bob Dylan, Gelb created the Juggling Metaphor Method. He authored More Balls Than Hands: Juggling Your Way to Success by Learning to Love Your Mistakes, which was featured in USA Today. He also originated the concept of synvergent thinking, expressed in his Random House release, Thinking for a Change: Discovering the Power to Create, Communicate, and Lead.

The New York Times, The Washington Post and Training Magazine have all featured Gelb's work. He has also appeared on Good Morning America, CNN's Business Unusual and on many radio programs including live interviews with NPR and the BBC World Service. A fourth degree black belt in the Japanese martial art of Aikido, Gelb is co-author with International Grandmaster Raymond Keene, of Samurai Chess: Mastering Strategic Thinking Through the Martial Art of the Mind.

A passionate student of the Renaissance and the nature of genius, Gelb ignited the current fascination with all things Da Vinci with his How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci: Seven Steps to Genius Every Day, which has been translated into 24 languages and has appeared on The Washington Post, Amazon.com, and The New York Times best-seller lists. Gelb's book, Discover Your Genius: How to Think Like History's Ten Most Revolutionary Minds, was featured in USA Today.

Gelb's latest book, Da Vinci Decoded, taps into the seven Da Vincian principles outlined in How to Think Like Leonardo da Vinci to show readers how to cultivate spiritual potential.

Anne BogartAnne Bogart
Anne Bogart has taught at the University of California San Diego, New York University, Williams College, Bennington College, University of Alaska, Playwrights Horizons, Trinity Rep Conservatory, the School for Movement Research, and American Repertory Theater Institute for Advanced Theater Training at Harvard University. She is an associate professor at Columbia University where she runs the Graduate Directing Program.

She is the recipient of a Guggenheim Fellowship (2000-01), two Obie Awards, the New York Dance and Performance (Bessie) Award (1984), the Villager Award (1980), and a National Endowment for the Arts Artistic Associate Grant (1986-87). Bogart was the president of Theatre Communications Group from 1991 to 1993 and has served on the National Endowment for the Arts Overview Committee, the Opera Musical Theatre panel, and the Fulbright Committee. She was the featured speaker at the Toga Theatre Festival in Japan, 1988, and participated in the Cultural Olympiad (Atlanta) in 1996. She was the designated Modern Master at the Modern Masters Festival, Actors Theatre of Louisville, and is a recipient of the Kellogg Award from Bard College (2001) and the ATHE Achievement in Professional Theater Award (1999).

Bogart is artistic director the Saratoga International Theatre Institute (SITI), which she founded with Japanese director Tadashi Suzuki in 1992. Recent Works with SITI include La Dispute; Score; bobrauschenbergamerica; Room; War of the Worlds; Cabin Pressure; The Radio Play; Alice's Adventures; Culture of Desire; Bob; Going, Going, Gone; Small Lives/Big Dreams; The Medium; Noel Coward's Hay Fever and Private Lives; August Strindberg's Miss Julie; and Charles Mee's Orestes. Other recent productions include Nicholas and Alexandra (Los Angeles Opera), Marina A Captive Spirit (American Opera Projects), and Lilith and Seven Deadly Sins (New York City Opera).

Admission
Admission is free.

Telephone
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Tickets: 410-455-2917
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts

Directions
• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Recital Hall or Theatre.
• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Recital Hall or Theatre.
• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Recital Hall or Theatre.
• Visitor parking is available in the Commons Garage. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

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Posted by tmoore

February 22, 2006

UMBC Presents Gertrude Stein’s Ida; a novel

March 15 & 16, 2006
8 pm
UMBC Theatre

Media contact:
Tom Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
tmoore@umbc.edu
410-455-3370

Note: You may download this release as a pdf file (133k).

IdaOn March 15th and 16th at 8 pm in the UMBC Theatre, Gertrude Stein’s Ida; a novel, will be read, narrated and performed by Wendy Salkind, with a sound score composed by Linda Dusman.

This performance of the early section of the novel presents two characters: Ida, and the narrator of Ida’s story. Through dream-like imagery and wit, these characters merge in the telling of Ida’s creation of her dual identity and her struggle with her private and public self.

The performance will last approximately 45 minutes and will be followed by an audience talk-back with composer and performer.

Wendy Salkind is an actor whose performances of Play and Not I at international festivals established her reputation as a performer of the works of Samuel Beckett. As Associate Artist of the Maryland Stage Company she performed major roles in plays by Shakespeare, Chekov, Genet and Pinter, among others. She previously performed Façade with the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra and she directed Stein’s play Listen to Me. More recently she performed in two awarding-winning independent films, Cleave and Holy Water. Associate Professor Salkind chairs the Department of Theatre at UMBC, where she teaches acting and the Alexander Technique.

Composer and sound artist Linda Dusman’s works have been performed and installed throughout the United States, and in Europe, Asia, and South America. She is the recipient of grants and awards from the Swiss Women’s Music Forum, the American Composers Forum, the International Electroacoustic Music Festival of Sao Paulo, Brazil, and the Ucross Foundation, and most recently received an Individual Artist Award from the Maryland State Arts Council in the visual Arts: Media category. Her music is available on the Neuma, Capstone, and Maximalist Music labels. Professor Dusman chairs the Department of Music at UMBC and teaches music theory and composition.

Admission
Admission is free.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news

Directions

  • From I-95 take exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the UMBC Theatre. Parking is available in The Commons Garage.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the UMBC Theatre. Parking is available in The Commons Garage.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

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Posted by tmoore

UMBC Presents Cellist Franklin Cox in Concert

Saturday, March 12, 2006
3 pm
UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall

Media contact:
Tom Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
tmoore@umbc.edu
410-455-3370

Note: You may download this release as a pdf file (213k).

Franklin Cox (photo: Richard Anderson)The Department of Music’s Faculty Recital Series presents cellist Franklin Cox, who will present a concert featuring contemporary music for the cello. His program will feature J. S. Bach’s Cello Suite No. 3 in C Major, BWV 1009, performed in extended just intonation, a new work by Aaron Cassidy, a new work by David Kim-Boyle and other compositions.

Dr. Franklin Cox received B.M. degrees in cello and composition from Indiana University, as well as composition degrees from Columbia University (M.A.), and the University of California, San Diego (Ph.D.), where he also served as adjunct faculty member from 1993 to 1995. He studied cello with Gary Hoffman, Janos Starker, and Peter Wiley, and composition with Steven Suber, Fred Lerdahl, Brian Ferneyhough, and Harvey Sollberger. Dr. Cox has received numerous fellowships, prizes, and commissions from leading institutions and festivals of new music, including fellowships from the Schloss Solitude and the Sacher Stiftung, the Kranichsteiner Prize for both composition and cello performance from the Darmstadt Festival (also serving on the Komponistforum in 1994), and commissions from the 1998 Berliner Biennale and 2001 Hannover Biennale. He has performed with many leading new music groups, including SONOR, the Group for Contemporary Music, Exposé, Surplus, Kammerensemble Neue Musik Berlin, and Ensemble Köln. Since 1993, he has presented a solo recital entitled The New Cello, focused on original new works for the cello, more than 90 times throughout Europe and North America. In 2002, he joined the faculty of UMBC as assistant professor of music. He is co-editor of the international book series, New Music and Aesthetics in the 21st Century. His works are published by Rugginenti Editions and Smith Publications, and his works can be heard on Rusty Classica, Neuma Records, Solitude Edition, and 11 West Records.

Admission
Admission is $7 general, $3 for senior citizens, free for all students, and free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix or by calling MissionTix at 410-752-8950.
Tickets will also be available at the door (cash or check only) immediately prior to the concert.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
MissionTix: 410-752-8950
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news

Images for Media
High resolution images for media is available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

Directions

  • From I-95 take exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to UMBC.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road.
  • Parking is available after 3:30 p.m. on weekdays and all day during weekends in gated Lots 16/9A for a $.50 fee, quarters only. To get to these parking lots, circle around Hilltop Circle (either direction) until you reach Hilltop Road. Take Hilltop Road toward the center of campus. (The Fine Arts Building will now be directly in front of you.) Proceed through the stop sign. The road will curve to the right. You will need to deposit 50¢ (two quarters) to open the gate. If Lot 16 is full, you can also pay to park in Lot 9A, which sits on the hill immediately above Lot 16—just go back to the stop sign and turn left toward Lot 9A, and then to the gate. If both these Lots are full (which would be unusual in the evening), then park in the Commons Garage, Walker Avenue Garage or Lot 10.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

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Posted by tmoore

UMBC Presents Pianist Rachel Franklin and Mezzo Soprano Patricia Green in Concert

Saturday, March 11, 2006
8 pm
UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall

Media contact:
Tom Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
tmoore@umbc.edu
410-455-3370

Note: You may download this release as a pdf file (120k).

The Department of Music’s Faculty Recital Series presents soprano Patricia Green and pianist Rachel Franklin in concert. Their program, Lieder and Life Connections, features the songs of Robert Schumann and his circle and commemorates the 150th anniversary of Schumann’s death.

The two performers renew a long-standing collaboration to explore an exquisite selection of songs by Robert Schumann, his wife and muse Clara, and his close friends Johannes Brahms, Felix Mendelssohn and Mendelssohn's gifted sister Fanny Hensel. The music and texts used by these five composers are thoughtfully juxtaposed to reveal hidden subtleties of their complex relationships with each other, and provide insights into the social and historical currents that shaped their work.

Mezzo soprano Patricia Green has gained acclaim for her expressive voice, noted for its three-octave ease in diverse repertoire. Her international career includes performances with L’Orchestre de Radio-France, the Dutch Radio Philharmonic, the National Symphony, the Northern Israel Philharmonic, the Theater Chamber Players, Washington Bach Consort, Vancouver New Music, Onafhankelijk Collective, Bethlehem Bach Society, and New Music Concerts (Toronto). Her performances with conductors Pierre Boulez, Leonard Slatkin, Reinbert de Leeuw, Peter Eötvös, Pascal Rophé and Sir David Willcocks have been broadcast internationally on both television and radio. As a performer of new music, she is sought out by international composers. She has recordings on Newport Classics, Albany Records, and Live Unity Productions. Ms. Green received the Artist Diploma from the Peabody Conservatory, winning the George Castelle Prize. She teaches at the University of Western Ontario.

As a Pro Musicis International Award winner, British pianist Rachel Franklin gave her solo debuts in Carnegie Recital Hall, New York, and Jordan Hall, Boston. The Boston Globe enthused about her “beautiful differentiations of color, touch and texture” and described a performance on her solo debut CD as “not inferior...to the recorded performances by Cortot and Rubinstein.” She has also given European Pro Musicis solo debuts in Paris and Rome. She is on the faculty of the Department of Music at UMBC.

Admission
Admission is $7 general, $3 for senior citizens, free for all students, and free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix or by calling MissionTix at 410-752-8950.
Tickets will also be available at the door (cash or check only) immediately prior to the concert.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
MissionTix: 410-752-8950
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news

Images for Media
High resolution images for media is available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

Directions

  • From I-95 take exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to UMBC.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road.
  • Parking is available after 3:30 p.m. on weekdays and all day during weekends in gated Lots 16/9A for a $.50 fee, quarters only. To get to these parking lots, circle around Hilltop Circle (either direction) until you reach Hilltop Road. Take Hilltop Road toward the center of campus. (The Fine Arts Building will now be directly in front of you.) Proceed through the stop sign. The road will curve to the right. You will need to deposit 50¢ (two quarters) to open the gate. If Lot 16 is full, you can also pay to park in Lot 9A, which sits on the hill immediately above Lot 16—just go back to the stop sign and turn left toward Lot 9A, and then to the gate. If both these Lots are full (which would be unusual in the evening), then park in the Commons Garage, Walker Avenue Garage or Lot 10.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

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Posted by tmoore

UMBC Presents Trombonist Abbie Conant in Concert with Composer William Osborne

Saturday, March 4, 2006
8 pm
UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall

Media contact:
Tom Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
tmoore@umbc.edu
410-455-3370

Note: You may download this release as a pdf file (329k).

Abbie Conant and William OsborneThe Department of Music’s Contemporary Concert Series presents Abbie Conant and William Osborne on Saturday, March 4th at 8 pm in the Fine Arts Recital Hall.

Conant and Osborne’s performance features their composition Cybeline, a music theater work for performance-artist, glove controller, trombone, video, and quadraphonic surround sound. Schubert Lieder, the Egyptian Goddess Maat, Native American poetry, dismemberment, trombone playing, a cyborg talkshow host, a talking hand, sacred cartoons, a vengeful opera singer, a martyred math geek, Hildegard von Bingen, fighter jets, commercials for synthetic flesh, cyborgian attack dogs, and personality-enhancement chips, Psalms, a country western song, Mother Nature, and a tribute to Joni Mitchell...all integrated into a 45 minute surround sound mini opera with computer-generated accompaniment, video and live electronics. And yes, this is classical music about a cyborg trying to prove she is human by being a talk show host.

The concert will also include Music for the End of Time by William Osborne for trombone and quadraphonic tape, an apocalyptic work in six movements based on the Book of Revelation. The electronic music of the surround sound creates a sonic environment in which the trombone is the central figure. It explores all aspects of the trombone, ranging from expressions of "divine wrath," to wild rhythmic unisons with the Four Horsemen, to the gentlest, meditative lyricism.

Admission
Admission is free.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news

Images for Media
High resolution images for media is available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

Directions

  • From I-95 take exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to UMBC.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road.
  • Parking is available after 3:30 p.m. on weekdays and all day during weekends in gated Lots 16/9A for a $.50 fee, quarters only. To get to these parking lots, circle around Hilltop Circle (either direction) until you reach Hilltop Road. Take Hilltop Road toward the center of campus. (The Fine Arts Building will now be directly in front of you.) Proceed through the stop sign. The road will curve to the right. You will need to deposit 50¢ (two quarters) to open the gate. If Lot 16 is full, you can also pay to park in Lot 9A, which sits on the hill immediately above Lot 16—just go back to the stop sign and turn left toward Lot 9A, and then to the gate. If both these Lots are full (which would be unusual in the evening), then park in the Commons Garage, Walker Avenue Garage or Lot 10.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

###

Posted by tmoore

UMBC Presents Keyboardist Lafayette Gilchrist in Concert with Saxophonist John Dierker

Thursday, March 2, 2006
8 pm
UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall

Media contact:
Tom Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
tmoore@umbc.edu
410-455-3370

Note: You may download this release as a pdf file (311k).

Lafayette GilchristThe Department of Music’s Faculty Recital Series presents keyboardist Lafayette Gilchrist joined by tenor saxophonist John Dierker on Thursday, March 2nd in the Fine Arts Recital Hall.

Lafayette Gilchrist has been playing his own unique brand of jazz-inspired music for more than ten years now and has been an active performer in and around the Baltimore/Washington D.C. area. Born and raised in Washington D.C., this young self-taught musician has released under his own label two hotly regarded CDs, The Art is Life and Asphalt Revolt and now haunts the clubs of New York, Philadelphia, Baltimore, and Washington D.C. Recently, Gilchrist has been working with Grammy-award-winning saxophonist/composer/band leader David Murray as a featured performer in his current octet. David Murray, who has graced the covers of both Jazz Times and Down Beat magazines for years, has long been on the cutting edge of creative music and with over 200 albums to his credit, David Murray is bringing Lafayette Gilchrist into a whole new and wider world of creative playing and writing. Gilchrist just made his national recording debut on Hyena Records with his CD The Music According to Lafayette Gilchrist.


Admission
Admission is $7 general, $3 for senior citizens, free for all students, and free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix or by calling MissionTix at 410-752-8950.
Tickets will also be available at the door (cash or check only) immediately prior to the concert.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news

Images for Media
High resolution images for media is available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

Directions

  • From I-95 take exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to UMBC.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road.
  • Parking is available after 3:30 p.m. on weekdays and all day during weekends in gated Lots 16/9A for a $.50 fee, quarters only. To get to these parking lots, circle around Hilltop Circle (either direction) until you reach Hilltop Road. Take Hilltop Road toward the center of campus. (The Fine Arts Building will now be directly in front of you.) Proceed through the stop sign. The road will curve to the right. You will need to deposit 50¢ (two quarters) to open the gate. If Lot 16 is full, you can also pay to park in Lot 9A, which sits on the hill immediately above Lot 16—just go back to the stop sign and turn left toward Lot 9A, and then to the gate. If both these Lots are full (which would be unusual in the evening), then park in the Commons Garage, Walker Avenue Garage or Lot 10.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Lafayette Gilchrist

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Posted by tmoore

UMBC Presents Pianist Joel Sachs in Concert

March 1, 2006
8 pm
UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall

Media contact:
Tom Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
tmoore@umbc.edu
410-455-3370

Note: You may download this release as a pdf file (212k).

Joel Sachs (photo: Nan Melville)The Department of Music’s Contemporary Concert Series presents pianist Joel Sachs, who has conducted at major European and American festivals, has been music director for experimental operas, and performs extensively as a pianist. At Juilliard he conducts the New Juilliard Ensemble, a chamber orchestra for new music, and directs the annual “Focus!” festival. For ten years he also was Artistic Director of the MoMA Summergarden. Appearances include orchestral concerts throughout Europe and Latin America, and residencies in Brazil, Germany, Israel, Poland, and Russia.

Sach’s CD of intercultural music of the Americas with Mexico’s La Camerata de las Americas was released on Dorian. He is heard with CONTINUUM on Nonesuch, CRI, TNC, and Musical Heritage Society, among others. He received Columbia University’s Alice M. Ditson Conductor’s Award for service to American music. A Harvard graduate, he received the Ph.D. at Columbia and is writing a biography of Henry Cowell.

His performance will feature music of John Cage, including music for piano, toy piano and prepared piano: Dream (1948), Suite for Toy Piano (1948), In a Landscape (1948), Sonatas and Interludes (1946-48).

8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. For more information, call 410-455-MUSC.

Admission
Admission is free.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news

Images for Media
A high resolution imagea for media is available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail. (Photo: Nan Melville.)

Directions

  • From I-95 take exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to UMBC.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road.
  • Parking is available after 3:30 p.m. on weekdays and all day during weekends in gated Lots 16/9A for a $.50 fee, quarters only. To get to these parking lots, circle around Hilltop Circle (either direction) until you reach Hilltop Road. Take Hilltop Road toward the center of campus. (The Fine Arts Building will now be directly in front of you.) Proceed through the stop sign. The road will curve to the right. You will need to deposit 50¢ (two quarters) to open the gate. If Lot 16 is full, you can also pay to park in Lot 9A, which sits on the hill immediately above Lot 16—just go back to the stop sign and turn left toward Lot 9A, and then to the gate. If both these Lots are full (which would be unusual in the evening), then park in the Commons Garage, Walker Avenue Garage or Lot 10.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

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Posted by tmoore

UMBC Theatre presents Victor Frankenstein

Colette Searls directs new puppetry adaptation of Mary Shelley’s classic

March 8 - 12, 2006
UMBC Theatre

Media contact:
Tom Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
tmoore@umbc.edu
410-455-3370

Note: You may download this release as a pdf file (1.8 Mb).

Victor Frankenstein (photo by Rich Riggins)The UMBC Department of Theatre presents Victor Frankenstein, a new puppetry adaptation of Mary Shelley’s classic novel conceived and directed by Colette Searls, with new music by Anna Rubin. The production features set design by Peter Wood, costume design by Celestine Ranney-Howes, light design by Terry Cobb, sound design by Erica Yeager and dramaturgy by Susan McCully.

A young scholar makes an astonishing discovery: how to create a new human being out of other people’s dead bodies. Paper sculpture, floating masks, and eerie medical tools bring life to the inanimate in this ghastly tale of human transgression.

This production is not recommended for young children.

Performances
Wednesday, March 8, 8 pm (preview)
Thursday, March 9, 4 pm (opening—free for the UMBC campus community (students, faculty, staff))
Friday, March 10, 8 pm
Saturday, March 11, 8 pm
Sunday, March 12, 4 pm

Admission
General admission: $10.00
Students and seniors: $5.00
Preview: $3.00
Box Office: www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950

Telephone
Box Office: 410-752-8950
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail. (Photos: Rich Riggins.)

Directions

  • From I-95 take exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the UMBC Theatre. Parking is available in The Commons Garage.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the UMBC Theatre. Parking is available in The Commons Garage.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

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Posted by tmoore

January 27, 2006

UMBC presents Keigwin + Company

February 15, 2006, 8 p.m.
UMBC Theatre

Media contact:
Tom Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
tmoore@umbc.edu
410-455-3370

Note: You may download this release as a pdf file (1.8 Mb).

Keigwin + Company (Photo credit: Tom Caravaglia)UMBC presents Keigwin + Company in concert on February 15, 2006 at 8 p.m. in the UMBC Theatre.

Keigwin + Company lives to create provocative, witty and engaging dances. Utilizing a collaborative process, K+C combines physicality with theatricality, samples a variety of mediums, and, ultimately, fuses art with entertainment.

Keigwin + Company was established in 2003 with its premiere performance at the New York City’s Joyce Soho and has performed in such venues as Joe’s Pub at the Public Theater, Thalia Theater at Symphony Space, NYU/Tisch School of the Arts, Martha@Mother, Galapagos Art Space, and in the clubs Avalon and Marquee. Nationally, Keigwin + Company has been presented by the American Dance Festival, the Bates Dance Festival, Summerdance Santa Barbara, Jacob’s Pillow Inside/out, the Kaatsbaan International Dance Center, and DRA’s Fire Island Dance Festival. Recent commissions include the American Dance Festival, Hofstra University, Moving Arts Projects, California Institute of the Arts, NYU/Tisch School of the Arts, Zenon Dance Company, and Bates College.

"The kinetic delight of Keigwin's high-powered dancing is infectious, and he doesn't shy away from the 'e' word: entertainment."
—Gus Solomons, Dance Magazine

This event is sponsored by the Department of Dance and the InterArts Program.

Keigwin + Company (Photo credit: Tom Caravaglia)

Admission
General admission: $15.00.
Students and seniors: $7.00.
Box Office: www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950

Telephone
Box Office: 410-752-8950
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail. (Photos: Tom Caravaglia.)

Directions

  • From I-95 take exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the UMBC Theatre. Parking is available in The Commons Garage.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the UMBC Theatre. Parking is available in The Commons Garage.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Keigwin + Company (Photo credit: Tom Caravaglia)

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Posted by tmoore

January 20, 2006

UMBC presents the Phoenix Dance Company

February 8, 9, 10 & 11, 2006, 8 p.m.
UMBC Theatre

Media contact:
Tom Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
tmoore@umbc.edu
410-455-3370

Note: You may download this release as a pdf file (6.5 Mb).

Phoenix Dance CompanyUMBC presents the Phoenix Dance Company in concert on February 8, 9, 10 and 11, 2006 at 8 p.m. in the UMBC Theatre.

Renowned for its exploration of dance and technology, the Phoenix Dance Company features choreography by Carol Hess and Doug Hamby, and performances by Sandra Lacy and other artists.

The program will include:

  • A new hardcore/punk work by Carol Hess featuring the chaotic and thrashy music by Baltimore band Lilu Dallas.
  • Award-winning soloist Sandra Lacy in the highly expressive and provocative Underview by Lisa Race and Dissolve by Jeanine Durning.
  • Floating Above, a sumptuous and thrilling duet with striking imagery and intricate partnering.
  • The mysterious, jarring and dramatic Nacht by Doug Hamby, in which three women explore the confines of a surreal nightmare.
  • A new work by Doug Hamby that explores the hot zone of connection between dancers to the music of Charlie Haden.

Phoenix Dance Company

Admission
General admission: $15.00.
Students and seniors: $7.00.
Box Office: www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950

Telephone
Box Office: 410-752-8950
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

Directions

  • From I-95 take exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the UMBC Theatre. Parking is available in The Commons Garage.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the UMBC Theatre. Parking is available in The Commons Garage.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Phoenix Dance Company

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Posted by tmoore

December 15, 2005

Center for Art and Visual Culture presents "What Sound Does a Color Make?"

February 2 - March 18, 2006

Media contact:
Tom Moore
tmoore@umbc.edu
410-455-3370

Note: You may download this release as a pdf file (1.2 Mb).

Scott Arford
Static Room, 2003
Two-channel video installation with sound (excerpt above)
Dimensions variable
Courtesy the artist

Static Room is an abstract audiovisual composition of manipulated static that spatially surrounds the viewer both sonically and visually. The audio track was generated directly by the flickering, strobing image itself—the image and the sound having been created from the same signal, the same set of data. In the words of the artist, “Experiencing it is learning how to see with your ears wide open.”

D-Fuse: D-TonateOpening on February 2nd and continuing though March 16th, UMBC’s Center for Art and Visual Culture (CAVC) presents What Sound Does a Color Make?, a traveling exhibition organized and circulated by Independent Curators International (iCI) that explores the fusion of vision and sound in electronic media. What Sound Does a Color Make? connects the recent boom of digital audiovisual art to its pre-digital roots, presenting ten contemporary works by an internationally diverse group of artists. The exhibition will include a selection of single-channel videos from the 1970s and feature several sensuous new media environments that fascinate both technophiles and general audiences alike, heightening awareness of human perception and cognition.

For some people, a stimulus to one of the five senses evokes the sensation of another sense, as when hearing a sound produces the visualization of a color. For contemporary audiovisual artists, the possibilities inspired by this phenomenon, known as synesthesia, have expanded with the advent of recent digital technologies that translate all electronic media, whether sounds or moving images, into the zeros and ones of computer bits.

United by similar and overlapping premises, the works in the exhibition are widely divergent in their results. They range from large-scale immersive installations with moving forms that morph to corresponding tonal compositions, to discrete DVD stations inviting viewers to access electronic music pieces in different combinations with videos. One of the recent works, Self-Portrait of Paul (DeMarinis) by Jim Campbell, is a portrait of a colleague who uses sound in his own art. In Campbell’s work, an LED grid is activated by playing a recording of that man’s voice, and the gridded lights resemble pixels that gradually build up an image of the man, with his voice’s high tones representing white and the low tones representing black. Another contemporary work is an interactive installation by D-Fuse, a London-based collective of artists and musicians, which layers different music soundtracks onto dynamic video clips, creating a distinctive audiovisual experience. The earlier works from the 1970s, by such pioneers of video art as Nam June Paik, Steina Vasulka, and Gary Hill, place the current interest in synesthetic media art in a broader historical context, offering a unique perspective on this phenomenon. The exhibition will encourage a high degree of individual engagement and self-reflection, as well as further thought about the ways that visual and aural stimuli are electronically, digitally and perceptually connected.

Nam June Paik and Jud Yalkut: Beatles ElectroniquesWhat Sound Does a Color Make? is a traveling exhibition organized and circulated by Independent Curators International (iCI), New York and curated by Kathleen Forde. The exhibition and tour are made possible, in part, by grants from The David Bermant Foundation: Color, Light, Motion; The Horace W. Goldsmith Foundation; and Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen e.V., Stuttgart; and by an in-kind donation from Philips Electronics North America.

Events
On Thursday, February 2nd from 5 to 7 pm, the CAVC will host an opening reception for What Sound Does a Color Make?.

On Thursday, February 2nd at 5 pm, Kathleen Forde, curator of the exhibition, will lead a gallery tour. Forde is curator at the Experimental Media and Performing Arts Center (EMPAC), Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute in Troy, New York. She also curates and writes on a freelance basis, most recently for the Rotterdam Film Festival, VideoZone Tel Aviv, the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the Duesseldorf and Cologne Kunstverein, and the Transmediale Festival in Berlin, Germany.

On Thursday, March 16th at 7 pm, the CAVC hosts a lecture by sound a media artist Stephen Vitiello, location to be announced. In his work, Vitiello is particularly interested in the physical aspect of sound and its potential to define the form and atmosphere of a spatial environment. Recent solo exhibitions include The Project, New York; Galerie Almine Rech, Paris; The Project, Los Angeles. Group exhibitions include the 2002 Whitney Biennial; Ce qui arrive at the Cartier Foundation, Paris, curated by Paul Virilio, Yanomami: Spirit of the Forest, also at the Cartier Foundation. Previous exhibitions include Greater New York at P.S. 1 Contemporary Art Center presented in collaboration with the Museum of Modern Art, and a solo exhibition at the Texas Gallery, Houston. In 1999, Stephen Vitiello was awarded a six month WorldViews residency on the 91st floor of the World Trade Center. The residency resulted in a site-specific sound installation which has been broadcast and exhibited internationally.

Participating Artists
Scott Arford
Jim Campbell
D-Fuse
Granular-Synthesis (Kurt Hentschläger & Ulf Langheinrich)
Gary Hill
Thom Kubli
Nam June Paik and Jud Yalkut
Robin Rimbaud (a.k.a. Scanner) in collaboration with D-Fuse
Fred Szymanski
Atau Tanaka
Steina and Woody Vasulka
Stephen Vitiello

About the Center for Art and Visual Culture
The Center for Art and Visual Culture is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study of contemporary art and visual culture, critical theory, art and cultural history, and the relationship between society and the arts. The CAVC serves as a forum for students, faculty, and the general public for the discussion of important aesthetic and social issues of the day. Disciplines represented include painting, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, photography, digital art, video, film, television, design, architecture, advertising, and installation and performance art.

Atau Tanaka: BondageSince 1989, the CAVC has incorporated a number of public programs into its exhibition programming schedule to further impact the communities it serves. Symposia, lecture series, conferences, film series, visiting artist series, and residencies have all been fundamental in an effort to create an ongoing dialogue about contemporary art and culture. The Center has also initiated a number of projects with Baltimore and surrounding schools systems to integrate the contemporary artist and their concerns into the classroom. These projects take place on-site at both middle schools and high schools and are team taught by the instructors at these schools, professional artists, and students from the CAVC’s Internship Program. The Center produces one to two exhibition catalogues each year. Each document is fully illustrated and contains critical essays on the given subject by a variety of distinguished professionals in the field. Recent publications include Postmodernism: A Virtual Discussion and Paul Rand: Modernist Design. These books and catalogues are published and are distributed internationally through Distributed Art Publishers.

Since 1992, the Center for Art and Visual Culture has actively pursued the organization of exhibitions that contain the aesthetic, theoretical, and educational potential to reach both a national and international audience. Over the years, the CAVC has traveled these exhibition projects to a broad spectrum of museums, professional non-profit galleries, and universities national and internationally. Recent traveling exhibitions include:

Blur of the Otherworldly (2005)
White: Whiteness and Race in Contemporary Art (2003)
Fred Wilson: Objects and Installations (2001)
Adrian Piper: A Retrospective (1999)
Bruno Monguzzi: A Designer’s Perspective (1998)
Minimal Politics (1997)
Kate Millet, Sculpture: The First 38 Years (1997)

Beyond the scope of these traveling exhibitions, the Center for Art and Visual Culture also undertakes an exhibition schedule that includes a Faculty Biennial, and projects such as the Joseph Beuys Tree Partnership. As part of the educational mission of the CAVC, one graduate thesis exhibition and one undergraduate senior exhibition are scheduled on a yearly basis.

This multi-faceted focus for presenting exhibitions, projects and scholarly research publications focused on contemporary art and cultural issues positions the Center for Art and Visual Culture in a unique position within the mid-Atlantic region.

Robin Rimbaud (aka Scanner) in collaboration with D-Fuse: Light Turned DownHours and Admission
Tuesday through Saturday 10 A.M. - 5:00 P.M.
Admission is free.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Center for Art and Visual Culture: 410-455-3188
Media inquiries: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
What Sound Does a Color Make? website: http://www.ici-exhibitions.org/Exhibitions/WhatSoundDoesColor/WhatSound.htm
Center for Art and Visual Culture: http://www.umbc.edu/cavc

Directions
• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
• Daytime metered visitor parking is available in the Administration Drive Garage.
• Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.
Images in this release:
D-Fuse, D-Tonate, 2003
Nam June Paik and Jud Yalkut, Beatles Electroniques, 1966-69, courtesy Electronic Arts Intermix (EAI), New York
Atau Tanaka, Bondage, 2004
Robin Rimbaud (a.k.a Scanner) in collaboration with D-Fuse, Light Turned Down, 2001
Granular-Synthesis, Lux, 2003

Granular-Synthesis: Lux

Posted by tmoore

Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents "Extraordinary Bodies: Photographs from the Mütter Museum"

January 30 - March 12, 2006

Media contact:
Tom Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
tmoore@umbc.edu
410-455-3370

Note: You may download this release as a pdf file (1.2 Mb).

Joel-Peter Witkin: HarvestUMBC’s Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents Extraordinary Bodies: Photographs from the Mütter Museum, on display from January 30 through March 12, 2006.

Photographers and medicine are no strangers. The visual representation of anatomy and pathology as viewed by the camera dates back to the advent of the daguerreotype, and early pathology was used by doctors and scientists to create anatomical atlases as well as document disease and trauma. Photographs also allowed physicians to keep exact visual records of cases long after patients died.

The historical bond between photographers and medicine carries forward to the present day with Extraordinary Bodies: Photographs from the Mütter Museum, the culmination of more than a decade of work that includes contemporary photography by Shelby Lee Adams, Max Aguilera-Hellweg, Gwen Akin & Allan Ludwig, Candace diCarlo, Dale Gunnoe, Steven Katzman, Mark Kessell, Scott Lindgren, Olivia Parker, Rosamond Purcell, Richard Ross, Ariel Ruiz i Altaba, Harvey Stein, Arne Svenson, William Wegman and Joel-Peter Witkin. For some of these photographers, the medical manipulation of the body—an act that amounts to the isolation of the part from the whole—becomes a visual metaphor for the human condition. Others experiment with the juxtaposition of real or artificial body parts and the public and private spaces of the Museum itself.

Extraordinary Bodies: Photographs from the Mütter Museum presents these works by current photographers alongside powerful images from the Mütter Museum’s renowned historical photography collection. The images in the exhibition extend the boundaries of traditional photographic subject matter, finding beauty not in conventional forms, but in internal marvels and in the enigma of those whose bodies—deformed, broken, and disfigured—have suffered physical abnormality, trauma or destructive disease.

Rosamond Purcell: Human Head Prepared by BatsonThe Mütter Museum, one of the last medical museums from the nineteenth century, comprises a sublime anatomical and pathological collection that originated with Dr. Thomas Dent Mütter, a professor of surgery who collected unique specimens and models for teaching purposes. Under the care of The College of Physicians of Philadelphia, to which Dr. Mütter offered his collection in 1856, the Mütter Museum has grown and survived where most others did not; today a new audience has emerged to appreciate its collections.

Extraordinary Bodies: Photographs from the Mütter Museum offers a rare opportunity for people who have not experienced the medical student’s rite of passage and initiation into the singular mysteries of the profession to encounter powerful, inspiring, and enthralling images of nature’s challenges to human life.

The publication Mütter Museum (Blast Books, 2002) by Gretchen Worden, the late director of the Mütter Museum, accompanies the exhibition and will be available for sale.

On Tuesday, February 21 at 4:30 pm, the Library Gallery will host a lecture by Mark Alice Durant, professor of photography in the Department of Visual Arts at UMBC, who will discuss the photographers in the show, as well as other photographers whose work illustrates the continued fascination of the contemporary artist with the aesthetics of the human form. A reception will follow the lecture.

Olivia Parker: HeartGallery Information
The Albin O. Kuhn Gallery serves as one of the principal art galleries in the Baltimore region. Objects from the Special Collections Department, as well as art and artifacts from all over the world, are displayed in challenging and informative exhibitions for the University community and the public. Moreover, traveling exhibitions are occasionally presented, and the Gallery also sends some of its exhibits on tour to other institutions nationwide. Admission to the Gallery is free.

Acknowledgements
Extraordinary Bodies: Photographs from the Mütter Museum is curated by independent curator Laura Lindgren and is organized by Curatorial Assistance Traveling Exhibitions (CATE), Los Angeles. Its presentation at UMBC has been supported in part from an arts program grant from the Maryland State Arts Council, an agency funded by the State of Maryland and the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Friends of the Library & Gallery. The reception for Extraordinary Bodies is sponsored by the Friends of the Library & Gallery and the Libby Kuhn Endowment.

Hours of Operation (please note the Gallery is now open on Sundays)
Sunday 1 pm - 5 pm
Monday 12 pm - 4:30 pm
Tuesday 12 pm - 4:30 pm
Wednesday 12 pm - 4:30 pm
Thursday 12 pm - 8 pm
Friday 12 pm - 4:30 pm
Saturday 1 pm - 5 pm

Telephone
General Gallery information: 410-455-2270
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery: http://aok.lib.umbc.edu/gallery/

Directions
UMBC is located approximately 10 minutes from downtown Baltimore and 20 minutes from I-495.
• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.
• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.
• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.
Daytime metered visitor parking is available in the Walker Avenue Garage. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.
Images in this release:
Joel-Peter Witkin, Harvest, 1984, silver gelatin print
Rosamond Purcell, Human Head Prepared by Batson, 2000, Iris print
Olivia Parker, Heart, 1994, Nash digital print
William Wegman, Kyphosified, 2000, c-print

William Wegman: Kyphosified

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Posted by tmoore

November 18, 2005

UMBC Department of Theatre presents The Love of Don Perlimplín for Belisa in the Garden by Federico García Lorca

December 1-10, 2005
UMBC Theatre

Contact:
Tom Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

From December 1st through 10th, the UMBC Department of Theatre presents The Love of Don Perlimplín for Belisa in the Garden by Federico García Lorca, translated by Caridad Svich, directed by Xerxes Mehta with set and costume design by Elena Zlotescu and lighting design by Terry Cobb.

A delicious little tragic farce by Spain’s greatest modern playwright, Don Perlimplín rings sly and shocking changes on that comic staple—the rich old man with the sexy young wife. A small masterpiece from Lorca’s surrealist period, when he was collaborating with his friends Buñuel and Dalí, this fantastical parody of the classical Spanish “honor” tragedy plays lighthearted games with color, shape, language, the human form, and “reality” in general. The production includes songs and music.

Formally, Perlimplín is a play about an art form reinventing itself, just as, thematically, it is a play about the birth of an artist. Suffering shakes Don Perlimplin out of his fear of chaos into the power of his imagination. Reborn into life, love and eros, ironically through death, the Don, and his creator, in redoubled irony, find their place in the great traditional theme of Spanish literature and art—the truth of desire and the reality of imagined worlds.

"My first plays were unpresentable....In these impossible plays lie my real intentions. But to demonstrate a personality and gain the right to respect, I've written other things."
—Federico García Lorca, 1936

Showtimes
Thursday, December 1st, 8 pm (preview)
Friday, December 2nd, 8 pm (opening night)
Saturday, December 3rd, 8 pm
Sunday, December 4th, 4 pm
Thursday, December 8th, 4 pm
Friday, December 9th, 8 pm
Saturday, December 10th, 8 pm

Admission
$10 general admission; $5 students and seniors; $3 for the preview.
The performance on Thursday, December 8th is free for the UMBC campus community.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or by calling MissionTix at 410-752-8950.

Telephone
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Tickets: 410-752-8950
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
Tickets: http://www.missiontix.com/

Directions
• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.
• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Theatre.
• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.
• Visitor parking is available in the Commons Garage. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res or by email or postal mail.

Posted by tmoore

October 11, 2005

UMBC's Center for Art and Visual Culture presents Blur of the Otherworldly: Contemporary Art, Technology, and the Paranormal

October 20 - December 17, 2005

Contact: Thomas Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

Susan Hiller: Wild TalentsFrom October 20 through December 17, 2005, UMBC’s Center for Art and Visual Culture (CAVC) presents Blur of the Otherworldly: Contemporary Art, Technology, and the Paranormal, organized at the CAVC by Mark Alice Durant and Jane D. Marsching. This major traveling exhibition features twenty-eight contemporary artists whose work employs modern communication technologies (photography, film, video, computers, radio, internet, and digital media) to explore culturally inbred questions/ superstitions concerning parallel worlds to our own.

From the infamous Cottingham fairy photographs through Victorian spiritualist images to recent grainy images of Sasquatch and sky-borne saucers, photographs have attempted to provide the material of proof of the otherworldly. The earliest photographic images rendered a detailed impression of the subjects materiality, and, through the process of doubling and repeating, seemed to destabilize reality by producing the ghost image, a dematerialization of the three-dimensional world. In response to this strange new technology, some Victorian minds associated photography with the occult, believing the human eye did not see at all, that human perception was blind to the spirit world. Occultists conjectured that the air was charged with floating images and disembodied spirits, and they set out to prove their claims by documenting episodes of visitations. Photography was the perfect tool conscripted in this effort.

Today, the amount of attention devoted to paranormal phenomena—UFOs, demonic possession, psychics, ghosts—in the media indicates that photography’s early fascinations have not disappeared. Millennial angst, bewildering leaps of science, wildly improbable technological inventions, and ever-decreasing wilderness as human sprawl grows exponentially, make other worlds once again appear possible, even probable, and definitely alluring. Our escalating desire to prove the existence of another dimension (no matter which one) is linked to photography, with its history of providing us with our proofs. Seduced by the invisible in the face of the mediums relentless and dull dependence upon the physical, photography as a tool of fact (in science), fantasy (in spirit photography), and invention (in the hands of artists) is exploring new frontiers once again.

Zoe Beloff: The Ideoplastic Materializations of Eva CIncluded in the exhibition are works by Mark Amerika, Zoe Beloff, Diane Bertolo, Jeremy Blake, Corrine May Botz, Susan Collins, Gregory Crewdson, Paul DeMarinis, Spencer Finch, Ken Goldberg, Susan Hiller, Marko Maetamm, Miya Masaoka, Jennifer and Kevin McCoy, Maria Miranda and Norie Neumark, Mariko Mori, Paul Pfeiffer, Fred Ressler, John Roach, Ted Serios, Leslie Sharpe, Chrysanne Stathacos, Thomson & Craighead, and Suzanne Treister.

Blur of the Otherworldly: Contemporary Art, Technology, and the Paranormal will be accompanied by a 200 page fully illustrated catalogue with essays on the significance of paranormal and the supernatural in contemporary culture by Lynne Tillman, associate professor and writer-in-residence at the University at Albany, and Marina Warner, novelist and former scholar at the Getty Center for History of Art and Humanities. Mark Alice Durant and Jane D. Marsching, co-curators of the exhibition, will contribute extensive essays on the interplay between science, art, and the occult as it relates to the artworks in the exhibition. The publication will contain over eighty illustrations in color and black and white as well as a checklist for the exhibition, illustrated timeline, and a bibliography. Published by the Center for Art and Visual Culture, as the ninth title of its Issues in Cultural Theory series, Blur of the Otherworldly: Contemporary Art, Technology, and the Paranormal will be distributed internationally by Distributed Art Publishers (DAP), in New York.

Three QuickTime clips about the exhibition are available:
John Roach discusses Transmissions from Beyond
Miya Masaoka discusses Piece for Plants
Co-curator Mark Alice Durant discusses the exhibition

Events

  • An Opening Reception will be held on Thursday, October 20th at 5 pm.
  • On October 28th, the exhibition hosts the Paranormal Party. Costumes are optional but encouraged. This event is sponsored by the CAVC, the UMBC Alumni Association, the UMBC Student Events Board and the UMBC Student Government Association. 7 to 10 pm. Admission is free.
  • On November 3rd, the Center for Art and Visual Culture presents a Panel Discussion in conjunction with the exhibition. The panel will be moderated by Mark Alice Durant, curator and professor of Visual Arts at UMBC; and Jane D. Marsching, curator and assistant professor, Studio Foundation and Studio for Interrelated Media, Massachusetts College of Art, Boston. Panelists will include Lynne Tillman, novelist, critic, essayist and professor/writer in residence at the University at Albany; artist Diane Bertolo, and Jeffrey Sconce, associate professor in the Screen Cultures Program, Northwestern University. This panel will be a conversation among a small group of scholars, artists and writers whose works have involved the subject of the paranormal. From gods and ghosts to telepathy and Electronic Voice Phenomena, issues such as the otherworldly as metaphor; technology and the shape of imagination; and art as a site for exploration of belief and superstition will be discussed. 6–7:30 pm at UMBC’s Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery. Admission is free.

Fred Ressler: Shadow PhotoAbout the Center for Art and Visual Culture
The Center for Art and Visual Culture is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study of contemporary art and visual culture, critical theory, art and cultural history, and the relationship between society and the arts. The CAVC serves as a forum for students, faculty, and the general public for the discussion of important aesthetic and social issues of the day. Disciplines represented include painting, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, photography, digital art, video, film, television, design, architecture, advertising, and installation and performance art.

Since 1989, the CAVC has incorporated a number of public programs into its exhibition programming schedule to further impact the communities it serves. Symposia, lecture series, conferences, film series, visiting artist series, and residencies have all been fundamental in an effort to create an ongoing dialogue about contemporary art and culture. The Center has also initiated a number of projects with Baltimore and surrounding schools systems to integrate the contemporary artist and their concerns into the classroom. These projects take place on-site at both middle schools and high schools and are team taught by the instructors at these schools, professional artists, and students from the CAVC’s Internship Program.

The Center produces one to two exhibition catalogues each year. Each document is fully illustrated and contains critical essays on the given subject by a variety of distinguished professionals in the field. Recent publications include Postmodernism: A Virtual Discussion and Paul Rand: Modernist Design. These books and catalogues are published and are distributed internationally through Distributed Art Publishers in New York.

Since 1992, the Center for Art and Visual Culture has actively pursued the organization of exhibitions that contain the aesthetic, theoretical, and educational potential to reach both a national and international audience. Over the years, the CAVC has traveled these exhibition projects to a broad spectrum of museums, professional non-profit galleries, and universities national and internationally. Recent traveling exhibitions include:

White: Whiteness and Race in Contemporary Art (2003)
Fred Wilson: Objects and Installations (2001)
Adrian Piper: A Retrospective (1999)
Bruno Monguzzi: A Designer’s Perspective (1998)
Minimal Politics (1997)
Kate Millet, Sculpture: The First 38 Years (1997)
Layers: Contemporary Collage from St. Petersburg, Russia (1995/96)
Notes In Time: Leon Golub and Nancy Spero (1995)

Chrysanne Stathacos: The Aura ProjectBeyond the scope of these traveling exhibitions, the Center for Art and Visual Culture also undertakes an exhibition schedule that includes a Faculty Biennial, and projects such as the Joseph Beuys Tree Partnership. As part of the educational mission of the CAVC, one graduate thesis exhibition and one undergraduate senior exhibition are scheduled on a yearly basis.

This multi-faceted focus for presenting exhibitions, projects and scholarly research publications focused on contemporary art and cultural issues positions the Center for Art and Visual Culture in a unique position within the mid-Atlantic region.

Hours of Operation
Sunday: closed
Monday: closed
Tuesday: 10 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Wednesday: 10 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Thursday: 10 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Friday: 10 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Saturday: 10 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Center for Art and Visual Culture: 410-455-3188
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news
Center for Art and Visual Culture: http://www.umbc.edu/cavc
Blur of the Otherworldly website: http://www.bluroftheotherworldly.com/
Distributed Art Publishers: http://www.artbook.com/

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media (including all shown here) are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.
Images in this release:
Susan Hiller: Wild Talents
Zoe Beloff: The Ideoplastic Materializations of Eva C
Fred Ressler: Shadow Photo
Chrysanne Stathacos: The Aura Project
Jennifer and Kevin McCoy: Frame Grab from Horror Chase

Jennifer and Kevin McCoy: Frame Grab from Horror Chase

Posted by tmoore

August 31, 2005

UMBC Presents Cellist Madeleine Shapiro in Concert

Thursday, September 15, 2005, 8 p.m.
Fine Arts Recital Hall

Contact: Thomas Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

Madeleine ShapiroOn September 15th at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall, the Department of Music’s Contemporary Concert Series presents cellist Madeleine Shapiro, whose program, Voices, is a multi-media recital of works for solo cello interwoven with taped statements by the composers. The program will feature both acoustic and electronic works by an international roster of composers, highlighting the lyrical Song of Songs by Karen Tanaka (Japan), which is recorded on Shapiro’s latest CD. She will also play works by Salvatore Sciarrino (Italy), Alberto Ginastera (Argentina), Americans John Cage and Orlando Jacinto Garcia, plus two rip-roaring works for cello and electronics by younger Americans Anthony Cornicello and Craig Walsh.

Madeleine Shapiro’s concerts have included numerous premiere performances of recent works for cello, and cello and electronics, many of which were written specially for her by a wide variety of American, European and Asian composers. She is a recipient of two Performance Incentive Awards from the American Composers Forum to assist in the premieres of new works. Recent appearances include a concert of works for cello and electronics at the avant-garde Logos Foundation in Ghent, Belgium and two tours of Italy with performances and masterclasses at the American Academy and the Nuovi Spazi Musicali festival in Rome; the Orsini Castle in Avezzano, and the conservatories of Parma and Castelfranco Veneto. Madeleine Shapiro performs regularly at colleges and performing arts series in the East and Midwest United States. She appeared twice in recital at the Instituto Brazil-Estados Unidos in Rio De Janiero, Brazil and participated in the 3rd and 5th International Cello Encounters, also in Rio de Janiero.

She is presently an adjunct professor at the Mannes College of Music, New York City, where she directs the Contemporary Music Ensemble and teaches classes in the performance practice of twentieth century music. As co-director of the New Music Consort, she held the Chair of Johnson Distinguished Visiting Professor at Middlebury College, Vermont.

Admission
Admission is free.

Telephone
Public information (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
Public information: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news

Directions
• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
• Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

###

Posted by tmoore

UMBC Presents the "two" Percussion Ensemble in Concert

Contact: Thomas Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

twoOn September 15th at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall, the UMBC Department of Music’s Contemporary Concerts Series presents the “two” percussion group, a duo committed to the advancement of new music through performance, education, and experimentation. two was founded in 1998 by Chris Leonard and Dale Speicher, both founding members of the seminal percussion group trio algetic. The music of two invites listeners to investigate the boundaries of complexity and sonority by exploring the world outside of driving repetitive rhythms and, instead, diving into a world of polytonality and polyrhythmic structures. two actively commissions new music for percussion from forward thinking composers throughout the world.

Their program will include All that is Left and Polka in Treblinka by Stuart Saunders Smith, Pairs by Christian Wolff, bicoastal by Roger Zahab, Rhythm Strip by Askell Masson, Verhälthis (ähneln..) by Franklin Cox, and a new work by Tom Baker.

Admission
Admission is free.

Telephone
Public information (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
Public information: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news

Directions
• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
• Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

###

Posted by tmoore

August 29, 2005

UMBC Department of Dance presents Naturally Modern: Bodily Expeditions and Other Traveling Secrets

Contact: Thomas Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

On September 31 and October 1 at 8 p.m., the UMBC Department of Dance presents Naturally Modern: Bodily Expeditions and Other Traveling Secrets, an evening of solo, duo and trio modern dance works performed by Sandra Lacy with Mary Williford-Shade, James Hansen and Jennifer Keller. The program, which will be presented in the UMBC Dance Lab (Fine Arts Building 317) will include:

• The Baltimore premiere of Ophelia’s Reclamation choreographed by James Hansen and performed by Hansen, Lacy and Williford-Shade, featuring complex partnering sequences and organic movement phrases, creating a sense of organic ease and harmony within relationships.
• A new work by Ray Eliot Schwartz, performed by Lacy and Williford-Shade.
Henrietta and Alexandra, choreographed by José Bustamante.
Lo and Behold by Michael Foley, performed by Williford-Shade.
Underview by Lisa Race, performed by Lacy.

A member of the UMBC dance faculty, Sandra Lacy holds a B.A. in Psychology and is an Associate of the Royal Academy of Dancing in London. She has performed with the Maryland Ballet, Impetus Dance Company, Path Dance Company and Bill T. Jones and Arnie Zane and Company. She also teaches at the Baltimore School for the Arts. She is a recipient of five Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Awards in solo dance performance.

Mary Williford-Shade has been hailed by The Washington Post as “the dancing equivalent of Edvard Munch’s The Scream.” She made her initial mark on the dance scene as a dancer with Mark Taylor & Friends and has also performed with Mark Dendy, Maryland Dance Theater, Dance Alloy of Pittsburgh and with Sandra Lacy. Williford-Shade received her MFA from Ohio State University, is a certified Laban Movement Analyst, and is a nine year member of the dance faculty at Texas Woman's University. Her other teaching credits include Cleveland State University, University of Quebec, Connecticut College, George Washington University, Towson State University, The Klutz Schule in Hamburg, Germany, the American Dance Festival, and the Bates Dance Festival.

James Hansen is the founder and artistic director and choreographer for Assemblage Dance Company. He studied at SUNY Purchase, and performed with the Eglevsky Ballet in New York City. He appeared as a featured soloist with Alfonzo Cata of France’s Ballet du Nord. After retiring from ballet, he performed with several downtown New York choreographers, including Sean Curran and Rachel Thorne Germond.

Ray Eliot Schwartz is a movement artist and bodyworker who has spent the last 20 years developing a unique synthesis of somatic movement studies and the performing arts. He has co-founded three contemporary dance projects in the Southeastern United States: The Zen Monkey Project, Steve’s House Dance Collection, and THEM. He has been on the faculty of both the American College Dance Festival and the Bates Dance Festival.

Admission
General admission: $12.00.
Students and seniors: $6.00.
Box Office: www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950

Location
Dance Lab (Fine Arts Building Studio 317)

Telephone
Box Office: 410-752-8950
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

Directions

• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building. The Dance Lab is Studio 317 (third floor).
• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building. The Dance Lab is Studio 317 (third floor).
• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building. The Dance Lab is Studio 317 (third floor).
• Metered visitor parking is available in The Commons Garage and the Administration Drive Garage. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

###

Posted by tmoore

August 27, 2005

UMBC Department of Music Presents Fall 2005 Concerts

The UMBC Department of Music presents its fall 2005 season, featuring an array of contemporary classical music concerts by renowned artists, including four all-percussion events (the “two” percussion group, Michael Lipsey of the Talujon Percussion Quartet, the Proper Glue Duo) , the percussion/voice ensemble “canto battuto” and the percussion/piano artistry of the Hoffmann/Goldstein Duo. Also in the lineup is the Federal City Brass Band, always a family favorite.

Contact: Thomas Moore
Director of Arts & Culture
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

Professional Artist Series

twoSeptember 15
two
, percussion ensemble
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Free admission
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

The “two” percussion group, a duo committed to the advancement of new music through performance, education, and experimentation, was founded in 1998 by Chris Leonard and Dale Speicher, both founding members of the seminal percussion group trio algetic. The music of two invites listeners to investigate the boundaries of complexity and sonority by exploring the world outside of driving repetitive rhythms and, instead, diving into a world of polytonality and polyrhythmic structures. two actively commissions new music for percussion from forward thinking composers throughout the world.

Their program will include All that is Left and Polka in Treblinka by Stuart Saunders Smith, Pairs by Christian Wolff, bicoastal by Roger Zahab, Rhythm Strip by Askell Masson, Verhälthis (ähneln..) by Franklin Cox, and a new work by Tom Baker.

Madeliene ShapiroSeptember 28
Madeleine Shapiro
, cello
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Free admission
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

Cellist Madeleine Shapiro presents Voices, is a multi-media recital of works for solo cello interwoven with taped statements by the composers. The program will feature both acoustic and electronic works by an international roster of composers, highlighting the lyrical Song of Songs by Karen Tanaka (Japan), which is recorded on Shapiro’s latest CD. She will also play works by Salvatore Sciarrino (Italy), Alberto Ginastera (Argentina), Americans John Cage and Orlando Jacinto Garcia, plus two rip-roaring works for cello and electronics by younger Americans Anthony Cornicello and Craig Walsh.

Madeleine Shapiro’s concerts have included numerous premiere performances of recent works for cello, and cello and electronics, many of which were written specially for her by a wide variety of American, European and Asian composers. She is a recipient of two Performance Incentive Awards from the American Composers Forum to assist in the premieres of new works. Recent appearances include a concert of works for cello and electronics at the avant-garde Logos Foundation in Ghent, Belgium and two tours of Italy with performances and masterclasses at the American Academy and the Nuovi Spazi Musicali festival in Rome; the Orsini Castle in Avezzano, and the conservatories of Parma and Castelfranco Veneto. Madeleine Shapiro performs regularly at colleges and performing arts series in the East and Midwest United States. She appeared twice in recital at the Instituto Brazil-Estados Unidos in Rio De Janiero, Brazil and participated in the 3rd and 5th International Cello Encounters, also in Rio de Janiero.

She is presently an adjunct professor at the Mannes College of Music, New York City, where she directs the Contemporary Music Ensemble and teaches classes in the performance practice of twentieth century music. As co-director of the New Music Consort, she held the Chair of Johnson Distinguished Visiting Professor at Middlebury College, Vermont.

Michael LipseyOctober 6
Michael Lipsey
, percussion
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Free admission
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

Percussionist Michael Lipsey's program will include Dominic Donato’s Either/Or, David Cossin’s Nixkin, Arthur Krieger’s Joining Hands, Eric Moe’s Teeth of the Sea, John Cage’s cComposed Improvisation (for one sided drum with or without jangles), and other works.

Michael Lipsey has performed with such prestigious ensembles as the Lincoln Center Chamber Music Society, Music From China, S.E.M. Ensemble, Ensemble Sospeso, Philharmonia Virtuosi, Tan Dun, Newband and is a founding member of the Talujon Percussion Quartet. Michael Lipsey has recorded for Sony Classical with the BBC Symphony, CRI Records, Albany Records, Mode Records and Nonesuch Records. He has performed at festivals around the world including the Library of Congress Music Series, LaJolla Chamber Music Society, Berlin American Festival, Mexico City Percussion Festival, Taipei Percussion Festival, Taipei Red Lantern Festival, Okada Festival in Osaka and Tokyo, Moscow, Bang on a Can Marathon, Chautauqua Institute, Sonic Boom Festival and the Lincoln Center Out-of-Doors Festival. He has presented master classes at the Juilliard School of Music, Manhattan School of Music, Purchase Conservatory of Music, CSU Sacramento, UC Davis, Oregon University at Eugene and the Atlantic Center for the Arts in Florida. He holds a B.M. from Queens College and an M.M. from Manhattan School of Music.

Michael Lipsey directs the Percussion and Contemporary Ensembles at Queens College. Mr. Lipsey is very interested in creating new works for hand drums and is working on a project to commission and premiere works in this medium.

Rachel FranklinOctober 9
SONOS

3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950 and at the door immediately prior to the concert (cash or check only).
Public information: 410-455-ARTS.

Directed by pianist Rachel Franklin, the unique classical and jazz ensemble SONOS returns to UMBC to present works that blur the edges between classical chamber works and jazz improvisation. Franklin will be joined by international artists David Stambler, saxophone, and Amy Beth Horman, violin. Their program will include Contrasts by Béla Bartók, music by Beethoven, plus contemporary jazz, and classics by George Gershwin.

As a Pro Musicis International Award winner, British pianist Rachel Franklin gave her solo debuts in Carnegie Recital Hall, New York, and Jordan Hall, Boston. The Boston Globe enthused about her “beautiful differentiations of color, touch and texture” and described a performance on her solo debut CD as “not inferior...to the recorded performances by Cortot and Rubinstein.” She has also given European Pro Musicis solo debuts in Paris and Rome. She is on the faculty of the Department of Music at UMBC.

Proper Glue DuoOctober 13
The Proper Glue Duo

8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Free admission
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

The Proper Glue Duo, an exciting and virtuosic percussion ensemble will perform Integrity by Mark Applebaum, Rrrrrr... by Mauricio Kagel, The Three Strange Angels by Peter Garland, All That Is Left by Stuart Saunders Smith, Piano Phase by Steve Reich, and Credo in US by John Cage.

Dedicated to the performance of contemporary repertoire, the Proper Glue Duo has performed alone and in collaboration with other chamber groups in Boston, Buffalo, Ithaca, Toronto, and Rochester, New York. Their percussion roots have also led to the exploration of other musical traditions from around the world, and they continue to present performances and clinics on the Shona mbira.

Individually, duo members Melanie and Steve Sehman have performed for composers such as Harrison Birtwistle, Charles Wuorinen, Brian Bevelander, Carlos Sanchez-Gutierrez, Steven Mackey, and Ricardo Zohn-Muldoon, appeared with the Tucson Symphony Orchestra, and recorded on the Summit and Equilibrium labels. For this concert the duo will be joined by pianist David Plylar.

William PowellOctober 21
William Powell, clarinet

8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Free admission
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

Clarinetist William Powell has commissioned many new works for clarinet and has premiered over 200 compositions. He has performed at major concert venues throughout the United States, Europe and Asia, including Avery Fischer Concert Hall, Merkin and Carnegie Recital Halls, and Dag Hammarskjold Auditorium at the United Nations in New York; the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C.; at the North American New Music Festival as soloist with the Buffalo Philharmonic; and at the International Congresses on Women in Music in Los Angeles, New York, Paris and Bremen.

He has performed with the Aspen Festival and Chamber Orchestra, the contemporary music ensemble Sonor, the Sierra Wind Quintet, the Naumburg Award-winning Aulos Wind Quintet and, as principal clarinetist with the San Diego chamber Orchestra, the Las Vegas Symphony, and the Reno Philharmonic. Powell has served on the faculties of UC and CSU, San Diego; CSU, Long Beach; and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He has recorded for Cambria, CRI, Electra/Asylum and Nonesuch.

William Powell received an Artist’s Diploma from the Juilliard School and the M.F.A. from CalArts. In 1993/94 he lived in India on a Senior Research Grant from the J. William Fulbright Commission. Under the auspices of Brhaddhvani Research and Training Centre for Musics of the World, he presented concerts of American music throughout India, collaborated in cross-cultural performances with clarinetists A.K.C. Natarajan and Narasinhalu Wadavatti, and recorded for All India Radio with Indian pianist Handel Manuel.

Canto BattutoOctober 28
canto battuto

8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Free admission
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

The duo canto battuto features the artistry of percussionists Eva Nievergelt and Christoph Brunner, who have been working together in various projects since 1995. The program will include Märchenerzählung by Rico Gubler, the world premiere of a new work by Erik Oña, Ryoanji by John Cage, und durch. figuren. unter ruhe/punkten by Annette Schmucki and two works by Gary Berger: doppelte wendung and the world premiere of a new piece.

canto battuto has collaborated in concerts with Gruppe für Neue Musik Baden and with the Collegium Novum Zurich (Circles by Luciano Berio and Aria by Beat Furrer), presented two music theatre productions with the pianist Regula Stibi and the director Regina Heer (in 1996 and 1999) as well as a musical collage using texts from Swiss author Robert Walser with the ensemble girafe bleue (1999/2000).

In 1999 they founded the duo canto battuto in order to work together more constantly and to create their own repertoire for voice and percussion. In the past five years they commissioned more than a dozen duo works and have given concerts on various tours in Switzerland, Germany, France and the UK. More recently they also started working on previously existing repertoire (works by John Cage, Maurice Ohana and others).

October 29
Faculty Chamber Ensemble

8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950 and at the door immediately prior to the concert (cash or check only).
Public information: 410-455-ARTS.

The Department of Music presents the Faculty Chamber Ensemble, featuring violinist Airi Yoshioka, flutist Lisa Cella, clarinetist E. Michael Richards, cellist Franklin Cox, pianist Rachel Franklin, guitarist Troy King and percussionist Tom Goldstein.

8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. $7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID. For more information, call 410-455-MUSC.

Mari KimuraNovember 2
Mari Kimura
, violin
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Free Admission
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

Violinist and composer Mari Kimura picks up the tradition of the virtuoso performer/composer and carries it straight into the future. The New York Times raved her solo performance as “Chilling...gripping...charming...Ms. Kimura is a virtuoso playing at the edge.” Branching out from a mastery of traditional violin repertoire, Ms. Kimura embraces the worlds of extended violin technique and interactive computer music, making them her own. She pushes the boundaries of the instrument, playing both her own works and those that numerous composers have written especially for her. Ms. Kimura has premiered pieces by such composers as Toshi Ichiyanagi, Jean-Claude Risset, and Tania León.

Ms. Kimura is widely admired for her revolutionary extended technique “Subharmonics,” and for the solo performances of diverse programs. She has developed an international performing career that has taken her to festivals throughout the world, performing her own works in more than 18 countries. Recent appearances include those at the Spring in Budapest festival, the Musiana Festival in Denmark, Festival Internacional Cervantino in Mexico, International Bartók Festival in Hungary, Other Minds festival in San Francisco, International Symposium of Electronic Art (ISEA) in Helsinki and Rotterdam, and International Computer Music Conference (ICMC) in San José, Thessaloniki, Banff and Göteborg, Sweden. Ms. Kimura was a featured soloist at ISCM World Music Days 2002 in Hong Kong, performing with Hong Kong Sinfonietta.

In her native Japan, Ms. Kimura was awarded 1995 Kenzo Nakajima Music Prize, a prestigious honor in recognition of her creative activities in the country. She has given the Japanese premiere of major contemporary violin concertos including works by John Adams and Anders Hillborg, as a soloist with the Tokyo Philharmonic, Tokyo Symphony Orchestra, and Orchestra Ensemble Kanazawa, and continues to perform as a soloist with major orchestras. The renowned Japanese composer Toshi Ichiyanagi has described her as “a violinist on a grand scale... her activity gives us bright hopes for the future in the field.”

As a composer, her recent commissions include Violin Concerto for violin and interactive computer system with orchestra (Teatro Juarez in Guanajuato, Mexico, 1999), Kivika for dance (Joyce SOHO in New York, 2000), Arboleda for viola and electronics (Merkin Hall in New York, 2001), and Descarga Interactive (ICMC Commission Award) which was premiered in Göteborg, Sweden in 2002. Her latest work, GuitarBotana is a piece with GuitarBot (LEMUR), commissioned by Harvestworks. Ms. Kimura's works have been supported by grants including Meet the Composer, Jerome Foundation, and the New York State Council on the Arts.

Hoffmann/Goldstein DuoNovember 12
The Hoffmann/Goldstein Duo
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950 and at the door immediately prior to the concert (cash or check only).
Public information: 410-455-ARTS.

The Hoffmann/Goldstein Duo, featuring the artistry of pianist Paul Hoffmann and percussionist Tom Goldstein, presents a program that will include five world premieres, including a new work by Linda Dusman; Jazz motetus VI (Cricket Play) by Riccardo Piacentini; You're Not a Composer by Tom Goldstein; Pure emersioni d’onda by Gianvincenzo Cresta; and assemblage, montage…icon, image by Jerry N. Tabor. The program will also include Struck Sound by Robert Morris, Still to J.S.B. by Anneliese Weibel, Islands That Never Were by James Romig, Swing Fantasy by Patrick Hardish, and an improvisation.

Over the past dozen years, the Hoffmann/Goldstein Duo has appeared in dozens of concerts and new music festivals in the U.S. and in Europe, and recently released their first CD on Capstone Records, Crossfade.

As a New York City freelance percussionist for over twenty years, Tom Goldstein performed extensively with groups such as the Orchestra of St. Luke’s and the Brooklyn Philharmonic, as well as chamber groups, Broadway shows and in nightclubs. Especially active in contemporary music, he has premiered dozens of solo and chamber works, many of which were written expressly for him. From 1980-1990 he served as Artistic Director of the new-music group GAGEEGO. He has toured with Steve Reich, played with Pauline Oliveros, and the ensemble Continuum. Mr. Goldstein composed and performed percussion soundtracks for NBC World Series and U.S. Tennis Open documentaries. Mr. Goldstein has published articles in Perspectives of New Music and Percussive Notes. He has recorded on Neuma, Vanguard, Polydor, Opus 1, OO Discs, CD Tech, Capstone and CRI. He is an associate professor of music at UMBC.

Paul Hoffmann, pianist and conductor, made his debut at the Vienna Konzerthaus in 1973 while on a Fulbright grant, and has since concertized extensively in the U.S. and abroad. Hoffmann has recorded solo piano and chamber music for Capstone, Orion, CRI, Northeastern, Composers Guild of New Jersey, Contemporary Record Society, OO Discs, Spectrum, and Vienna Modern Masters labels and has made numerous radio broadcasts in the U.S. as well as for Voice of America, Radio Cologne, Radio Frankfurt, and Radio France. He is currently working on recordings for Capstone and NUEMA Records. Most recently he has performed at new music festivals in Italy (“Spaziomusica” in Cagliari and “Musiche in Mostra” in Turin), National Sun Yat-sen University in Taiwan, Goucher College in Baltimore, Merkin Hall in New York City and The 8th International Symposium on Electronic Art at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago. He has served on the jury of many piano competitions including the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra Concerto Competition, and was the first U.S. judge to be invited to the prestigious Concours International de Musique Contemporaine pour Piano in 1983 and 1986. Mr. Hoffmann has degrees from Eastman School of Music, and did further study at the Peabody Conservatory. He attended both the Salzburg “Mozarteum” and the Hochschule für Musik in Vienna. His principal teachers have been Leon Fleisher, Cecile Genhart, Dieter Weber, Kurt Neumuller, and Brooks Smith. Mr. Hoffmann is currently Professor of Music at Mason Gross School of the Arts, Rutgers University, where he teaches piano, chamber music and directs the contemporary music ensemble, HELIX!, which he founded in 1990.

E. Michael Richards (Photo by Richard Anderson)November 13
E. Michael Richards
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950 and at the door immediately prior to the concert (cash or check only).
Public information: 410-455-ARTS.

The Department of Music’s Faculty Recital Series presents clarinetist E. Michael Richards with David Kim-Boyle (computer) and Kazuko Tanosaki (piano).

The program will include Dialogue l’ombre double by Pierre Boulez, Music for Clarinet and ISPW by Cort Lippe, a new work for bass clarinet and computer by William Kleinsasser, and a new work for bass clarinet and piano by Stephen Blumberg.

As a recitalist of new music, E. Michael Richards has premiered over 125 works throughout the United States, Japan, Australia, and Western Europe. Trained as a clarinetist at the New England Conservatory (B.Mus.) and Yale School of Music (M.Mus.), Richards earned a Ph.D. at the University of California, San Diego. He received a 1990 U.S./Japan Creative Artist Fellowship (sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts, U.S.-Japan Friendship Commission, and Japanese Government Cultural Agency) as a solo recitalist for a six-month residency in Japan, an NEH Summer Fellowship to study traditional Japanese music, and a residency grant (Cassis, France) from the Camargo Foundation to complete a book, The Clarinet of the Twenty-First Century.

Richards has performed as concerto soloist with the Syracuse Symphony and Shinsei Japan Philharmonic (Tokyo), in chamber music performances with the Cassatt Quartet, Ying Quartet, SONOR, and the East-West Quartet, and in recital at eight international festivals and more than 20 universities, as well as at Lincoln Center, the Guggenheim Museum (New York), the American Academy in Rome, and the Tokyo American Center. He has also performed as a member of the Tanosaki-Richards Duo (with pianist Kazuko Tanosaki) since 1982. Richards has recorded on the NEUMA, Mode, CRI, Ninewinds, and Opus One labels. He has taught at Smith College; the University of California, San Diego; Bowdoin College; Hamilton College; and the Hochstein Music School in Rochester, New York; and completed short terms with Kazuko Tanosaki as visiting artists in residence at the University of Massachusetts, CNMAT (Center for New Music and Audio Technologies), at the University of California Berkeley, and San Jose State University.(Photo: Richard Anderson.)

Federal City Brass BandNovember 20
The Federal City Brass Band
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950 and at the door immediately prior to the concert (cash or check only).
Public information: 410-455-ARTS.

The Department of Music’s Faculty Recital Series presents the Federal City Brass Band under the direction of Jari Villanueva.

The Federal City Brass Band presents music of the 26th North Carolina Regiment Band, one of the most renowned brass bands of the Civil War era. Based in Salem, North Carolina, the band was made up of Moravian musicians who enlisted in 1862 and served until the last week of the war. Their music, from the only known existing set of Confederate band books, has enriched the repertoire of bands since it was re-discovered in the late 1950s. Selections will include Moravian hymns, music heard in prewar America and music from the wartime band books including the 26th Regiment Quickstep, Maryland My Maryland, Cheer Boys Cheer, Tu Che a Dio, Canary Bird Waltz, Trovatore Quickstep and Lorena.

The Federal City Brass Band wears reproduction uniforms for the re-created 26th North Carolina Regiment Band meticulously based on the only known photograph of the band during the War, taken in July, 1862, using contemporary descriptions of the band and museum examples of original Confederate uniforms as additional references.

Special Event

October 29–30
4th Annual High School Chamber Music Festival and Concerto Competition
Information: 410-455-3064

The Department of Music presents the 4th Annual High School Chamber Music Festival and Concerto Competition, in which twenty-five selected students from the mid-Atlantic region will gather at UMBC for a weekend of performances, coachings, and new musical experiences.

Selected students in flute, clarinet, cello, piano, percussion, voice, violin, and classical guitar will rehearse intensively with their assigned chamber group coached by members of the UMBC faculty on Saturday the 29th and Sunday morning the 30th, in preparation for a Sunday afternoon concert. This concert will be professionally recorded, and a CD will be mailed to participating students. In addition, students will attend a chamber music performance by UMBC faculty, a variety of master classes (on their major instrument), and a class in a related musical area (including composition, early music, gamelan and others). Meals and lodging will be provided on campus, with current UMBC music students serving as hosts.

Student Recital Series

October 16
UMBC Symphony Orchestra
The Department of Music presents the UMBC Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Wayne Cameron.
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. Public information: 410-455-ARTS.

November 19
UMBC Chamber Players
The Department of Music presents the UMBC Chamber Players directed by E. Michael Richards.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. Public information: 410-455-ARTS.

November 21
UMBC Jazz Ensemble (Big Band)
The Department of Music presents the UMBC Jazz Ensemble (Big Band) directed by Jari Villanueva.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. Public information: 410-455-ARTS.

UMBC Wind EnsembleDecember 1
UMBC Wind Ensemble
The Department of Music presents the UMBC Wind Ensemble directed by Jari Villanueva.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. Public information: 410-455-ARTS.

December 2
Vocal Arts Ensemble
The Department of Music presents the Vocal Arts Ensemble under the direction of David Smith.
7 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. Public information: 410-455-ARTS.

December 3
Jubilee Singers
The Department of Music presents the Jubilee Singers followed by the UMBC Gospel Choir, both directed by Janice Jackson.
7 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. Public information: 410-455-ARTS.

December 4
Collegium Musicum
The Department of Music presents the Collegium Musicum directed by Joseph Morin.
The Collegium Musicum is a performance ensemble dedicated to exploring and performing vocal and instrumental music from European Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque periods, sampling musical repertoires created between 800 and 1750.
4 pm, St. John’s Episcopal Church, 9120 Frederick Road, Ellicott City. Admission is free. Public information: 410-455-ARTS.

December 8
UMBC Percussion Ensemble
The Department of Music presents the UMBC Percussion Ensemble directed by Tom Goldstein. The ensemble is adventurous in its programming, with a repertoire that includes graphic-notation pieces, improvisational works, and theater, as well as works by important early percussion composers, such as Alan Hovhaness, John Cage and Carlos Chavez.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. Public information: 410-455-ARTS.

December 10
Maryland Camerata
The Department of Music presents the Maryland Camerata directed by David Smith.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. Public information: 410-455-ARTS.

December 11
UMBC Symphony Orchestra
The Department of Music presents the UMBC Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Wayne Cameron. The program will include the Brahms Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 77, performed by Airi Yoshioka.
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. Public information: 410-455-ARTS.

December 12
UMBC Guitar Ensemble and Soloists
The Department of Music presents the UMBC Guitar Ensemble and Soloists directed by Troy King.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. Public information: 410-455-ARTS.

December 13
Department of Music Honors Recital
The Department of Music presents an Honors Recital.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. Public information: 410-455-ARTS.

Additional Information

Telephone
MissionTix box office: 410-752-8950
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/news
MissionTix: http://www.missiontix.com/

 Directions
• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

Parking is available after 3:30 p.m. on weekdays and all day during weekends in gated Lots 16/9A for a 50¢ fee, quarters only. From any campus entrance, circle around Hilltop Circle (the road the encircles the campus) to Hilltop Road. Take Hilltop Road toward the center of campus. The Fine Arts Building will now be directly in front of you. Proceed through the stop sign. The road will curve to the right. If Lot 16 is full, you can also pay to park in Lot 9A, which sits on the hill immediately above Lot 16—return to the stop sign and turn left toward Lot 9A, and then to the gate.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

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Posted by tmoore

May 1, 2005

My Place Live Media Event Showcases Unique Collaboration of Urban Youth, College Students, Public Institutions and Artists

Contact: Tom Moore
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

My PlaceOn Thursday, May 12th, students from UMBC's Imaging Research Center (IRC) will present a collaboration with middle school children working with Wide Angle Community Media. Their collaboration, entitled My Place, offers participants and viewers an innovative media experience.

Throughout spring 2005, UMBC IRC graduate and undergraduate media arts students worked with Cherry Hill Middle School youth who are involved with the Baltimore Speaks Out! partnership. Together they shot video footage in and about Cherry Hill that expresses personal artistic or community significance and explores questions such as: How do we describe a place? What makes Cherry Hill a place? What is your favorite place? Does it have a name? Experimenting with software to manipulate video, sound, written narratives, and drawings, students from Cherry Hill and UMBC worked together to create the content that will be used for the live performance, adding new layers of meaning in the process.

One of the project facilitators, Steve Bradley, associate professor of Visual Arts at UMBC, adds that the event is also "a celebration of personal teamwork and accomplishment. Cherry Hill youth have learned valuable technical skills in documenting impressions of their community and they have generously shared their exuberance and insight."

Audiences can gather at Enoch Pratt Free Library in Cherry Hill from 5 to 6 pm to see My Place as a live performance. Admission is free. The library is hosting the event as part of their Baltimore Speaks Out! partnership with Wide Angle.

Because of limited audience space, the event will be streamed live on the Internet and archived at http://art-radio.net/CH-IRC/.

About the Imaging Research Center
UMBC's Imaging Research Center (IRC) is dedicated to investigating new technologies and their use for interpreting and presenting content. Since its inception in 1987, artists and researchers across disciplines have collaborated in the IRC's creative environment to develop new strategies and techniques in digital media. State-of-the-art facilities enable research in 3D visualization, immersive technologies, interactivity, installation, animation, high definition video, and sound.

In conjunction with UMBC's Department of Visual Arts, the IRC has developed successful academic programs that incorporate undergraduate and graduate students into professional research activities. These students receive valuable experience with contemporary digital art technologies while working as partners with researchers, artists, scholars, and industry specialists to create large-scale, high profile works.

About Wide Angle Community Media
Wide Angle Community Media provides youth and communities with media education and leadership opportunities so they may represent themselves and tell their own stories. Wide Angle's workshops, collaborations, and public events fulfill our mission to make media make a difference in the Baltimore region.

Wide Angle trains 100 youth and community members yearly in media literacy and production, and community-based distribution. Wide Angle also supports the broader youth media field through the administration of the Youth Media Advocacy Coalition (YMAC), which provides media education training, travel, and networking opportunities to youth educators.

About Baltimore Speaks Out!
Baltimore Speaks Out! is a youth media education program, training youth ages 12 to 14 in media literacy, video production, teambuilding, and presentation skills. Developed as a partnership between Wide Angle Community Media and the Enoch Pratt Free Library, this program has served youth in Baltimore City for more than three years.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24-hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
Public information: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC arts news releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Link to live stream: http://art-radio.net/CH-IRC/

Images for Media
High resolution images are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/
or by email or postal mail.

My Place

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Posted by tmoore

April 22, 2005

UMBC Students Partner with the Liz Lerman Dance Exchange and Erickson Retirement Communities to Create New Modern Dance

Contact: Tom Moore
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

Written in Stone, Danced on the BodyOn April 29 and May 1, UMBC students will partner with the Liz Lerman Dance Exchange and the Charlestown campus of Erickson Retirement Communities to present Written in Stone, Danced on the Body, a modern dance performance event.

The sort of dance experience that only Liz Lerman Dance Exchange would conceive and dare, Written in Stone, Danced on the Body melds three cultures into one dance dialogue: seven older women dancers from Kyoto, Japan; residents of Charlestown Retirement Community; and performing arts students from UMBC. The dance, designed to be as thought provoking as it is entertaining, has been choreographed by the Dance Exchange's Margot Greenlee and Martha Wittman and will include recorded narrative/music and a photographic display documenting the performance's process. The performance will be filmed by UMBC's New Media Studio.

Written in Stone, Danced on the Body is the culmination of a semester-long collaboration between UMBC, the Liz Lerman Dance Exchange and Charlestown. During the spring 2005 semesters, participating UMBC students participated in a special course, Dance in Community, in which they learned about community arts movement, aspects of gerontology, and specific techniques pioneered by the Dance Exchange for bringing movement and dance into the lives of people of all ages.

The performances on April 29 will be at 2 pm and 7 pm will be held in the Auditorium of the Charlestown Retirement Community. Admission is free.

The performance on May 1st will be at 3 pm, at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, D.C. Admission is free.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24-hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Liz Lerman Dance Exchange: http://www.danceexchange.org/

Images for Media
High resolution images are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/
or by email or postal mail.

###

Posted by tmoore

April 5, 2005

UMBC Presents Pianist Marc Ponthus in Concert

Contact: Tom Moore
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

Marc PonthusThe UMBC Department of Music's Contemporary Concert Series presents pianist Marc Ponthus in a performance of the Second and Third Piano Sonatas by Pierre Boulez on Thursday, April 21st at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall.

The only pianist to have performed the complete solo piano work of Pierre Boulez and Karlheinz Stockhausen, Ponthus's solo performances with the BBC in London have been broadcast on numerous occasions. His recording of the complete solo piano works of Xenakis was recently released on Neuma records.

Born in Lyon, France, Mr. Ponthus studied with Claudio Arrau and has lectured and given master classes at New England Conservatory, San Francisco Conservatory, the Juilliard School and Columbia University. He is the director of the Institute and Festival for Contemporary Performance at the Mannes College of Music.

The New York Times wrote, "Mr. Ponthus's virtuosity is hair-raising, like beams of electricity shooting from a Frankenstein machine…a kind of priest channeling spirits in an arcane rite, hurling himself at the keyboard…until the whole instrument shook." The Washington Post's Joseph McLellan said, "Ponthus has a technique and a musical sensitivity that simply brush technical obstacles aside."

Admission
Admission is free.

Telephone
Public information: UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media is available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

Marc Ponthus

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Posted by tmoore

March 31, 2005

UMBC Theatre presents Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare

Contact: Tom Moore
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

Photo by Terry CobbThe UMBC Department of Theatre presents Much Ado About Nothing by William Shakespeare, directed by Colette Searls and Lynn Watson, in which the bard aims his savage wit at chivalry and romance. A gender-bending ensemble exposes the true nature of patriarchy and sexual power-play in this favorite of Shakespeare's comedies.

The production features set and costume design by Elena Zlotescu, light and sound design by Terry Cobb, original music composed and performed by John Yurick, dramaturgy by Susan McCully, choreography by Doug Hamby, and movement coaching by Wendy Salkind.

Much Ado is Shakespeare's wickedly funny treatise on the fickle, fantastical, often-fierce nature of love. In the old Sicilian town of Messina, four lovers engage in fierce battles of wit and delicious practical jokes. But beneath the games of disguise and foolery lie darker forces of mistrust and fear. While Beatrice and Benedick wrangle turning wordplay to foreplay, Claudio and Hero must overcome treachery and deceit to make their love-match. In a world where appearances can't be trusted, truth finally conquers and Cupid's war is won—but not without leaving its scars on this scathing comedy.

Showtimes
Thursday, April 14, 8 pm (preview)
Friday, April 15, 8 pm (opening night)
Saturday, April 16, 8 pm
Sunday, April 17, 4 pm
Thursday, April 21, 4 pm (free performance)
Friday, April 22, 8 pm
Saturday, April 23, 8 pm
Thursday, April 28, 8 pm
Friday, April 29, 8 pm
Sunday, May 1, 4 pm
(The Theatre will be dark on April 30.)

Admission
$10 general admission
$5 students
$3 for the preview
The performance on Thursday, April 21st is free for the UMBC campus community.
Ticket proceeds benefit the Department of Theatre Scholarship Fund.
Tickets are available online through MissionTix or by calling MissionTix at 410-752-8950. Any remaining tickets will be available at the door (cash or check only).

Telephone
MissionTix: 410-752-8950
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Department of Theatre website: http://www.umbc.edu/theatre

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.

From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Theatre.

From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.

Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked. Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

Image by Nic Takemoto

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Posted by tmoore

March 28, 2005

UMBC Presents Ruckus in Concert

Contact: Tom Moore
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

RuckusThe UMBC Department of Music's Faculty Recital Series presents Ruckus, the professional contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC on Tuesday, April 12th, at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall.

The program will include Elliott Carter's Triple Duo, Hymne by Anneliese Wiebel, Sleep, in the Shape of My Body by Mark Osborn, Bones by Stuart Saunders Smith, Magnificat 3: Lament by Linda Dusman and so, between and e,nm by Thomas DeLio.

The ensemble features flutist Lisa Cella, cellist Franklin Cox, percussionist Tom Goldstein, clarinetist E. Michael Richards, violinist Airi Yoshioka, pianist Thomas Moore and conductor Brian Stone.

Founded in 2000 to promote the performance of contemporary chamber music, Ruckus has performed at the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Smithsonian Institution, and at universities throughout the East Coast. Ruckus will present the same program on April 3rd at the New England Conservatory of Music in Boston and on April 17th at Stanford University, where the ensemble will be in residence for a week.

Admission
Admission to the concert is $7 general, $3 for senior citizens, free for all students, and free with a UMBC ID. Tickets are available online through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or by calling 410-752-8950. Any remaining tickets will be available at the door (cash or check only).

Telephone
Public information: UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
A high resolution image for media is available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail. (Photo credit: Richard Anderson.)

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Posted by tmoore

UMBC Presents the Callithumpian Consort in Concert

Contact: Tom Moore
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

Callithumpian ConsortThe UMBC Department of Music's Contemporary Concert Series presents the Callithumpian Consort, based at New England Conservatory and directed by Stephen Drury, on Thursday, April 14th, at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall.

The ensemble's program will feature Miss Donnithorne's Maggot, a music-theatre work by Peter Maxwell Davies, and Stanley Kubrick's Mountain Home by Paul Elwood.

The Callithumpian Consort was created in the belief that new music should be an exciting adventure shared by performers and listeners alike, and that brand new masterpieces of our day are beautiful, sensuous, challenging, delightful, provocative, and a unique joy. The Consort is flexible in size and makeup, in some cases performing as a full chamber orchestra. Its members pursue parallel solo and orchestral careers as well. Each musician is a soloist, enabling the group to tackle unusual repertoire in non-standard ensembles, or to take part in experimental projects.

The Consort's repertoire encompasses a huge stylistic spectrum, from the classics of the last 100 years to works of the avant-garde and experimental jazz and rock. Active commissioning and recording of new works is crucial to the ensemble's mission, and the group has worked with composers John Cage, Lee Hyla, John Zorn, Michael Finnissy, Franco Donatoni, Lukas Foss, Christian Wolff and many others. Its recordings are available on Tzadik and Mode records.

Admission
Admission is free.

Telephone
Public information: UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media is available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

Callithumpian Consort

###

Posted by tmoore

March 24, 2005

Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery Presents On Assignment: Photographs by Arthur Leipzig

Contact: Tom Moore
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

Arthur Leipzig, Sleeping Child, Levittown, 1950UMBC’s Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents On Assignment: Photographs by Arthur Leipzig, on display from April 11 through May 31, 2005.

Arthur Leipzig, perhaps best known for his photo essays depicting life in New York in the 1940s, has spent a lifetime capturing the human condition through his photographs. On Assignment will be the first major presentation to highlight the broad range of Leipzig’s astute photographic vision. Included are 70 photographs representing his most significant bodies of work either taken on assignment for major publications or for his own “self-assignments”: children, New York, rural labor, winter fishing in the Atlantic, Pablo Casals, South Sudan, Mexico, pediatric hospitals, and Jewish Life. The show is organized by the Library Gallery and curated by Tom Beck and Cynthia Wayne, in collaboration with the photographer.

Throughout his career, Arthur Leipzig has viewed photography as an exciting way to both connect with the world and to separate from it. He has remarked: “I have been able to observe the world and myself. Photography has helped me to learn much about both.” At eighty-six, Leipzig’s lifetime of learning is clearly visible in his photographs, a broad selection of which has been gathered into this exhibition.

Arthur Leipzig, Chalk Games, 1950Leipzig, who was born in 1918 and came of age in the Depression, left school at the age of seventeen and took on an assortment of jobs, including truck driver, salesman, office manager, and assembly line worker. While working at a wholesale glass plant, he seriously injured and lost the use of his right hand for fourteen months, an event that propelled Leipzig into photography, beginning with studies at the Photo League and with Sid Grossman. In 1942, Leipzig launched his career as photography assignment editor and staff photographer for PM, a newspaper that, like the Photo League, was people-oriented and “dared to tell the truth.” By 1947, Leipzig also had studied with Paul Strand, the eminent artist-photographer, and left PM to become a freelance photojournalist, a pursuit he continued even after 1963 when he began a 25-year teaching career at C.W. Post College, Long Island University. In recent years, exhibitions and books of Leipzig’s imagery have appeared with increasing frequency.

Not only did Leipzig photograph specifically for diverse publications such as Fortune, Look, Parade, and Natural History, but also for “self-assignments,” those that he gave to himself either with or without immediate expectations of publication. In either case, Leipzig’s primary subject always has been people who are famous primarily by virtue of having been photographed in the act of being human. His fascination with people is so pervasive that individuals almost invariably become icons of humanity in general with all beauties and imperfections clearly delineated. Undoubtedly, his diverse experiences with many different kinds of people have taught him well that humanity is an exquisite source of inspiration for images. His photographs are almost entirely visceral responses to a chaotic world to which he has sought to provide order and structure.

In 2004, Leipzig was awarded the prestigious Lucie Award for Outstanding Achievement in Fine Art Photography. The spirit behind the annual Lucie award is to salute the achievements of the world’s finest photographers, discover new and emerging talent, and promote the appreciation of photography. Gordon Parks, the 2004 Lucie Awards Lifetime Achievement recipient observed, “[Leipzig’s photography] opens up our feelings to so many things, immeasurable things that have given license to his unbridled eye. His curiosity appears inexhaustible and keeps sprouting.”

After its presentation at UMBC, the exhibition will travel to the Columbus Museum of Art, where it will be on view December 17, 2005 – March 11, 2006. A book by the same title is being published by Bulfinch Press.

Arthur Leipzig, Brooklyn Bridge, 1946Gallery Information
The Albin O. Kuhn Gallery serves as one of the principal art galleries in the Baltimore region. Items from the Special Collections Department, as well as art and artifacts from all over the world, are displayed in challenging and informative exhibitions for the University community and the public. Moreover, traveling exhibitions are occasionally presented, and the Gallery also sends some of its exhibits throughout the state and nation. Admission to the Gallery is free.

Acknowledgements
Funding for On Assignment has been provided in part from an arts program grant from the Maryland State Arts Council, an agency funded by the State of Maryland and the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Friends of the Library & Gallery.

Hours of Operation
Sunday: Closed
Monday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Tuesday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Thursday: 12 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Friday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Saturday: 1 p.m. - 5 p.m.

Telephone
General Gallery information: 410-455-2270
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
Gallery website: http://aok.lib.umbc.edu/gallery/
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail. The images in this release and others are available at 300 dpi on high resolution image website.

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in the Walker Avenue Garage. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Arthur Leipzig, Divers, 1948

###

Posted by tmoore

UMBC Department of Music Presents Guitarist Troy King in Concert

Contact: Tom Moore
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

Troy KingThe UMBC Department of Music presents guitarist Troy King in concert on Sunday, April 3rd at 3 pm in the Fine Arts Recital Hall. His program will feature works by Augustin Barrios, Sylvius Leopold Weiss, Manuel Ponce, Jorge Morel, and Radames Gnattali.

With a reputation as an inspired, technically refined performer, Troy King is recognized as a guitarist who brings an intense, passionate commitment to his art, and who is able to emotionally connect with audiences. He holds a Bachelor of Music Degree from the Cleveland Institute of Music as a scholarship student of John Holmquist, and a Master’s Degree from the University of Denver, where he was the teaching assistant to Ricardo Iznaola. Additional instruction includes private study in England with composer/ guitarist Gilbert Biberian, and a long list of masterclasses with many of today’s most notable guitarists.

King has performed concerts across the United States and Europe. He has been heard on the BBC and National Public Radio. His varied programs include beloved guitar masterworks as well as important and exciting contemporary offerings, such as Ricardo Iznaola’s Three Little Tales, which he premiered in 1997. Notable festival appearances have included guest artist recitals at the Charlton Kings International Guitar Festival (England), the Portland Guitar Festival (Oregon), and at the Summer Guitar Workshop (New Mexico). After giving what Soundboard Magazine described as “a fiery performance,” King won First Prize at the Portland Guitar Festival International Guitar Competition. Other accomplishments include winning First Prize at the Lamont Chamber Music Competition and being selected as a Finalist in the Manuel Ponce International Guitar Competition in Mexico City.

Admission
Admission to the concert is $7 general, $3 for senior citizens, free for all students, and free with a UMBC ID. Tickets are available online through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or by calling 410-752-8950. Any remaining tickets will be available at the door (cash or check only). Admission to the masterclass is free.

Telephone
Public information: UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
A high resolution image for media is available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

###

Posted by tmoore

February 22, 2005

UMBC's Center for Art and Visual Culture presents the Tour de Clay

Contact: Tom Moore
410-455-3370
tmoore@umbc.edu

Work by Dana Morales UMBC's Center for Art and Visual Culture presents three exhibitions as part of the Baltimore area-wide Tour de Clay, held in conjunction with the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts 2005 Conference. The exhibitions open on March 10th and continue through April 2nd. An opening reception for all three exhibitions will be held on Wednesday, March 16 from 5 to 7 pm at the Center for Art and Visual Culture.

The largest of the exhibitions -- and the largest Tour de Clay exhibition in Baltimore -- is the NCECA 2005 Clay National Exhibition, a nationally juried exhibition of emerging and established artists, including Tara Wilson, Stan Welsh, Wendy Walgate, John Utgaard, Virginia Trammell, Matthew Towers, Billie Jean Theide, Leigh Taylor Mickelson, Katherine Taylor, Chris Staley and 72 others. This exhibition will be presented in the Center for Art and Visual Culture's main exhibition space in the Fine Arts Building.

Series of Echoes: Anderson Ranch, featuring work by past and present Anderson Ranch resident artists, is curated by Jill Oberman and organized by the Anderson Ranch Arts Center in Snowmass Village, Colorado. Series of Echoes showcases the diversity and individual strengths of the artists in residence, and highlights the emerging and established artists who have left a legacy at the Anderson Ranch while contributing to the field of contemporary ceramics. Artists featured in the exhibition include Doug Casebeer, Brad Miller, Christa Assad, Ruth Borgenicht, Sam Chung, Michael Connelly, Julia Galloway, Sam Harvey, Giselle Hicks, Sinisa Kukec, Jae Won Lee, Alleghany Meadows, Jill Oberman, Rich Parsons, Pelusa Rosenthal, Bradley Walters and Michael Wisner. Series of Echoes will be presented in the Gallery on Upper Main at The Commons.

Contemporary Codex: Ceramics and the Book is a traveling invitational exhibition exploring the written word, curated by Holly Hanessian and Janet Williams and organized by the University Art Gallery, Central Michigan University. Participating artists include Lenny Goldberg, Holly Henessian, Barbara Hashimoto, Kimiyo Michima, Nancy Selvin, Richard Shaw, Forrest Snyder and Janet Williams. Ceramics and books share a common history: The earliest book forms, imbued with power and intimacy, were cuneiforms, small terra cotta tablets with orderly symbols easily tucked into a side sleeve and carried around. The book objects or installations in this exhibition stretch the boundaries of both ceramics and the book form, interpreting the book with integrity and a variety of aesthetic viewpoints. Contemporary Codex will be on display on the Second Floor of The Commons in Room 2B24. A full-color catalog with essays from both curators will be available for purchase at the CAVC for $10.

Work by Tyler LotzAbout the Center for Art and Visual Culture
The Center for Art and Visual Culture is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study of contemporary art and visual culture, critical theory, art and cultural history, and the relationship between society and the arts. The CAVC serves as a forum for students, faculty, and the general public for the discussion of important aesthetic and social issues of the day. Disciplines represented include painting, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, photography, digital art, video, film, television, design, architecture, advertising, and installation and performance art.

Since 1989, the CAVC has incorporated a number of public programs into its exhibition programming schedule to further impact the communities it serves. Symposia, lecture series, conferences, film series, visiting artist series, and residencies have all been fundamental in an effort to create an ongoing dialogue about contemporary art and culture. The Center has also initiated a number of projects with Baltimore and surrounding schools systems to integrate the contemporary artist and their concerns into the classroom. These projects take place on-site at both middle schools and high schools and are team taught by the instructors at these schools, professional artists, and students from the CAVC's Internship Program.

Currently the Center produces one to two exhibition catalogues each year. Each document is fully illustrated and contains critical essays on the given subject by a variety of distinguished professionals in the field. Recent publications include Postmodernism: A Virtual Discussion and Paul Rand: Modernist Design. These catalogues are published yearly and are distributed internationally through Distributed Art Publishers in New York.

Since 1992, the Center for Art and Visual Culture has actively pursued the organization of exhibitions that contain the aesthetic, theoretical, and educational potential to reach both a national and international audience. Over the years, the CAVC has traveled these exhibition projects to a broad spectrum of museums, professional non-profit galleries, and universities national and internationally. These traveling exhibitions include:

  • White: Whiteness and Race in Contemporary Art (2003)
  • Fred Wilson: Objects and Installations (2001)
  • Adrian Piper: A Retrospective (1999)
  • Bruno Monguzzi: A Designer's Perspective (1998)
  • Minimal Politics (1997)
  • Kate Millet, Sculpture: The First 38 Years (1997)
  • Layers: Contemporary Collage from St. Petersburg, Russia (1995/96)
  • Notes In Time: Leon Golub and Nancy Spero (1995)
  • Ciphers of Identity (1994)

Beyond the scope of these traveling exhibitions, the Center for Art and Visual Culture also undertakes an exhibition schedule that includes a Faculty Biennial, and projects such as the Joseph Beuys Tree Partnership. As part of the educational mission of the CAVC, one graduate thesis exhibition and one undergraduate senior exhibition are scheduled on a yearly basis.

This multi-faceted focus for presenting exhibitions, projects and scholarly research publications focused on contemporary art and cultural issues positions the Center for Art and Visual Culture in a unique position within the mid-Atlantic region.

Upcoming Exhibitions at the Center for Art and Visual Culture
April 14 – May 7
The IMDA Thesis Exhibition, an exhibition by graduates of UMBC's MFA program in Imaging and Digital Arts, an interdisciplinary program integrating computer art, video, filmmaking, photography, art theory and criticism. An opening reception will be held on April 14 from 5 to 7 pm.

May 18 – June 18
The Senior Exit Exhibition. This exhibition reflects the interdisciplinary orientation and the technological focus of the Department of Visual Arts and provides the opportunity for undergraduate seniors to exhibit within a professional setting prior to exiting the University. An opening reception will be held on May 18 from 5 to 7 pm.

Work by Bede ClarkHours of Operation
Sunday: Closed
Monday: Closed
Tuesday: 10 A.M. – 5:00 P.M.
Wednesday: 10 A.M. – 5:00 P.M.
Thursday: 10 A.M. – 5:00 P.M.
Friday: 10 A.M. – 5:00 P.M.
Saturday: 10 A.M. – 5:00 P.M.

Admission
Admission to the CAVC and all events is free.

Telephone
CAVC offices: 410-455-3188
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
CAVC website: http://www.umbc.edu/cavc
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

Work by Tom Bartel

###

Posted by tmoore

February 13, 2005

UMBC Presents Guitarist Stephen Marchionda in Concert

The UMBC Department of Music presents a masterclass and concert by renowned guitarist Stephen Marchionda on Saturday, February 26. The masterclass will be held at 3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall, with the concert to follow at 7:30 pm in the Fine Arts Recital Hall. His program will include the regional premiere of the Tango from Sophie's Choice by Nicholas Maw, as well as Maw's monumental work for solo guitar, Music of Memory, and works by John Dowland and Joaquin Rodrigo.

Stephen MarchiondaThe UMBC Department of Music presents a masterclass and concert by renowned guitarist Stephen Marchionda on Saturday, February 26. The masterclass will be held at 3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall, with the concert to follow at 7:30 pm in the Fine Arts Recital Hall.

His program will include the regional premiere of the Tango from Sophie's Choice by Nicholas Maw, as well as Maw's monumental work for solo guitar, Music of Memory, and works by John Dowland and Joaqu�n Rodrigo.

Stephen Marchionda has emerged as a unique presence on the international concert scene. His performances are characterized by flair, technical facility and musical individuality. The American Record Guide says, “...he turns in vibrant performances...energetic and vital, with a great sense of momentum and flow...cohesive and highly charged.” He has recently been featured in New York City at Weill Recital Hall/Carnegie Hall (the Aranjuez Series), where Soundboard magazine wrote that “imbued with depth and passion, Marchionda played engagingly and with a sense of drama...deftly played.” He has appeared at Lincoln Center, the Kennedy Center, Aspen Music Festival, the Cleveland and San Diego Museums of Art, the Cleveland Institute, the San Francisco Conservatory of Music and numerous universities.

A strong advocate of contemporary music, Mr. Marchionda is top prize winner at several international competitions, including the Guitar Foundation of America's International Solo, the Segovia International, and the Manuel de Falla. A graduate of Yale University's School of Music and the Cleveland Institute of Music, he was affiliated with the Royal Academy of Music in London in 1991, where he received classes with the celebrated guitarist Julian Bream, who called him a “strong, spirited performer.”

Admission
Admission to the concert is $7 general, $3 for senior citizens, free for all students, and free with a UMBC ID. Tickets are available online through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or by calling 410-752-8950. Any remaining tickets will be available at the door (cash or check only). Admission to the masterclass is free.

Telephone
Public information: UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
A high resolution image for media is available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

###

Posted by dwinds1

UMBC Presents the Damocles Trio in Concert

The UMBC Department of Music’s Faculty Recital Series presents the Damocles Trio in concert on Thursday, March 3 at 8 pm in the Fine Arts Recital Hall. The Trio’s program will features performances of the Brahms Trio No. 2 in C Major, Op. 87; Joaquín Turina’s Trio No. 2 in B Minor, Op. 76; and Ravel’s Trio in A Minor.

Damocles TrioThe UMBC Department of Music’s Faculty Recital Series presents the Damocles Trio in concert on Thursday, March 3 at 8 pm in the Fine Arts Recital Hall. The Trio’s program will features performances of the Brahms Trio No. 2 in C Major, Op. 87; Joaquín Turina’s Trio No. 2 in B Minor, Op. 76; and Ravel’s Trio in A Minor.

The Damocles Trio has performed throughout the United States, appearing numerous times at Alice Tully Hall in New York City, and completed highly successful tours of Switzerland in 1999 and 2001. Commenting on a performance in Interlaken, the Oberländisches Tagblatt wrote, “The members of this international trio were perfectly attuned to each other and interpreted the magnificent work with great expressiveness” and a critic from the Zürichsee Zeitung enthused, “The three artists did justice to the great work of Beethoven with perfect harmony, courtly elegance...subtle coloration, and great virtuosity.”

The ensemble was founded in 1996 by pianist Adam Kent, violinist Airi Yoshioka, and cellist Sibylle Johner, all accomplished soloists in their own right. Mr. Kent won top prizes in the American Pianists Association Fellowship, Simone Belsky Music, Thomas Richner Foundation, Juilliard Concerto, and Kosciuszko Foundation Chopin competitions and is also a recipient of the Arthur Rubinstein Prize and the Harold Bauer Award. Ms. Yoshioka was a winner of The Juilliard School’s concerto competition, concertmaster and soloist with the Manhattan Virtuosi, concertmaster at the Aspen Music Festival, and concertmaster and soloist with The New Juilliard Ensemble. She is now on the faculty of UMBC. Ms. Johner was a winner of both the Drake and Zurich Conservatory soloist competitions and received the Dienemann, Ernst Göhner, and Eubie Blake Scholarship awards. The three musicians met in the doctoral program at The Juilliard School, where they were awarded a Maxwell and Muriel Gluck Fellowship for the 1998/99 academic year and coached with Felix Galimir, Jerome Lowenthal, and Stephen Clapp. The only piano trio to advance to the finals of the 2002 International Concert Artists Guild Competition, the Damocles Trio has been featured frequently on Robert Sherman’s Young Artists Showcase on WQXR radio.

Admission
Admission to the concert is $7 general, $3 for senior citizens, free for all students, and free with a UMBC ID. Tickets are available online through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or by calling 410-752-8950. Any remaining tickets will be available at the door (cash or check only). Admission to the masterclass is free.

Telephone
Public information: UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
A high resolution image for media is available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail. (Photo credit: Michael Dames.)

###

Posted by dwinds1

February 1, 2005

UMBC Presents the 'two' Percussion Duo in Concert

The UMBC Department of Music's Contemporary Concert Series presents the two percussion group on Thursday, February 24th, 2005. Their program will include All that is Left and Polka in Treblinka by Stuart Saunders Smith, Pairs by Christian Wolff, bicoastal by Roger Zahab, Duo for Marimba and Vibraphone by Gitta Steiner, Verh'lthis ('hneln..) by Franklin Cox, and a new work by Tom Baker.

twoThe UMBC Department of Music's Contemporary Concert Series presents the two percussion group, a duo committed to the advancement of new music through performance, education, and experimentation. two was founded in 1998 by Chris Leonard and Dale Speicher, both founding members of the seminal percussion group trio algetic. The music of two invites listeners to investigate the boundaries of complexity and sonority by exploring the world outside of driving repetitive rhythms and, instead, diving into a world of polytonality and polyrhythmic structures. two actively commissions new music for percussion from forward thinking composers throughout the world.

Their program will include All that is Left and Polka in Treblinka by Stuart Saunders Smith, Pairs by Christian Wolff, bicoastal by Roger Zahab, Duo for Marimba and Vibraphone by Gitta Steiner, Verh�lthis (�hneln..) by Franklin Cox, and a new work by Tom Baker

Admission
Admission is free.

Telephone
Public information: UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
A high resolution image for media is available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail. (Photo credit: Richard Anderson.)

###

Posted by OIT

UMBC Presents Cellist Franklin Cox in Concert

The UMBC Department of Music’s Faculty Recital Series presents cellist Franklin Cox in concert on Sunday, February 20th at 3 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall. His program will include J.S. Bach’s Cello Suite No. 5 in C minor (BWV 1011), the Maryland premiere of a work by Elliott Carter, works by Volker Schmidt and Ignacio Baca-Lobera, and a new work of his own.

Franklin Cox (photo: Richard Anderson)The UMBC Department of Music’s Faculty Recital Series presents cellist Franklin Cox in concert on Sunday, February 20th at 3 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall. His program will include J.S. Bach’s Cello Suite No. 5 in C minor (BWV 1011), the Maryland premiere of a work by Elliott Carter, works by Volker Schmidt and Ignacio Baca-Lobera, and a new work of his own.

Franklin Cox has performed in numerous festivals and new music ensembles, including the Indiana University New Music Ensemble, the Group for Contemporary Music, and SONOR, as well as at the 1980 and 1982 Spoleto Festivals, the 1983 Banff Summer Chamber Music Festival, the Xenakis Festival and Darmstadt Revisited Festival at UCSD, and at the Darmstadt Festival since 1988, where he received a special citation for cello performance in 1990. He received a Bachelor of Music degree in composition from Indiana University, a Master of Arts degree in composition from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. in composition at the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Cox studied with Brian Ferneyhough, Roger Reynolds, Joji Yuasa, Steven Suber, Fred Fox, Harvey Sollberger, Fred Lerdahl, and Jack Beeson. He received an Alice M. Ditson Scholarship and Dissertation Fellowship at Columbia University, Regent’s Fellowship and a Dissertation Research Fellowship for Outstanding Research at UCSD, a full scholarship to the 1990 June in Buffalo Festival, and full scholarships for the 1988 and 1992 Darmstadt Festivals. He was awarded a Stipendium Fellowship at the 1990 Darmstadt Festival, won 2nd prize in the Los Angeles Arts Commission competition in the spring of 1991, and was co-winner of the Kranichsteiner Musikpreis (highest award for composition) in the 1992 Darmstadt Festival.

Admission
Admission is $7 general, $3 for senior citizens, free for all students, and free with a UMBC ID. Tickets are available online through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or by calling 410-752-8950. Any remaining tickets will be available at the door (cash or check only).

Telephone
Public information: UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
A high resolution image for media is available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail. (Photo credit: Richard Anderson.)

###

Posted by OIT

January 11, 2005

UMBC Department of Music Presents Spring 2005 Concerts and Events

The UMBC Department of Music presents its spring 2005 season, featuring an array of contemporary classical music concerts by renowned artists, including classical guitarist Stephen Marchionda, Ruckus (the contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC), the Callithumpian Consort (featuring a performance of Miss Donnithornes Maggot by Peter Maxwell Davies), the Damocles Trio and other performers.

The UMBC Department of Music presents its spring 2005 season, featuring an array of contemporary classical music concerts by renowned artists, including classical guitarist Stephen Marchionda, Ruckus (the contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC), the Callithumpian Consort (featuring a performance of Miss Donnithornes Maggot by Peter Maxwell Davies), the Damocles Trio and other performers.

Professional Artist Series

Duo Ego (Photo Uristin Lidell)February 9
Duo Ego
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Free admission
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

Duo Ego, featuring the unusual ensemble of singer Monica Danielsson and percussionist Per Sjgren, has, in fewer than four years, established itself as one of the leading contemporary music ensembles in Scandinavia. A number of composers have written for the duo, which will present the world premiere of a new work by Magnus Lindborg at Stockholm New Music in February 2005. Their program will include Forever and Sunsmell by John Cage, Tranquil by Pr Lindgren, Aspects of Humanity by Fredrik sterling, A day goes by by Karin Rehnqvist, La fracheur de la dernire vpre by Viktor Varela, and Breath by Stuart Saunders Smith. (Photo: Uristin Lidell.)

Franklin Cox (Photo by Richard Anderson)February 20
Franklin Cox, cello
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950 and at the door immediately prior to the concert.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS.

Cellist Franklin Coxs program will include J.S. Bachs Cello Suite No. 4 in E-flat (BWV 1010), works by Wolfram Schurig, Ignacio Baca-Lobera, Nicola Sani and a new work by Franklin Cox. Franklin Cox has performed in numerous festivals and new music ensembles, including the Indiana University New Music Ensemble, the Group for Contemporary Music, and SONOR, as well as at the 1980 and 1982 Spoleto Festivals, the 1983 Banff Summer Chamber Music Festival, the Xenakis Festival and Darmstadt Revisited Festival at UCSD, and at the Darmstadt Festival since 1988, where he received a special citation for cello performance in 1990. He received a Bachelor of Music degree in composition from Indiana University, a Master of Arts degree in composition from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. in composition at the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Cox studied with Brian Ferneyhough, Roger Reynolds, Joji Yuasa, Steven Suber, Fred Fox, Harvey Sollberger, Fred Lerdahl, and Jack Beeson. He received an Alice M. Ditson Scholarship and Dissertation Fellowship at Columbia University, Regents Fellowship and a Dissertation Research Fellowship for Outstanding Research at UCSD, a full scholarship to the 1990 June in Buffalo Festival, and full scholarships for the 1988 and 1992 Darmstadt Festivals. He was awarded a Stipendium Fellowship at the 1990 Darmstadt Festival, won 2nd prize in the Los Angeles Arts Commission competition in the spring of 1991, and was co-winner of the Kranichsteiner Musikpreis (highest award for composition) in the 1992 Darmstadt Festival. (Photo: Richard Anderson.)

February 24
two percussion ensemble
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Free admission
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

The two percussion group, a duo committed to the advancement of new music through performance, education, and experimentation, was founded in 1998 by Chris Leonard and Dale Speicher, both founding members of the seminal percussion group trio algetic. The music of two invites listeners to investigate the boundaries of complexity and sonority by exploring the world outside of driving repetitive rhythms and, instead, diving into a world of polytonality and polyrhythmic structures. two actively commissions new music for percussion from forward thinking composers throughout the world. Their program will include All that is Left and Polka in Treblinka by Stuart Saunders Smith, Pairs by Christian Wolff, bicoastal by Roger Zahab, Duo for Marimba and Vibraphone by Gitta Steiner, Verhlthis (hneln..) by Franklin Cox, and a new work by Tom Baker.

February 26
Stephen Marchionda, guitar
7:30 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950 and at the door immediately prior to the concert.
(A 3 pm masterclass, Fine Arts Recital Hall, is free.)
Public information: 410-455-ARTS.

Renowned guitarist Stephen Marchionda renowned guitarist Stephen Marchionda. His program will include the regional premiere of the Tango from Sophies Choice by Nicholas Maw, as well as Maws monumental work for solo guitar, Music of Memory, and works by John Dowland and Joaqun Rodrigo. Stephen Marchionda has emerged as a unique presence on the international concert scene. His performances are characterized by flair, technical facility and musical individuality. The American Record Guide says, ...he turns in vibrant performances...energetic and vital, with a great sense of momentum and flow...cohesive and highly charged. He has recently been featured in New York City at Weill Recital Hall/Carnegie Hall (the Aranjuez Series), where Soundboard magazine wrote that imbued with depth and passion, Marchionda played engagingly and with a sense of drama...deftly played. He has appeared at Lincoln Center, the Kennedy Center, Aspen Music Festival, the Cleveland and San Diego Museums of Art, the Cleveland Institute, the San Francisco Conservatory of Music and numerous universities. A strong advocate of contemporary music, Mr. Marchionda is top prize winner at several international competitions, including the Guitar Foundation of Americas International Solo, the Segovia International, and the Manuel de Falla. A graduate of Yale Universitys School of Music and the Cleveland Institute of Music, he was affiliated with the Royal Academy of Music in London in 1991, where he received classes with the celebrated guitarist Julian Bream, who called him a strong, spirited performer.

The Damocles TrioMarch 3
The Damocles Trio
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950 and at the door immediately prior to the concert.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS.

The energetic Damocles Trio will perform the Brahms Trio No. 2 in C Major, Op. 87; Joaqun Turinas Trio No. 2 in B Minor, Op. 76; and Ravels Trio in A Minor. The Damocles Trio has performed throughout the United States, appearing numerous times at Alice Tully Hall in New York City, and completed highly successful tours of Switzerland in 1999 and 2001. Commenting on a performance in Interlaken, the Oberlndisches Tagblatt wrote, The members of this international trio were perfectly attuned to each other and interpreted the magnificent work with great expressiveness and a critic from the Zrichsee Zeitung enthused, The three artists did justice to the great work of Beethoven with perfect harmony, courtly elegance...subtle coloration, and great virtuosity. The ensemble was founded in 1996 by pianist Adam Kent, violinist Airi Yoshioka, and cellist Sibylle Johner, all accomplished soloists in their own right. Mr. Kent won top prizes in the American Pianists Association Fellowship, Simone Belsky Music, Thomas Richner Foundation, Juilliard Concerto, and Kosciuszko Foundation Chopin competitions and is also a recipient of the Arthur Rubinstein Prize and the Harold Bauer Award. Ms. Yoshioka was a winner of The Juilliard Schools concerto competition, concertmaster and soloist with the Manhattan Virtuosi, concertmaster at the Aspen Music Festival, and concertmaster and soloist with The New Juilliard Ensemble. She is now on the faculty of UMBC. Ms. Johner was a winner of both the Drake and Zurich Conservatory soloist competitions and received the Dienemann, Ernst Ghner, and Eubie Blake Scholarship awards. The three musicians met in the doctoral program at The Juilliard School, where they were awarded a Maxwell and Muriel Gluck Fellowship for the 1998/99 academic year and coached with Felix Galimir, Jerome Lowenthal, and Stephen Clapp. The only piano trio to advance to the finals of the 2002 International Concert Artists Guild Competition, the Damocles Trio has been featured frequently on Robert Shermans Young Artists Showcase on WQXR radio. (Photo: Michael Dames.)

Troy KingApril 3
Troy King, guitar
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950 and at the door immediately prior to the concert.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

Guitarist Troy King presents a program of works by Augustin Barrios, Sylvius Leopold Weiss, Manuel Ponce, Jorge Morel, and Radames Gnattali. With a reputation as an inspired, technically refined performer, Troy King is recognized as a guitarist who brings an intense, passionate commitment to his art, and who is able to emotionally connect with audiences. He holds a Bachelor of Music Degree from the Cleveland Institute of Music as a scholarship student of John Holmquist, and a Masters Degree from the University of Denver, where he was the teaching assistant to Ricardo Iznaola. Additional instruction includes private study in England with composer/guitarist Gilbert Biberian, and a long list of masterclasses with many of todays most notable guitarists. King has performed concerts across the United States and Europe. He has been heard on the BBC and National Public Radio. His varied programs include beloved guitar masterworks as well as important and exciting contemporary offerings, such as Ricardo Iznaolas Three Little Tales, which he premiered in 1997. Notable festival appearances have included guest artist recitals at the Charlton Kings International Guitar Festival (England), the Portland Guitar Festival (Oregon), and at the Summer Guitar Workshop (New Mexico). After giving what Soundboard Magazine described as a fiery performance, King won First Prize at the Portland Guitar Festival International Guitar Competition. Other accomplishments include winning First Prize at the Lamont Chamber Music Competition and being selected as a Finalist in the Manuel Ponce International Guitar Competition in Mexico City. (Photo credit: Tanya Gerodette.)

RuckusApril 12
Ruckus, the professional contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950 and at the door immediately prior to the concert.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS.

Ruckus, the professional contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC, will perform Elliott Carters Triple Duo, James Erbers The Ray and its Shadow, a new work by Anneliese Wiebel, a work by Mark Osborn, and so, between and e,nm by Thomas DeLio. The ensemble features flutist Lisa Cella, cellist Franklin Cox, percussionist Tom Goldstein, clarinetist E. Michael Richards, pianist Kazuko Tanosaki and violinist Airi Yoshioka. Founded in 2000 to promote the performance of contemporary chamber music, Ruckus has performed at the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Smithsonian Institution, and at universities throughout the East Coast. (Photo: Richard Anderson.)

Callithumpian ConsortApril 14
The Callithumpian Consort
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Free admission
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

The Callithumpian Consort hails from New England Conservatory and is directed by noted pianist Stephen Drury. The ensembles program will feature Miss Donnithornes Maggot, a music-theatre work by Peter Maxwell Davies. The Callithumpian Consort was created in the belief that new music should be an exciting adventure shared by performers and listeners alike, and that brand new masterpieces of our day are beautiful, sensuous, challenging, delightful, provocative, and a unique joy. The Consort is flexible in size and makeup, in some cases performing as a full chamber orchestra. Its members pursue parallel solo and orchestral careers as well. Each musician is a soloist, enabling the group to tackle unusual repertoire in non-standard ensembles, or to take part in experimental projects. The Consorts repertoire encompasses a huge stylistic spectrum, from the classics of the last 100 years to works of the avant-garde and experimental jazz and rock. Active commissioning and recording of new works is crucial to the ensembles mission, and the group has worked with composers John Cage, Lee Hyla, John Zorn, Michael Finnissy, Franco Donatoni, Lukas Foss, Christian Wolff and many others. Its recordings are available on Tzadik and Mode records.

Marc PonthusApril 21
Marc Ponthus, piano
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Free admission
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

Pianist Marc Ponthus presents a performance of the Second and Third Piano Sonatas by Pierre Boulez. The only pianist to have performed the complete solo piano work of Pierre Boulez and Karlheinz Stockhausen, Ponthuss solo performances with the BBC in London have been broadcast on numerous occasions. The New York Times wrote, Mr. Ponthuss virtuosity is hair-raising, like beams of electricity shooting from a Frankenstein machine...a kind of priest channeling spirits in an arcane rite, hurling himself at the keyboard...until the whole instrument shook. The Washington Posts Joseph McLellan said, Ponthus has a technique and a musical sensitivity that simply brush technical obstacles aside.

Special Event

February 16
Studio 508, the Department of Musics recording studio and black box performance space, celebrates its re-opening with updated equipment and renovations. The public is invited to an Open House event with surround sound experiencesranging from the music of Roger Reynolds to The Beatlesand a reception.
5 pm, Studio 508, Fine Arts Building. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

Student Recital Series

March 6
The UMBC Symphony Orchestra, directed by Wayne Cameron, will feature the winners of the High School Concerto Competition and the Department of Music Concerto Competition in a program that will include Mozarts Symphony No. 29.
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

April 2
The Vocal Arts Ensemble under the direction of David Smith, presenting an Opera Gala that will feature a wonderful evening of scenes from Carmen, La Bohme, Cos Fan Tutti, The Marriage of Figaro, Elixir of Love, A Hand of Bridge, and The Gondoliers.
7 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

April 28
The UMBC Jazz Ensemble directed by Jari Villanueva.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

May 1
The UMBC Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Wayne Cameron. The program will feature the London Suite by Eric Coates; the Richard Strauss Oboe Concerto with guest oboist Lori Guess; and a Gloria for choir and orchestra by Antonio Vivaldi.
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

May 5
The UMBC Wind Ensemble directed by Jari Villanueva.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

May 6
The UMBC Jazz Combo directed by Rick Hannah.
4 pm, the Commons Cabaret. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

May 7
The Jubilee Singers directed by Janice Jackson.
7 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

May 8
The Collegium Musicum directed by Joseph Morin, a performance ensemble dedicated to exploring and performing vocal and instrumental music from European Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque periods, sampling musical repertoires created between 800 and 1750.
4 pm, St. Johns Episcopal Church, 9120 Frederick Road, Ellicott City. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

May 9
The UMBC Chamber Players directed by E. Michael Richards.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

May 10
The UMBC Percussion Ensemble directed by Tom Goldstein. The ensemble is adventurous in its programming, with a repertoire that includes graphic-notation pieces, improvisational works, and theatre, as well as works by important early percussion composers such as Alan Hovhaness, John Cage and Carlos Chavez.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

May 14
The Maryland Camerata directed by David Smith.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

May 16
The UMBC Classical Guitar Ensemble directed by Troy King.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

May 17
Department of Music Honors Recital.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

Additional Information

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

Telephone
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Department of Music website: http://www.umbc.edu/music

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Evening parking is available in Lot 16, adjacent to the Fine Arts Building, for 50. Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

###

Posted by OIT

UMBC Presents the Phoenix Dance Company

The UMBC Department of Dance presents the Phoenix Dance Company, the professional dance company in residence at UMBC, in its annual concerts from Wednesday, February 9 through Saturday, February 12 at 8 p.m. in the UMBC Theatre. Renowned for its exploration of dance and technology, the Phoenix Dance Company features choreography by co-artistic directors Carol Hess and Doug Hamby, and performances by Sandra Lacy and other artists.

Phoenix Dance CompanyThe UMBC Department of Dance presents the Phoenix Dance Company, the professional dance company in residence at UMBC, in its annual concerts from Wednesday, February 9 through Saturday, February 12 at 8 p.m. in the UMBC Theatre.

Tickets are $15 general admission and $7 for students and seniors, available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950.

Renowned for its exploration of dance and technology, the Phoenix Dance Company features choreography by co-artistic directors Carol Hess and Doug Hamby, and performances by Sandra Lacy and other artists. The venerable company, founded in 1983, has played in venues such as the Kennedy Center, Lincoln Center, the Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore Theatre Project, Ohio State University, Judson Church, Goucher College, McDaniel College, Salisbury University and Temple University.

The program will include:

  • Common Axis III, a multimedia work for eight dancers, featuring video by Timothy Nohe and sound performed live by Joe Reinsel;
  • Two premieres by Doug Hamby and Carol Hess;
  • Henrietta and Alexandra by Mexican choreographer Jose Bustamante, an emotionally charged, dramatic and very physical piece performed by Sandra Lacy and guest artist Mary Williford-Shade;
  • Shooting Gallery by Carol Hess, performed by Mandi and Evan Davidson;
  • A Memory (Baltimore premiere) by Doug Hamby, performed by Emily Gibbs;
  • Three Miniatures by Tonya Lockyer, performed by Sandra Lacy;
  • Dancers Cristal Cooper, Evan Davidson, Mandi Davidson, Jenifer Dobbins, Lisa Fecteau, Emily Gibbs, Christina Kennedy, Sandra Lacy, Lindsay Phebus, Alicia Ritgert, Chip Scuderi and Mary Williford-Shade

Admission
General admission: $15.00
Students and seniors: $7.00
Box Office: http://www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24-hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art

Images for Media
High resolution images are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/
or by email or postal mail.

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.
From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Theatre.
From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.
Theatre Parking is available in The Commons Garage.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Phoenix Dance Company

###

Posted by dwinds1

UMBC Presents the Liz Lerman Dance Exchange

UMBC presents the Liz Lerman Dance Exchange in concert on Friday, February 4, 2005 at 8 p.m. in the UMBC Theatre. The Liz Lerman Dance Exchange's performance at UMBC offers a sneak peek into a dance company whose moves, grooves and imagery are created from a multitude of voices spanning six decades.

Liz Lerman Dance ExchangeUMBC presents the Liz Lerman Dance Exchange in concert on Friday, February 4, 2005 at 8 p.m. in the UMBC Theatre.

Tickets are $17 general admission and $7 for students and seniors, available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950.

The Liz Lerman Dance Exchange's performance at UMBC will feature an evening of joyous and provocative dance—plus an opportunity to see sections of a new work being developed by Martha Wittman. The program will include:

Imprints on a Landscape: a multi-media work including movement, text and visual imagery, Imprints involves the full professional company of Liz Lerman Dance Exchange. Through extensive research, and drawing on her family’s background in the coal mining culture of northeastern Pennsylvania, veteran choreographer and Dance Exchange favorite Martha Wittman creates and directs Imprints, which includes the oral histories of elders or still-living family members who recall the mining-industry days. The New York Times described Wittman as “one of those rare and daring performers who seems simply to embody truth.”

Dances at a Cocktail Party: in a spirit more impressionistic than biographical, Dances at a Cocktail Party is Liz Lerman’s work based on the music and spirit of Leonard Bernstein: his connection to composing and teaching, his insistence on the coexistence of both “high” and “low” art and, in his personal life, the zeal to live on a large spectrum.

In Praise of Animals and Their People: a work that celebrates the bond between humans and animals, Jennifer Dunning of The New York Times described Animals as “a wonder.”

Founded in 1976, the Liz Lerman Dance Exchange presents a unique brand of dance/theater, breaking boundaries between stage and audience, theater and community, movement and language, tradition and the unexplored. Through explosive dancing, personal stories and intelligent humor, Liz Lerman Dance Exchange stretches the expressive range of contemporary dance.

Liz Lerman (Founding Artistic Director) has choreographed works that have been seen throughout the United States and abroad. Combining dance with realistic imagery, her works are defined by the spoken word, drawing from literature, personal experience, philosophy, and political and social commentary. Over the past 26 years she has received recognition for her work with Liz Lerman Dance Exchange and as a solo artist. In 2002, she received a MacArthur Genius Grant fellowship for her visionary work. She has received an American Choreographer Award, the American Jewish Congress Golda award, the first annual Pola Nirenska Award, the Mayor's Art Award, and was named Washingtonian Magazine's Washingtonian of the Year in 1988.

Liz Lerman's work has been commissioned by Lincoln Center, American Dance Festival, Dancing in the Street, BalletMet, and The Kennedy Center. Her choreographic work has received support from AT&T, Meet The Composer, American Festival Project, National Endowment for the Arts, National Performance Network Creation Fund, and the National Foundation for Jewish Culture.

An open rehearsal will be held at 2:30 pm on Thursday, February 3rd in the Theatre. Admission to the open rehearsal is free.

Admission
General admission: $17.00
Students and seniors: $7.00
Box Office: http://www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24-hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Liz Lerman Dance Exchange: http://www.danceexchange.org/

Images for Media
High resolution images (those shown here and others) are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/
or by email or postal mail.

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.
From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Theatre.
From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.
Theatre Parking is available in The Commons Garage.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

###

Posted by dwinds1

UMBC Department of Music Presents Spring 2005 Concerts and Events

The UMBC Department of Music presents its spring 2005 season, featuring an array of contemporary classical music concerts by renowned artists, including classical guitarist Stephen Marchionda, Ruckus (the contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC), the Callithumpian Consort (featuring a performance of Miss Donnithorne's Maggot by Peter Maxwell Davies), the Damocles Trio and other performers.

The UMBC Department of Music presents its spring 2005 season, featuring an array of contemporary classical music concerts by renowned artists, including classical guitarist Stephen Marchionda, Ruckus (the contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC), the Callithumpian Consort (featuring a performance of Miss Donnithorne's Maggot by Peter Maxwell Davies), the Damocles Trio and other performers.

Professional Artist Series

Duo Ego (Photo Uristin Lidell)February 9
Duo Ego
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Free admission
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

Duo Ego, featuring the unusual ensemble of singer Monica Danielsson and percussionist Per Sjgren, has, in fewer than four years, established itself as one of the leading contemporary music ensembles in Scandinavia. A number of composers have written for the duo, which will present the world premiere of a new work by Magnus Lindborg at Stockholm New Music in February 2005. Their program will include Forever and Sunsmell by John Cage, Tranquil by Pr Lindgren, Aspects of Humanity by Fredrik sterling, A day goes by by Karin Rehnqvist, La fracheur de la dernire vpre by Viktor Varela, and Breath by Stuart Saunders Smith. (Photo: Uristin Lidell.)

Franklin Cox (Photo by Richard Anderson)February 20
Franklin Cox, cello
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950 and at the door immediately prior to the concert.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS.

Cellist Franklin Cox's program will include J.S. Bach's Cello Suite No. 4 in E-flat (BWV 1010), works by Wolfram Schurig, Ignacio Baca-Lobera, Nicola Sani and a new work by Franklin Cox. Franklin Cox has performed in numerous festivals and new music ensembles, including the Indiana University New Music Ensemble, the Group for Contemporary Music, and SONOR, as well as at the 1980 and 1982 Spoleto Festivals, the 1983 Banff Summer Chamber Music Festival, the Xenakis Festival and Darmstadt Revisited Festival at UCSD, and at the Darmstadt Festival since 1988, where he received a special citation for cello performance in 1990. He received a Bachelor of Music degree in composition from Indiana University, a Master of Arts degree in composition from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. in composition at the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Cox studied with Brian Ferneyhough, Roger Reynolds, Joji Yuasa, Steven Suber, Fred Fox, Harvey Sollberger, Fred Lerdahl, and Jack Beeson. He received an Alice M. Ditson Scholarship and Dissertation Fellowship at Columbia University, Regent's Fellowship and a Dissertation Research Fellowship for Outstanding Research at UCSD, a full scholarship to the 1990 June in Buffalo Festival, and full scholarships for the 1988 and 1992 Darmstadt Festivals. He was awarded a Stipendium Fellowship at the 1990 Darmstadt Festival, won 2nd prize in the Los Angeles Arts Commission competition in the spring of 1991, and was co-winner of the Kranichsteiner Musikpreis (highest award for composition) in the 1992 Darmstadt Festival. (Photo: Richard Anderson.)

February 24
two percussion ensemble
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Free admission
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

The two percussion group, a duo committed to the advancement of new music through performance, education, and experimentation, was founded in 1998 by Chris Leonard and Dale Speicher, both founding members of the seminal percussion group trio algetic. The music of two invites listeners to investigate the boundaries of complexity and sonority by exploring the world outside of driving repetitive rhythms and, instead, diving into a world of polytonality and polyrhythmic structures. two actively commissions new music for percussion from forward thinking composers throughout the world. Their program will include All that is Left and Polka in Treblinka by Stuart Saunders Smith, Pairs by Christian Wolff, bicoastal by Roger Zahab, Duo for Marimba and Vibraphone by Gitta Steiner, Verhlthis (hneln..) by Franklin Cox, and a new work by Tom Baker.

February 26
Stephen Marchionda, guitar
7:30 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950 and at the door immediately prior to the concert.
(A 3 pm masterclass, Fine Arts Recital Hall, is free.)
Public information: 410-455-ARTS.

Renowned guitarist Stephen Marchionda renowned guitarist Stephen Marchionda. His program will include the regional premiere of the Tango from Sophie's Choice by Nicholas Maw, as well as Maw's monumental work for solo guitar, Music of Memory, and works by John Dowland and Joaqun Rodrigo. Stephen Marchionda has emerged as a unique presence on the international concert scene. His performances are characterized by flair, technical facility and musical individuality. The American Record Guide says, ...he turns in vibrant performances...energetic and vital, with a great sense of momentum and flow...cohesive and highly charged. He has recently been featured in New York City at Weill Recital Hall/Carnegie Hall (the Aranjuez Series), where Soundboard magazine wrote that imbued with depth and passion, Marchionda played engagingly and with a sense of drama...deftly played. He has appeared at Lincoln Center, the Kennedy Center, Aspen Music Festival, the Cleveland and San Diego Museums of Art, the Cleveland Institute, the San Francisco Conservatory of Music and numerous universities. A strong advocate of contemporary music, Mr. Marchionda is top prize winner at several international competitions, including the Guitar Foundation of America's International Solo, the Segovia International, and the Manuel de Falla. A graduate of Yale University's School of Music and the Cleveland Institute of Music, he was affiliated with the Royal Academy of Music in London in 1991, where he received classes with the celebrated guitarist Julian Bream, who called him a strong, spirited performer.

The Damocles TrioMarch 3
The Damocles Trio
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950 and at the door immediately prior to the concert.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS.

The energetic Damocles Trio will perform the Brahms Trio No. 2 in C Major, Op. 87; Joaqun Turina's Trio No. 2 in B Minor, Op. 76; and Ravel's Trio in A Minor. The Damocles Trio has performed throughout the United States, appearing numerous times at Alice Tully Hall in New York City, and completed highly successful tours of Switzerland in 1999 and 2001. Commenting on a performance in Interlaken, the Oberlndisches Tagblatt wrote, The members of this international trio were perfectly attuned to each other and interpreted the magnificent work with great expressiveness and a critic from the Zrichsee Zeitung enthused, The three artists did justice to the great work of Beethoven with perfect harmony, courtly elegance...subtle coloration, and great virtuosity. The ensemble was founded in 1996 by pianist Adam Kent, violinist Airi Yoshioka, and cellist Sibylle Johner, all accomplished soloists in their own right. Mr. Kent won top prizes in the American Pianists Association Fellowship, Simone Belsky Music, Thomas Richner Foundation, Juilliard Concerto, and Kosciuszko Foundation Chopin competitions and is also a recipient of the Arthur Rubinstein Prize and the Harold Bauer Award. Ms. Yoshioka was a winner of The Juilliard School's concerto competition, concertmaster and soloist with the Manhattan Virtuosi, concertmaster at the Aspen Music Festival, and concertmaster and soloist with The New Juilliard Ensemble. She is now on the faculty of UMBC. Ms. Johner was a winner of both the Drake and Zurich Conservatory soloist competitions and received the Dienemann, Ernst Ghner, and Eubie Blake Scholarship awards. The three musicians met in the doctoral program at The Juilliard School, where they were awarded a Maxwell and Muriel Gluck Fellowship for the 1998/99 academic year and coached with Felix Galimir, Jerome Lowenthal, and Stephen Clapp. The only piano trio to advance to the finals of the 2002 International Concert Artists Guild Competition, the Damocles Trio has been featured frequently on Robert Sherman's Young Artists Showcase on WQXR radio. (Photo: Michael Dames.)

Troy KingApril 3
Troy King, guitar
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950 and at the door immediately prior to the concert.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

Guitarist Troy King presents a program of works by Augustin Barrios, Sylvius Leopold Weiss, Manuel Ponce, Jorge Morel, and Radames Gnattali. With a reputation as an inspired, technically refined performer, Troy King is recognized as a guitarist who brings an intense, passionate commitment to his art, and who is able to emotionally connect with audiences. He holds a Bachelor of Music Degree from the Cleveland Institute of Music as a scholarship student of John Holmquist, and a Master's Degree from the University of Denver, where he was the teaching assistant to Ricardo Iznaola. Additional instruction includes private study in England with composer/guitarist Gilbert Biberian, and a long list of masterclasses with many of today's most notable guitarists. King has performed concerts across the United States and Europe. He has been heard on the BBC and National Public Radio. His varied programs include beloved guitar masterworks as well as important and exciting contemporary offerings, such as Ricardo Iznaola's Three Little Tales, which he premiered in 1997. Notable festival appearances have included guest artist recitals at the Charlton Kings International Guitar Festival (England), the Portland Guitar Festival (Oregon), and at the Summer Guitar Workshop (New Mexico). After giving what Soundboard Magazine described as a fiery performance, King won First Prize at the Portland Guitar Festival International Guitar Competition. Other accomplishments include winning First Prize at the Lamont Chamber Music Competition and being selected as a Finalist in the Manuel Ponce International Guitar Competition in Mexico City. (Photo credit: Tanya Gerodette.)

RuckusApril 12
Ruckus, the professional contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Tickets are available through MissionTix at www.missiontix.com or 410-752-8950 and at the door immediately prior to the concert.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS.

Ruckus, the professional contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC, will perform Elliott Carter's Triple Duo, James Erber's The Ray and its Shadow, a new work by Anneliese Wiebel, a work by Mark Osborn, and so, between and e,nm by Thomas DeLio. The ensemble features flutist Lisa Cella, cellist Franklin Cox, percussionist Tom Goldstein, clarinetist E. Michael Richards, pianist Kazuko Tanosaki and violinist Airi Yoshioka. Founded in 2000 to promote the performance of contemporary chamber music, Ruckus has performed at the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Smithsonian Institution, and at universities throughout the East Coast. (Photo: Richard Anderson.)

Callithumpian ConsortApril 14
The Callithumpian Consort
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Free admission
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

The Callithumpian Consort hails from New England Conservatory and is directed by noted pianist Stephen Drury. The ensemble's program will feature Miss Donnithorne's Maggot, a music-theatre work by Peter Maxwell Davies. The Callithumpian Consort was created in the belief that new music should be an exciting adventure shared by performers and listeners alike, and that brand new masterpieces of our day are beautiful, sensuous, challenging, delightful, provocative, and a unique joy. The Consort is flexible in size and makeup, in some cases performing as a full chamber orchestra. Its members pursue parallel solo and orchestral careers as well. Each musician is a soloist, enabling the group to tackle unusual repertoire in non-standard ensembles, or to take part in experimental projects. The Consort's repertoire encompasses a huge stylistic spectrum, from the classics of the last 100 years to works of the avant-garde and experimental jazz and rock. Active commissioning and recording of new works is crucial to the ensemble's mission, and the group has worked with composers John Cage, Lee Hyla, John Zorn, Michael Finnissy, Franco Donatoni, Lukas Foss, Christian Wolff and many others. Its recordings are available on Tzadik and Mode records.

Marc PonthusApril 21
Marc Ponthus, piano
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Free admission
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

Pianist Marc Ponthus presents a performance of the Second and Third Piano Sonatas by Pierre Boulez. The only pianist to have performed the complete solo piano work of Pierre Boulez and Karlheinz Stockhausen, Ponthus's solo performances with the BBC in London have been broadcast on numerous occasions. The New York Times wrote, Mr. Ponthus's virtuosity is hair-raising, like beams of electricity shooting from a Frankenstein machine...a kind of priest channeling spirits in an arcane rite, hurling himself at the keyboard...until the whole instrument shook. The Washington Post's Joseph McLellan said, Ponthus has a technique and a musical sensitivity that simply brush technical obstacles aside.

Special Event

February 16
Studio 508, the Department of Music's recording studio and black box performance space, celebrates its re-opening with updated equipment and renovations. The public is invited to an Open House event with surround sound experiencesranging from the music of Roger Reynolds to The Beatlesand a reception.
5 pm, Studio 508, Fine Arts Building. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

Student Recital Series

March 6
The UMBC Symphony Orchestra, directed by Wayne Cameron, will feature the winners of the High School Concerto Competition and the Department of Music Concerto Competition in a program that will include Mozart's Symphony No. 29.
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

April 2
The Vocal Arts Ensemble under the direction of David Smith, presenting an Opera Gala that will feature a wonderful evening of scenes from Carmen, La Bohme, Cos Fan Tutti, The Marriage of Figaro, Elixir of Love, A Hand of Bridge, and The Gondoliers.
7 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

April 28
The UMBC Jazz Ensemble directed by Jari Villanueva.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

May 1
The UMBC Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Wayne Cameron. The program will feature the London Suite by Eric Coates; the Richard Strauss Oboe Concerto with guest oboist Lori Guess; and a Gloria for choir and orchestra by Antonio Vivaldi.
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

May 5
The UMBC Wind Ensemble directed by Jari Villanueva.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

May 6
The UMBC Jazz Combo directed by Rick Hannah.
4 pm, the Commons Cabaret. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

May 7
The Jubilee Singers directed by Janice Jackson.
7 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

May 8
The Collegium Musicum directed by Joseph Morin, a performance ensemble dedicated to exploring and performing vocal and instrumental music from European Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque periods, sampling musical repertoires created between 800 and 1750.
4 pm, St. John's Episcopal Church, 9120 Frederick Road, Ellicott City. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

May 9
The UMBC Chamber Players directed by E. Michael Richards.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

May 10
The UMBC Percussion Ensemble directed by Tom Goldstein. The ensemble is adventurous in its programming, with a repertoire that includes graphic-notation pieces, improvisational works, and theatre, as well as works by important early percussion composers such as Alan Hovhaness, John Cage and Carlos Chavez.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

May 14
The Maryland Camerata directed by David Smith.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

May 16
The UMBC Classical Guitar Ensemble directed by Troy King.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

May 17
Department of Music Honors Recital.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. 410-455-ARTS.

Additional Information

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

Telephone
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Department of Music website: http://www.umbc.edu/music

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Evening parking is available in Lot 16, adjacent to the Fine Arts Building, for 50. Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

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Posted by dwinds1

January 7, 2005

UMBC's Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents

The Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents Suburban Journals: The Sketchbooks, Drawings and Prints of Charles Ritchie. This exhibition presents recent work by Maryland artist Charles Ritchie. The sketchbooks, drawings, and prints trace Ritchie's creations from journal conceptions as watercolor and pen and ink, through independent sheets in various drawing media, to a range of possibilities as prints. The works span a twenty-year period and reveal the artist’s increasing sophistication in representation. The exhibition will be open from January 31 through March 26, 2005.

Charles Ritchie imageUMBC’s Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents Suburban Journals: The Sketchbooks, Drawings and Prints of Charles Ritchie, on display from January 31 through March 26, 2005.

On Thursday, February 3 at 4:30 pm, the Gallery will host an artist’s lecture, Private Astronomies, by Charles Ritchie, followed by a reception.

About the Artist
Since 1978, contemporary Maryland artist Charles Ritchie (American, born 1954) has filled intimate journals with written notations and watercolor studies exploring subjects drawn primarily from his suburban home. Dating from 1983 to the present, the sketchbooks, drawings, and prints in the exhibition trace Ritchie’s creations from journal conceptions as watercolor and pen and ink studies, through independent sheets in various drawing media, to a range of possibilities as prints. Over fifty works are arranged into three thematic sections: still lifes, landscapes, and self-portraits.

In a recent review in the magazine Art on Paper, writer and critic Faye Hirsch observed, “Ritchie’s very ordinary suburban house and yard are becoming, in the hands of this artist, a subject as loaded with expressive potential as the most sublime landscape.” Suburban Journals highlights the process by which the artist translates moments of inspiration into abstracted accumulations of events and experiences from everyday life. For example, the earliest image in the exhibition is a journal study for Rocking Chair in black watercolor from 1983. This was the basis for a drawing of the same year done in watercolor, graphite, and pen and ink. When Rocking Chair was translated into a mezzotint print thirteen years later, the artist eliminated almost all detail to accentuate spare, luminous elements isolated against an inky background.

Charles Ritchie imageWorking primarily in black and white, Ritchie places emphasis on dark and light contrasts. Shadows engulf his compositions, obscuring details and evoking a sense of subtle drama. The artist states, “The pictures begin with the scene but aim to move deeper. Over years of scrutiny, my subjects have accrued greater meaning and mystery for me.” In each of the small-scale works, Ritchie invites the viewer to participate in an intimate scene from his environment, and in this exhibition to understand the process from which it results.

Charles Ritchie received his B.F.A. from the University of Georgia, Athens, in 1977, and his M.F.A. from Carnegie-Mellon University, Pittsburgh in 1980. His awards include the Individual Artist Award from the Maryland State Arts Council in 2004, 2002, and 1998, the MacDowell Colony Fellowship in 1999, and the Individual Artist Fellowship from the Arts Council of Montgomery County, Maryland. Ritchie’s artwork has been featured in numerous exhibitions, and his work is in many public collections including the National Gallery of Art, Washington, DC; the Butler Institute of American Art, Youngstown, Ohio; Fogg Art Museum, Harvard University Art Museums; and the University of Richmond Museums.

Gallery Information
The Albin O. Kuhn Gallery serves as one of the principal art galleries in the Baltimore region. Items from the Special Collections Department, as well as art and artifacts from all over the world, are displayed in challenging and informative exhibitions for the University community and the public. Moreover, traveling exhibitions are occasionally presented, and the Gallery also sends some of its exhibits throughout the state and nation. Admission to the Gallery is free.

Charles Ritchie image

Acknowledgements
Organized and circulated by the University of Richmond Museums, the exhibition was curated by Richard Waller, Executive Director, University Museums, in collaboration with the artist. It is made possible in part with the generous support of the University’s Cultural Affairs Committee and funds from the Louis S. Booth Arts Fund. Published by the University of Richmond Museums, an illustrated exhibition catalogue with essays by Marjorie Cohn, Peter Turchi, and the artist is available.

The presentation of Suburban Journals at UMBC is made possible by the Baltimore County Commission on Arts & Sciences, the Maryland State Arts Council, an agency funded by the State of Maryland and the National Endowment for the Arts, and the Friends of the Library & Gallery. Funding support for the artist, and for additional work to the exhibition, has been provided by the Arts and Humanities Council of Montgomery County, Maryland, the Franz and Virginia Bader Fund and the Maryland State Arts Council.

Charles Ritchie imageHours of Operation
Sunday: Closed
Monday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Tuesday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Thursday: 12 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Friday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Saturday: 1 p.m. - 5 p.m.

Telephone
General Gallery information: 410-455-2270
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
Gallery website: http://aok.lib.umbc.edu/gallery/
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail. The images in this release and others are available at 300 dpi on high resolution image website.

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in the Walker Avenue Garage. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Charles Ritchie image

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Posted by dwinds1

November 22, 2004

UMBC Theatre presents Fanshen by David Hare

The UMBC Department of Theatre presents Fanshen by David Hare, directed by Xerxes Mehta, from December 2 through 12 at the UMBC Theatre. A fascinating play from one of England’s greatest playwrights, David Hare’s Fanshen throws a brilliant light on the critical years in the late 1940s that gave birth to modern China by focusing on one village’s struggle to survive war, want, oppression and corruption.

Image by Nicholas TakemotoThe UMBC Department of Theatre presents Fanshen by David Hare, directed by Xerxes Mehta, from December 2 through 12 at the UMBC Theatre.

A fascinating play from one of England’s greatest playwrights, David Hare’s Fanshen is, in his own words, “a play for Europe, for the West. Besides trying to explain as deftly as possible the aim and operation of land reform in China, to show how it changed souls as well as bodies, the play is much concerned with political leadership, with the relationship in any society between leadership and led.” Brutal, tender, violent, reasoned, and all-absorbing, Fanshen throws a brilliant light on the critical years in the late 1940s that gave birth to modern China by focusing on one village’s struggle to survive war, want, oppression and corruption, until it finally learns how to take control of its own destiny.

The production features dramaturgy by Susan McCully, set and costume design by Holly Highfill, light and sound design by Terry Cobb and vocal direction by Lynn Watson.

Please note that this production is for mature audiences and contains violence, nudity and explicit language.

Showtimes
Thursday, December 2, 8 pm (preview)
Friday, December 3, 8 pm
Saturday, December 4, 8 pm
Thursday, December 9, 4 pm (free for the UMBC campus community)
Friday, December 10, 8 pm
Saturday, December 11, 8 pm
Sunday, December 12, 4 pm

Admission
$10 general admission
$5 students
$3 for the preview
The performance on Thursday, December 9th is free for the UMBC campus community.
Ticket proceeds benefit the Department of Theatre Scholarship Fund.
Theatre Box Office: 410-455-2476

Telephone
Theatre Box Office: 410-455-2476
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Department of Theatre website: http://www.umbc.edu/theatre

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.

From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Theatre.

From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.

Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked. Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

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Posted by dwinds1

October 26, 2004

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Posted by dwinds1

October 25, 2004

UMBC Presents Flutist Lisa Cella in Concert

The UMBC Department of Music's Faculty Recital Series presents flutist Lisa Cella in concert on Sunday, November 14th at 3:00 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall. Tickets are $7 general admission, $3 for senior citizens, free for students and free with a UMBC ID. Lisa Cella's program will include NoaNoa by Kaija Saariaho, Quodlibets II by Donald Martino, Sgothan by James Dillon and Nocturno by Mario Lavista.

Lisa Cella (photo: Richard Anderson)The UMBC Department of Music’s Faculty Recital Series presents flutist Lisa Cella in concert on Sunday, November 14th at 3:00 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall. Tickets are $7 general admission, $3 for senior citizens, free for students and free with a UMBC ID.

Lisa Cella’s program will include NoaNoa by Kaija Saariaho, Quodlibets II by Donald Martino, Sgothan by James Dillon and Nocturno by Mario Lavista.

Artistic Director of San Diego New Music, Ms. Cella received a DMA in contemporary flute performance at the University of California, San Diego while studying with John Fonville. She has performed with SONOR, the faculty ensemble of UCSD, SIRIUS, and in various concert series and festivals in the San Diego area. She is a founding member of NOISE, the resident ensemble of San Diego New Music and runs the music series Noise at the Library at the Athenaeum Library in San Diego, California. She received her Applied Bachelors in Music with a dual concentration in Psychology from Syracuse University under the tutelage of John Oberbrunner. Upon graduation, she received the Civic Morning Musicals award for excellence in performance. She then received a Master of Music degree and a Graduate Performance Diploma from Peabody Conservatory, where she studied with Robert Willoughby. While in Baltimore, she was the winner of the 1992 Washington Flute Fair Young Artist Competition and founded the flute and guitar duo, Adesso!, which was a finalist in the Baltimore Chamber Competition. A dedicated performer of contemporary music, Cella was a member of the Baltimore based contemporary ensemble Polaris in 1993. She attended the Norfolk Chamber Music Festival in 1993 and was a fellowship member of the Aspen Contemporary Ensemble at the Aspen Music Festival for two summers. She is the founding member of the ensemble Sounding, a contemporary quartet (flute, clarinet, piano, percussion) that had its origins in the Aspen Contemporary Ensemble. With Sounding, she has performed at universities such as Bowling Green, Cornell, SUNY Buffalo, Oberlin, and Syracuse. Currently, she is a lecturer in music at UMBC and a founding member of the faculty contemporary music ensemble, Ruckus.

Admission
Admission is $7 general, $3 for senior citizens, free for all students, and free with a UMBC ID.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
General Department of Music Information: 410-455-MUSC
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
UMBC Department of Music: http://www.umbc.edu/music/

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
A high resolution image for media is available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail. (Photo credit: Richard Anderson.)

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Posted by dwinds1

October 15, 2004

UMBC Presents the SONOS Duo in Concert

On Sunday, November 7th at 3 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall, the UMBC Department of Music's Faculty Recital Series presents duo SONOS, featuring the artistry of pianists Rachel Franklin and Corey McVicar. SONOS performances showcase international classical and jazz artists combining their talents to blur the edges between classical chamber works and jazz improvisation, including improvised jazz solos as both commentary and contrast. Witty conversation complements superb performances, as SONOS explores the fascinating links between genres: jazz as chamber music, classical music with jazz, and why they work wonderfully together.

Sonos (Rachel Franklin and Corey McVicar)On Sunday, November 7th at 3 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall, the UMBC Department of Music's Faculty Recital Series presents duo SONOS, featuring the artistry of pianists Rachel Franklin and Corey McVicar.

Their program will include Winnsboro Cotton Mill Blues by Frederic Rzewski; Variations on a Theme of Joseph Haydn, Op. 56b by Johannes Brahms; the Rondo in C major, Op. 73 by Frederick Chopin; the Variations on a Theme of Paganini by Witold Lutoslawski; and other works, including improvised jazz solos as both commentary and contrast.

SONOS performances showcase international classical and jazz artists combining their talents to blur the edges between classical chamber works and jazz improvisation. Witty conversation contrasts superb performances, as SONOS explores the fascinating links between genres: jazz as chamber music, classical music with jazz, and why they work wonderfully together.

As a Pro Musicis International Award winner, British pianist Rachel Franklin has given her solo debuts in Carnegie Recital Hall, New York, and Jordan Hall, Boston. The Boston Globe enthused about her beautiful differentiations of color, touch and texture and described a performance on her solo debut CD as not inferiorto the recorded performances by Cortot and Rubinstein. She has also given European Pro Musicis solo debuts in Paris and Rome. An accomplished jazz pianist, Rachel Franklin has performed with many jazz ensembles and has broadcast solo jazz on BBC Radio 3. Much in demand as a teacher and speaker, she is a member of the faculties at UMBC and the Peabody Conservatory.

Corey McVicar is a member of the Peabody Conservatory faculty. He received musical degrees from Sydney Conservatorium of Music, the Peabody Conservatory of Music, and completed post graduate piano studies in Germany and France, working with Ann Schein, Leon Fleisher, Yvonne Lefebure and Murray Perahia. A winner of numerous competition prizes and awards including the Frinna Awerbuch International Piano Competition, he has been featured in concerts and broadcasts in Australia, Thailand, Singapore, France and at various cities and venues in the United States including Carnegie Recital Hall.

This event is sponsored in part by Jordan Kitts Music.

Admission
Admission is $7 general, $3 for senior citizens, free for all students, and free with a UMBC ID.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
UMBC Department of Music: http://www.umbc.edu/music/

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
A high resolution image for media is available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail. (Photo credit: Richard Anderson.)

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Posted by dwinds1

October 5, 2004

UMBC Theatre presents Action by Sam Shepard

The UMBC Department of Theatre presents Action, a rarely performed play by Pulitzer Prize winning playwright and film actor Sam Shepard, directed by Colette Searls. The production runs from October 19th through 24 at the UMBC Theatre.

Photo by Damon MeledonesThe UMBC Department of Theatre presents Action, a rarely performed play by Pulitzer Prize winning playwright and film actor Sam Shepard, directed by Colette Searls. The play runs from October 19th through 24th at the UMBC Theatre.

Action takes the audience right into the living room of a post-apocalyptic holiday. Liza, Lupe, Jeep and Shooter are trapped in a cold, isolated cabin after a mysterious crisis. Time has passed since the days of mass-media and indoor plumbing and they are struggling to pull off a holiday meal. Limited food, an uncertain future and overwhelming boredom begin to take their toll with disturbing and absurd results. In this hilarious marriage between the realistic and bizarre, Shepard offers a stirring look at the unplugged American mind.

Sam Shepard has written 45 plays, 11 of which have won Obie Awards, and has appeared as an actor in 16 films. In 1979 he was awarded the Pulitzer Prize for Drama for Buried Child, and in 1984 he earned an Oscar nomination for his performance in The Right Stuff. His screenplay for Paris, Texas won the Golden Palm Award at the 1984 Cannes Film Festival, and he wrote and directed the film Far North in 1988. Other plays by Sam Shepard include Simpatico, Curse of the Starving Class, True West, Fool for Love and A Lie of the Mind. In 1986 he was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters, and in 1992 he received the Gold Medal for Drama from the Academy. In 1994 he was inducted into the Theatre Hall of Fame.

The production features set and costume design by Elena Zlotescu and lighting and sound design by Terry Cobb.

Showtimes
Tuesday, October 19 at 8 pm (preview)
Wednesday, October 20 at 8 pm
Thursday, October 21 at 4 pm
Friday, October 22 at 8 pm
Saturday, October 23 at 8 pm
Sunday, October 24 at 4 pm

Admission
$10 general admission
$5 students
$3 for the preview
Ticket proceeds benefit the Department of Theatre Scholarship Fund.
Theatre Box Office: 410-455-2476

Telephone
Theatre Box Office: 410-455-2476
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Department of Theatre website: http://www.umbc.edu/theatre

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.

From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Theatre.

From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.

Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked. Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

Photo by Damon Meledones

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Posted by dwinds1

August 9, 2004

UMBC's Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents
A Thousand Hounds:
A Walk with the Dogs Through the History of Photography

UMBC's Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents A Thousand Hounds: A Walk with the Dogs Through the History of Photography, on display from September 20 through December 11, 2004. The exhibition was organized by the Cygnet Foundation and curated by Ray Merritt and Miles Barth. The exhibition celebrates the endearing and enduring partnership between human and dog in more than 150 photographs and one photographic sculpture, which date from 1840 to the current day and have been created by both masters of the medium and lesser-known practitioners.

UMBC’s Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents A Thousand Hounds: A Walk with the Dogs Through the History of Photography, on display from September 20 through December 11, 2004. The exhibition was organized by the Cygnet Foundation and curated by Ray Merritt and Miles Barth.

Photography has offered a means of documentation and expression for more than 160 years. Focusing on a seemingly obscure subject, curators Raymond Merritt and Miles Barth have unearthed a delightful and varied array of images in which the dog’s presence serves as a central trope in the history of the medium. A Thousand Hounds: A Walk with the Dogs Through the History of Photography is based in part on the Cygnet Foundation’s popular and critically acclaimed book of the same title, which, when it was released by Taschen in 2000, was announced as “a completely original history of photography told through images of canines.”

The exhibition celebrates the endearing and enduring partnership between human and dog in more than 150 photographs and one photographic sculpture, which date from 1840 to the current day and have been created by both masters of the medium and lesser-known practitioners. Among the noted artists included from the nineteenth century are Gustav Le Gray, W.A. Mooers and Henry Fox Talbot, and from the twentieth century, Bill Brandt, Henri Cartier-Bresson, André Kertész, Jacques-Henri Lartigue, Man Ray, Robert Mapplethorpe, Paul Strand, and Weegee. Also prominently featured are works by contemporary artists, including William Wegman, Elliott Erwitt, and Keith Carter, all renowned for their images of dogs, as well as by Larry Clark, Robert Frank, Ralph Gibson, Sally Mann, Vik Muniz, and Sandy Skoglund. The exhibition is serious and scholarly in its considered presentation of the dog’s place in momentous historical and cultural events of the past century and a half, ranging from polar expeditions to the Great Depression to the World Wars. It is also light-hearted and engaging in its celebration of photographers’ longstanding artistic interest in the canine as model, muse, and metaphor.

A Thousand Hounds: A Walk with the Dogs Through the History of Photography includes depictions of dogs with children, with women, with old men, with celebrities, and with members of their own species. Presented in two parts, its historical organization illuminates technological innovations, as well as cultural, sociological and aesthetic developments related to the medium, while contemporary work is organized thematically, with individual sections devoted to the notions of pathos, whimsy, elegance, companionship, and inspiration.

The earliest images in the exhibition introduce the viewer to the first popular application of the new medium. When photography burst onto the scene in the mid-nineteenth century, the lengthy sittings required for daguerreotypes and paper negatives made pets unlikely sitters for the portraits that were immediately commissioned by the upper and middle classes. The daguerreotypes, ambrotypes, tintypes, cartes-de-visite and cabinet cards presented here exemplify attempts by anonymous photographers to memorialize all variety of man’s best friend. Moving into the twentieth century, the exhibition covers major movements in the history of photography, pictorialism and modernism. Bill Brandt’s photograph from 1945 captures a dog as a glowing silhouette in the harsh glare of car’s headlights.

A section devoted to the subject of war demonstrates how dogs have accompanied soldiers on the front from the earliest photographic depictions of battle. Photographs by Gustav Le Gray and the Mathew Brady Studio document the presence of dogs during the Crimean War and the American Civil War. Numerous other photographs show how these valued companions have transported equipment and supplies, carried messages, searched for the wounded, and galvanized troop morale and civilian support in every war since.

From the 1950s into the 1970s, photographers such as Mario Giacomelli, Robert Doisneau, Diane Arbus and Robert Frank developed a personal vision that has become synonymous with a unique photographic voice. The images presented in this exhibition reveal how each of these voices has been compelled to capture the antics of the dog. Elliott Erwitt’s humorous depictions of dogs remind us of their capacity to become companions that never cease to amuse.

In the 1980s and 1990s, photographers James Balog, Keith Carter, Michal Rover and Peter Hujar created individualistic portraits of dogs as pets or rare breeds with distinct emotions and personalities, none more memorable than William Wegman’s Weimaraners. By comparison, the inclusion of dogs in real-life or constructed narratives by Tina Barney, Nic Nicosia and Sandy Skoglund reveals the enigmatic qualities that our canine friend bring to our lives, while Robert Mapplethorpe and Scavullo remind us of the inherent elegance of the simplest of poses.

Gallery Information
The Albin O. Kuhn Gallery serves as one of the principal art galleries in the Baltimore region. Items from the Special Collections Department, as well as art and artifacts from all over the world, are displayed in challenging and informative exhibitions for the University community and the public. Moreover, traveling exhibitions are occasionally presented, and the Gallery also sends some of its exhibits throughout the state and nation. Admission to the Gallery is free.

Acknowledgements
A Thousand Hounds: A Walk with the Dogs Through the History of Photography is organized by The Cygnet Foundation. The local presentation of the exhibition is generously funded by the Maryland State Arts Council and the Friends of the Library & Gallery.

Hours of Operation
Sunday: Closed
Monday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Tuesday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Thursday: 12 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Friday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Saturday: 1 p.m. - 5 p.m.

Telephone
General Gallery information: 410-455-2270
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
Gallery website: http://aok.lib.umbc.edu/gallery/
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail. The images in this release and others are available at 300 dpi on high resolution image website.

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in the Walker Avenue Garage. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

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Posted by dwinds1

UMBC's Center for Art and Visual Culture presents
The HOME House Project

UMBC's Center for Art and Visual Culture presents The HOME House Project, an innovative multi-year initiative organized by the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art (SECCA), Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Through a competition and subsequent exhibition addressing the future of affordable housing, SECCA challenged artists and architects to propose new designs for affordable and sustainable single-family housing for low and moderate income-families.

http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/#homeUMBC's Center for Art and Visual Culture presents The HOME House Project, an innovative multi-year initiative organized by the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art (SECCA), Winston-Salem, North Carolina, from September 30 through November 27, 2004. An opening reception will be held on Thursday, September 30 from 5 to 7 pm. The exhibition will be enhanced by public programs and outreach.

About the Exhibition
The Center for Art and Visual Culture presents The HOME House Project, an innovative multi-year initiative organized by the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art (SECCA), Winston-Salem, North Carolina. Through a competition and subsequent exhibition addressing the future of affordable housing, SECCA challenged artists and architects to propose new designs for affordable and sustainable single-family housing for low and moderate income-families. These designs were guided by the existing building criteria and price parameters for typical three and four bedroom Habitat for Humanity houses, supplied by Habitat International in Americus, Georgia. Competition participants were required to use the Habitat information as a point of departure. In addition, the design criteria focused on green and sustainable materials, technologies, and methods. Response was overwhelming, with house designs from more than 442 individuals and firms from the United States, Spain, the Netherlands, Italy, Canada, Russia, and England. The jury consisted of three nationally-known figures who share the multiple designations of critic, architect, educator, author, designer and builder: Michael Sorkin (New York), Ben Nicholson (Chicago) and Steve Badanes (Seattle).

http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/#homeThe 100 works represented in this exhibition are the award winners plus other selections from the initial group. Presented as framed two dimensional works or in virtual format, they offer a range of design solutionsfrom the adventurous and visionary to the traditional, and everything in between.

The HOME House Project was made possible by grants received from the North Carolina Arts Council, an agency funded by the State of North Carolina and the National Endowment for the Arts, the Elizabeth Firestone Graham Foundation, and an anonymous gift. The HOME House Project Design Awards were made possible by a generous gift from Bank of America. For its exhibition at UMBC, funding for The HOME House Project is provided by the Neighborhood Design Center, AIABaltimore, the Enterprise Foundation, the Baltimore County Commission on Arts and Sciences, and the Maryland State Arts Council, an agency funded by the State of Maryland and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Public Programs

The HOME House Project exhibition will be enhanced by public programming, including a lecture, a panel discussion, a symposium, a film series, a solar home tour and co-sponsorship of Baltimore Architecture Week:

Mike Tidwell's HomeOctober 2
The Center for Art and Visual Culture will participate in the 14th Annual Tour of Solar Homes, organized by the Potomac Region Solar Energy Association. A bus will depart at 10:00 A.M. from CAVC, UMBC to visit the home of Mike Tidwell of the Chesapeake Climate Action Network, Maryland's only 95% renewable energy home, designed to fight global warming through energy conservation and use of solar wind and corn power.
Tour tickets are $10 for non-students and $5 for students (cash or check the day of the event).
Drinks and snacks will be provided.
Information or rspvs: 410-455-1440 or vanderst@umbc.edu by September 30.

October 916
The Center for Art and Visual Culture partners with American Institute of Architects Baltimore Chapter, the Neighborhood Design Center, the Baltimore Architecture Foundation, and Baltimore Heritage, Inc. to sponsor the first annual Baltimore Architecture Week, a week of lectures related to architecture and planning in the Baltimore/Washington areas. Support for this program has been provided by media sponsors WYPR and urbanite and host sponsor Century Engineering.
Public information: AIA Baltimore at 410-625-2585.

October 11
The Center for Art and Visual Culture and the Neighborhood Design Center present Michael Pyatok, who is considered the leading designer of low-income housing in the United States. His lecture, Affordable Housing in the US: Who is Responsible for Good Design? will review the role of twelve different players who contribute to the circumstances that can improve the chances for quality design (from elected officials to residents, and ten other participants in between, one being the architect). Pyatok is a professor of Architecture at the University of Washington, is Principal of Pyatok Architects, Inc., and is part time tenured professor and Director of the Center for Affordable Housing and the Family at Arizona State University. His work has been featured recently in the national media, including Newsweek and Atlantic Monthly. A practicing architect for some 30 years, Pyatok is known both for his innovative design work and for his efforts to assist in the creation of the community groups that design and build low-income housing projects.
6 8 pm, Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery.
$10 general admission (payable by cash or check), free for UMBC students with an ID and free for members of the Neighborhood Design Center.
Public information: 410-455-1440.

The Rural Studio FilmOctober 14
As part of the HOME House Project Film Series, the Center for Art and Visual Culture and The Commons present The Rural Studio, directed and produced by Chuck Schultz. Fine architecture is usually reserved for wealthy patrons or grand civic spaces. But in 1993, MacArthur Fellow and Auburn University Professor Samuel Mockbee set out to change that. He and Professor D.K. Ruth founded The Rural Studio, which guides students in the design and construction of homes and community spaces in economically depressed Hale County, Alabama. The film captures this innovative program's vision of architecture as a social art form capable of raising the human spirit. This contextual based learning philosophy seeks to transcend race and class and in the process change the lives of both student and client.
6 pm, the Sports Zone at The Commons (UMBC).
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-1440.

October 28
In partnership with the Neighborhood Design Center and the UMBC Department of Geography and Environmental Systems, the Center for Art and Visual Culture presents Community Building by Design: Affordable Housing and Neighborhood Revitalization, a panel discussion on affordable housing and neighborhood revitalization in the Baltimore-Washington area.
Panel Moderator: Ralph D. Bennett, Jr., School of Architecture, University of Maryland, College Park
Panelists:
David Brown, Senior Curator, Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, Winston Salem, North Carolina
Jelili Ogundele, Director of the Harlem Park Revitalization Corporation
Stephanie Prange Proestel, Housing Initiative Partnership
Dr. John Rennie Short, Professor and Chair, Department of Geography and Environmental Systems, UMBC
Thomas J. Vicino, doctoral student, UMBC Department of Public Policy, Center for Urban Environmental Research and Education
6 7:30 pm, Fine Arts Building Room 306.
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-1440.

Blue VinylNovember 4
As part of the HOME House Project Film Series, the Center for Art and Visual Culture and The Commons present Blue Vinyl, which searches for the environmental truth about vinyl. With humor, chutzpah and a piece of vinyl siding firmly in hand, Peabody Award-winning filmmaker Judith Helfand and co-director and award-winning cinematographer Daniel B. Gold set out in search of the truth about polyvinyl chloride (PVC), America's most popular plastic. From Long Island to Louisiana to Italy, they unearth the facts about PVC and its effects on human health and the environment. Back at the starter ranch, Helfand coaxes her terribly patient parents into replacing their vinyl siding on the condition that she can find a healthy, affordable alternative (and it has to look good!). A detective story, an eco-activism doc, and a rollicking comedy, Blue Vinyl puts a human face on the dangers posed by PVC at every stage of its life cycle, from factory to incinerator. Consumer consciousness and the precautionary principle have never been this much fun.
6 pm, the Cabaret at The Commons (UMBC).
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-1440.

November 11
In partnership with the Neighborhood Design Center, the Center for Art and Visual Culture presents Building Community Through the Arts, a symposium on the role of the arts in community development and cultural activity in neighborhoods. Speakers will include:
Steven Goldsmith, Director of the Rose Fellowship of the Enterprise Foundation, who will address Affordable Housing in the Art Community.
Jennifer Mange, Public Art Coordinator, Baltimore Office of Promotion and the Arts
Nick Francis, Executive Director of Gateway Municipalities Community Development Corporation, who will discuss successes and challenges in developing the Gateway Arts District along Route 1 in Prince George's County.
A representative from Station North, who will speak about recent accomplishments in the Station North Arts District in Baltimore.
6 7:30 pm, Fine Arts Building Room 306.
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-1440.

Ecological DesignNovember 18
As part of the HOME House Project Film Series, the Center for Art and Visual Culture and The Commons present two films: Up Close and Toxic and Ecological Design: Inventing the Future, which examine issues related to environmental hazards related to in door pollution and the evolution of environmentally aware design. Up Close and Toxic discloses the many surprising and not so surprising ways that we are exposed to pollutionhazardous gasses, particulate matter and various chemicals in the very places we feel safest. Ecological Design: Inventing the Future outlines the evolution from a mechanistic model of building and system design to one rooted in natural systems. The film features interviews with R. Buckminster Fuller, Paolo Soleri, Paul MacCready, Peter Calthorpe, Ian McHarg, William McDonough, Jay Baldwin, Hazel Henderson, Jaime Lerner, Armory Lovins, John Todd, Stewart Brand, and Pliny Fisk, all of whom bring the design evolution to life and provide insights in the ideas and concerns that have motivated their work.
6 pm, The Commons Cabaret.
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-1440.

The Next Industrial RevolutionDecember 2
As part of the HOME House Project Film Series, the Center for Art and Visual Culture and The Commons present The Next Industrial Revolution, directed by Chris Bedford and Shelley Morhaim, which outlines the work and vision of architect William McDonough and chemist Dr. Michael Braungart, two leaders in a growing movement to transform the relationship between commerce and nature. While some environmental observers predict doomsday scenarios in which a rapidly increasing human population is forced to compete for ever scarcer natural resources, Bill McDonough sees a more exciting and hopeful future. In his vision humanity takes nature itself as our guide reinventing technical enterprises to be as safe and ever-renewing as natural processes. Can't happen? It's already happening...at Nike, at Ford Motor Company, at Oberlin College, at Herman Miller Furniture, and at DesignTex...and it's part of what architect McDonough and his partner, chemist Michael Braungart, call The Next Industrial Revolution. Shot in Europe and the United States, the film explores how businesses are transforming themselves to work with nature and enhance profitability.
6 pm, The Commons Cabaret.
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-1440.

Outreach
The HOME House Project exhibition and events at UMBC will be accompanied by a K-12 educational outreach program. Details on the outreach program are available through Rene van der Stelt at 410-455-1440 or vanderst@umbc.edu.


About the Center for Art and Visual Culture
The Center for Art and Visual Culture is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study of contemporary art and visual culture, critical theory, art and cultural history, and the relationship between society and the arts. The CAVC serves as a forum for students, faculty, and the general public for the discussion of important aesthetic and social issues of the day. Disciplines represented include painting, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, photography, digital art, video, film, television, design, architecture, advertising, and installation and performance art.

Since 1989, the CAVC has incorporated a number of public programs into its exhibition programming schedule to further impact the communities it serves. Symposia, lecture series, conferences, film series, visiting artist series, and residencies have all been fundamental in an effort to create an ongoing dialogue about contemporary art and culture. The Center has also initiated a number of projects with Baltimore and surrounding schools systems to integrate the contemporary artist and their concerns into the classroom. These projects take place on-site at both middle schools and high schools and are team taught by the instructors at these schools, professional artists, and students from the CAVC's Internship Program.

Currently the Center produces one to two exhibition catalogues each year. Each document is fully illustrated and contains critical essays on the given subject by a variety of distinguished professionals in the field. Recent publications include Postmodernism: A Virtual Discussion and Paul Rand: Modernist Design. These catalogues are published yearly and are distributed internationally through Distributed Art Publishers in New York.

Since 1992, the Center for Art and Visual Culture has actively pursued the organization of exhibitions that contain the aesthetic, theoretical, and educational potential to reach both a national and international audience. Over the years, the CAVC has traveled these exhibition projects to a broad spectrum of museums, professional non-profit galleries, and universities national and internationally. These traveling exhibitions include:

  • White: Whiteness and Race in Contemporary Art (2003)
  • Fred Wilson: Objects and Installations (2001)
  • Adrian Piper: A Retrospective (1999)
  • Bruno Monguzzi: A Designer's Perspective (1998)
  • Minimal Politics (1997)
  • Kate Millet, Sculpture: The First 38 Years (1997)
  • Layers: Contemporary Collage from St. Petersburg, Russia (1995/96)
  • Notes In Time: Leon Golub and Nancy Spero (1995)
  • Ciphers of Identity (1994)

Beyond the scope of these traveling exhibitions, the Center for Art and Visual Culture also undertakes an exhibition schedule that includes a Faculty Biennial, and projects such as the Joseph Beuys Tree Partnership. As part of the educational mission of the CAVC, one graduate thesis exhibition and one undergraduate senior exhibition are scheduled on a yearly basis.

This multi-faceted focus for presenting exhibitions, projects and scholarly research publications focused on contemporary art and cultural issues positions the Center for Art and Visual Culture in a unique position within the mid-Atlantic region.

Upcoming Exhibitions at the Center for Art and Visual Culture
March 10 April 2
Tour de Clay, presented as part of the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts 2005 Conference, which will present other events in venues throughout Baltimore. An opening reception will be held on March 10 from 5 to 7 pm.

April 14 May 7
The IMDA Thesis Exhibition, an exhibition by graduates of UMBC's MFA program in Imaging and Digital Arts, an interdisciplinary program integrating computer art, video, filmmaking, photography, art theory and criticism. An opening reception will be held on April 14 from 5 to 7 pm.

May 18 June 18
The Senior Exit Exhibition. This exhibition reflects the interdisciplinary orientation and the technological focus of the Department of Visual Arts and provides the opportunity for undergraduate seniors to exhibit within a professional setting prior to exiting the University. An opening reception will be held on May 18 from 5 to 7 pm.

Hours of Operation
Sunday: Closed
Monday: Closed
Tuesday: 10 A.M. 5:00 P.M.
Wednesday: 10 A.M. 5:00 P.M.
Thursday: 10 A.M. 5:00 P.M.
Friday: 10 A.M. 5:00 P.M.
Saturday: 10 A.M. 5:00 P.M.

Admission
Admission to the CAVC and all events is free.

Telephone
CAVC offices: 410-455-3188
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
CAVC website: http://www.umbc.edu/cavc
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/#home

###

Posted by dwinds1

July 7, 2004

UMBC's Fall 2204 Arts Season

UMBC has announced its fall 2004 arts season. Visit the online arts calendar at www.umbc.edu/arts for the latest information on exhibitions, lectures and performances.

Posted by dwinds1

July 2, 2004

UMBC Department of Music Presents Fall 2004 Season of Concerts and Events

The UMBC Department of Music presents its fall 2004 season, featuring an array of contemporary classical music concerts by world renowned artists, including performances by percussionist Steven Schick, saxophonist John Berndt and Ruckus, the professional contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC. The department will also sponsor a three day conference, Art-Reach!: Tapping the Power of the Arts, featuring educator Eric Booth and composer Tania Len.

The UMBC Department of Music presents its fall 2004 season, featuring an array of contemporary classical music concerts by world renowned artists, including performances by percussionist Steven Schick, saxophonist John Berndt and Ruckus, the professional contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC. The department will also sponsor a three day conference, Art-Reach!: Tapping the Power of the Arts, featuring educator Eric Booth and composer Tania Len.

Professional Artist Series

RuckusSeptember 16
Ruckus, the professional contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.

Ruckus presents a program of music by composer Stuart Saunders Smith in honor of his 30 years at UMBC. Featured works will include Bones, Further Than Now, In Bingham, Family Portrait: Self, Aussie Blue, Part, Tunnels and the world premiere of Hearts, a solo violin work to be performed by Airi Yoshioka. Founded in 2000 to promote the performance of contemporary chamber music, Ruckus has performed at the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Smithsonian Institution, and at universities throughout the East Coast.

John BerndtOctober 21
John Berndt and Friends
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission is free.

John Berndt and Friends will present a program of improvisation featuring Baltimore area musicians. Berndt is a multi-instrumentalist best known as a saxophonist, an instrument on which he has developed a broad and idiosyncratic technical ability. He has dedicated himself almost entirely to freely improvised music since 1990. A student of American master improviser Jack Wright, and also a composer of electronic music, Berndt's saxophones survey terrain reminiscent of John Butcher and John Oswald, with a strong intensity of self-expression that finds inspiration in free jazz. He is a tireless collaborator, including THUS with instrument builder Neil Feather, his larger groups Multiphonic Choir and Second Nature, and the intensive quartet The Short Life of Harry Crosby. An active playing partner of Eugene Chadbourne, Bhob Rainey, and Kaffe Matthews, Berndt is also the founder of the Red Room collective and High Zero Foundation.

October 23
The Faculty Chamber Ensemble
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.

The Faculty Chamber Ensemble features violinist Airi Yoshioka, flutist Lisa Cella, clarinetist E. Michael Richards, cellist Franklin Cox, pianist Rachel Franklin, guitarist Troy King and percussionist Tom Goldstein.

Steven SchickOctober 28
Steven Schick, percussion
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission is free.

Steven Schick presents a performance of a new hour-long work by composer John Luther Adams. Steven Schick has commissioned and premiered more than one hundred new works for percussion and has performed these pieces on major concert series such as Lincoln Center's Great Performers and the Los Angeles Philharmonic's Green Umbrella concerts as well as in international festivals, including Warsaw Autumn, the BBC Proms, the Jerusalem Festival, the Holland Festival, the Stockholm International Percussion Event and the Budapest Spring Festival. He has recorded many of those works for SONY Classical, Wergo, Point, CRI and will release a new solo CD with Neuma Records. From 1984 to 1992, Schick taught at the Darmstadt Ferienkurse fr Neue Musik in Darmstadt, Germany, co-directing the course's seminal percussion program with James Wood. He has been regular guest lecturer at the Rotterdam Conservatory and the Royal College of Music in London. Schick is Professor of Music at the University of California, San Diego and Lecturer in Percussion at the Manhattan School of Music.

October 30
The Faculty Chamber Ensemble
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.

The Faculty Chamber Ensemble features violinist Airi Yoshioka, clarinetist E. Michael Richards, tenor David Smith, cellist Franklin Cox and pianist Rachel Franklin. Their all-Brahms program will include the Clarinet Trio in A minor, Op. 114; the Piano Quartet No. 1 in G minor, Op. 25; and songs.

Triple HelixNovember 5
Triple Helix Piano Trio masterclass
3:30 6:30 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission is free.

The Boston-based Triple Helix Piano Trio presents a masterclass. When three internationally known musiciansviolinist Bayla Keyes, cellist Rhonda Rider and pianist Lois Shapirojoined together in 1995 to form Triple Helix, the Boston Globe described the results of their union as the livest live music in town. Since then, the ensemble has become recognized as among the best piano trios on the musical landscape today. Artists-in-residence at Wellesley College, the award-winning musicians of the Triple Helix are also on the faculties of several Boston-area universities. The ensemble has also held residencies at Monadnock Music and Skidmore College, where their lecture-recitals have been enthusiastically received in the classroom and concert hall alike. Advocates for new music, Triple Helix has premiered seven works written expressly for the ensemble since its formation in 1995.

SonosNovember 7
SONOS, featuring pianists Rachel Franklin and Corey McVicar
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.

SONOS, featuring the artistry of pianists Rachel Franklin and Corey McVicar, classical and jazz artists who combine their talents to blur the edges between classical chamber works and jazz improvisation. Witty commentary complements superb performances, as SONOS explores the fascinating links between genres: jazz as chamber music, classical music with jazz, and why they work wonderfully together. Their program will include Winnsboro Cotton Mill Blues by Frederic Rzewski; Variations on a Theme of Joseph Haydn, Op. 56b by Johannes Brahms; the Rondo in C major, Op. 73 by Fryderyk Chopin; the Variations on a Theme of Paganini by Witold Lutoslawski; and other works. As a Pro Musicis International Award winner, British pianist Rachel Franklin has given her solo debuts in Carnegie Recital Hall, New York, and Jordan Hall, Boston. The Boston Globe enthused about her beautiful differentiations of color, touch and texture and described a performance on her solo debut CD as not inferiorto the recorded performances by Cortot and Rubinstein. She has also given European Pro Musicis solo debuts in Paris and Rome. An accomplished jazz pianist, Rachel Franklin has performed with many jazz ensembles and has broadcast solo jazz on BBC Radio 3. Much in demand as a teacher and speaker, she is a member of the faculties at UMBC and the Peabody Conservatory. Corey McVicar is a member of the Peabody Conservatory faculty. He received musical degrees from Sydney Conservatorium of Music, the Peabody Conservatory of Music, and completed post graduate piano studies in Germany and France, working with Ann Schein, Leon Fleisher, Yvonne Lefebure and Murray Perahia. A winner of numerous competition prizes and awards including the Frinna Awerbuch International Piano Competition, he has been featured in concerts and broadcasts in Australia, Thailand, Singapore, France and at various cities and venues in the United States including Carnegie Recital Hall. This event is sponsored in part by Jordan Kitts Music.

Lisa CellaNovember 14
Lisa Cella, flute
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.

Flutist Lisa Cella's program will include NoaNoa by Kaija Saariaho, Quodlibets II by Donald Martino and Sgothan by James Dillon. Artistic Director of San Diego New Music, Dr. Cella received a DMA in contemporary flute performance at the University of California, San Diego while studying with John Fonville. She has performed with SONOR, the faculty ensemble of UCSD, SIRIUS, and in various concert series and festivals in the San Diego area. She is a founding member of NOISE, the resident ensemble of San Diego New Music and runs the music series Noise at the Library at the Athenaeum Library in San Diego, California. Dr. Cella received her Applied Bachelors in Music with a dual concentration in Psychology from Syracuse University under the tutelage of John Oberbrunner. Upon graduation, she received the Civic Morning Musicals award for excellence in performance. She then received a Master of Music degree and a Graduate Performance Diploma from Peabody Conservatory, where she studied with Robert Willoughby. While in Baltimore, she was the winner of the 1992 Washington Flute Fair Young Artist Competition and founded the flute and guitar duo, Adesso!, which was a finalist in the Baltimore Chamber Competition. A dedicated performer of contemporary music, Cella was a member of the Baltimore based contemporary ensemble Polaris in 1993. She attended the Norfolk Chamber Music Festival in 1993 and was a fellowship member of the Aspen Contemporary Ensemble at the Aspen Music Festival for two summers. She is the founding member of the ensemble Sounding, a contemporary quartet (flute, clarinet, piano, percussion) that had its origins in the Aspen Contemporary Ensemble. With Sounding, she has performed at universities such as Bowling Green, Cornell, SUNY Buffalo, Oberlin, and Syracuse. Currently, she is a lecturer in music at UMBC and a founding member of the faculty contemporary music ensemble, RUCKUS.

Susan Fancher and Mark EngebretsonNovember 18
Susan Fancher and Mark Engebretson, saxophonists
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission is free.

This concert by saxophonists Susan Fancher and Mark Engebretson will include works for solo saxophone ranging from the pulsing minimalism of Steve Reich and the beautiful just intonation of Ben Johnston to Mark Engebretson's powerful Energy Drink and Luciano Berio's legendary Sequenza VIIb. The artists will join forces for Stuart Saunders Smith's unconventional Notebook and the premiere of new music for two saxophones and live electronics by Mark Engebretson. Susan Fancher's career has featured hundreds of concerts internationally as a soloist and as the member of chamber music ensembles. She has worked with a multitude of composers in the creation and interpretation of new music, including Terry Riley, Charles Wuorinen, Philip Glass, Hilary Tann and others. Composer and performer Mark Engebretson's works have been performed in concerts, festivals and venues around the world, including Montreal, Vienna, Italy, Lithuania, Poland, Norway, Albania and Azerbaijan.

December 16
Mezzo soprano Patricia Green, harpist Sonja Inglefield and flutist Lisa Cella
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-ARTS

Patricia Green, Sonja Inglefield and Lisa Cella present an eclectic program that will explore the lyrical and unique combination of flute, voice, and harp, including George Crumb's Federico's Little Songs for Children.

Special Events

Eric Booth

October 1, 2 & 3
The Department of Music and Arts Education in Maryland Schools Alliance (AEMS) present Art-Reach!: Tapping the Power of the Arts, for K-16 teachers, artists, administrators and community leaders. The weekend symposium features Eric Booth, one of the nation's leading thinkers, speakers and program designers in arts learning, award winning author and faculty leader at Juilliard, The Kennedy Center, and the Lincoln Center Institute, and the dynamic multi-ethnic ensemble Son Sonora, directed by Cuban composer Tania Len. This two day symposium will explore some of the most powerful arts learning strategies from experiments happening across the country, and will report the latest research. Participants will leave with a personal plan for new approaches to put right into action.

Eric Booth has had successful careers as a Broadway actor, a business entrepreneur, and an author (his award-winning fourth book The Everyday Work of Art was a Book of the Month Club selection). He is on the faculty of The Juilliard School, Tanglewood, The Kennedy Center, and Lincoln Center Institute. He is in great demand as a keynote speaker and arts education consultant, leading events in 20-30 cities a year. He is the Faculty Chair of The Empire State Partnership, the largest arts-in-education experiment in the nation.

Tania Len, a vital personality in today's music scene, is highly regarded as a composer and conductor, recognized for her accomplishments as an educator and advisor to arts organizations. She has been the subject of profiles on ABC, CBS, CNN, PBS, Univision and independent films.Ms. Len is currently featured on Univision's Orgullo Hispano series which celebrates living American Latinos whose contributions in society have been invaluable.

Schedule of Art-Reach! events:

Friday, October 1, 7 p.m.
Interactive Concert with Son Sonora
Fine Arts Recital Hall

Saturday, October 2, 9:303:00
Presentations, hands-on activities and discussions with Eric Booth
University Center Ballroom

Sunday, October 3, 9:302:00
Workshops, breakout sessions and planning for symposium attendees
Led by Eric Booth and UMBC faculty

$25 registration fee, $35 after September 15th.
Information: 410-455-2942.

October 23 & 24
A Festival of Chamber Music for high school musicians.
Information: 410-455-2942.

Student Recital Series

October 17
The UMBC Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Wayne Cameron. The program will feature the Tchaikovsky Concerto for Violin in D Major, Op. 35, with violinist Airi Yoshioka; The Walk to the Paradise Garden by Frederick Delius; and The Sea by Frank Bridge. 3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

November 22
The UMBC Chamber Players under the direction of E. Michael Richards. 8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

November 29
The UMBC Wind Ensemble under the direction of Jari Villanueva. 8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

December 1
The Flute Studio of Lisa Cella. 8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

December 2
The UMBC Jazz Ensemble directed by Jari Villanueva. 8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

December 4
The Jubilee Singers under the direction of Janice Jackson. 7 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

December 5
The Maryland Camerata under the direction of David Smith. 3 pm, Charlestown Chapel, Charlestown Retirement Community, Catonsville. Admission is free.

December 5
The Collegium Musicum under the direction of Joseph Morin. 4 pm, St. John's Episcopal Church, 9120 Frederick Road, Ellicott City, Maryland. Admission is free.

December 9
The UMBC Percussion Ensemble under the direction of Tom Goldstein. 8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

December 11
The UMBC Flute Ensemble under the direction of Lisa Cella. 1 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

December 12
The UMBC Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Wayne Cameron. The program will feature George Whitefield Chadwick's Euterpe and the Symphony No. 1 in B minor, Op. 4 by Anton Arensky. 3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

December 13
The UMBC Guitar Ensemble under the direction of Troy King. 8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

December 14
Departmental Honors Recital. 8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

Telephone
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Parking is available after 3:30 p.m. on weekdays and all day during weekends in gated Lots 16/9A for a 50 fee, quarters only. From any campus entrance, circle around Hilltop Circle (the road the encircles the campus) to Hilltop Road. Take Hilltop Road toward the center of campus. The Fine Arts Building will now be directly in front of you. Proceed through the stop sign. The road will curve to the right. If Lot 16 is full, you can also pay to park in Lot 9A, which sits on the hill immediately above Lot 16return to to the stop sign and turn left toward Lot 9A, and then to the gate. If both these Lots are full (which would be unusual in the evening), park in the Commons Garage, Walker Avenue Garage or Lot 10.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

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April 4, 2004

Center for the Humanities presents folklorist Gladys-Marie Fry

The Center for the Humanities presents Gladys-Marie Fry, professor emerita of folklore and English at the University of Maryland, College Park, who will present the 2004 Daphne Harrison Lecture, entitled From the African Loom to the American Quilt. Professor Fry will speak at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, April 28, 2004, at the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery.

Quilt by Harriet PowersThe Center for the Humanities presents Gladys-Marie Fry, professor emerita of folklore and English at the University of Maryland, College Park, who will present the 2004 Daphne Harrison Lecture, entitled From the African Loom to the American Quilt. Professor Fry will speak at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, April 28, 2004, at the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery.

One of the leading authorities on African-American textiles, Gladys-Marie Fry has been the recipient of numerous awards, including a Guggenheim Fellowship. Her book Stitched from the Soul was the first to place slave-made quilts into historical and cultural context, as it provided insight into the lives and creativity of slave women. She has also curated more than a dozen exhibitions at institutions such as the American Folk Art Museum and the Renwick Gallery, Anacostia Museum, Smithsonian Institution.

Admission
Admission is free.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
UMBC Center for the Humanities: http://www.umbc.edu/humanities/

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in the Walker Avenue Garage. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

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Posted by dwinds1

UMBC Presents Zanana in Concert

The InterArts series presents Zanana, a collaborative duo featuring Kristin Norderval (voice) and Monique Buzzarté (trombone) in a program of improvised music blending acoustic sounds, electronics and live processing. Zanana will perform on April 30, 2004, at 8 p.m. in Fine Arts Studio 508, located in the Fine Arts Building.

ZananaThe InterArts series presents Zanana, a collaborative duo featuring Kristin Norderval (voice) and Monique Buzzarté (trombone) in a program of improvised music blending acoustic sounds, electronics and live processing. Zanana will perform on April 30, 2004, at 8 p.m. in Fine Arts Studio 508, located in the Fine Arts Building.

Kristin Norderval is a classically trained singer, improviser, and composer who performs an eclectic repertoire that spans the renaissance to the avant-garde. Many works have been written for her, and her collaborations have included work with choreographers, sculptors, filmmakers and installation artists. Since 1997, she has also been recording on-site improvisations in unusual spaces, many of them industrial. Profiled by The New York Times in “Downtown Divas Expand their Horizons” and hailed as one of “new music’s best” by the Village Voice, her performances range from concert and opera to multi-media events. Her work as a soloist has taken her to festivals throughout the world, and her credits include performances with the San Francisco Symphony, the Stuttgart Philharmonic, Oslo Sinfonietta, the Philip Glass Ensemble, and numerous new music ensembles in the United States and Europe. She has recorded new works for Mode, Nonesuch, Point, and CRI as well as for Norwegian, German, and Austrian radio, and has performed in opera and music-theater productions for Lincoln Center, BAM, the Yerba Buena Arts Center in San Francisco, Santa Fe Opera, Netherlands Dance Theater, and Dance Alloy. Ms. Norderval received 2002 Artist Residencies at Harvestworks Digital Media Arts and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Ms. Norderval is certified to teach the meditative improvisation techniques of Deep Listening.

Monique Buzzarté, trombonist, is an avid proponent of contemporary music, commissioning and premiering many new works for trombone alone, with electronics, and in chamber ensembles. Since 1983 her New Music from Women: Trombone Commissions project has been supporting the expansion of the trombone repertoire, with 2002–2004 commissions forthcoming from Pauline Oliveros, Annea Lockwood, Anne LeBaron, and Alice Shields. Ms. Buzzarté is currently developing a new interactive performance system for the trombone, supported in part through artist residencies at Create@iEAR Studios in 2003 and Harvestworks Digital Media Arts in 2003. Ms. Buzzarté's recordings include John Cage’s Five3 with the Arditti Quartet (Mode Records) and Dreaming Wide Awake with the New Circle Five (Deep Listening 20). An author, activist, and educator as well as a performer/composer, Ms. Buzzarté has published research on the brass music of women composers and led efforts which led to the admission of women into the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra. Ms. Buzzarté is certified to teach the meditative improvisation techniques of Deep Listening.

Admission
Admission is free.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
UMBC InterArts Program: http://www.umbc.edu/las/pages/interarts.html

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media is available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

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Posted by dwinds1

UMBC Presents Flutist Jane Rigler in Concert

On April 28th at 8:00 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall, UMBC's Department of Music will present flutist Jane Rigler, who will perform a program of contemporary works.

Jane RiglerOn April 28th at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall, UMBC's Department of Music presents flutist Jane Rigler, who will perform a program of contemporary works.

With an extensive background in both classical and contemporary music, Jane Rigler has considerable experience as an interpreter of contemporary music. Her repertoire covers some of the most complex and demanding works played today, including works such as Monolith by Vinko Globokar and Cassandra’s Dream Song by Brian Ferneyhough. Between 1989 and 1995 she was a member of several orchestras and contemporary music ensembles in California as well as collaborated with both Madrid-based Ensemble Plural and Grupo Cosmos. In 2000, she was a guest artist with Grupo Cosmos, touring Tokyo and various northern Italian cities and playing works by John Cage and Bruno Maderna. Besides ensemble work, her performing experience encompasses flute and electronics, computer interactive improvisation and interdisciplinary experimental works.

Between 1994–1999, Rigler collaborated with composer/multi-instrumentalist Rafael Liñán. Together they have performed in contemporary music festivals in Madrid, Barcelona, Alicante and Granada, in the Horizontal Radio of the European Radio Union, the Paralelo Madrid, and the Punto de Encuentro of the Association of Electroacoustic Music of Spain. In addition, the Rigler-Liñán duo has given more than 250 pedagogical concerts for children in both Madrid and Granada. Their performances throughout Spain have been reviewed as showing “great imagination and profound knowledge” (Enrique Franco, El Pais) as well as having “an intense humanistic content” (Manuel Ferrand, ABC). Rigler has been combining forces with other composers and performers such as Koji Asano, Agustí Fernández, Hannes Giger, Barbara Held, Christoph Irmer, Marisa Manchado, Wade Matthews, Liba Villavecchia, Musicalibre of Madrid and the IBA Olestars of Barcelona, among others. Her book, The Vocalization of the Flute, demonstrates a variety of imaginative ways the voice and flute interact based upon non-western traditions, Western 20th Century works and her own compositions.

Admission
Admission is free.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
UMBC Department of Music: http://www.umbc.edu/music/

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

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Posted by dwinds1

UMBC Presents the Federal City Brass Band

The UMBC Department of Music's Faculty Recital Series presents the Federal City Brass Band under the direction of Jari Villanueva on Sunday, April 25 at 3:00 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall.The Federal City Brass Band, based in Baltimore, recreates the sound and appearance of a U.S. Army regimental brass band of the 1860s.

Federal City Brass Band (photo: Supertone Studio)The UMBC Department of Music’s Faculty Recital Series presents the Federal City Brass Band under the direction of Jari Villanueva on Sunday, April 25 at 3:00 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall.

The Federal City Brass Band, based in Baltimore, recreates the sound and appearance of a U.S. Army regimental brass band of the 1860s. With the exception of the reproduction rope-tension drums, all of the instruments used by the Federal City Brass Band are originals dating to the mid-19th century. The sources of the music the band plays include original band journals and sheet music of the Civil War era. Members of the Federal City Brass Band are professional and volunteer musicians, music educators, historians and re-enactors, and collectively represent some of the finest brass and percussion players in the hobby today. The band has performed for events at Gettysburg, Sharpsburg, Baltimore, Fredericksburg, Rockville, and Arlington, for the Library of Congress and the American Bandmasters Association, and at the 2003 National Civil War Band Festival in Campbellsville, Kentucky. The program at UMBC will feature Civil War-era favorites.

Admission
Admission is $7 general, $3 for senior citizens, free for all students, and free with a UMBC ID.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
UMBC Department of Music: http://www.umbc.edu/music/

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
A high resolution image for media is available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

Federal City Brass Band (photo: Rob Szabo)

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Posted by dwinds1

UMBC Presents Cellist Franklin Cox in Concert

The UMBC Department of Music's Faculty Recital Series presents cellist Franklin Cox. His program will include J.S. Bach's Cello Suite No. 4 in E-flat (BWV 1010), a new work by Erik Ulman, Willow by Stuart Saunders Smith, and a new work of his own.

Franklin Cox (photo: Richard Anderson)The UMBC Department of Music’s Faculty Recital Series presents cellist Franklin Cox. His program will include J.S. Bach’s Cello Suite No. 4 in E-flat (BWV 1010), a new work by Erik Ulman, Willow by Stuart Saunders Smith, and a new work of his own.

Franklin Cox has performed in numerous festivals and new music ensembles, including the Indiana University New Music Ensemble, the Group for Contemporary Music, and SONOR, as well as at the 1980 and 1982 Spoleto Festivals, the 1983 Banff Summer Chamber Music Festival, the Xenakis Festival and Darmstadt Revisited Festival at UCSD, and at the Darmstadt Festival since 1988, where he received a special citation for cello performance in 1990. He received a Bachelor of Music degree in composition from Indiana University, a Master of Arts degree in composition from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. in composition at the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Cox has studied with Brian Ferneyhough, Roger Reynolds, Joji Yuasa, Steven Suber, Fred Fox, Harvey Sollberger, Fred Lerdahl, and Jack Beeson. He received an Alice M. Ditson Scholarship and Dissertation Fellowship at Columbia University, Regent’s Fellowship and a Dissertation Research Fellowship for Outstanding Research at UCSD, a full scholarship to the 1990 June in Buffalo Festival, and full scholarships for the 1988 and 1992 Darmstadt Festivals. He was awarded a Stipendium Fellowship at the 1990 Darmstadt Festival, won 2nd prize in the Los Angeles Arts Commission competition in the spring of 1991, and was co-winner of the Kranichsteiner Musikpreis (highest award for composition) in the 1992 Darmstadt Festival.

Admission
Admission is $7 general, $3 for senior citizens, free for all students, and free with a UMBC ID.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
UMBC Department of Music: http://www.umbc.edu/music/

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
A high resolution image for media is available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail. (Photo credit: Richard Anderson.)

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Posted by dwinds1

Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents
We Shall Overcome: Photographs from the American Civil Rights Era

UMBC's Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents We Shall Overcome: Photographs from the American Civil Rights Era, on display from April 13 through June 6, 2004. During America's civil rights era, the fight for equal rights took many forms, including boycotts, sit-ins and marches. Photographers contributed to the movement by relaying the struggle to every corner of the nation. We Shall Overcome, comprised of 80 black and white photographs, explores the role of several prominent American photographers in documenting the era from 1954 to 1968.

UMBC’s Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents We Shall Overcome: Photographs from the American Civil Rights Era, on display from April 13 through June 6, 2004.

During America’s civil rights era, the fight for equal rights took many forms, including boycotts, sit-ins and marches. Photographers contributed to the movement by relaying the struggle to every corner of the nation. We Shall Overcome, comprised of 80 black and white photographs, explores the role of several prominent American photographers in documenting the era from 1954 to 1968.

We Shall Overcome was developed by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Services (SITES), and curated by Robert Phelan, an art historian, museum curator, and former director of CREED Photos (a database project for civil rights). Following its showing at the Kuhn Library Gallery, the exhibition will continue to tour through 2004. Works in We Shall Overcome are by some of America’s most thoughtful and gifted photographers, including for LIFE magazine photographers Gordon Parks and Charles Moore; Magnum photographers Bob Adelman and Leonard Freed; then-staff photographer for the Nation of Islam, Robert Sengstacke; and Black Star photographers Matt Heron and Bob Fitch. Drawn from the personal collections of the artists, these works bring the viewer into the presence of the people and events of the American civil rights movement of the 1960s. The images reflect both the power and beauty of the photographic medium when used as a tool for social change.

The striking photographs in the exhibition are juxtaposed with the words of James Baldwin, Fannie Lou Hamer, Malcolm X, Martin Luther King, Jr. and other movement participants. These quotations provide viewers with an opportunity to examine the civil rights movement through the experiences of those directly involved with the struggle.

Photographers in We Shall Overcome captured various aspects of the civil rights movement. Leonard Freed’s images represent his perceptions of racial conflict in America at the time of his return to the United States after several years abroad. Bob Adelman’s photographs document voter registration activities in the Deep South. Matt Heron’s pictures consider direct action by the young in the movement. Bob Fitch’s work chronicles grassroots organizing, primarily in association with the efforts of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference. Charles Moore’s images reveal incidents of extreme violence. Robert Sengstacke’s images of the separatist response of the Nation of Islam sharply contrast with his photographs of other civil rights activists. Gordon Park’s works are drawn from an assignment by LIFE magazine during 1963 when Parks was traveling with Malcolm X. The exhibition ends with a selection of photographs of Martin Luther King taken by each of the photographers.

About the Smithsonian Traveling Exhibition Service
Each year, the Smithsonian Traveling Exhibition Service shares the wealth of Smithsonian collections and research programs with millions of people outside of Washington, D.C. One of the Smithsonian’s four National Programs, SITES makes available a wide range of exhibitions about art, science, and history, which are shown not only in museums but wherever people live, work and play: in libraries, science centers, historical societies, community centers, botanical gardens, schools, and shopping malls. In 2002, SITES celebrated 50 years of connecting Americans to their shared cultural heritage. Exhibitions descriptions and tour schedules are available at their website.

Gallery Information
The Albin O. Kuhn Gallery serves as one of the principal art galleries in the Baltimore region. Items from the Special Collections Department, as well as art and artifacts from all over the world, are displayed in challenging and informative exhibitions for the University community and the public. Moreover, traveling exhibitions are occasionally presented, and the Gallery also sends some of its exhibits throughout the state and nation. Admission to the Gallery is free.

Acknowledgements
UMBC’s presentation of We Shall Overcome: Photographs from the American Civil Rights Era is supported in part by an arts program grant from the Maryland State Arts Council, an agency funded by the State of Maryland and the National Endowment for the Arts, and by the Friends of the Library & Gallery.

Hours of Operation
Sunday: Closed
Monday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Tuesday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Thursday: 12 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Friday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Saturday: 1 p.m. - 5 p.m.

Telephone
General Gallery information: 410-455-2270
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
Gallery website: http://aok.lib.umbc.edu/gallery/
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Umbrage Editions: http://www.umbragebooks.com/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail. The images in this release are available at 300 dpi on high resolution image website.

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in the Walker Avenue Garage. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

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Posted by dwinds1

April 3, 2004

UMBC Theatre presents Female Transport

UMBC Theatre presents Female Transport by Steve Gooch, directed by Christopher Owens, from April 22 through May 7 at the UMBC Theatre.

The UMBC Department of Theatre presents Female Transport by Steve Gooch, directed by Christopher Owens. The play runs from April 22nd through May 7th at the UMBC Theatre.

It’s 1807 and the petty crimes of a hundred women have resulted in their forced transportation to the British penal colony of Australia. What begins as a riotous group of disparate cellmates transforms during the six month sea journey to a tough, unified matriarchal society—ready to change the wild land they are about to inhabit into a more just place than the England they left behind. As songs of the period punctuate and underscore the action, these women strive to prove themselves more civilized below deck than their male captors above. Female Transport features original music by Ron Barnett, scenic design by William T. Brown, costume design by Karen Murphy, lighting and sound design by Terry Cobb, and vocal and dialect direction by Lynn Watson. (Design credit: Evan Wiegand.)

Showtimes
Thursday, April 22 at 8 pm (preview)
Friday, April 23 at 8 pm (opening night)
Sunday, April 25 at 4 pm
Thursday, April 29 at 4 pm
Friday, April 30 at 8 pm
Saturday, May 1 at 8 pm
Sunday, May 2 at 4 pm

Admission
$10 general admission
$5 students
$3 for the preview
The performance on Thursday, March 11th, is free to the UMBC campus community.
Ticket proceeds benefit the Department of Theatre Scholarship Fund.
Theatre Box Office: 410-455-2476

Telephone
Theatre Box Office: 410-455-2476
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Department of Theatre website: http://www.umbc.edu/theatre

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.

From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Theatre.

From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.

Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked. Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

###

Posted by dwinds1

March 1, 2004

UMBC Presents the Ruckus Contemporary Music Ensemble in Concert

On March 18, 2004, the UMBC Department of Music's Contemporary Concerts Series presents Ruckus, the professional contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC. The program will include Elliott Carter's Triple Duo, Vinko Globokar's Correspondences, Anna Rubin's Dreaming Fire, Tasting Rain, a new work by Thomas DeLio, Hiroyuki Itoh's Shadows of Night III, and Milton Babbitt's Composition for Four Instruments.

Ruckus (photo: Richard Anderson)The UMBC Department of Music’s Contemporary Concerts Series presents Ruckus, the professional contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC. The program will include Elliott Carter’s Triple Duo, Vinko Globokar’s Correspondences, Anna Rubin’s Dreaming Fire, Tasting Rain, a new work by Thomas DeLio, Hiroyuki Itoh’s Shadows of Night III, and Milton Babbitt’s Composition for Four Instruments.

The ensemble features flutist Lisa Cella, cellist Franklin Cox, percussionist Tom Goldstein, clarinetist E. Michael Richards, pianist Kazuko Tanosaki and violinist Airi Yoshioka. Founded in 2000 to promote the performance of contemporary chamber music, Ruckus has performed at the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Smithsonian Institution, and at universities throughout the East Coast.

Admission
Admission is free.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
General Department of Music Information: 410-455-MUSC
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
UMBC Department of Music: http://www.umbc.edu/music/

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
A high resolution image for media is available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail. (Photo credit: Richard Anderson.)

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Posted by dwinds1

Albin O. Kuhn Library & Gallery Presents "Havana: The Revolutionary Moment"

UMBC's Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents "Havana: The Revolutionary Moment," on display through April 4. The exhibition, featuring the photography of Burt Glinn, is organized by Umbrage Editions.

UMBC's Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents "Havana: The Revolutionary Moment," on display through April 4. The exhibition, featuring the photography of Burt Glinn, is organized by Umbrage Editions.

"Havana: The Revolutionary Moment" presents a unique collection of never-before seen photographs by veteran Magnum photographer Burt Glinn, recording Castro's historic entry into Havana in January 1959. In his memoir, Glinn describes the combination of chutzpah and journalistic prescience that led him to leave a New York party and hop a plane to Havana on New Year's Eve. Although this snap decision made Glinn one of three western photographers (and the only one still living) to accompany Castro during the revolution, the images have been virtually unseen since then. The photographs--of Castro thronged by his fellow Cubans along the road to Havana, of troops embracing, and of fierce men and women taking up arms in the streets--are full of the revolutionary fervor and idealistic anticipation that characterized this pivotal moment in Cuban history.

Studs Turkel, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Good War and Working, states, It is an astonishing experience to simply look at Burt Glinn's on-the-spot photographs of Fidel Castro's 1959 triumphal march into Havana. It is a historic moment captured by a courageous master craftsman. What was touched on in the film Godfather II comes fully alive in this remarkable assemblage.

Burt Glinn first became known for his spectacular color coverage of the South Seas, Japan, Russia, Mexico and California. Collaborating with author Laurens van der Post, he has produced two books: A Portrait of All the Russias and A Portrait of Japan. Glinn was one of the original contributing editors of New York Magazine. He has authored editorial stories for magazines such as Esquire, GEO, Travel and Leisure and Fortune, and published reportage in magazines such as Life and Paris-Match, covering the Sinai War, the U.S. Marine invasion of Lebanon, Castro's takeover in Cuba and the integration of schools in Little Rock.

The photography exhibited in "Havana: The Revolutionary Moment" is published in a book of the same title by Umbrage Editions. Support for the publication and exhibition has been provided by Sidney Kimmel, Andrew S. Karsch, the Southeast Museum of Photography and the Fototeca de Havana. Its presentation at UMBC is supported in part by an arts program grant from the Maryland State Arts Council, an agency funded by the State of Maryland and the National Endowment for the Arts.

The Gallery is open Monday through Friday, 12 noon to 4:30 p.m., on Thursday until 8 p.m., and Saturday 1 to 5 p.m. For more information call 410-455-2270.

Posted by dwinds1

February 20, 2004

UMBC Department of Theatre Presents The Bald Soprano by Eugéne Ionesco

From March 9 through 14, the UMBC Department of Theatre presents The Bald Soprano by Eugéne Ionesco, directed by Colette Searls.

The UMBC Department of Theatre presents The Bald Soprano by Eugéne Ionesco, directed by Colette Searls with set and costumes by Elena Zlotescu, lighting design by Greggory Schraven and sound design by Greg Lemich. Join us for a night of absurdity at the Smith residence, where guests forget their own names and clocks refuse to tell time. This first of Ionesco’s celebrated absurdist plays wickedly satires the emptiness of life lived by habit. Shoe-tying reveals itself as a bizarre spectacle and showy doorbells ring by themselves as the Smiths and Martins trip through the horrors of disorder and nonsense. Don’t miss UMBC’s unique twist on this classic of the 20th century avant garde.Buried is not recommended for young children.

Showtimes
Tuesday, March 9 at 8 pm (preview)
Wednesday, March 10 at 8 pm (opening night)
Thursday, March 11 at 4 pm
Friday, March 12 at 8 pm
Saturday, March 13 at 8 pm
Sunday, March 14 at 4 pm

Admission
$10 general admission
$5 students
$3 for the preview
The performance on Thursday, March 11th, is free to the UMBC campus community.
Ticket proceeds benefit the Department of Theatre Scholarship Fund.
Theatre Box Office: 410-455-2476

Telephone
Theatre Box Office: 410-455-2476
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
General Department of Theatre information: 410-455-2917
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Department of Theatre website: http://www.umbc.edu/theatre

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.

From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Theatre.

From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.

Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked. Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.


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Posted by dwinds1

February 16, 2004

UMBC's Department of Music Receives Prestigious Award

UMBC's Department of Music has been awarded Third Prize in the distinguished Adventurous Programming Awards from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP). The award recognizes UMBC's national contribution as a presenter of contemporary music written since 1980.

UMBC’s Department of Music has been awarded Third Prize in the distinguished Adventurous Programming Awards from the American Society of Composers, Authors and Publishers (ASCAP). The award recognizes UMBC’s national contribution as a presenter of contemporary music written since 1980.

The ASCAP Adventurous Programming Awards, which were presented at Chamber Music America’s Annual Conference held January 15-18, 2004 in New York City, were conceived seventeen years ago to encourage ensembles, festivals and presenters to program new works. First place in the category for 2003 was awarded to the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, and second place was awarded to the Cornish Music Series.

ASCAP’s Vice President of Concert Music, Frances Richard, who presented the awards, commented: “This is the seventeenth year of ASCAP’s collaboration with Chamber Music America to present Adventurous Programming Awards. These awards are made on behalf of the members of ASCAP, in appreciation for the Ensembles, Presenters and Festivals, which feature performances of the music of our time for audiences throughout the United States. With special emphasis upon works written since 1980, we celebrate the exciting and vibrant Chamber Music tradition through adventurous programming.”

Linda Dusman, the chair of UMBC’s Department of Music, stated: “We are honored to have received this award, and especially to be the only university so recognized. UMBC prides itself on being at the cutting edge of research and creative work; in music this translates into our valuing that our students and community have access to and an understanding of the music of their own times.”

During the 2002-2003 season, for which the award was presented, the Department of Music’s concert series included performances by the Bugallo-Williams Piano Duo, composer Thomas Lehn, pianist Marc Ponthus, pianist Kazuko Tanosaki, the ensemble NOISE, composer Claus-Steffen Mahnkopf, cellist Franklin Cox, the ensemble Interface, flutist Lisa Cella, bassist Michael Cameron, percussionist Jonas Larsson, composer Paul Koonce, and a duo concert by saxophonist Anjan Shah and pianist Rachel Franklin. The Department also sponsored a major festival, Music of Japan Today 2003, which featured performances by Ruckus (the professional chamber music ensemble in residence at UMBC) and others, and events with featured composers Joji Yuasa, Akira Nishimura, Tokuhide Niimi and Toshi Ichiyanagi.

The 2002-2003 season featured works by many living composers, including compositions by Makiko Asaoka, Curtis Bahn, J. Fredric Bergström, Luciano Berio, Pierre Boulez, Matthew Burtner, Elliott Carter, Frankin Cox, Thomas DeLio, Franco Donatoni, Dominic Dousa, Linda Dusman, Morton Feldman, Mamoru Fujieda, Keiko Fujiie, Hans Werner Henze, Asako Hirabayashi, Colin Holter, Toshi Ichiyanagi, Yukiko Ito, Nagako Konishi, Paul Koonce, György Kurtág, Anne La Berge, Thomas Lehn, Thomas Liljeholm, Erik Lund, Claus-Steffen Mahnkopf, Nicholas Maw, Ronaldo Miranda, Akira Miyoshi, Junko Mori, Robert Muczynski, Isaac Nagao, Shigenobu Nakamura, Conlon Nancarrow, Tokuhide Niimi, Akira Nishimura, Mark Osborn, Fredrik Österling, Takayuki Rai, Kaija Saariaho, Stuart Sankey, Giacinto Scelsi, Stuart Saunders Smith, Karlheinz Stockhausen, Steven Kazuo Takasugi, Toru Takemitsu, Karen Tanaka, Jukka Tiensuu, Yoichi Togawa, Dan Trueman, David Ward-Steinman, Amy Williams, Iannis Xenakis, Joji Yuasa and Akira Yuyama.

The UMBC Department of Music’s calendar of upcoming events is available at www.umbc.edu/arts.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
General Music Information: 410-455-MUSC
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
UMBC Department of Music: http://www.umbc.edu/music

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Posted by dwinds1

February 11, 2004

The Arts at UMBC Present Nina Katchadourian

On March 3rd, the UMBC Department of Visual Arts and the InterArts series present a lecture by visual artist Nina Katchadourian. The lecture will be presented at 8 pm in Fine Arts Building 306. Admission is free.

Nina Katchadourian: Renovated Mushroom (Tip Top Tire Rubber Patch Kit) (1998)Cibachrome, 30" x 40"On March 3rd, the UMBC Department of Visual Arts and the InterArts series present a lecture by visual artist Nina Katchadourian. The lecture will be presented at 8 pm in Fine Arts Building 306. Admission is free.

Born in 1968 in Stanford, California, Katchadourian earned a B.A. in Visual Arts and Literature and Society from Brown University in 1989, and an M.A. in Fine Arts in 1993 from the University of California, San Diego. In her work, technology comes into play in ways that are strongly connected to her processes of dissection, restoration, and translation. The technological realm is conventionally thought of as a place where translation happens seamlessly and without residue, but Katchadourian seeks out places that hold the promise of minor breakdowns and potential misunderstandings. Her diverse practice includes photography, sound, video and sculpture.

Katchadourian often locates her subject matter in the colloquial; in recent years she has also looked to “nature” as concept, construct and site. Activities which engage technology, in both low tech and hi tech ways, have included mending broken spiderwebs; restoring loose, discarded audio and video tape found on the streets of different cities; creating car alarm systems based on bird sounds; and inventing a talking popcorn machine that uses a Morse Code program to translate the sounds of popping popcorn and turn it into spoken language.

Katchadourian has been awarded numerous grants including the Art Matters Grant (1994) and Konstsamfundet Artists Grant, Helsinki, Finland (1998). Katchadourian has shown throughout the United States and internationally, including exhibitions at the San Diego Museum of Art; the San Diego Museum of Natural History; the San Jose Institute of Contemporary Art; the Akron Museum of Art; Bard College; the Islip Art Museum; the Fabric Workshop and Museum and the University of the Arts Museum in Philadelphia; the Museum of Textiles, Toronto, Canada; the Museum of Contemporary Art, Zagreb, Croatia; the Serpentine Gallery, London, England; the Lönnström Art Museum, Rauma and the Lahden Biennale, in Lahit, Finland; and the Borás Konstmuseum and Norrtälje Konsthall in Sweden. In 2002, Katchadourian was a grant recipient of the American-Scandinavian Foundation, and in 2001 she was awarded a Louis Comfort Tiffany Foundation Award. She currently lives and works in Brooklyn, New York.

Admission
Admission is free.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
UMBC Department of Visual Arts: http://art.umbc.edu/

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

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Posted by dwinds1

UMBC Presents Composer Christian Wolff in Concert

On March 4, the Department of Music's Contemporary Concerts Series presents composer Christian Wolff, who will perform some of his own work for solo piano in celebration of his 70th birthday, including For Prepared Piano (1951) and selections from two new works, Keyboard Miscellany and Incidental Music. The concert will be held at 8 pm in the Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

Christian WolffOn March 4, the Department of Music’s Contemporary Concerts Series presents composer Christian Wolff, who will perform some of his own work for solo piano in celebration of his 70th birthday, including For Prepared Piano (1951) and selections from two new works, Keyboard Miscellany and Incidental Music. The concert will be held at 8 pm in the Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

Born in 1934 in Nice, France, Christian Wolff has lived mostly in U.S. since 1941. He studied piano with Grete Sultan and composition with John Cage. Although mostly an autodidact, his early contact with Cage, Morton Feldman, David Tudor and Earle Brown, and later Cornelius Cardew and Frederic Rzewski helped form the direction of his work. He received academic training in classics and comparative literature at Harvard University, taught classics at Harvard and, from 1971 until 2000, classics, comparative literature and music at Dartmouth College. Wolff’s compositions include works for piano(s), miscellaneous keyboards, instrumental solos, chamber groups, unspecified groups of players and sound sources, tape, chorus and orchestra.

A particular interest in Wolff’s work has been to allow performers flexibility and ranges of freedom at the actual time of a piece’s performance, to devise notations to make this practicable, to foster among both professional and lay players a spirit of liberating interdependence, and to draw material from traditions of popular political music. Wolff’s music has been performed throughout the world, especially in Europe and the United States. A number of pieces have been used by Merce Cunningham and his dance company, and also the dancer Lucinda Childs.

His music is published by C.F. Peters in New York, and has been recorded on Columbia-Odyssey, Vox, Time-Mainstream, Wergo, Centaur, Elektrola, EMI, CRI, Opus One, Philo, EMI-TOCI, Collecta, Hat Hut, Mode, Koch International, Time-Scraper and Content. His writings on music have been collected in Cues: Writings & Conversations, published by MusikTexte, Cologne. Christian Wolff has performed as an improviser with Takehisa Kosugi, Steve Lacy, Christian Marclay, Kui Dong and Larry Polansky. He received awards from the American Academy and National Institute for Arts and Letters (1975); DAAD, Berlin (1974); and the Asian Cultural Council Grant (1987); received the John Cage Award for Music (1996); and was made a member of the Akademie der Künste, Berlin in 1999.

Admission
Admission is free.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
General Department of Music Information: 410-455-MUSC
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
UMBC Department of Music: http://www.umbc.edu/music/

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
A high resolution image for media is available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

###

Posted by dwinds1

January 29, 2004

UMBC's Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery Presents Havana: The Revolutionary Moment

UMBC's Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents Havana: The Revolutionary Moment, on display from February 9 through April 4, 2004. The exhibition, featuring the photography of Burt Glinn, is organized by Umbrage Editions, which publishes a companion book with the same title. Havana: The Revolutionary Moment presents a unique collection of never-before seen photographs recording Castro's historic entry into Havana in January 1959.

Havana: The Revolutionary MomentUMBC’s Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents Havana: The Revolutionary Moment, on display from February 9 through April 4, 2004. The exhibition, featuring the photography of Burt Glinn, is organized by Umbrage Editions, which publishes a companion book with the same title.

Havana: The Revolutionary Moment presents a unique collection of never-before seen photographs by veteran Magnum photographer Burt Glinn, recording Castro’s historic entry into Havana in January 1959. In his memoir, Glinn describes the combination of chutzpah and journalistic prescience that led him to leave a New York party and hop a plane to Havana on New Year’s Eve. Although this snap decision made Glinn one of three western photographers (and the only one still living) to accompany Castro during the revolution, the images have been virtually unseen since then. The photographs—of Castro thronged by his fellow Cubans along the road to Havana, of troops embracing, and of fierce men and women taking up arms in the streets—are full of the revolutionary fervor and idealistic anticipation that characterized this pivotal moment in Cuban history.

Studs Turkel, Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Good War and Working, states, “It is an astonishing experience to simply look at Burt Glinn’s on-the-spot photographs of Fidel Castro’s 1959 triumphal march into Havana. It is a historic moment captured by a courageous master craftsman. What was touched on in the film Godfather II comes fully alive in this remarkable assemblage.”

Havana: The Revolutionary MomentAbout Burt Glinn
Burt Glinn first became known for his spectacular color coverage of the South Seas, Japan, Russia, Mexico and California. Collaborating with author Laurens van der Post, he has produced two books: A Portrait of All the Russias and A Portrait of Japan. Glinn was one of the original contributing editors of New York Magazine. He has authored editorial stories for magazines such as Esquire, GEO, Travel and Leisure and Fortune, and published reportage in magazines such as Life and Paris-Match, covering the Sinai War, the U.S. Marine invasion of Lebanon, Castro’s takeover in Cuba and the integration of schools in Little Rock. He is a past president of the American Society of Media Photographers, and a member of the Magnum Photographic Cooperative, having served at different times as its president and chairman of the board. He has received many awards, including the Mathew Brady Award as the Magazine Photographer of the Year from the University of Missouri and the Encyclopædia Britannica; and the Award for the Best Book of Photographic Reporting from Abroad from the Overseas Press Club. Glinn has had one-man shows at the Photographers Gallery in London, the Nikon Gallery in New York and three at the Sag Harbor Picture Gallery. Group shows include In Our Time at the International Center of Photography, New York and major cities; and Magnum Cinema, Magnum East, and 1968, at the Newseum, New York City and Washington, D.C. The International Center of Photography exhibited his Castro story in 1996 when they acquired many of the photos for their permanent collection. Born in Pittsburgh in 1925, Glinn lives in New York with his wife Elena Anastasia Prohaska and their nineteen-year-old son, Sam.

Havana: The Revolutionary MomentPublication
The photography exhibited in Havana: The Revolutionary Moment is published in a book of the same title by Umbrage Editions. The book, which contains 83 duotone photographs in 128 pages, is available in hardcover with a jacket, ISBN 1-8844167-09-8, and retails for $45.00. Havana: The Revolutionary Moment is distributed by powerHouse Books.

About the Publisher, Umbrage Editions
Umbrage Editions, based in New York City, is a packager of high-quality visual books, traveling exhibitions, and multimedia projects. Founded in 1991 by Nan Richardson, former editor of Aperture and editor of over 150 books for Random House, Twin Palms, Bulfinch, Abrams, and others, Umbrage Editions works on the creation of content-rich books, exhibitions, websites, theater productions, and CD-ROMs from their conception to development and final production. Umbrage Editions also offers many titles in foreign language editions. In the past, published works have varied in subject matter from pop culture to global human rights, from the closets of drag queens to the runways of fashion, from classic photojournalism to cutting-edge art.

Gallery Information
The Albin O. Kuhn Gallery serves as one of the principal art galleries in the Baltimore region. Items from the Special Collections Department, as well as art and artifacts from all over the world, are displayed in challenging and informative exhibitions for the University community and the public. Moreover, traveling exhibitions are occasionally presented, and the Gallery also sends some of its exhibits throughout the state and nation. Admission to the Gallery is free.

Havana: The Revolutionary MomentAcknowledgements
Support for the publication and exhibition of Havana: The Revolutionary Moment has been provided by Sidney Kimmel, Andrew S. Karsch, the Southeast Museum of Photography and the Fototeca de Havana. Its presentation at UMBC is supported in part by an arts program grant from the Maryland State Arts Council, an agency funded by the State of Maryland and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Hours of Operation
Sunday: Closed
Monday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Tuesday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Thursday: 12 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Friday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Saturday: 1 p.m. - 5 p.m.

Telephone
General Gallery information: 410-455-2270
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370
Umbrage Editions: 212-965-0197

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
Gallery website: http://aok.lib.umbc.edu/gallery/
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Umbrage Editions: http://www.umbragebooks.com/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail. The images in this release are available at 300 dpi on high resolution image website.

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in the Walker Avenue Garage. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Havana: The Revolutionary Moment

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Posted by dwinds1

January 28, 2004

UMBC Presents Pianist Stephen Drury in Concert

The UMBC Department of Music's Contemporary Concerts Series and the InterArts program present pianist Stephen Drury in concert on Wednesday, February 18th at 8:00 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall. Mr. Drury will present a program of the three piano sonatas by Charles Ives (Sonata No. 1, Sonata No. 2 (Concord, Mass., 184060), and the Three Page Sonata) the commemorate the 50th anniversary of the composer's death. Admission is free.

Stephen Drury (photo: Lisa Kohler)The UMBC Department of Music’s Contemporary Concerts Series and the InterArts program present pianist Stephen Drury in concert on Wednesday, February 18th at 8:00 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

Mr. Drury will present a program of the three piano sonatas by Charles Ives (Sonata No. 1, Sonata No. 2 (“Concord, Mass., 1840–60”), and the Three Page Sonata) to commemorate the 50th anniversary of the composer’s death.

Stephen Drury was named 1989 Musician of the Year by the Boston Globe and has concertized throughout the world with a repertoire that stretches from Bach to Liszt to the music of today. He has given solo performances at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., New York’s Symphony Space, and from Arkansas to California to Hong Kong to Paris. A champion of twentieth-century music, Drury’s performances of music—ranging from the piano sonatas of Charles Ives to works by John Cage and György Ligeti—have received the highest critical acclaim. He has appeared at the MusikTriennale Köln in Germany, the Subtropics Festival in Miami, the Festival of New American Music in Sacramento, and the North American New Music Festival in Buffalo as well as at Roulette and the Knitting Factory in New York. At Spoleto USA and at the Angelica Festival in Bologna, he performed as both conductor and pianist. He has also conducted the Britten Sinfonia in England, the Santa Cruz New Music Works Ensemble, and the Harvard Group for New Music. In 1992 Stephen Drury directed the world premiere of George Russell’s Time Line for orchestra, chorus, jazz band and soloists. In 1988-1989, he organized a year-long festival of the music of John Cage which led to a request from the composer to perform the solo piano part in Cage’s 1O1, premiered with the Boston Symphony Orchestra in April, 1989. Drury has commissioned new works for solo piano from John Cage, John Zorn, Terry Riley, and Chinary Ung with funding provided by Meet The Composer. In 1995, he gave the first performance of John Zorn’s concerto for piano and orchestra, Aporias, with Dennis Russell Davies and the Cologne Radio Symphony Orchestra. Later that same season he gave the premiere of Basic Training for solo piano, written for him by Lee Hyla. Drury is artistic director of the Callithumpian Consort, and he created and directs the Summer Institute for Contemporary Piano Performance at New England Conservatory.

Admission
Admission is free.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
General Department of Music Information: 410-455-MUSC
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
UMBC Department of Music: http://www.umbc.edu/music/

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
A high resolution image for media is available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail. (Photo credit: Lisa Kohler.)

###

Posted by dwinds1

UMBC Presents the ConText Performers Collective in Concert

The UMBC Department of Music's Contemporary Concerts Series presents the ConText Performers Collective in concert on Thursday, February 9th at 8:00 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. The ConText Performers Collective, which features Sylvia Smith and Carrie Rose, will perform Robert Erickson's Pacific Sirens, Stuart Saunders Smith's Transitions and Leaps, and works by Will Ogdon and Herbert Brün.

ConText Performers CollectiveThe UMBC Department of Music’s Contemporary Concerts Series presents the ConText Performers Collective in concert on Thursday, February 9th at 8:00 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free. Please note that the date of this concert has been changed from February 19th.

The ConText Performers Collective, which features Sylvia Smith and Carrie Rose, will perform Robert Erickson’s Pacific Sirens, Stuart Saunders Smith’s Transitions and Leaps, and works by Will Ogdon and Herbert Brün.

Sylvia Smith is a percussionist, scholar and publisher, and is the artistic director of the UMBC New Music Ensemble. She has performed at the Percussive Arts Society International Convention and has participated in the Interpretations Series at Merkin Hall in New York. In 1998 she founded the ConText Performers Collective, which specializes in music that integrates percussion, spoken text and theatre. She has authored articles on graphic notation and curated many concerts of the music of John Cage. Smith owns and operates Smith Publications, and in 1994 was awarded an honorary doctorate for her work in American music by the University of Akron.

Flutist and dancer Carrie Rose earned Master and Bachelor of Music degrees from the Cleveland Institute of Music as a student of Joshua Smith, principal flutist of the Cleveland Orchestra. She toured Russia and Eastern Europe with the American Russian Young Artists Orchestra, has performed throughout Switzerland, Germany and England, was awarded a full scholarship to the National Orchestral Institute at the University of Maryland, and was a Fellow in Chamber Music at the Schweitzer Institute of Music in Sandpoint, Idaho, directed by Gunther Schuller. Rose has played with the New World Symphony in Miami, and the Akron and Youngstown Symphonies in Ohio. Honors and awards include first prize at the national level of the Yamaha/Music Teachers National Association Competition, a Presser Foundation Scholarship, and the Amherst Symphony Womens’ Committee Scholarship.

Admission
Admission is free.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
General Department of Music Information: 410-455-MUSC
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
UMBC Department of Music: http://www.umbc.edu/music/

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
A high resolution image for media is available online at http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

###

Posted by dwinds1

Phoenix Dance Company Performs at UMBC

UMBC's Department of Dance presents the Phoenix Dance Company in concert on February 11, 12, 13 and 14, 2004. All performances will be held at 8 p.m. in the UMBC Theatre. Tickets are $15 general admission and $7 for students and seniors, available through the box office at 410-455-6240.

Phoenix Dance CompanyUMBC’s Department of Dance presents the Phoenix Dance Company in concert on February 11, 12, 13 and 14, 2004. All performances will be held at 8 p.m. in the UMBC Theatre. Tickets are $15 general admission and $7 for students and seniors, available through the box office at 410-455-6240.

About the Phoenix Dance Company
The venerable Phoenix Dance Company, founded in 1983, has played in venues such as the Kennedy Center, Lincoln Center, the Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore Theatre Project, Ohio State University, Judson Church, Goucher College, McDaniel College, Salisbury University and Temple University. A professional company in residence at UMBC, Phoenix is co-directed by choreographers Carol Hess and Doug Hamby.

Operating at the intersection between art and technology, the Phoenix Dance Company has explored radical dance collaborations with UMBC videographers, mechanical engineers, computer programmers and visual artists, recently including Steve Bradley, an intermedia artist who has generated live computer-enhanced video images and a system for generating sounds based on dancers’ movements; Tony Farquhar, a mechanical engineer who developed a spunky six-legged dancing robot (Maurice Tombé); Vin Grabill, an MIT-trained videographer; and composer Linda Dusman.

The Phoenix Dance Company was recently featured in the business section of The Baltimore Sun. To read that article, click here.

Phoenix Dance CompanyThe Program
Featured on the program are the following works:

  • Mobile II by Carol Hess, a dance of visual beauty and complexity, featuring six women with an original score by Neal Woodson. An installation of plexiglass screens becomes a projection surface for video images by Vin Grabill and Carol Hess. Throughout the piece, the dancers perform, re-orient and re-combine clusters of movement in open spaces, behind layers of fabric, and amid sheets of plexiglass and changing projections.
  • In a new video piece by Carol Hess, dancer Margaret Terry wanders along a dark hallway with many doors, to find herself dancing in unexpected environments. The choreography moves across multiple settings which include a river, a forest, a field, and a city. Sound design is by Timothy Nohe.
  • Doug Hamby’s Interplay, a beautiful and boldly dynamic dance for four women that brings to life Robert Moran’s energetic music. In this quartet, the dance enlivens and intertwines the rich physical, temporal and spatial connections between the performers.
  • Edgewater Park by Doug Hamby, a sensuous duet for two men combining live video images from the dance with images of carnival rides. Beautiful and intriguing video images of the live dance are simultaneously edited by filmmaker, Nick Prevas and projected onto a movie screen that blocks much of the viewer’s direct access to the dance, with a sound score by artist Timothy Nohe.
  • Part One Parting, a solo choreographed by Jeanine Durning and performed by Sandra Lacy, with original electronic music by composer Chris Peck. Structured like a short story, Part One Parting follows a woman who recalls an event in her life over and over again. In this episodic solo, the dream-like sequences reflect the idea of memory and how we remember and re-experience events.

Principal Choreographers and Dancer
Choreographer and artistic director Carol Hess received a B.A. from Barnard College and an M.A. from Columbia University. Before coming to Maryland, she danced professionally in New York City, where she performed and taught in hundreds of public schools through the Young Audiences Programs and Residencies in the Schools and the Lincoln Center Touring Program. She has performed with Hannah Kahn and Dancers, the Rondo Dance Theatre, the Janet Soares Company, and as a tap soloist she has appeared on television and in concerts in the United States and Europe. As Artistic Director of the Oregon Dance Theatre, Ms. Hess, in partnership with the Carpenter Foundation, initiated a series of program and workshops in schools, in which nearly fifty schools participated. As associate professor of dance, Ms. Hess has taught at UMBC since 1982 and is currently chair of the Department of Dance, where she also directs Project REACH, an outreach program to Baltimore City and Baltimore County elementary, middle and high schools.

Phoenix Dance CompanyDoug Hamby lives and works in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C. area. He has extensive experience as a dancer, chroeographer, and educator. In addition to his work with the Phoenix Dance Company, he is the artistic director of Doug Hamby Dance, a professional dance company in residence at UMBC. Recent collaborators include artist Timothy Nohe, intermedia artist Steve Bradley, video artist Deborah Gorski, and mechanical engineer Tony Farquhar. Hamby has performed with Martha Graham, May O’Donnell, Rachel Lampert, Elizabeth Keen, Pearl Lang, Norman Walker, the Chicago Moving Company, Phoenix Dance Company, and Hamby and Lacy. His works have been featured at Dance Place, Washington, D.C.; Riverside Dance Festival, Lincoln Center Out-of-Doors, and Celebrate Brooklyn, in New York City; the 1998 New York International Fringe Festival; 1997 Philadelphia Fringe Festival; and 1996 International Fringe Festivals in Edinburgh, Scotland and Vancouver, Canada. He has received choreography awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, Maryland State Arts Council, New York State Council on the Arts, Arts Council of Montgomery County, Maryland, and the Baltimore Mayor’s Advisory Committee on Art and Culture. He served as a dance advisory panelist for the Maryland State Arts Council for three years. He is an associate professor of dance at UMBC and holds an MFA in Dance from Temple University and a Biology degree from Michigan State University. He has also appeared on national television as a giant slice of American cheese.

Principal dancer Sandra Lacy has been the recipient of three Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Awards in Solo Dance Performance. She holds a B.A. in psychology and is an Associate of the Royal Academy of Dance in London. She has performed with Maryland Ballet, Impetus Dance Company, Path Dance Company, Lacy & Shade, and the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company. Ms. Lacy is on the faculty of UMBC and the Baltimore School for the Arts.

Admission
General admission: $15.00.
Students and seniors: $7.00.
Box Office: 410-455-6240

Telephone
Box Office: 410-455-6240
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
UMBC Department of Dance website: http://www.umbc.edu/dance

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

Directions
• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the UMBC Theatre.
• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the UMBC Theatre.
• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the UMBC Theatre.
• Metered parking for the UMBC Theatre is available in The Commons Garage.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Acknowledgements
This program is supported in part by an arts program grant from the Maryland State Arts Council, an agency funded by the State of Maryland and the National Endowment for the Arts, and by the Baltimore County Commission on Arts and Sciences.

Phoenix Dance Company

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Posted by dwinds1

UMBC Presents Flutist Lisa Cella in Concert

The UMBC Department of Music's Faculty Recital Series presents flutist Lisa Cella in concert on Sunday, February 15th at 3:00 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall. Tickets are $7 general admission, $3 for senior citizens, free for students and free with a UMBC ID. Lisa Cella's program will include Chronopolis by Franklin Cox, Flutter by Robert Rowe, Landmines by Anna Rubin, the premiere of a new work by Stuart Saunders Smith and other compositions.

Lisa Cella (photo: Richard Anderson)The UMBC Department of Music’s Faculty Recital Series presents flutist Lisa Cella in concert on Sunday, February 15th at 3:00 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall. Tickets are $7 general admission, $3 for senior citizens, free for students and free with a UMBC ID.

Lisa Cella’s program will include Chronopolis by Franklin Cox, Flutter by Robert Rowe, Landmines by Anna Rubin, the premiere of a new work by Stuart Saunders Smith and other compositions.

Artistic Director of San Diego New Music, Ms. Cella received a DMA in contemporary flute performance at the University of California, San Diego while studying with John Fonville. She has performed with SONOR, the faculty ensemble of UCSD, SIRIUS, and in various concert series and festivals in the San Diego area. She is a founding member of NOISE, the resident ensemble of San Diego New Music and runs the music series Noise at the Library at the Athenaeum Library in San Diego, California. She received her Applied Bachelors in Music with a dual concentration in Psychology from Syracuse University under the tutelage of John Oberbrunner. Upon graduation, she received the Civic Morning Musicals award for excellence in performance. She then received a Master of Music degree and a Graduate Performance Diploma from Peabody Conservatory, where she studied with Robert Willoughby. While in Baltimore, she was the winner of the 1992 Washington Flute Fair Young Artist Competition and founded the flute and guitar duo, Adesso!, which was a finalist in the Baltimore Chamber Competition. A dedicated performer of contemporary music, Cella was a member of the Baltimore based contemporary ensemble Polaris in 1993. She attended the Norfolk Chamber Music Festival in 1993 and was a fellowship member of the Aspen Contemporary Ensemble at the Aspen Music Festival for two summers. She is the founding member of the ensemble Sounding, a contemporary quartet (flute, clarinet, piano, percussion) that had its origins in the Aspen Contemporary Ensemble. With Sounding, she has performed at universities such as Bowling Green, Cornell, SUNY Buffalo, Oberlin, and Syracuse. Currently, she is a lecturer in music at UMBC and a founding member of the faculty contemporary music ensemble, Ruckus.

Admission
Admission is $7 general, $3 for senior citizens, free for all students, and free with a UMBC ID.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
General Department of Music Information: 410-455-MUSC
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
UMBC Department of Music: http://www.umbc.edu/music/

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
A high resolution image for media is available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail. (Photo credit: Richard Anderson.)

###

Posted by dwinds1

UMBC Presents Clarinetist E. Michael Richards in Concert

The UMBC Department of Music's Faculty Recital Series presents clarinetist E. Michael Richards in concert on Sunday, February 22nd at 3:00 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is $7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students and free with a UMBC ID. E. Michael Richards's program will include the Fantasia da Concerto su motivi de La Traviata di G. Verdi by Donato Lovreglio, Altre Tracce by Fabio Cifariello Ciardi, the American premiere of magnificat 2: Still by Linda Dusman, Undercurrents by Eve de Castro-Robinson, and Dal Niente (Interieur III) by Helmut Lachenmann.

E. Michael Richards (photo: Richard Anderson)The UMBC Department of Music’s Faculty Recital Series presents clarinetist E. Michael Richards in concert on Sunday, February 22nd at 3:00 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is $7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students and free with a UMBC ID.

E. Michael Richards’s program will include the Fantasia da Concerto su motivi de La Traviata di G. Verdi by Donato Lovreglio, Altre Tracce by Fabio Cifariello Ciardi, the American premiere of magnificat 2: Still by Linda Dusman, Undercurrents by Eve de Castro-Robinson, and Dal Niente (Interieur III) by Helmut Lachenmann. The pieces all connect the clarinet to the human voice, from the arrangement of Verdi arias in a bel canto style (Lovreglio), to short ambiguous (and embedded in a complex structure) quotations of famous works (part of our “cultural memory” such as Bizet’s Carmen, Rossini’s Barber of Seville, etc.) that share a motivic similarity (Ciardi), to an exploration of the passagio among registers of the clarinet that culminates in multiphonics (Jones), to extreme contrast between chalumeau and altissimo registers that includes simultaneous singing and playing (de Castro-Robinson), to the idea of a “musique concrete instrumentale,” in which all of the sounds point away from themselves as a kind of “corporeal” experience. And finally, as Lachenmann said, “The instrument becomes a device: a characteristically manipulated filter for the player’s breath.” Two of the works will be performed by the Tanosaki-Richards Duo, featuring pianist Kazuko Tanosaki.

As a recitalist of new music, E. Michael Richards has premiered over 125 works throughout the United States, Japan, Australia, and Western Europe. Trained as a clarinetist at the New England Conservatory (B.Mus.) and Yale School of Music (M.Mus.), Richards earned a Ph.D. at the University of California, San Diego. He received a 1990 U.S./Japan Creative Artist Fellowship (sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts, U.S.-Japan Friendship Commission, and Japanese Government Cultural Agency) as a solo recitalist for a six-month residency in Japan, an NEH Summer Fellowship to study traditional Japanese music, and a residency grant (Cassis, France) from the Camargo Foundation to complete a book, The Clarinet of the Twenty-First Century. Richards has performed as concerto soloist with the Syracuse Symphony and Shinsei Japan Philharmonic (Tokyo), in chamber music performances with the Cassatt Quartet, Ying Quartet, SONOR, and the East-West Quartet, and in recital at eight international festivals and more than 20 universities, as well as at Lincoln Center, the Guggenheim Museum (New York), the American Academy in Rome, and the Tokyo American Center. He has also performed as a member of the Tanosaki-Richards Duo (with pianist Kazuko Tanosaki) since 1982. Richards has recorded on the NEUMA, Mode, CRI, Ninewinds, and Opus One labels. He has taught at Smith College; the University of California, San Diego; Bowdoin College; Hamilton College; and the Hochstein Music School in Rochester, New York; and completed short terms with Kazuko Tanosaki as visiting artists in residence at the University of Massachusetts, CNMAT (Center for New Music and Audio Technologies), at the University of California Berkeley, and San José State University.

Admission
Admission is $7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students and free with a UMBC ID.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
General Department of Music Information: 410-455-MUSC
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
UMBC Department of Music: http://www.umbc.edu/music/

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
A high resolution image for media is available online at http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail (photo credit: Richard Anderson).

###

Posted by dwinds1

January 14, 2004

UMBC Department of Music Presents
Spring 2004 Concerts and Events

The UMBC Department of Music presents its spring 2004 season, featuring an array of contemporary classical music concerts by world renowned artists, including composer Christian Wolff, pianist Stephen Drury, flutist Jane Rigler and the Ruckus ensemble.

The UMBC Department of Music presents its spring 2004 season, featuring an array of contemporary classical music concerts by world renowned artists, including composer Christian Wolff, pianist Stephen Drury, flutist Jane Rigler and the Ruckus ensemble.

Professional Artist Series

January 28
Patricia Green, mezzo soprano
12 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission is free.

Mezzo soprano Patricia Green will perform King Harald's Saga (1979), a short opera for solo voice by Judith Weir. Green will host a vocal masterclass with UMBC students after her performance. Patricia Green has gained acclaim for her expressive voice, noted for its three-octave ease in diverse repertoire. Her international career includes performances with L'Orchestre de Radio-France, the Dutch Radio Philharmonic, the National Symphony, the Northern Israel Philharmonic, the Theater Chamber Players, Washington Bach Consort, Vancouver New Music, Onafhankelijk Collective, Bethlehem Bach Society, and New Music Concerts (Toronto). Her performances with conductors Pierre Boulez, Leonard Slatkin, Reinbert de Leeuw, PeterEtvs, Pascal Roph and Sir David Willcocks have been broadcast internationally on both television and radio.As a performer of new music, she is sought out by international composers. She has recordings on Newport Classics, Albany Records, and Live Unity Productions. Ms. Green received the Artist Diploma from the Peabody Conservatory, winning the George Castelle Prize. She teaches at Michigan State University.

February 15
Lisa Cella, flute
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.

Flutist Lisa Cella will perform Chronopolis by Franklin Cox, Flutter by Robert Rowe, Landmines by Anna Rubin, and other works. Artistic Director of San Diego New Music, Ms. Cella received a DMA in contemporary flute performance at the University of California, San Diego while studying with John Fonville. She has performed with SONOR, the faculty ensemble of UCSD, SIRIUS, and in various concert series and festivals in the San Diego area. She is a founding member of NOISE, the resident ensemble of San Diego New Music and runs the music series Noise at the Library at the Athenaeum Library in San Diego, California. She received her Applied Bachelors in Music with a dual concentration in Psychology from Syracuse University under the tutelage of John Oberbrunner. Upon graduation, she received the Civic Morning Musicals award for excellence in performance. She then received a Master of Music degree and a Graduate Performance Diploma from Peabody Conservatory, where she studied with Robert Willoughby. While in Baltimore, she was the winner of the 1992 Washington Flute Fair Young Artist Competition and founded the flute and guitar duo, Adesso!, which was a finalist in the Baltimore Chamber Competition. A dedicated performer of contemporary music, Cella was a member of the Baltimore based contemporary ensemble Polaris in 1993. She attended the Norfolk Chamber Music Festival in 1993 and was a fellowship member of the Aspen Contemporary Ensemble at the Aspen Music Festival for two summers. She is the founding member of the ensemble Sounding, a contemporary quartet (flute, clarinet, piano, percussion) that had its origins in the Aspen Contemporary Ensemble. With Sounding, she has performed at universities such as Bowling Green, Cornell, SUNY Buffalo, Oberlin, and Syracuse. Currently, she is a lecturer in music at UMBC and a founding member of the faculty contemporary music ensemble, RUCKUS.

Stephen Drury (photo by Lisa Kohler)February 18
Stephen Drury
, piano
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission is free.

Pianist Stephen Drury will present a program of the three piano sonatas by Charles Ives (Sonata No. 1, Sonata No. 2 (Concord, Mass., 184060), and the Three Page Sonata) on the 50th anniversary of the composer's death. Drury was named 1989 Musician of the Year by the Boston Globe and has concertized throughout the world with a repertoire that stretches from Bach to Liszt to the music of today. He has given solo performances at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., New York's Symphony Space, and from Arkansas to California to Hong Kong to Paris. A champion of twentieth-century music, Drury's performances of musicranging from the piano sonatas of Charles Ives to works by John Cage and Gyrgy Ligetihave received the highest critical acclaim. He has appeared at the MusikTriennale Kln in Germany, the Subtropics Festival in Miami, the Festival of New American Music in Sacramento, and the North American New Music Festival in Buffalo as well as at Roulette and the Knitting Factory in New York. At Spoleto USA and at the Angelica Festival in Bologna, he performed as both conductor and pianist. He has also conducted the Britten Sinfonia in England, the Santa Cruz New Music Works Ensemble, and the Harvard Group for New Music. In 1992 Stephen Drury directed the world premiere of George Russell's Time Line for orchestra, chorus, jazz band and soloists. In 1988-1989, he organized a year-long festival of the music of John Cage which led to a request from the composer to perform the solo piano part in Cage's 1O1, premiered with the Boston Symphony Orchestra in April, 1989. Drury has commissioned new works for solo piano from John Cage, John Zorn, Terry Riley, and Chinary Ung with funding provided by Meet The Composer. In 1995, he gave the first performance of John Zorn's concerto for piano and orchestra, Aporias, with Dennis Russell Davies and the Cologne Radio Symphony Orchestra. Later that same season he gave the premiere of Basic Training for solo piano, written for him by Lee Hyla. Drury is artistic director of the Callithumpian Consort, and he created and directs the Summer Institute for Contemporary Piano Performance at New England Conservatory. (Co-sponsored by UMBC's InterArts program.)

ConText Performers CollectiveFebruary 19
ConText Performers Collective
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission is free.

The ConText Performers Collective, featuring Sylvia Smith and Carrie Rose. Their concert will feature Robert Erickson's Pacific Sirens, Stuart Saunders Smith's Transitions and Leaps, and works by Will Ogdon and Herbert Brn. Sylvia Smith is a percussionist, scholar and publisher, and is the artistic director of the UMBC New Music Ensemble. She has performed at the Percussive Arts Society International Convention and has participated in the Interpretations Series at Merkin Hall in New York. In 1998 she founded the ConText Performers Collective, which specializes in music that integrates percussion, spoken text and theatre. She has authored articles on graphic notation and curated many concerts of the music of John Cage. Smith owns and operates Smith Publications, and in 1994 was awarded an honorary doctorate for her work in American music by the University of Akron. Flutist and dancer Carrie Rose earned Master and Bachelor of Music degrees from the Cleveland Institute of Music as a student of Joshua Smith, principal flutist of the Cleveland Orchestra. She toured Russia and Eastern Europe with the American Russian Young Artists Orchestra, has performed throughout Switzerland, Germany and England, was awarded a full scholarship to the National Orchestral Institute at the University of Maryland, and was a Fellow in Chamber Music at the Schweitzer Institute of Music in Sandpoint, Idaho, directed by Gunther Schuller. Rose has played with the New World Symphony in Miami, and the Akron and Youngstown Symphonies in Ohio. Honors and awards include first prize at the national level of the Yamaha/Music Teachers National Association Competition, a Presser Foundation Scholarship, and the Amherst Symphony Womens' Committee Scholarship.

E. Michael Richards (Photo by Richard Anderson)February 22
E. Michael Richards, clarinet
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.

Clarinetist E. Michael Richards will perform the Fantasia da Concerto su motivi de La Traviata di G. Verdi by Donato Lovreglio, Altre Tracce by Fabio Cifariello Ciardi, the American premiere of magnificat 2: Still by Linda Dusman, Undercurrents by Eve de Castro-Robinson, and Dal Niente (Interieur III) by Helmut Lachenmann. The pieces all connect the clarinet to the human voice, from the arrangement of Verdi arias in a bel canto style (Lovreglio), to short ambiguous (and embedded in a complex structure) quotations of famous works (part of our cultural memory such as Bizet's Carmen, Rossini's Barber of Seville, etc.) that share a motivic similarity (Ciardi), to an exploration of the passagio among registers of the clarinet that culminates in multiphonics (Jones), to extreme contrast between chalumeau and altissimo registers that includes simultaneous singing and playing (de Castro-Robinson), to the idea of a musique concrete instrumentale, in which all of the sounds point away from themselves as a kind of corporeal experience. And finally, as Lachenmann said, The instrument becomes a device: a characteristically manipulated filter for the player's breath. Two of the works will be performed by the Tanosaki-Richards Duo, featuring pianist Kazuko Tanosaki. As a recitalist of new music, E. Michael Richards has premiered over 125 works throughout the United States, Japan, Australia, and Western Europe. Trained as a clarinetist at the New England Conservatory (B.Mus.) and Yale School of Music (M.Mus.), Richards earned a Ph.D. at the University of California, San Diego. He received a 1990 U.S./Japan Creative Artist Fellowship (sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts, U.S.-Japan Friendship Commission, and Japanese Government Cultural Agency) as a solo recitalist for a six-month residency in Japan, an NEH Summer Fellowship to study traditional Japanese music, and a residency grant (Cassis, France) from the Camargo Foundation to complete a book, The Clarinet of the Twenty-First Century. Richards has performed as concerto soloist with the Syracuse Symphony and Shinsei Japan Philharmonic (Tokyo), in chamber music performances with the Cassatt Quartet, Ying Quartet, SONOR, and the East-West Quartet, and in recital at eight international festivals and more than 20 universities, as well as at Lincoln Center, the Guggenheim Museum (New York), the American Academy in Rome, and the Tokyo American Center. He has also performed as a member of the Tanosaki-Richards Duo (with pianist Kazuko Tanosaki) since 1982. Richards has recorded on the NEUMA, Mode, CRI, Ninewinds, and Opus One labels. He has taught at Smith College; the University of California, San Diego; Bowdoin College; Hamilton College; and the Hochstein Music School in Rochester, New York; and completed short terms with Kazuko Tanosaki as visiting artists in residence at the University of Massachusetts, CNMAT (Center for New Music and Audio Technologies), at the University of California Berkeley, and San Jose State University.

March 4
Christian Wolff
, composer
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission is free.

Composer Christian Wolff will perform some of his own work for solo piano in celebration of his 70th birthday, including For Prepared Piano (1951) and selections from two new works, Keyboard Miscellany and Incidental Music. Born in 1934 in Nice, France, Christian Wolff has lived mostly in U.S. since 1941. He studied piano with Grete Sultan and composition with John Cage. Although mostly an autodidact, his early contact with Cage, Morton Feldman, David Tudor and Earle Brown, and later Cornelius Cardew and Frederic Rzewski helped form the direction of his work. He received academic training in classics and comparative literature at Harvard University, taught classics at Harvard and, from 1971 until 2000, classics, comparative literature and music at Dartmouth College. Wolff's compositions include works for piano(s), miscellaneous keyboards, instrumental solos, chamber groups, unspecified groups of players and sound sources, tape, chorus and orchestra. A particular interest in Wolff's work has been to allow performers flexibility and ranges of freedom at the actual time of a piece's performance, to devise notations to make this practicable, to foster among both professional and lay players a spirit of liberating interdependence, and to draw material from traditions of popular political music. Wolff's music has been performed throughout the world, especially in Europe and the United States. A number of pieces have been used by Merce Cunningham and his dance company, and also the dancer Lucinda Childs. His music is published by C.F. Peters in New York, and has been recorded on Columbia-Odyssey, Vox, Time-Mainstream, Wergo, Centaur, Elektrola, EMI, CRI, Opus One, Philo, EMI-TOCI, Collecta, Hat Hut, Mode, Koch International, Time-Scraper and Content. His writings on music have been collected in: Cues: Writings & Conversations, published by MusikTexte, Cologne. Christian Wolff has performed as an improviser with Takehisa Kosugi, Steve Lacy, Christian Marclay, Kui Dong and Larry Polansky. He received awards from the American Academy and National Institute for Arts and Letters (1975); DAAD, Berlin (1974); and the Asian Cultural Council Grant (1987); received the John Cage Award for Music (1996); and was made a member of the Akademie der Knste, Berlin in 1999.

RuckusMarch 18
Ruckus
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission is free.

Ruckus, the professional contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC, will present Elliott Carter's Triple Duo, Vinko Globokar's Correspondences, Anna Rubin's Dreaming Fire, Tasting Rain, a new work by Thomas DeLio, Hiroyuki Itoh's Shadows of Night III, and Milton Babbitt's Composition for Four Instruments. The ensemble features flutist Lisa Cella, cellist Franklin Cox, percussionist Tom Goldstein, clarinetist E. Michael Richards, pianist Kazuko Tanosaki and violinist Airi Yoshioka. Founded in 2000 to promote the performance of contemporary chamber music, Ruckus has performed at the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Smithsonian Institution, and at universities throughout the East Coast.

Airi Yoshioka (Photo by Richard Anderson)April 4
Airi Yoshioka, violin
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.

Violinist Airi Yoshioka, accompanied by pianist John Novacek, will feature Ludwig van Beethoven's Sonata No. 10 in G major, Op. 96; Robert Schumann's Sonata No. 1 in a minor, Op. 105; Arvo Prt's Fratres; the world premiere of a work by Alice Shields; and three rags by John Novacek. Airi Yoshioka has concertized throughout the United States, Europe, Japan, and Canada. Deeply committed to chamber music, Ms. Yoshioka was a founding member of Yale University's Wenceslas Ensemble and the Modigliani Quartet. Her orchestral credits include performances with the American Sinfonietta and engagements as concertmaster and soloist with the Manhattan Virtuosi and concertmaster of one of the festival orchestras at the Aspen Music Festival. An enthusiastic performer of new music, she was one of the original members and concertmasters of the New Juilliard Ensemble and performed in the school's FOCUS! Festival as well as with the Lower Eastside Ensemble for Contemporary Music. Of a performance with the New Juilliard Ensemble, The New York Times wrote, Airi Yoshioka played the violin solo touchingly.

Franklin Cox (Photo by Richard Anderson)April 18
Franklin Cox, cello
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.

Cellist Franklin Cox will feature J.S. Bach's Cello Suite No. 4 in E-flat (BWV 1010), a new work by Erik Ulman, Willow by Stuart Saunders Smith, and a new work by Franklin Cox. Franklin Cox has performed in numerous festivals and new music ensembles, including the Indiana University New Music Ensemble, the Group for Contemporary Music, and SONOR, as well as at the 1980 and 1982 Spoleto Festivals, the 1983 Banff Summer Chamber Music Festival, the Xenakis Festival and Darmstadt Revisited Festival at UCSD, and at the Darmstadt Festival since 1988, where he received a special citation for cello performance in 1990. He received a Bachelor of Music degree in composition from Indiana University, a Master of Arts degree in composition from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. in composition at the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Cox has studied with Brian Ferneyhough, Roger Reynolds, Joji Yuasa, Steven Suber, Fred Fox, Harvey Sollberger, Fred Lerdahl, and Jack Beeson. He received an Alice M. Ditson Scholarship and Dissertation Fellowship at Columbia University, Regent's Fellowship and a Dissertation Research Fellowship for Outstanding Research at UCSD, a full scholarship to the 1990 June in Buffalo Festival, and full scholarships for the 1988 and 1992 Darmstadt Festivals. He was awarded a Stipendium Fellowship at the 1990 Darmstadt Festival, won 2nd prize in the Los Angeles Arts Commission competition in the spring of 1991, and was co-winner of the Kranichsteiner Musikpreis (highest award for composition) in the 1992 Darmstadt Festival.

April 25
Federal City Brass Band
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.

The Federal City Brass Band, directed of Jari Villanueva and based in Baltimore, recreates the sound and appearance of a U.S. Army regimental brass band of the 1860s. With the exception of the reproduction rope-tension drums, all of the instruments used by the Federal City Brass Band are originals dating to the mid-19th century. The sources of the music the band plays include original band journals and sheet music of the Civil War era. Members of the Federal City Brass Band are professional and volunteer musicians, music educators, historians and re-enactors, and collectively represent some of the finest brass and percussion players in the hobby today. The band has performed for events at Gettysburg, Sharpsburg, Baltimore, Fredericksburg, Rockville, and Arlington, for the Library of Congress and the American Bandmasters Association, and at the 2003 National Civil War Band Festival in Campbellsville, Kentucky. The program at UMBC will feature Civil War-era favorites.

Jane RiglerApril 28
Jane Rigler, flute
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission is free.

Flutist Jane Rigler will perform a program of contemporary works. With an extensive background in both classical and contemporary music, Jane Rigler has considerable experience as an interpreter of contemporary music. Her repertoire covers some of the most complex and demanding works played today, including works such as Monolith by Vinko Globokar and Cassandra's Dream Song by Brian Ferneyhough. Between 1989 and 1995 she was a member of several orchestras and contemporary music ensembles in California as well as collaborated with both Madrid-based Ensemble Plural and Grupo Cosmos. In 2000, she was a guest artist with Grupo Cosmos, touring Tokyo and various northern Italian cities and playing works by John Cage and Bruno Maderna. Besides ensemble work, her performing experience encompasses flute and electronics, computer interactive improvisation and interdisciplinary experimental works. Between 19941999, Rigler collaborated with composer/multi-intstrumentalist Rafael Lin. Together they have performed in contemporary music festivals in Madrid, Barcelona, Alicante and Granada, in the Horizontal Radio of the European Radio Union, the Paralelo Madrid, and the Punto de Encuentro of the Association of Electroacoustic Music of Spain. In addition, the Rigler-Lin duo has given more than 250 pedagogical concerts for children in both Madrid and Granada. Their performances throughout Spain have been reviewed as showing great imagination and profound knowledge (Enrique Franco, El Pais) as well as having an intense humanistic content (Manuel Ferrand, ABC). Rigler has been combining forces with other composers and performers such as Koji Asano, Agust Fernndez, Hannes Giger, Barbara Held, Christoph Irmer, Marisa Manchado, Wade Matthews, Liba Villavecchia, Musicalibre of Madrid and the IBA Olestars of Barcelona, among others.

ZananaApril 30
Zanana
8 pm, Fine Arts Studio 508
Admission is free.

Zanana, a collaborative duo featuring Kristin Norderval (voice) and Monique Buzzart (trombone), will perform a program of improvised music blending acoustic sounds, electronics and live processing. Kristin Norderval is a classically trained singer, improviser, and composer who performs an eclectic repertoire that spans the renaissance to the avant-garde. Many works have been written for her, and her collaborations have included work with choreographers, sculptors, filmmakers and installation artists. Since 1997, she has also been recording on-site improvisations in unusual spaces, many of them industrial. Profiled by The New York Times in Downtown Divas Expand their Horizons and hailed as one of new music's best by the Village Voice, her performances range from concert and opera to multi-media events. Her work as a soloist has taken her to festivals throughout the world, and her credits include performances with the San Francisco Symphony, the Stuttgart Philharmonic, Oslo Sinfonietta, the Philip Glass Ensemble, and numerous new music ensembles in the United States and Europe. She has recorded new works for Mode, Nonesuch, Point, and CRI as well as for Norwegian, German, and Austrian radio, and has performed in opera and music-theater productions for Lincoln Center, BAM, the Yerba Buena Arts Center in San Francisco, Santa Fe Opera, Netherlands Dance Theater, and Dance Alloy. Ms. Norderval received 2002 Artist Residencies at Harvestworks Digital Media Arts and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Ms. Norderval is certified to teach the meditative improvisation techniques of Deep Listening. Monique Buzzart, trombonist, is an avid proponent of contemporary music, commissioning and premiering many new works for trombone alone, with electronics, and in chamber ensembles. Since 1983 her New Music from Women: Trombone Commissions project has been supporting the expansion of the trombone repertoire, with 20022004 commissions forthcoming from Pauline Oliveros, Annea Lockwood, Anne LeBaron, and Alice Shields. Ms. Buzzart is currently developing a new interactive performance system for the trombone, supported in part through artist residencies at Create@iEAR Studios in 2003 and Harvestworks Digital Media Arts in 2003. Ms. Buzzart's recordings include John Cage's Five3 with the Arditti Quartet (Mode Records) and Dreaming Wide Awake with the New Circle Five (Deep Listening 20). An author, activist, and educator as well as a performer/composer, Ms. Buzzart has published research on the brass music of women composers and led efforts which led to the admission of women into the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra. Ms. Buzzart is certified to teach the meditative improvisation techniques of Deep Listening. (Presented by UMBC's InterArts program.)

Student Recital Series

February 21
The Jubilee Singers under the direction of Janice Jackson. 7 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

March 14
The UMBC Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Wayne Cameron, featuring winners of the High School Concerto Competition, and Ryan Bridgland, winner of the UMBC Department of Music Concerto Competition, performing a Dmitri Shostakovich Cello Concerto. 3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

April 24
The Maryland Camerata under the direction of David Smith. 7:30 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

April 29
The UMBC Jazz Big Band under the direction of Jari Villanueva. 8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

May 1
The Jubilee Singers under the direction of Janice Jackson. 7 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

May 2
An Evening of Opera, featuring selected works by composers such as Verdi, Bizet, Offenbach, Puccini and others, featuring soloists, duets, and the choral ensembles of UMBC. 7:30 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

May 3
The UMBC Chamber Players under the direction of E. Michael Richards. 8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

May 6
The UMBC Concert Band under the direction of Jari Villanueva. 8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

May 8
The UMBC Guitar Ensemble under the direction of Troy King. 5 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

May 8
The Collegium Musicum under the direction of Joseph Morin. 8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

May 9
The UMBC Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Wayne Cameron. 3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

May 11
Departmental Honors Recital. 8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

May 14
The UMBC Jazz Improv Ensemble under the direction of Rick Hannah. 8 pm, The Commons Cabaret. Admission is free.

World Music Series

February 27
Stone Groove, an Afro-BeatDubJazzFunk group featuring Africana Studies faculty member Stephanie Johnson. 12 2 pm, Main Street at The Commons. Admission is free.

March 29
The Global Percussion Trio, featuring Department of Music faculty member Barry Dove, featuring African, Brazilian, Japanese and other forms of drumming from around the world. 12 2 pm, Main Street at The Commons. Admission is free.

WillbillyApril 14
Willbilly, an American roots music ensemble that draws from the folk, blues, country, and rock traditions. The band features John Thomakos on drums, Dave Chappell on guitar, Justin Crown on bass, Mookie Siegel on keyboards, and Department of Music faculty member Billy Kemp on guitar and vocals. 12 2 pm, Main Street at The Commons. Admission is free.

Additional Information

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

Telephone
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Department of Music website: http://www.umbc.edu/music

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Evening parking is available in Lot 16, adjacent to the Fine Arts Building, for 50. Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

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Posted by dwinds1

UMBC Department of Music Presents
Spring 2004 Concerts and Events

The UMBC Department of Music presents its spring 2004 season, featuring an array of contemporary classical music concerts by world renowned artists, including the composer Christian Wolff, pianist Stephen Drury, flutist Jane Rigler and the Ruckus ensemble.

The UMBC Department of Music presents its spring 2004 season, featuring an array of contemporary classical music concerts by world renowned artists, including the composer Christian Wolff, pianist Stephen Drury, flutist Jane Rigler and the Ruckus ensemble.

Professional Artist Series

January 28
Patricia Green, mezzo soprano
12 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission is free.
Mezzo soprano Patricia Green will perform King Harald’s Saga (1979), a short opera for solo voice by Judith Weir. Green will host a vocal masterclass with UMBC students after her performance. Patricia Green has gained acclaim for her expressive voice, noted for its three-octave ease in diverse repertoire. Her international career includes performances with L’Orchestre de Radio-France, the Dutch Radio Philharmonic, the National Symphony, the Northern Israel Philharmonic, the Theater Chamber Players, Washington Bach Consort, Vancouver New Music, Onafhankelijk Collective, Bethlehem Bach Society, and New Music Concerts (Toronto). Her performances with conductors Pierre Boulez, Leonard Slatkin, Reinbert de Leeuw, Peter Eötvös, Pascal Rophé and Sir David Willcocks have been broadcast internationally on both television and radio. As a performer of new music, she is sought out by international composers. She has recordings on Newport Classics, Albany Records, and Live Unity Productions. Ms. Green received the Artist Diploma from the Peabody Conservatory, winning the George Castelle Prize. She teaches at Michigan State University.

February 15
Lisa Cella, flute
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Flutist Lisa Cella will perform Chronopolis by Franklin Cox, Flutter by Robert Rowe, Landmines by Anna Rubin, and other works. Artistic Director of San Diego New Music, Ms. Cella received a DMA in contemporary flute performance at the University of California, San Diego while studying with John Fonville. She has performed with SONOR, the faculty ensemble of UCSD, SIRIUS, and in various concert series and festivals in the San Diego area. She is a founding member of NOISE, the resident ensemble of San Diego New Music and runs the music series Noise at the Library at the Athenaeum Library in San Diego, California. She received her Applied Bachelors in Music with a dual concentration in Psychology from Syracuse University under the tutelage of John Oberbrunner. Upon graduation, she received the Civic Morning Musicals award for excellence in performance. She then received a Master of Music degree and a Graduate Performance Diploma from Peabody Conservatory, where she studied with Robert Willoughby. While in Baltimore, she was the winner of the 1992 Washington Flute Fair Young Artist Competition and founded the flute and guitar duo, Adesso!, which was a finalist in the Baltimore Chamber Competition. A dedicated performer of contemporary music, Cella was a member of the Baltimore based contemporary ensemble Polaris in 1993. She attended the Norfolk Chamber Music Festival in 1993 and was a fellowship member of the Aspen Contemporary Ensemble at the Aspen Music Festival for two summers. She is the founding member of the ensemble Sounding, a contemporary quartet (flute, clarinet, piano, percussion) that had its origins in the Aspen Contemporary Ensemble. With Sounding, she has performed at universities such as Bowling Green, Cornell, SUNY Buffalo, Oberlin, and Syracuse. Currently, she is a lecturer in music at UMBC and a founding member of the faculty contemporary music ensemble, RUCKUS.

Stephen Drury (photo by Lisa Kohler)February 18
Stephen Drury
, piano
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission is free.
Pianist Stephen Drury will present a program of the three piano sonatas by Charles Ives (Sonata No. 1, Sonata No. 2 (“Concord, Mass., 1840–60”), and the Three Page Sonata) on the 50th anniversary of the composer’s death. Drury was named 1989 Musician of the Year by the Boston Globe and has concertized throughout the world with a repertoire that stretches from Bach to Liszt to the music of today. He has given solo performances at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C., New York’s Symphony Space, and from Arkansas to California to Hong Kong to Paris. A champion of twentieth-century music, Drury’s performances of music—ranging from the piano sonatas of Charles Ives to works by John Cage and György Ligeti—have received the highest critical acclaim. He has appeared at the MusikTriennale Köln in Germany, the Subtropics Festival in Miami, the Festival of New American Music in Sacramento, and the North American New Music Festival in Buffalo as well as at Roulette and the Knitting Factory in New York. At Spoleto USA and at the Angelica Festival in Bologna, he performed as both conductor and pianist. He has also conducted the Britten Sinfonia in England, the Santa Cruz New Music Works Ensemble, and the Harvard Group for New Music. In 1992 Stephen Drury directed the world premiere of George Russell's Time Line for orchestra, chorus, jazz band and soloists. In 1988-1989, he organized a year-long festival of the music of John Cage which led to a request from the composer to perform the solo piano part in Cage’s 1O1, premiered with the Boston Symphony Orchestra in April, 1989. Drury has commissioned new works for solo piano from John Cage, John Zorn, Terry Riley, and Chinary Ung with funding provided by Meet The Composer. In 1995, he gave the first performance of John Zorn’s concerto for piano and orchestra, Aporias, with Dennis Russell Davies and the Cologne Radio Symphony Orchestra. Later that same season he gave the premiere of Basic Training for solo piano, written for him by Lee Hyla. Drury is artistic director of the Callithumpian Consort, and he created and directs the Summer Institute for Contemporary Piano Performance at New England Conservatory. (Co-sponsored by UMBC’s InterArts program.)

ConText Performers CollectiveFebruary 19
ConText Performers Collective
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission is free.
The ConText Performers Collective, featuring Sylvia Smith and Carrie Rose. Their concert will feature Robert Erickson’s Pacific Sirens, Stuart Saunders Smith’s Transitions and Leaps, and works by Will Ogdon and Herbert Brün. Sylvia Smith is a percussionist, scholar and publisher, and is the artistic director of the UMBC New Music Ensemble. She has performed at the Percussive Arts Society International Convention and has participated in the Interpretations Series at Merkin Hall in New York. In 1998 she founded the ConText Performers Collective, which specializes in music that integrates percussion, spoken text and theatre. She has authored articles on graphic notation and curated many concerts of the music of John Cage. Smith owns and operates Smith Publications, and in 1994 was awarded an honorary doctorate for her work in American music by the University of Akron. Flutist and dancer Carrie Rose earned Master and Bachelor of Music degrees from the Cleveland Institute of Music as a student of Joshua Smith, principal flutist of the Cleveland Orchestra. She toured Russia and Eastern Europe with the American Russian Young Artists Orchestra, has performed throughout Switzerland, Germany and England, was awarded a full scholarship to the National Orchestral Institute at the University of Maryland, and was a Fellow in Chamber Music at the Schweitzer Institute of Music in Sandpoint, Idaho, directed by Gunther Schuller. Rose has played with the New World Symphony in Miami, and the Akron and Youngstown Symphonies in Ohio. Honors and awards include first prize at the national level of the Yamaha/Music Teachers National Association Competition, a Presser Foundation Scholarship, and the Amherst Symphony Womens’ Committee Scholarship.

E. Michael Richards (Photo by Richard Anderson)February 22
E. Michael Richards, clarinet
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Clarinetist E. Michael Richards will perform the Fantasia da Concerto su motivi de La Traviata di G. Verdi by Donato Lovreglio, Altre Tracce by Fabio Cifariello Ciardi, the American premiere of magnificat 2: Still by Linda Dusman, Undercurrents by Eve de Castro-Robinson, and Dal Niente (Interieur III) by Helmut Lachenmann. The pieces all connect the clarinet to the human voice, from the arrangement of Verdi arias in a bel canto style (Lovreglio), to short ambiguous (and embedded in a complex structure) quotations of famous works (part of our “cultural memory” such as Bizet’s Carmen, Rossini’s Barber of Seville, etc.) that share a motivic similarity (Ciardi), to an exploration of the passagio among registers of the clarinet that culminates in multiphonics (Jones), to extreme contrast between chalumeau and altissimo registers that includes simultaneous singing and playing (de Castro-Robinson), to the idea of a “musique concrete instrumentale,” in which all of the sounds point away from themselves as a kind of “corporeal” experience. And finally, as Lachenmann said, “The instrument becomes a device: a characteristically manipulated filter for the player’s breath.” Two of the works will be performed by the Tanosaki-Richards Duo, featuring pianist Kazuko Tanosaki. As a recitalist of new music, E. Michael Richards has premiered over 125 works throughout the United States, Japan, Australia, and Western Europe. Trained as a clarinetist at the New England Conservatory (B.Mus.) and Yale School of Music (M.Mus.), Richards earned a Ph.D. at the University of California, San Diego. He received a 1990 U.S./Japan Creative Artist Fellowship (sponsored by the National Endowment for the Arts, U.S.-Japan Friendship Commission, and Japanese Government Cultural Agency) as a solo recitalist for a six-month residency in Japan, an NEH Summer Fellowship to study traditional Japanese music, and a residency grant (Cassis, France) from the Camargo Foundation to complete a book, The Clarinet of the Twenty-First Century. Richards has performed as concerto soloist with the Syracuse Symphony and Shinsei Japan Philharmonic (Tokyo), in chamber music performances with the Cassatt Quartet, Ying Quartet, SONOR, and the East-West Quartet, and in recital at eight international festivals and more than 20 universities, as well as at Lincoln Center, the Guggenheim Museum (New York), the American Academy in Rome, and the Tokyo American Center. He has also performed as a member of the Tanosaki-Richards Duo (with pianist Kazuko Tanosaki) since 1982. Richards has recorded on the NEUMA, Mode, CRI, Ninewinds, and Opus One labels. He has taught at Smith College; the University of California, San Diego; Bowdoin College; Hamilton College; and the Hochstein Music School in Rochester, New York; and completed short terms with Kazuko Tanosaki as visiting artists in residence at the University of Massachusetts, CNMAT (Center for New Music and Audio Technologies), at the University of California Berkeley, and San Jose State University.

March 4
Christian Wolff
, composer
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission is free.
Composer Christian Wolff will perform some of his own work for solo piano in celebration of his 70th birthday, including For Prepared Piano (1951) and selections from two new works, Keyboard Miscellany and Incidental Music. Born in 1934 in Nice, France, Christian Wolff has lived mostly in U.S. since 1941. He studied piano with Grete Sultan and composition with John Cage. Although mostly an autodidact, his early contact with Cage, Morton Feldman, David Tudor and Earle Brown, and later Cornelius Cardew and Frederic Rzewski helped form the direction of his work. He received academic training in classics and comparative literature at Harvard University, taught classics at Harvard and, from 1971 until 2000, classics, comparative literature and music at Dartmouth College. Wolff’s compositions include works for piano(s), miscellaneous keyboards, instrumental solos, chamber groups, unspecified groups of players and sound sources, tape, chorus and orchestra. A particular interest in Wolff’s work has been to allow performers flexibility and ranges of freedom at the actual time of a piece’s performance, to devise notations to make this practicable, to foster among both professional and lay players a spirit of liberating interdependence, and to draw material from traditions of popular political music. Wolff’s music has been performed throughout the world, especially in Europe and the United States. A number of pieces have been used by Merce Cunningham and his dance company, and also the dancer Lucinda Childs. His music is published by C.F. Peters in New York, and has been recorded on Columbia-Odyssey, Vox, Time-Mainstream, Wergo, Centaur, Elektrola, EMI, CRI, Opus One, Philo, EMI-TOCI, Collecta, Hat Hut, Mode, Koch International, Time-Scraper and Content. His writings on music have been collected in: Cues: Writings & Conversations, published by MusikTexte, Cologne. Christian Wolff has performed as an improviser with Takehisa Kosugi, Steve Lacy, Christian Marclay, Kui Dong and Larry Polansky. He received awards from the American Academy and National Institute for Arts and Letters (1975); DAAD, Berlin (1974); and the Asian Cultural Council Grant (1987); received the John Cage Award for Music (1996); and was made a member of the Akademie der Künste, Berlin in 1999.

RuckusMarch 18
Ruckus
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission is free.
The Department of Music’s Contemporary Concerts Series presents Ruckus, the professional contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC. The program will include Elliott Carter’s Triple Duo, Vinko Globokar’s Correspondences, Anna Rubin’s Dreaming Fire, Tasting Rain, a new work by Thomas DeLio, Hiroyuki Itoh’s Shadows of Night III, and Milton Babbitt’s Composition for Four Instruments. The ensemble features flutist Lisa Cella, cellist Franklin Cox, percussionist Tom Goldstein, clarinetist E. Michael Richards, pianist Kazuko Tanosaki and violinist Airi Yoshioka. Founded in 2000 to promote the performance of contemporary chamber music, Ruckus has performed at the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Smithsonian Institution, and at universities throughout the East Coast.

Airi Yoshioka (Photo by Richard Anderson)April 4
Airi Yoshioka, violin
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Violinist Airi Yoshioka, accompanied by pianist John Novacek, will feature Ludwig van Beethoven’s Sonata No. 10 in G major, Op. 96; Robert Schumann’s Sonata No. 1 in a minor, Op. 105; Arvo Pärt’s Fratres; the world premiere of a work by Alice Shields; and three rags by John Novacek. Airi Yoshioka has concertized throughout the United States, Europe, Japan, and Canada. Deeply committed to chamber music, Ms. Yoshioka was a founding member of Yale University’s Wenceslas Ensemble and the Modigliani Quartet. Her orchestral credits include performances with the American Sinfonietta and engagements as concertmaster and soloist with the Manhattan Virtuosi and concertmaster of one of the festival orchestras at the Aspen Music Festival. An enthusiastic performer of new music, she was one of the original members and concertmasters of the New Juilliard Ensemble and performed in the school’s FOCUS! Festival as well as with the Lower Eastside Ensemble for Contemporary Music. Of a performance with the New Juilliard Ensemble, The New York Times wrote, “Airi Yoshioka played the violin solo touchingly.”

Franklin Cox (Photo by Richard Anderson)April 18
Franklin Cox, cello
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Cellist Franklin Cox will feature J.S. Bach’s Cello Suite No. 4 in E-flat (BWV 1010), a new work by Erik Ulman, Willow by Stuart Saunders Smith, and a new work by Franklin Cox. Franklin Cox has performed in numerous festivals and new music ensembles, including the Indiana University New Music Ensemble, the Group for Contemporary Music, and SONOR, as well as at the 1980 and 1982 Spoleto Festivals, the 1983 Banff Summer Chamber Music Festival, the Xenakis Festival and Darmstadt Revisited Festival at UCSD, and at the Darmstadt Festival since 1988, where he received a special citation for cello performance in 1990. He received a Bachelor of Music degree in composition from Indiana University, a Master of Arts degree in composition from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. in composition at the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Cox has studied with Brian Ferneyhough, Roger Reynolds, Joji Yuasa, Steven Suber, Fred Fox, Harvey Sollberger, Fred Lerdahl, and Jack Beeson. He received an Alice M. Ditson Scholarship and Dissertation Fellowship at Columbia University, Regent’s Fellowship and a Dissertation Research Fellowship for Outstanding Research at UCSD, a full scholarship to the 1990 June in Buffalo Festival, and full scholarships for the 1988 and 1992 Darmstadt Festivals. He was awarded a Stipendium Fellowship at the 1990 Darmstadt Festival, won 2nd prize in the Los Angeles Arts Commission competition in the spring of 1991, and was co-winner of the Kranichsteiner Musikpreis (highest award for composition) in the 1992 Darmstadt Festival.

April 25
Federal City Brass Band
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission is free.
The Federal City Brass Band, directed of Jari Villanueva and based in Baltimore, recreates the sound and appearance of a U.S. Army regimental brass band of the 1860s. With the exception of the reproduction rope-tension drums, all of the instruments used by the Federal City Brass Band are originals dating to the mid-19th century. The sources of the music the band plays include original band journals and sheet music of the Civil War era. Members of the Federal City Brass Band are professional and volunteer musicians, music educators, historians and re-enactors, and collectively represent some of the finest brass and percussion players in the hobby today. The band has performed for events at Gettysburg, Sharpsburg, Baltimore, Fredericksburg, Rockville, and Arlington, for the Library of Congress and the American Bandmasters Association, and at the 2003 National Civil War Band Festival in Campbellsville, Kentucky. The program at UMBC will feature Civil War-era favorites.

Jane RiglerApril 28
Jane Rigler, flute
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission is free.
Flutist Jane Rigler will perform a program of contemporary works. With an extensive background in both classical and contemporary music, Jane Rigler has considerable experience as an interpreter of contemporary music. Her repertoire covers some of the most complex and demanding works played today, including works such as Monolith by Vinko Globokar and Cassandra’s Dream Song by Brian Ferneyhough. Between 1989 and 1995 she was a member of several orchestras and contemporary music ensembles in California as well as collaborated with both Madrid-based Ensemble Plural and Grupo Cosmos. In 2000, she was a guest artist with Grupo Cosmos, touring Tokyo and various northern Italian cities and playing works by John Cage and Bruno Maderna. Besides ensemble work, her performing experience encompasses flute and electronics, computer interactive improvisation and interdisciplinary experimental works. Between 1994–1999, Rigler collaborated with composer/multi-intstrumentalist Rafael Liñán. Together they have performed in contemporary music festivals in Madrid, Barcelona, Alicante and Granada, in the Horizontal Radio of the European Radio Union, the Paralelo Madrid, and the Punto de Encuentro of the Association of Electroacoustic Music of Spain. In addition, the Rigler-Liñán duo has given more than 250 pedagogical concerts for children in both Madrid and Granada. Their performances throughout Spain have been reviewed as showing “great imagination and profound knowledge” (Enrique Franco, El Pais) as well as having “an intense humanistic content” (Manuel Ferrand, ABC). Rigler has been combining forces with other composers and performers such as Koji Asano, Agustí Fernández, Hannes Giger, Barbara Held, Christoph Irmer, Marisa Manchado, Wade Matthews, Liba Villavecchia, Musicalibre of Madrid and the IBA Olestars of Barcelona, among others.

ZananaApril 30
Zanana
8 pm, Fine Arts Studio 508
Admission is free.
Zanana, a collaborative duo featuring Kristin Norderval (voice) and Monique Buzzarté (trombone), will perform a program of improvised music blending acoustic sounds, electronics and live processing. Kristin Norderval is a classically trained singer, improviser, and composer who performs an eclectic repertoire that spans the renaissance to the avant-garde. Many works have been written for her, and her collaborations have included work with choreographers, sculptors, filmmakers and installation artists. Since 1997, she has also been recording on-site improvisations in unusual spaces, many of them industrial. Profiled by The New York Times in “Downtown Divas Expand their Horizons” and hailed as one of “new music’s best” by the Village Voice, her performances range from concert and opera to multi-media events. Her work as a soloist has taken her to festivals throughout the world, and her credits include performances with the San Francisco Symphony, the Stuttgart Philharmonic, Oslo Sinfonietta, the Philip Glass Ensemble, and numerous new music ensembles in the United States and Europe. She has recorded new works for Mode, Nonesuch, Point, and CRI as well as for Norwegian, German, and Austrian radio, and has performed in opera and music-theater productions for Lincoln Center, BAM, the Yerba Buena Arts Center in San Francisco, Santa Fe Opera, Netherlands Dance Theater, and Dance Alloy. Ms. Norderval received 2002 Artist Residencies at Harvestworks Digital Media Arts and Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. Ms. Norderval is certified to teach the meditative improvisation techniques of Deep Listening. Monique Buzzarté, trombonist, is an avid proponent of contemporary music, commissioning and premiering many new works for trombone alone, with electronics, and in chamber ensembles. Since 1983 her New Music from Women: Trombone Commissions project has been supporting the expansion of the trombone repertoire, with 2002–2004 commissions forthcoming from Pauline Oliveros, Annea Lockwood, Anne LeBaron, and

Posted by dwinds1

January 13, 2004

UMBC's Center for Art and Visual Culture presents
Paradise Now: Picturing the Genetic Revolution

UMBC's Center for Art and Visual Culture presents Paradise Now: Picturing the Genetic Revolution, organized by Exit Art and co-curated by Marvin Heiferman and Carol Kismaric, from January 29 through March 13, 2004. Paradise Now scrutinizes and questions the profound shifts in our basic understanding and acceptance of nature’s (formerly) incontrovertible truths regarding genetic engineering.

Alexis Rockman, The Farm (2000)UMBC’s Center for Art and Visual Culture presents Paradise Now: Picturing the Genetic Revolution, organized by Exit Art and co-curated by Marvin Heiferman and Carol Kismaric, from January 29 through March 13, 2004.

About the Exhibition
Paradise Now scrutinizes and questions the profound shifts in our basic understanding and acceptance of nature’s (formerly) incontrovertible truths regarding genetic engineering. Featured in the exhibition are works by Heather Ackroyd & Dan Harvey, Suzanne Anker, Dennis Ashbaugh, Aziz + Cucher, Brandon Ballengée, Christine Borland, Nancy Burson, Helen Chadwick, Kevin Clarke, Keith Cottingham, Bryan Crockett, Christine Davis, George Gessert, Rebecca Howland, Ronald Jones, davidkremers, Jane Lackey, Julian LaVerdiere, Karl S. Mihail & Tran T. Kim-Trang, Larry Miller, Steve Miller, Frank Moore, Alexis Rockman, Bradley Rubenstein, Nicolas Rule, Christy Rupp, Gary Schneider, Laura Stein, Eva Sutton, Catherine Wagner and Janet Zweig. The co-curators state:

We are at a threshold, witnesses to the moment when genetic research is rewriting the definition of life. Biotechnology is altering the food we eat, and the information revealed by the decoding of the human genome will give science, medicine, and business unprecedented power. Increasingly, the news media and popular culture are alerting the public to the heated dialogue that is underway about what our brave new world might become. Daily, the unusual procedures and outrageous predictions that were once the subject of science fiction are announced as realities. Each new announcement triggers hope and controversy and guarantees further debate among humanitarians, profit seekers, legal experts, ethicists, politicians, nations, and the public, all in search of paradise, now.

davidkremers: trophoblast (1992)Artists have claimed an important role in this ongoing exploration, creating images that literally give shape to abstract, complex concepts. Stretching the traditions of portraiture and landscape, working with the genetic revolution’s new language and images, they raise questions about the social, ecological, economic, and ethical implications of science’s breakthroughs. The works in Paradise Now investigate urgent issues and concerns triggered by the modification of human cells, nature, and food, and provide viewers with an opportunity to pay closer attention to the dramatic advances in science and to reflect upon the boundaries between science and the human imagination. Some artists make use of new scientific images and information to explore the meaning of identity and the options that can alter our understanding of individuality. They speculate about how the genetic revolution will force us to rethink race, the inevitability of disease and death, and our need to control our bodies, our lives, and our fate. Others consider how we shape nature to meet our desires and demands, manipulating the genetic makeup and enhancing the size and productivity of animals and plants.

With the new power of biotechnology come progress, debate, and protest. Will we live longer, healthier, more perfect lives? Will new discoveries and products have unsuspected consequences to the land and to our health? How will each of us face the challenges, choices, and opportunities that the genetic revolution promises? The artists in Paradise Now speculate about these new parameters of life and these expressions of scientific and corporate creativity with a mixture of awe and concern.

Events and programming include:

  • Kathy Marmor, associate professor of media arts at the University of Vermont, will present a performance entitled Kitchen Science on Friday, January 30th at 12:30 and 8:30 on Main Street in The Commons. Kitchen Science is a tour de force that makes extracting DNA fun an accessible. Her David Lettermanesque banter whirls together household engineering, social engineering and genetic engineering to make one mighty tasty thought provoking DNA soufflé.
  • Imagining the Invisible, an exhibition of research photographs from UMBC’s Department of Biological Sciences, will be on display from January 29th through March 13th in the Skylight Lounge, The Commons. An opening reception for Imagining the Invisible will be held on February 5th from 2 to 4 pm. Admission to the exhibition is free.
  • An opening reception for Paradise Now will be held on February 5th from 5 to 7 pm at the Center for Art and Visual Culture.
  • A panel discussion, Paradise Now?, will be held on Thursday, February 12th from 4:00 to 5:30 p.m. at the CAVC. Moderated by Phyllis Robinson (Department of Biological Sciences), the panel will include Mark Alice Durant (Department of Visual Arts), David M. Eisenmann (Department of Biological Sciences), Stephen J. Freeland (Department of Biological Sciences), Christina Hung (Imaging Research Center) and Jessica J. Pfeifer (Department of Philosophy).

About the Center for Art and Visual Culture
The Center for Art and Visual Culture is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study of contemporary art and visual culture, critical theory, art and cultural history, and the relationship between society and the arts. The CAVC serves as a forum for students, faculty, and the general public for the discussion of important aesthetic and social issues of the day. Disciplines represented include painting, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, photography, digital art, video, film, television, design, architecture, advertising, and installation and performance art.

Bryan Crockett: ecce homo (2000)Since 1989, the CAVC has incorporated a number of public programs into its exhibition programming schedule to further impact the communities it serves. Symposia, lecture series, conferences, film series, visiting artist series, and residencies have all been fundamental in an effort to create an ongoing dialogue about contemporary art and culture. The Center has also initiated a number of projects with Baltimore and surrounding schools systems to integrate the contemporary artist and their concerns into the classroom. These projects take place on-site at both middle schools and high schools and are team taught by the instructors at these schools, professional artists, and students from the CAVC’s Internship Program.

Currently the Center produces one to two exhibition catalogues each year. Each document is fully illustrated and contains critical essays on the given subject by a variety of distinguished professionals in the field. With the printing of Minimal Politics: Performativity and Minimalism in Recent American Art in 1997, the CAVC inaugurated a new series of publications entitled Issues in Cultural Theory. These catalogues are published yearly and are distributed internationally through Distributed Art Publishers in New York.

Since 1992, the Center for Art and Visual Culture has actively pursued the organization of exhibitions that contain the aesthetic, theoretical, and educational potential to reach both a national and international audience. Over the years, the CAVC has traveled these exhibition projects to a broad spectrum of museums, professional non-profit galleries, and universities national and internationally. These traveling exhibitions include:

  • White: Whiteness and Race in Contemporary Art (2003)
  • Fred Wilson: Objects and Installations (2001)
  • Adrian Piper: A Retrospective (1999)
  • Bruno Monguzzi: A Designer’s Perspective (1998)
  • Minimal Politics (1997)
  • Kate Millet, Sculpture: The First 38 Years (1997)
  • Layers: Contemporary Collage from St. Petersburg, Russia (1995/96)
  • Notes In Time: Leon Golub and Nancy Spero (1995)
  • Ciphers of Identity (1994)
  • Nancy Graves: Recent Works (1993)
  • Environmental Terror (1992)

Beyond the scope of these traveling exhibitions, the Center for Art and Visual Culture also undertakes an exhibition schedule that includes a Faculty Biennial, and projects such as the Joseph Beuys Tree Partnership. As part of the educational mission of the CAVC, one graduate thesis exhibition and one undergraduate senior exhibition are scheduled on a yearly basis.

This multi-faceted focus for presenting exhibitions, projects and scholarly research publications focused on contemporary art and cultural issues positions the Center for Art and Visual Culture in a unique position within the mid-Atlantic region.

Hours of Operation
Sunday: Closed
Monday: Closed
Tuesday: 10 A.M. – 5:00 P.M.
Wednesday: 10 A.M. – 5:00 P.M.
Thursday: 10 A.M. – 5:00 P.M.
Friday: 10 A.M. – 5:00 P.M.
Saturday: 10 A.M. – 5:00 P.M.

Admission
Admission to the CAVC and all events is free.

Telephone
CAVC offices: 410-455-3188
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
CAVC website: http://www.umbc.edu/cavc
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked
  • Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

Keith Cottingham: Fictitious Portrait series (1993)

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Posted by dwinds1

January 11, 2004

UMBC presents the Troika Ranch Dance Company

UMBC's InterArts series and the Department of Dance present the Troika Ranch dance company on February 3 and 4, 2003, at 8 p.m. in the UMBC Theatre.

Troika Ranch ©2003 Richard TermineUMBC’s InterArts series and the Department of Dance present the Troika Ranch dance company on February 3 and 4, 2003, at 8 p.m. in the UMBC Theatre.

Renowned for their densely textured choreography, original musical scores and groundbreaking use of interactive digital media and technology, the New York City-based dance theater company Troika Ranch continues to redefine experimental dance theatre. Their program will feature two works: 2001’s Reine Rien and a work-in-progress showing of their newest evening length piece, Surfaces, which is slated to premiere in New York City in May, 2004.

Dubbed “interactive performance pioneers” by The New York Times and “multimedia mavericks” by the Village Voice, Troika Ranch uses custom software and interactive sensory devices to allow their dancers’ movements to directly create music and manipulate video imagery as they perform. The company’s previous work, Future of Memory, which played to sold out houses in New York in February 2003, was awarded the first ever Dance Audience Award at the 2003 “Bessie” (a.k.a. Downtown Dance and Performance) Awards.

In Surfaces, the company will use onstage cameras and a sophisticated form of “video feedback” to allow the real dancers to perform with their video counterparts. As dancers enter and leave the stage, video “echoes”—delayed by moments or minutes—appear and disappear, creating a swirling fugue between the real and the virtual. In addition, software that analyzes movement in the video frame allows the performers to become “media conductors.” Much as the gestures of an orchestra conductor dictate how the music will be played, the dancers’ movement will control the timing, dynamics, and effects applied to the video and sound. The standard relationship, where dancers perform to music, is inverted—now, the media perform to the dancers.

Troika Ranch ©2003 Richard TermineConceptually, Surfaces begins with the notion that a surface is a point of contact and conflict. Whether the surface of a body, a surface that delineates space, or one that separates one’s public and private parts, the surface ensures that one is either on the inside or the outside. Who we are (and who we become) when we struggle to break through the surface is the idea that drives this work.

In Reine Rien, the dancers also directly control their musical and visual accompaniment. Wireless sensors in the performers’ costumes measure the flexion of their joints, transmitting that information to an offstage computer. The performers thus determine the timing, dynamics and looping of sampled sound, and the speed, color content and warping of video imagery. The Village Voice described Reine Rien by saying, “Troika Ranch have created an oxymoron: warm, glowy conceptual art. The movement of the dancers, who are wired to a computer, releases…a beautiful idea—that whole cities of sound are immanent in the air, and human motion makes them visible.”

About Troika Ranch and the Artistic Directors
Pushing the integration of dance and media to new heights, artistic directors Mark Coniglio (music and interactive media) and Dawn Stoppiello (choreography) founded Troika Ranch in 1994 with the mission to create digital-dance-theater in which the media elements share the same spontaneity as the human performers on stage. Based in New York City, Troika Ranch is a leader in interactive performance. The two words that comprise the company name are indicative of its focus. Troika, Russian for three, represents dance, theater and digital media, the three core elements found in the company’s artwork. Ranch symbolizes the collaboration among its members. Coniglio and Stoppiello encourage all in the company to share ideas, techniques and processes to ensure the most abundant aesthetic harvest. The over-arching goal of this collaboration is to fully integrate the three core elements into what Richard Wagner called the gesamtkunstwerk—the total artwork.

Troika Ranch ©2003 Richard TermineMark Coniglio focuses predominately on interweaving music and media into performance. As a composer, he uses dense rhythmic constructions and sampled sound to invent the unusual percussive instruments that are hallmarks of his compositions. Keyboard Magazine perhaps best described his style: “Coniglio’s music consistently expresses a deep, sustained heaviness and ferocity. Powered by big drum sounds, surging phrases and throbbing rhythms, it attacks the listener with stealth and force.” As an inventor, he creates custom instruments and software specifically for use in performance, to which Tannsi (Finnish dance magazine) exclaimed, “there are magical moments when the organic and the electronic components of the performance exist in perfect harmony.” In addition to his work with Troika Ranch, Coniglio also acts as a consultant for other dance companies. He recently served as technical advisor for a video-intensive work created by Judith Jamison for the Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater. Coniglio is one of nine artists selected to receive support during the 2003 inaugural year of a twelve-month dance and technology fellowship at Dance Theater Workshop.

Dawn Stoppiello is a choreographer, dancer and media artist. Her choreography reflects her keen interest in visual rhythm, kinetic complexity and nonlinear motion. An examination of the changing state of the human body as it responds to the increasingly technological world that surrounds it is a recurring and underlying theme in her work. Recognized as a creative leader in the field of dance and technology, she was an invited panelist for the Beyond the Divide Symposium as part of Australia’s Adelaide Festival 2002; has taught master classes at numerous universities around the country; has lectured on interactive performance in France, Monaco, Holland, England, Canada and the U.S.; and her article “FleshMotor” was recently included in the book Women in New Media, published by MIT Press/ Leonardo Art Journal.

Admission
General admission: $15.00
Students and seniors: $7.00
Box Office: 410-455-6240

Telephone
Box Office: 410-455-6240
UMBC Artsline (24-hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
UMBC Department of Dance website: http://www.umbc.edu/dance
Troika Ranch website: http://www.troikaranch.org/

Images for Media
High resolution images (those shown here and others) are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/
or by email or postal mail.
Photos #1 and #2 in this press release are ©2003 Richard Termine. Photos #3 and #4 are by Piro Patton.

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Theatre.
From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.
Theatre Parking is available in The Commons Garage.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Troika Ranch ©2003 Richard Termine

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Posted by dwinds1

October 28, 2003

UMBC Presents the So Percussion Group in Concert

On Thursday, November 9th at 3 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall, the UMBC Department of Music's Contemporary Concert Series presents the So Percussion Group.

So PercussionOn Thursday, November 13th at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall, the UMBC Department of Music's Contemporary Concert Series presents the So Percussion Group. Their concert will feature Shifty by Dennis DeSantis, Each Moment an Ending by Stuart Saunders Smith, Third Construction by John Cage, and The So-called Laws of Nature by David Lang. So Percussion (Douglas Perkins, Adam Sliwinski, Jason Treuting, and Lawson White) is a captivating young group that can always be counted on to astound. Founded in New Haven in 1999, the group has recently been featured at the Bang on a Can Marathon, the BAM Next Wave Festival, the Norfolk Chamber Music Festival, the Percussive Arts Society International Convention, Miller Theater, the Roundtop Festival, and has been heard on WNYC’s New Sounds and Soundcheck. So has also worked closely with student musicians and composers, resulting in residencies at The University of Texas at Austin, Williams College, King’s College, and performances with the Harvard Group for New Music and Columbia Composers. With a breadth extending to both established and emerging composers, So Percussion Group has embarked on an ambitious commissioning project that has led to several other world premieres, including works by composers Kathryn Alexander, Dennis DeSantis, David Lang, and Ken Ueno.

Admission
Admission is free.

Telephone
General Music information: 410-455-2942
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Department of Music website: http://www.umbc.edu/music

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

###

Posted by dwinds1

UMBC Presents Pamela Z in Concert

On Monday, November 17th at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall, the UMBC InterArts program presents Pamela Z in concert.

Pamela ZOn Monday, November 17th at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall, the UMBC InterArts Program presents Pamela Z, a San Francisco-based composer/performer and audio artist who works primarily with voice, live electronic processing, and sampling technology. She creates solo works combining operatic bel canto and experimental extended vocal techniques with found percussion objects, spoken word, “MAX MSP” on a PowerBook, and sampled concrête sounds triggered with a MIDI controller called The BodySynth™ which allows her to manipulate sound with physical gestures. Her performances range in scale from small concerts in galleries to large-scale multi-media works in proscenium halls and flexible black-box venues. Pamela Z has toured extensively throughout the United States, Europe, and Japan. She has performed in numerous festivals, including Bang On A Can at Lincoln Center in New York, the Interlink Festival in Japan, Other Minds in San Francisco, and Pina Bausch Tanztheater’s 25 Jahre Fest in Wuppertal, Germany. She has composed, recorded and performed original scores for choreographers and for film and video artists, and has done vocal work for other composers (including Charles Amirkhanian and Henry Brant). Her large-scale, multi-media performance works, Parts of Speech and Gaijin, have been presented at Theater Artaud in San Francisco, and her audio works have been included in exhibitions at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York and the Erzbischöfliches Diözesanmuseum in Cologne. Ms. Z has composed commissioned works for new music chamber ensembles the Bang On A Can Allstars, the California E.A.R. Unit, and the Left Coast Chamber Ensemble. Since 1986 she has been producing “Z Programs,” an ongoing series of interdisciplinary events in which her own work has been featured along with that of other artists doing experimental work in various genres. She is a member of the electroacoustic ensemble sensorChip (with Miya Masaoka and Donald Swearingen) and the interdisciplinary performance ensemble The Qube Chix. She has done several concerts and experimental theater pieces with Zakros New Music Theatre (including their John Cage festivals), and has performed with The San Francisco Contemporary Music Players. She is the recipient of numerous awards including the CalArts Alpert Award in the Arts, the ASCAP Music Award, and the NEA and Japan/US Friendship Commission Fellowship. She holds a music degree from the University of Colorado at Boulder.

Pamela Z

Admission
Admission is free.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

Images on this page
Top: ©2002 Lori Eanes
Bottom: ©2001 Marion Gray

###

Posted by dwinds1

UMBC's Department of Music Presents the Tabla Duo in Concert

On Sunday, November 9th at 3 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall, the UMBC Department of Music's Faculty Recital Series presents Tabla, featuring Larry Williams on French horn and Bryan Young on bassoon, in a program of multimedia works.

TABLAOn Sunday, November 9th at 3 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall, the UMBC Department of Music's Faculty Recital Series presents Tabla, featuring Larry Williams on French horn and Bryan Young on bassoon, in a program of multimedia works. The Washington Post writes that Bryan Young is a bassoonist who “makes his music dance with lightness and grace, as well as with a sparkle uncommon for his instrument.” The Maine Sunday Telegram raves that Larry Williams is “a phenomenally good horn player, with the brilliance for solo work.” These acclaimed artists have joined forces to create Tabla, a new and exciting duo whose innovative performances shatter the traditional barriers between classical, jazz, contemporary and world music. Williams and Young combine digital video and sound, costume, and lighting with virtuosic live performance to create a stunning concert experience. Tabla’s concert will stimulate your imagination, feed your spirit and make you laugh out loud as they take you on a journey through some of the world’s greatest and most entertaining music.

Admission
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.

Telephone
General Music information: 410-455-2942
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Department of Music website: http://www.umbc.edu/music

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

###

Posted by dwinds1

UMBC Department of Theatre Presents Buried: an Original Puppet Performance

From November 19th through December 7th, 2003, the UMBC Department of Theatre presents Buried, an original puppet performance about the casualties of war.

The UMBC Department of Theatre presents Buried, an original puppet performance about the casualties of war. Looking at war through the eyes of its victims, Buried uses puppetry to imagine what happens to the suspended thoughts and intentions of those who don't survive. Artfully mixing actors with animated objects and humanoid puppets, Buried takes us into a world where spirits enter objects, long-scattered bones rejoin and abandoned possessions reach out to the living. Conceived and directed by Colette Searls, Buried features commissioned puppets by artist Don Becker, with set design by Greggory Schraven, sound design by Terry Cobb, lighting design by Damon Meledones, costume design by Claire Cantwell, and vocal direction by Lynn Watson.

Buried is not recommended for young children.

Showtimes
Wednesday, November 19th at 8 pm (preview)
Thursday, November 20th at 4 pm
Friday, November 21st at 8 pm (opening night)
Saturday, November 22nd at 8 pm
Sunday, November 23rd at 4 pm
Thursday, December 4th at 4 pm
Friday, December 5th at 8 pm
Saturday, December 6th at 8 pm
Sunday, December 7th at 4 pm

Admission
$10 general admission
$5 students
$3 for the preview
The performance on Thursday, November 20th, is free to the UMBC campus community.
Ticket proceeds benefit the Department of Theatre Scholarship Fund.
Theatre Box Office: 410-455-2476

Telephone
Theatre Box Office: 410-455-2476
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
General Department of Theatre information: 410-455-2917
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Department of Theatre website: http://www.umbc.edu/theatre

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.

From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Theatre.

From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.

Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked. Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

###

Posted by dwinds1

August 21, 2003

UMBC Department of Music Presents Fall 2003 Concerts and Events

The UMBC Department of Music presents its fall 2003 season, featuring an array of contemporary classical music concerts by world renowned artists, including the So Percussion Group, Pamela Z, and the Hoffmann/Goldstein Duo.

The UMBC Department of Music presents its fall 2003 season, featuring an array of contemporary classical music concerts by world renowned artists, including the So Percussion Group, Pamela Z, and the Hoffmann/Goldstein Duo.

Professional Artist Series

September 13
Sonic Circuits, presented in cooperation with the American Composers Forum Washington, D.C. Chapter, a concert of new and experimental electroacoustic music from area composers. The American Composers Forum’s Sonic Circuits: International Festival of Electronic Music and Art provides exposure for composers and performers working in electronic media. Arguably the largest festival of its kind, Sonic Circuits consists of a curated pool of works that forms the basis of events occurring across the U.S. and abroad. Sonic Circuits is committed to supporting the best electronic art, without regard for “style” or “genre.”
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

September 25
Saxophonist Matthew Burtner. His program, entitled Disembodied Forms: Music for Metasaxophone, Virtual Strings, and Singing Bowls, will include S-Trance-S (2001), the United States premiere of (dis)Appearances (2003), and S-Morphe-S (2002) by Matthew Burtner; Questions and Fissures (1999) by Christopher Burns; and Grito de Corazon (2001) by Judith Shatin. Matthew Burtner spent his early childhood in a small village on the Arctic Ocean, the mountains outside of Anchorage, and on fishing boats on Alaska’s southwest coast. His earliest acoustic memories include the sound of the Arctic wind, and of storms on the ocean. As a sound artist his work is guided by an interest in natural acoustic processes, and music as the sonic activation of imagination through environment. Composed for a variety of instrumental, electroacoustic and mixed media, his music explores ecoacoustic processes, and extended polymetric and noise-based musical systems. Currently Burtner is an Assistant Professor of composition and computer music at the University of Virginia where he is also Associate Director of the VCCM Computer Music Center. He studied composition, computer music, saxophone and philosophy at St. Johns College, Tulane University (B.F.A. summa cum laude), Iannis Xenakis’ UPIC/CEMAMu, the Peabody Institute of the Johns Hopkins University (M.M.), and Stanford University/CCRMA (D.M.A.). He has been composer-in-residence at the Banff Centre, Simon Fraser University in Vancouver and the IUA/Phonos Institute in Barcelona. An active saxophonist, he developed the Metasaxophone, a project exploring the integration of the saxophone and electronics through sensor technology and imbedded systems research. Burtner has received numerous prizes and grants for his work including first prize in the 2000 Musica Nova International Electroacoustic Music Competition. His music, commissioned by performers such as the Spectri Sonori Ensemble, MiN Ensemble, Phyllis Bryn-Julson, the Peabody Trio, Trio Ascolto, Haleh Abghari, Noise Ensemble and others, has been performed throughout North America and Europe, as well as in Japan, Australia, China, Korea, Uruguay and Brazil at festivals such as ICMC, ISCM, Gaudeamus, SEAMUS, Darmstadt, Bourges, ILIOS, KEAMS, Autunnale, GEMS, Musica Nova, ICMF, Spectri Sonori, Sala Hal and others. His commercial CD releases include Incantations on the German DACO label, Portals of Distortion on Innova Recordis, and Arctic Contrasts on the Norwegian Eurudice label.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

October 2 & 3
A screening of the film Forbidden Planet and a lecture on its electronic sound score by Stephan Prock. This 1956 film featured the first full-length electronic sound score, created by Louis and Bebe Barron, two early pioneers in electroacoustic music.
The screening will be held at 8 pm on 2nd at the Commons Grill; the lecture will be at 1 pm on the 3rd in Fine Arts Building Room 011.
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

October 16
The Hoffmann/Goldstein Duo, featuring the artistry of pianist Paul Hoffmann and percussionist Tom Goldstein. Their program will include the premiere of Crystal: A Cycle of Names and Memories by Elliott Schwartz, the world premiere of James Romig’s Islands that Never Were, Robert MorrisStruck Sound, Anneliese Weibel’s Still for J.S.B., and Fluxus artist Dick HigginsHaydn in the Forest, Sparks, and Touch #1 for Piano. Over the past dozen years, the Hoffmann/Goldstein Duo has appeared in dozens of concerts and new music festivals in the U.S. and in Europe, and recently released their first CD on Capstone Records, Crossfade. As a New York City freelance percussionist for over twenty years, Tom Goldstein performed extensively with groups such as the Orchestra of St. Luke’s and the Brooklyn Philharmonic, as well as chamber groups, Broadway shows and in nightclubs. Especially active in contemporary music, he has premiered dozens of solo and chamber works, many of which were written expressly for him. From 1980-1990 he served as Artistic Director of the new-music group GAGEEGO. He has toured with Steve Reich, played with Pauline Oliveros, and the ensemble Continuum. Mr. Goldstein composed and performed percussion soundtracks for NBC World Series and U.S. Tennis Open documentaries. Mr. Goldstein has published articles in Perspectives of New Music and Percussive Notes. He has recorded on Neuma, Vanguard, Polydor, Opus 1, OO Discs, CD Tech, Capstone and CRI. Paul Hoffmann, pianist and conductor, made his debut at the Vienna Konzerthaus in 1973 while on a Fulbright grant, and has since concertized extensively in the U.S. and abroad. Hoffmann has recorded solo piano and chamber music for Capstone, Orion, CRI, Northeastern, Composers Guild of New Jersey, Contemporary Record Society, OO Discs, Spectrum, and Vienna Modern Masters labels and has made numerous radio broadcasts in the U.S. as well as for Voice of America, Radio Cologne, Radio Frankfurt, and Radio France. He is currently working on recordings for Capstone and NUEMA Records. Most recently he has performed at new music festivals in Italy (“Spaziomusica” in Cagliari and “Musiche in Mostra” in Turin), National Sun Yat-sen University in Taiwan, Goucher College in Baltimore, Merkin Hall in New York City and The 8th International Symposium on Electronic Art at the Museum of Contemporary Art in Chicago. He has served on the jury of many piano competitions including the New Jersey Symphony Orchestra Concerto Competition, and was the first U.S. judge to be invited to the prestigious Concours International de Musique Contemporaine pour Piano in 1983 and 1986. Mr. Hoffmann has degrees from Eastman School of Music, and did further study at the Peabody Conservatory. He attended both the Salzburg “Mozarteum” and the Hochschule für Musik in Vienna. His principal teachers have been Leon Fleisher, Cecile Genhart, Dieter Weber, Kurt Neumuller, and Brooks Smith. Mr. Hoffmann is currently Professor of Music at Mason Gross School of the Arts, Rutgers University, where he teaches piano, chamber music and directs the contemporary music ensemble, HELIX!, which he founded in 1990.
8:30 pm, immediately following a concert in the same location by Fluxus artists Alison Knowles and Larry Miller, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

October 25
The UMBC Faculty Chamber Ensemble, featuring clarinetist E. Michael Richards, flutist Lisa Cella, violinist Airi Yoshioka, cellist Franklin Cox, oboist Erin Gittelsohn, guitarist Troy King and pianist Rachel Franklin.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

November 6
Ruckus, the professional contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC, at the Baltimore Museum of Art. Part of the BMA’s free First Thursdays program, the performances will enhance the BMA’s Work Ethic exhibition. The Ruckus ensemble, which includes flutist Lisa Cella, cellist Franklin Cox, percussionist Tom Goldstein, clarinetist E. Michael Richards, and violinist Airi Yoshioka, will be joined by guest artists.
A family event at 6:30 will feature works by Fluxus composers and will include audience participation opportunities.
A concert at 8:00 will include Variations II by John Cage and other works.
The Baltimore Museum of Art is located at 1 Art Museum Drive in Baltimore.
For more information about First Thursdays and the Work Ethic exhibition, the public may call the BMA at 410-396-6314.
Public information for Ruckus: 410-455-MUSC.

November 9
Tabla, featuring Larry Williams on French horn and Bryan Young on bassoon, in a program of multimedia works. The Washington Post has called Bryan Young a bassoonist who “makes his music dance with lightness and grace, as well as with a sparkle uncommon for his instrument.” The Maine Sunday Telegram has described Larry Williams as “a phenomenally good horn player, with the brilliance for solo work.” These acclaimed artists have joined forces to create Tabla, a new and exciting duo whose innovative performances shatter the traditional barriers between classical, jazz, contemporary and world music. Williams and Young combine digital video and sound, costume, and lighting with virtuosic live performance to create a stunning concert experience.
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

November 13
The So Percussion Group. Their concert will feature Shifty by Dennis DeSantis, Each Moment an Ending by Stuart Saunders Smith, Third Construction by John Cage, and The So-called Laws of Nature by David Lang. So Percussion (Douglas Perkins, Adam Sliwinski, Jason Treuting, and Lawson White) is a captivating young group that can always be counted on to astound. Founded in New Haven in 1999, the group has recently been featured at the Bang on a Can Marathon, the BAM Next Wave Festival, the Norfolk Chamber Music Festival, the Percussive Arts Society International Convention, Miller Theater, the Roundtop Festival, and has been heard on WNYC’s New Sounds and Soundcheck. So has also worked closely with student musicians and composers, resulting in residencies at The University of Texas at Austin, Williams College, King’s College, and performances with the Harvard Group for New Music and Columbia Composers. With a breadth extending to both established and emerging composers, So Percussion Group has embarked on an ambitious commissioning project that has led to several other world premieres, including works by composers Kathryn Alexander, Dennis DeSantis, David Lang, and Ken Ueno.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

November 16
Pianist Kazuko Tanosaki, who will present a program of music by Berio, Beethoven and Takemitsu. Born in Japan and and educated at the Kunitachi College of Music, Kazuko Tanosaki received an MA in piano under full scholarship from the University of California, San Diego, and completed a DMA in piano performance and literature from the Eastman School of Music. She studied piano with Kazuko Abe, Cecil Lytle, Jean-Charles François, Frederick Marvin, and Rebecca Penneys. Ms. Tanosaki was a first prize winner in the 1982 La Jolla Orchestra Young Artist Competition (San Diego), and a finalist in the 1982 Ventura Young Artists Competition. Ms. Tanosaki has presented solo recitals throughout Japan, Europe, and the United States, including performances at the 1989 Piano Panorama of Twentieth Century Music in Rotterdam, Holland, the 1989 International Electronic Music Plus Festival (Oberlin College), the 1990 Kobe International Festival of Contemporary Music (Japan), the Tokyo American Center, and recitals at the Camargo Foundation in Cassis, France, the Civic Center in San Diego, California, and Lemoyne College in Syracuse, New York.
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with a UMBC ID.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

November 17
Pamela Z, a San Francisco-based composer/performer and audio artist who works primarily with voice, live electronic processing, and sampling technology. She creates solo works combining operatic bel canto and experimental extended vocal techniques with found percussion objects, spoken word, “MAX MSP” on a PowerBook, and sampled concrête sounds triggered with a MIDI controller called The BodySynth™ which allows her to manipulate sound with physical gestures. Her performances range in scale from small concerts in galleries to large-scale multi-media works in proscenium halls and flexible black-box venues. Pamela Z has toured extensively throughout the United States, Europe, and Japan. She has performed in numerous festivals, including Bang On A Can at Lincoln Center in New York, the Interlink Festival in Japan, Other Minds in San Francisco, and Pina Bausch Tanztheater’s 25 Jahre Fest in Wuppertal, Germany. She has composed, recorded and performed original scores for choreographers and for film and video artists, and has done vocal work for other composers (including Charles Amirkhanian and Henry Brant). Her large-scale, multi-media performance works, Parts of Speech and Gaijin, have been presented at Theater Artaud in San Francisco, and her audio works have been included in exhibitions at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York and the Erzbischöfliches Diözesanmuseum in Cologne. Ms. Z has composed commissioned works for new music chamber ensembles the Bang On A Can Allstars, the California E.A.R. Unit, and the Left Coast Chamber Ensemble. Since 1986 she has been producing “Z Programs,” an ongoing series of interdisciplinary events in which her own work has been featured along with that of other artists doing experimental work in various genres. She is a member of the electroacoustic ensemble sensorChip (with Miya Masaoka and Donald Swearingen) and the interdisciplinary performance ensemble The Qube Chix. She has done several concerts and experimental theater pieces with Zakros New Music Theatre (including their John Cage festivals), and has performed with The San Francisco Contemporary Music Players. She is the recipient of numerous awards including the CalArts Alpert Award in the Arts, the ASCAP Music Award, and the NEA and Japan/US Friendship Commission Fellowship. She holds a music degree from the University of Colorado at Boulder.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

December 4
Composer and trombonist James Staley, whose concert will feature trombone improvisations. Staley studied composition with Morgan Powell, Ben Johnston and Salvatore Martirano. For the past twenty years he has specialized in improvisation, attempting to work “at the edge of understanding.”
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

 

Student Recital Series

October 19
The UMBC Symphony Orchestra under the baton of Wayne Cameron.
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

November 15
The UMBC Concert Choir under the direction of David Smith.
7:30 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

November 20
The UMBC Jazz Big Band under the direction of Jari Villanueva.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

November 24
The UMBC Chamber Players under the direction of E. Michael Richards.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

December 5
The UMBC Saxophone Quartet under the direction of Anjan Shah.
7 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

December 6
The UMBC Guitar Ensemble under the direction of Troy King.
5 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

December 6
The Jubilee Singers under the direction of Janice Jackson.
7 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

December 7
The Maryland Camerata under the direction of David Smith.
7:30 pm, Charlestown Chapel, Charlestown Retirement Community Catonsville. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

December 9
Departmental Honors Recital.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

December 11
The UMBC Percussion Ensemble under the direction of Tom Goldstein.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

December 12
The UMBC Jazz Improv Ensemble under the direction of Rick Hannah.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

December 13
The Collegium Musicum under the direction of Joseph Morin.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

December 14
The UMBC Symphony Orchestra under the direction of Wayne Cameron.
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

December 14
The Maryland Camerata under the direction of David Smith.
7:30 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

 

Additional Information

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/
or by email or postal mail.

Telephone
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
General Department of Music information: 410-455-2942
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Department of Music website: http://www.umbc.edu/music

Directions
• From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

• From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

• From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

• Evening parking is available in Lot 16, adjacent to the Fine Arts Building, for 50¢. Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

• Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

###

Posted by dwinds1

August 8, 2003

Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery Presents Intermedia: The Dick Higgins Collection

UMBC's Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents Intermedia: The Dick Higgins Collection, on display from September 8 through December 13, 2003. The Dick Higgins Collection, acquired by UMBC in 1999, features works by leading Fluxus artists, including Joseph Beuys, Alison Knowles, Seiichi Niikuni, Jackson Mac Low, Wolf Vostell, Ben Patterson, Al Hansen, George Brecht, Mieko Shiomi and Dick Higgins. The exhibition is curated by Lisa Moren, assistant professor of visual arts at UMBC.

Alison Knowles: Bean Bag (1978)UMBC’s Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents Intermedia: The Dick Higgins Collection, on display from September 8 through December 13, 2003. The Dick Higgins Collection, acquired by UMBC in 1999, features works by leading Fluxus artists, including Joseph Beuys, Alison Knowles, Seiichi Niikuni, Jackson Mac Low, Wolf Vostell, Ben Patterson, Al Hansen, George Brecht, Mieko Shiomi and Dick Higgins. The exhibition is curated by Lisa Moren, assistant professor of visual arts at UMBC.

Dick Higgins (1938–1998) was an influential visual artist, composer, poet and art theorist. Because his work transgressed many art forms, he coined the now-popular term intermedia, stating, “I find I never feel quite complete unless I’m doing all the arts—visual, musical and literary…that’s why I developed the term intermedia, to cover my works that fall conceptually between these.”

As a young artist in New York in the late 1950s, Higgins studied with composer John Cage and Henry Cowell. By 1961, he co-founded Fluxus, a seminal experimental art movement that held that change is the only constant. Immediately interdisciplinary and international, Fluxus blurred the boundaries of music, theatre, poetry, and visual art, and engaged artists, musicians, and poets from Japan, Korea, Europe, Brazil, New York and California. By 1964 Higgins founded Something Else Press, a publishing house, in part to help disseminate the work of Fluxus artists and writings about their work. Something Else Press published editions of work by John Cage, Emmett Williams, Allan Kaprow, Claes Oldenberg, Gertrude Stein, Marshall McLuhan, Merce Cunningham, Dick Higgins and many other influential artists. By 1987, he authored the first scholarly work on pattern poetry through SUNY Press.

Dick Higgins: 1000 Symphonies (1967)After Higgins’s death in 1998, his wife, Fluxus artist Alison Knowles, and daughters Hannah Higgins and Jessica Higgins contributed much of Higgins’s remarkable collection to UMBC’s Albin O. Kuhn Library Special Collections. Intermedia: The Dick Higgins Collection is the first opportunity for the public to view this remarkable material, which includes visual and audio art, over a dozen limited edition boxes and hand printed folios (objects, printed matter, silkscreens, hand letter press prints including concrete poems), books, book jackets, pamphlets, newsletters, audio recordings, catalogs, journals, and other items.

Publication
A scholarly illustrated catalog accompanies the exhibition, and includes essays by Ina Blom, Ken Friedman, Hannah Higgins and others.

1962-1992)Events on October 16th
The exhibition of Intermedia: The Dick Higgins Collection will be enhanced by public programming. On October 16th from 4 to 6 p.m., a symposium will feature Hannah Higgins (University of Illinois at Chicago and daughter of Dick Higgins), Chris Thompson (Maine College of Art), Owen Smith (University of Maine), and co-moderators Kathy O’Dell (UMBC) and Lisa Moren (UMBC). A reception will follow from 6 to 7 p.m. At 7:30 p.m., Fluxus artists Alison Knowles and Larry Miller will present a performance with UMBC students in UMBC’s Fine Arts Recital Hall. Their concert will be immediately followed at 8:30 by a concert by the Hoffmann/Goldstein Duo, which will include performances of three works by Dick Higgins (Sparks, Haydn in the Forest and Touch #1 for Piano). All events are free. (For more information on the Hoffmann/Goldstein Duo concert, see here.)

Gallery Information
The Albin O. Kuhn Gallery serves as one of the principal art galleries in the Baltimore region. Items from the Special Collections Department, as well as art and artifacts from all over the world, are displayed in challenging and informative exhibitions for the University community and the public. Moreover, traveling exhibitions are occasionally presented, and the Gallery also sends some of its exhibits throughout the state and nation. Admission to the Gallery is free.

Acknowledgements
Intermedia: The Dick Higgins Collection has received major funding from the National Endowment for the Arts. The programs of the Albin O. Kuhn Library and Gallery are supported in part by an arts program grant from the Maryland State Arts Council, an agency funded by the State of Maryland and the National Endowment for the Arts, and by the Friends of the Library & Gallery. At UMBC, support has been provided by the Department of Visual Arts, the Dean of Arts & Sciences, and the Humanities Forum.

Hours of Operation
Sunday: Closed
Monday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Tuesday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Thursday: 12 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Friday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Saturday: 1 p.m. - 5 p.m.

Telephone
General Gallery information: 410-455-2270
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
Gallery website: http://aok.lib.umbc.edu/gallery/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail. The images in this release are available at 300 dpi on high resolution image website.

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.

From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.

From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.

Daytime metered visitor parking is available in the Walker Avenue Garage and in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

Serra Fin: This Is an Original Piece of Civilization (1980)

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Posted by dwinds1

July 14, 2003

Center for Art and Visual Culture presents White: Whiteness and Race in Contemporary Art

UMBC's Center for Art and Visual Culture presents White: Whiteness and Race in Contemporary Art, organized by curator Maurice Berger, from October 9, 2003 through January 10, 2004. The exhibition features works by Max Becher & Andrea Robbins, Nayland Blake, Nancy Burson, Wendy Ewald, Mike Kelley, William Kentridge, Barbara Kruger, Nikki S. Lee, Paul McCarthy, Cindy Sherman and Gary Simmons.

Cindy Sherman imageUMBC's Center for Art and Visual Culture presents White: Whiteness and Race in Contemporary Art, organized by curator Maurice Berger, from October 9, 2003 through January 10, 2004. The exhibition features works by Max Becher & Andrea Robbins, Nayland Blake, Nancy Burson, Wendy Ewald, Mike Kelley, William Kentridge, Barbara Kruger, Nikki S. Lee, Paul McCarthy, Cindy Sherman and Gary Simmons. An opening reception will be held on October 9th from 5 to 7 pm.

About the Exhibition
White: Whiteness and Race in Contemporary Art is the first exhibition of art that explores race and racism from the perspective of white people. Over the past twenty years, the cultural and scholarly discourse around race has expanded to include the study of whiteness and white privilege. This inquiry represents a radical shift in the way we think and talk about race in the United States. Since the advent of the modern civil rights movement, people of color have usually been responsible for leading the debate and discussion about race and racisma discourse that has traditionally centered on the issue of African-American, Latino, Asian-American, and American-Indian victimization. While people of color are forced to evaluate the status of their race in relation to the prejudice they experience every day, most white people, even the most liberal, are usually oblivious to the psychological and political weight of their own color. It is precisely this unwillingness to mark whiteness, to assign it meaning, that has freed most white people from the responsibility of understanding their complicity in the social and cultural economy of racism. The study of whiteness asks all Americansand especially white peopleto take stock of the political, psychological, economic, and cultural implications of white skin, white entitlement, and white privilege.

A number of visual artistssome white, some of colorhave taken their lead from progressive writers and scholars who have used the concept of whiteness to denote the racial counterpart of blackness. To these artists, whiteness is something that must be marked, represented, and explored. To them, whiteness is not just a color. It is also a ubiquitous and unexamined state of mind and bodya powerful norm that had been so constant and persistent in society that white people have never needed to acknowledge or name it.

Gary Simmons' Big StillWhite: Whiteness and Race in Contemporary Art gives voice to twelve contemporary artists who explicitly address the issue of whiteness: Max Becher and Andrea Robbin's German Indian series (1997-98)photographs of German men, women, and children who regularly attend carnivals dressed up as Native Americansexamines white people's fascination with and appropriation of racial otherness. Nayland Blake's Invisible Man (1994) challenges the socially and culturally prescribed boundaries of race, questioning both the purity and meaning of whiteness itself. Nancy Burson's Untitled (Guys Who Look Like Jesus) (2000-01), the culmination of a national search for people who believe they look like Christ, depicts eight men of varying ages and races. The series challenges one of Christianity's (and whiteness') most generative and foundational myths: that of Aryan purity as a metaphor of godliness and the triumph over evil. Wendy Ewald's White Girl's AlphabetAndover, Massachusetts (2002), a project created in collaboration with teenage subjects, represents a poignant, humanistic exploration of the vulnerabilities and ambivalence that underwrite both whiteness and femininity. William Kentridge's Drawings for Projection Series: Johannesburg2nd Greatest City after Paris; Monument; Mine; Sobriety, Obesity, and Growing Old (198191) are a series of short films based on charcoal drawings that play on the medium's innate black-and-white aesthetic to explore the complex, and often fragile realities of white power and black subservience in apartheid-era South Africa. Barbara Kruger, in a work specifically commissioned for the exhibition, will create a billboard series in a number of neighborhoods in Baltimore City. In Nikki S. Lee's The Yuppie Series (1998), the Korean-born artist infiltrates and documents the world of mostly white, economically privileged Wall Street professionals, meticulously adopting her colleagues' code of dress, behavior, and living habits. The series represents both a meticulous documentation of white privilege, clannishness, and exclusivity as well as Lee's own alienation in the face of white racism and indifference. Paul McCarthy and Mike Kelley's Heidi (1992), an hour-long video, represents a disquieting journey into the dysfunctional behavior and emotional brutality that they myth of the pristine and wholesome white middle-class family attempts to conceal. Cindy Sherman, in a series of early photographs, each depicting the artist masquerading as a bus passenger, depicts a range of racial and class types that include some of the earliest attempts by a visual artist to see whiteness as both a racial category and a stereotype (Bus Riders, 1976-2000). In another series, Untitled (2000), Sherman fixes her lens on white women, cycling through a range of characterological (and often stereotypical) types, from the erstwhile female executive to the WASP matron. Gary Simmons' Big Still (2001), a monumental, white-washed moonshine still, is a monument to the world of white povertythe hillbillies and white trash of depression-era Americathat has been erased from a mainstream history defined by white patriarchy and white power.

Catalog
White: Whiteness and Race in Contemporary Art will be accompanied by a 100 page catalog edited by Maurice Berger, the first book devoted to the subject of whiteness, race, and art. The catalog, to be published by the CAVC and distributed by Distributed Art Publishers (DAP), will contain essays on whiteness in the culture at large by David R. Roediger, Professor of History at the University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign, and the social and legal implications of whiteness by Patricia J. Williams, Professor of Law, Columbia University School of Law, as well as an extensive curatorial essay by Maurice Berger. The curatorial essay will include an introductory text on whiteness and art, as well as a text for each artist in the exhibition. The catalog will contain 50 illustrations, a checklist and bibliography.

Maurice BergerAbout the Curator, Maurice Berger
Maurice Berger is a Fellow at the Vera List Center for Art and Politics of the New School for Social Research in New York and Curator of the Center for Art and Visual Culture at UMBC. He received his undergraduate degree summa cum laude, Phi Beta Kappa from Hunter College. He later served as a Junior Fellow at the New York Institute for the Humanities at New York University and received his Ph.D. from the Graduate Center of the City University of New York. His articles have appeared in many journals and newspapers, including Artforum, Art in America, The New York Times, The Village Voice, October, Wired, and The Los Angeles Times. He is the author of the critically acclaimed White Lies: Race and the Myths of Whiteness (Farrar, Straus & Giroux, 1999)which was named as a finalist for the 2000 Horace Mann Bond Book Award of Harvard University and is being adapted as a television documentary for PBS (2002)and six other books: Labyrinths: Robert Morris, Minimalism, and the 1960s (Harper & Row, 1989), How Art Becomes History (HarperCollins, 1992), Modern Art and Society (HarperCollins, 1994), Constructing Masculinity (Routledge, 1995), The Crisis of Criticism (The New Press, 1998), and Postmodernism: A Virtual Discussion (Georgia O'Keeffe Research Center/CAVC, 2002)

About the Center for Art and Visual Culture
The Center for Art and Visual Culture is a non-profit organization dedicated to the study of contemporary art and visual culture, critical theory, art and cultural history, and the relationship between society and the arts. The CAVC serves as a forum for students, faculty, and the general public for the discussion of important aesthetic and social issues of the day. Disciplines represented include painting, sculpture, drawing, printmaking, photography, digital art, video, film, television, design, architecture, advertising, and installation and performance art.

Since 1989, the CAVC has incorporated a number of public programs into its exhibition programming schedule to further impact the communities it serves. Symposia, lecture series, conferences, film series, visiting artist series, and residencies have all been fundamental in an effort to create an ongoing dialogue about contemporary art and culture. The Center has also initiated a number of projects with Baltimore and surrounding schools systems to integrate the contemporary artist and their concerns into the classroom. These projects take place on-site at both middle schools and high schools and are team taught by the instructors at these schools, professional artists, and students from the CAVC's Internship Program.

Currently the Center produces one to two exhibition catalogues each year. Each document is fully illustrated and contains critical essays on the given subject by a variety of distinguished professionals in the field. With the printing of Minimal Politics: Performativity and Minimalism in Recent American Art in 1997, the CAVC inaugurated a new series of publications entitled Issues in Cultural Theory. These catalogues are published yearly and are distributed internationally through Distributed Art Publishers in New York.

Since 1992, the Center for Art and Visual Culture has actively pursued the organization of exhibitions that contain the aesthetic, theoretical, and educational potential to reach both a national and international audience. Over the years, the CAVC has traveled these exhibition projects to a broad spectrum of museums, professional non-profit galleries, and universities national and internationally. These traveling exhibitions include:

  • Fred Wilson: Objects and Installations (2001)
  • Adrian Piper: A Retrospective (1999)
  • Bruno Monguzzi: A Designer's Perspective (1998)
  • Minimal Politics (1997)
  • Kate Millet, Sculpture: The First 38 Years (1997)
  • Layers: Contemporary Collage from St. Petersburg, Russia (1995/96)
  • Notes In Time: Leon Golub and Nancy Spero (1995)
  • Ciphers of Identity (1994)
  • Nancy Graves: Recent Works (1993)
  • Environmental Terror (1992)

Beyond the scope of these traveling exhibitions, the Center for Art and Visual Culture also undertakes an exhibition schedule that includes a Faculty Biennial, and projects such as the Joseph Beuys Tree Partnership. As part of the educational mission of the CAVC, one graduate thesis exhibition and one undergraduate senior exhibition are scheduled on a yearly basis.

This multi-faceted focus for presenting exhibitions, projects and scholarly research publications focused on contemporary art and cultural issues positions the Center for Art and Visual Culture in a unique position within the mid-Atlantic region.

Hours of Operation
Sunday: Closed
Monday: Closed
Tuesday: 10 A.M. 5:00 P.M.
Wednesday: 10 A.M. 5:00 P.M.
Thursday: 10 A.M. 5:00 P.M.
Friday: 10 A.M. 5:00 P.M.
Saturday: 10 A.M. 5:00 P.M.

Telephone
CAVC offices: 410-455-3188
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
CAVC website: http://www.umbc.edu/cavc
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Department of Visual Arts: http://art.umbc.edu/

Directions

  • From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
  • Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Nancy Burson imageImages for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/
or by email or postal mail.

Photo Credits

  • Cindy Sherman, Untitled (#405) (2000), color photograph, edition of six, 44" x 33". Courtesy the Broad Art Foundation, Santa Monica, and Metro Pictures, New York.
  • Gary Simmons, Big Still (2001), painted foam, fiberglass, wood, metal. Courtesy of the artist and Metro Pictures, New York.
  • Nancy Burson, Untitled, from the Guys Who Look Like Jesus series (2000/01), digital photographs outputted as Iris prints on vellum.

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Posted by dwinds1

June 30, 2003

Doug Hamby Dance Performs at Dance Place

Doug Hamby Dance, a professional modern dance company in residence at UMBC, presents its annual concerts at Dance Place in Washington, D.C. on July 19th and 20th. Choreographer Doug Hamby is known for his provocative collaborations with visual artists, designers and composers. The program will feature the premiere of Edgewater Park, a sensuous duet for two men with live video and recorded images of carnivals, edited by filmmaker Nick Prevas and with a sound score by artist Timothy Nohe; the premiere of Vial, in which a women is engulfed in memory and sound, with a video and sound score by Timothy Nohe; the Washington premiere of Short'nin Bread Variations, in which a hungry 3-year-old boy makes old mischief in the kitchen with the help of a fairy and dancing bakers; and Opus 98, a dance of airborne feats of passion inspired by World Cup Soccer, with live percussion by Tom Goldstein. The company includes dancers Julie Peoples-Clark, Lorna Cox, Allyson Gebken, Emily Gibbs, Doug Hamby, Aaron Jackson, Ali Linthicum, Jessica McElvaney, Chip Scuderi and Margaret Terry. The Washington Post has said, "Hamby is an ambitious artist willing to take risks."

Doug Hamby Dance, a professional dance company in residence at UMBC, presents its annual concerts at Dance Place in Washington, D.C., on July 19th (8 pm) and 20th (7 pm).

Choreographer Doug Hamby is known for his provocative artistic and technological collaborations with visual artists, designers, composers and engineers. His company has become known as the Washington/Baltimore region’s leading explorers of technology in modern dance. The Village Voice has said, “Hamby proved that the fusion of dance and technology only needed time to mature.” The Washington Post stated, “Hamby is a bold and embitious artist willing to take risks.” The Company includes dancers Julie Peoples-Clark, Lorna Cox, Allyson Gebken, Emily Gibbs, Doug Hamby, Aaron Jackson, Ali Linthicum, Jessica McElvaney, Chip Scuderi and Margaret Terry.

The Program
The program includes:

  • The premiere of Edgewater Park, a sensuous duet for two men with live video and recorded images of carnivals, edited by filmmaker Nick Prevas, and with a sound score by artist Timothy Nohe;
  • The premiere of Vial, in which a woman is engulfed in memory and sound, with a video and sound score by Timothy Nohe;
  • The Washington premiere of Short’nin Bread Variations, in which a hungry 3-year-old boy makes old mischief in the kitchen with the help of a fairy and dancing bakers;
  • Opus 98, a dance of airborne feats of passion inspired by World Cup Soccer, with live percussion by Tom Goldstein.

About Doug Hamby
Doug Hamby lives and works in the Baltimore-Washington DC area. He has extensive experience as a dancer, choreographer, and educator. He is the artistic director of Doug Hamby Dance, a professional dance company in residence at UMBC. The company features works that spring from collaboration with dancers, composers, and other creative people. Recent collaborators include artist Timothy Nohe, intermedia artist Steve Bradley, video artist Deborah Gorski, and mechanical engineer Tony Farquhar. Hamby has directed the Douglas Hamby Dance Company in New York City and performed with Martha Graham, May O'Donnell, Rachel Lampert, Elizabeth Keen, Pearl Lang, Norman Walker, the Chicago Moving Company, Phoenix Dance Company, and Hamby and Lacy. Featured performances of his company include annual summer seasons at Dance Place, Washington, D.C., Riverside Dance Festival, Lincoln Center Out-of-Doors, and Celebrate Brooklyn, in New York City; the 1998 New York International Fringe Festival, 1997 Philadelphia Fringe Festival, and 1995 International Fringe Festivals in Edinburgh, Scotland and Vancouver, Canada. He has received choreography awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, Maryland State Arts Council, New York State Council on the Arts, Arts Council of Montgomery County, Maryland, and the Baltimore Mayor's Advisory Committee on Art and Culture. He has served as a dance advisory panelist for the Maryland State Arts Council for three years. He is an associate professor of dance at UMBC and has an MFA in Dance from Temple University and a Biology degree from Michigan State University. He is a recipient of a 2003 Individual Artist Award from the Maryland State Arts Council. He has also appeared on national television as a giant slice of American cheese.

Admission
General admission: $18.00.
Dance Place members, students, seniors and artists: $14.00.
Children and teens (17 and under): $6.00.
Tickets are available through the Dance Place Box Office at 202-269-1600 or online.

Telephone
Dance Place Box Office: 202-269-1600
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
Doug Hamby Dance: www.umbc.edu/dhd
Dance Place: www.danceplace.org
The Arts at UMBC: www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
UMBC Department of Dance: www.umbc.edu/dance

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

Directions
Dance Place is located at 3225 8th Street, N.E., in Washington, D.C., near the Brookland/CUA Metro station.

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Posted by dwinds1

April 9, 2003

Department of Theatre presents Dancing at Lughnasa

The Department of Theatre presents Brian Friel's award winning play Dancing at Lughnasa, featuring guest artist Michael Gabel. Dancing at Lughnasa was described by Time magazine as "The most elegant and rueful memory play since The Glass Menagerie" when it opened on Broadway in 1992. That year it won the Tony Award, Outer Circle Critics Award and the New York Drama Critics Award for Best Play. Originated by the Abbey Theatre in Dublin, it is the story of five unmarried sisters, eking out an existence in Ireland of 1936, where their only link to the outside world is a radio, the modern marvel of their life. It is a play of romance and hope, told through the eyes of the one illegitimate son as he remembers life when he was a boy of seven. The New York Times said, "This play does exactly what theater was born to do, carrying both its characters and audience aloft on those waves of music and ecstatic release that, in defiance of all language and logic, let us dance and dream just before night must fall." The production runs from April 24th through May 4th at the UMBC Theatre.

The UMBC Department of Theatre presents Brian Friel's Tony Award winning play Dancing at Lughnasa from April 24 to May 4 in the UMBC Theatre. Friel's tale of being raised by five sisters in Ireland in 1936 was developed first by the Abbey Theatre in Dublin, then moved to London for an extended run on the West End and after that to Broadway where it won the Outer Circle Critics Award, the Drama Desk Award, and the Tony Award in 1991 for Best Play.

Dancing at Lughnasa is a memory play, the events of a certain summer when Michael, the illegitimate son of an extended family, was seven. Michael leads us through this bittersweet time, both commenting on the action and reliving scenes with his mother and her sisters. New York critics commented on its tie to Tennessee Williams' Glass Menagerie, another memory play where the son leads us through the events, but felt it was "a unique and wondrous experience" in its own right. Director Christopher Owens feels "The essential and uplifting experience of the play is its celebration of things ending. Lughnasa is the harvest festival, the time when all the crops are in, summer is done with its warmth and blooms, and we're about to feel the chill of winter. The son is also ending his innocence about a number of things and his family is about to break up but what Friel (and the son) asks us to do is to celebrate this ending--to sing, to dance, to dream even though we know the reality is changing. It's a very Irish way of thinking as well, the wake being a good example, where we find great joy at the completion of the journey."

UMBC's production features Guest Artist Michael Gabel, a professional actor from Washington, D.C. in the role of Father Jack, the eldest brother of this family who has just returned to Ireland from an extended mission in East Africa. Mr. Gabel's work has been seen at the Kennedy Center (where he was in the original cast of the long-running Sheer Madness), as well as at Ford's Theatre, The Folger Theatre Group, Shakespeare Theatre, Olney Theatre, and Roundhouse Theatre. Mr. Gabel teaches for the Screen Actors Guild Conservatory and will be guest lecturing on Film Acting during his time at UMBC. Michael Gabel appears courtesy of Actors' Equity Association.

The production is directed by Christopher Owens, whose previous productions for UMBC have included Blue Window and Baby With The Bathwater. It includes scenic and costume design by Elena Zlotescu, lighting and sound design by Terry Cobb, and vocal coaching by Lynn Watson. Irish Step Dance choreography is by New York choreographer Dawn Lester, who has done two other productions of the play. "It is exciting for our students to have the opportunity to work with a couple of very talented guest artists." Owens commented. "I'd seen Michael Gabel's work in a few shows in D.C. some years ago and was very happy he was available and interested when we got ready to have auditions here for Father Jack at the end of January. I've worked with Dawn on two other professional productions and know that she'll bring a lot to the dance that's at the heart of this play." Owens concluded.

Dancing at Lughnasa is recommended for the entire family.

Showtimes
Thursday, April 24th at 8 pm (preview)
Friday, April 25th at 8 pm (opening night)
Sunday, April 27th at 4 pm
Thursday, May 1st at 4 pm
Friday, May 2nd at 8 pm
Saturday, May 3rd at 8 pm
Sunday, May 4th at 4 pm
Note: on Saturday, April 26th, the theatre will be dark.

Admission
$10 general admission
$8 UMBC faculty and staff
$5 students
$3 for the preview
The performance on May 1st is free to the UMBC campus community.
Ticket proceeds benefit the Department of Theatre Scholarship Fund.
Theatre Box Office: 410-455-2476

Telephone
Theatre Box Office: 410-455-2476
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
General Department of Theatre information: 410-455-2917
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Department of Theatre website: http://www.umbc.edu/theatre

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.

From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Theatre.

From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.

Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked. Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

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Posted by dwinds1

Humanities Forum Presents Art Historian David Driskell

UMBC's Center for the Humanities and the Department of Visual Arts present one of the world's leading authorities on African American art, David Driskell, who will offer a lecture entitled Black Visual Theorists: A Spiritual Rendering, at 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, April 23rd, in the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery. A professor emeritus of art at the University of Maryland, College Park, David Driskell is a noted artist, educator, philanthropist, collector, and art historian. He has organized groundbreaking exhibitions and has written extensively and lectured around the world.

UMBC's Center for the Humanities and the Department of Visual Arts present one of the world's leading authorities on African American art, David Driskell, who will offer a lecture entitled Black Visual Theorists: A Spiritual Rendering, at 4:00 p.m. on Wednesday, April 23rd, in the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery. A professor emeritus of art at the University of Maryland, College Park, David Driskell is a noted artist, educator, philanthropist, collector, and art historian. He has organized groundbreaking exhibitions and has written extensively and lectured around the world.

David Driskell's lecture on April 23rd is this year's Daphne Harrison Lecture and is part of UMBC's Humanities Forum, a program of events that illustrate the richness of contemporary work in philosophy, history, culture, language, literature, and the arts.

About David Driskell
David C. Driskell was born in 1931 in Eatonton, Georgia. Educated at Howard University, he received his MFA in 1961 from the Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C., and currently holds the title of Distinguished University Professor of Art at the University of Maryland, College Park. Trained as a painter and art historian, Driskell works principally in collage and mixed media. He is represented by the D.C. Moore Gallery in New York City, Midtown Payson Gallery in Jupiter Island, Florida, the Sherry Washington Gallery in Detroit, Michigan and Bomani Gallery in San Francisco.

His work has been featured in numerous solo and group exhibitions in galleries and museums throughout the United States, including the Corcoran Gallery of Art, the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Oakland Museum and the Whitney Museum of American Art. He has also exhibited internationally in South Africa, Poland and Brazil.

His work has been reviewed in many publications, including Art News, The New Art Examiner, Art in America, The Washington Post, The Washington Times, The Detroit Free Press, and The New York Times. He has been the recipient of several foundation fellowships among which are the Harmon Foundation, three Rockefeller Foundation Fellowships, and the Danforth Foundation.

Highly regarded as an artist and a scholar, Driskell is cited as one of the world's leading authorities on the subject of African American art. He is also the recipient of nine honorary doctoral degrees in art and has contributed significantly to scholarships in the history of art on the role of Black artists in America. He has authored five exhibition books on the subject of African American art, co-authored four others, and published more than 40 catalogues from exhibitions he has curated. His articles and essays on African American art have appeared in major publications throughout the world. He was the recipient of the Distinguished Alumni Award in Art from Howard University in 1981 and from The Catholic University of America in 1996. In October 1997, Driskell was awarded the President's Medal, the highest honor the University of Maryland, College Park bestows on a member of the faculty.

About the Humanities Forum
For more than a decade, the Humanities Forum has offered UMBC and the community a program of events that illustrate the richness of contemporary work in philosophy, history, culture, language, literature, and the arts. The speakers and performers that the Forum brings to campus provide students with the opportunity to discover new approaches to knowledge and offer intellectual stimulation to the faculty and the region. Forum events are often the occasion for the UMBC community to meet and speak with thinkers who have had enormous impact on current thinking. The Forum is particularly interested in demonstrating the links that bring the humanities, the social sciences, and the sciences together.

Telephone
Center for the Humanities: 410-455-6798
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
Center for the Humanities website: http://www.umbc.edu/humanities/

Images
Images for this event are available here: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 toexit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs tothe Albin O. Kuhn Library.

From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mileto the entrance of UMBC at the intersection of Wilkens Avenue andHilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.

From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B.Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Albin O.Kuhn Library.

Daytime metered visitor parking is available in the Walker Avenue garage, near the Albin O. Kuhn Library. Visitor parking regulations are enforced onall University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadwaysrequire a parking permit unless otherwise marked. An online campus map is available: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/.

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Posted by dwinds1

March 7, 2003

UMBC Presents Music of Japan Today Festival

The UMBC Department of Music presents Music of Japan Today, the largest festival and symposium on contemporary Japanese concert music in the United States, from April 2 through April 6, 2003. Featured composers include Joji Yuasa, Toshi Ichiyanagi, Tokuhide Niimi, and Akira Nishimura; performers include Ruckus, the professional contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC.

The UMBC Department of Music presents Music of Japan Today, the largest festival and symposium on contemporary Japanese concert music in the United States, from April 2 through April 6, 2003. Featured composers include Joji Yuasa, Toshi Ichiyanagi, Tokuhide Niimi, and Akira Nishimura; performers include Ruckus, the professional contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC.

The Music of Japan Today Festival
UMBC will host a five-day festival of performances, lecture-recitals, panel discussions, and paper presentations on topics that concern Japanese music from the widest possible range of disciplines and expertise. Four guest composers of international stature will participate in the festival: Toshi Ichiyanagi, who worked with John Cage in the early 1960s in New York, and has ever since introduced Japan to experimental music; Joji Yuasa, who was a member of the jikken kobo in the 1950s and a Professor of Music at the University of California, San Diego from 1981-94; Akira Nishimura, who has received numerous international awards and commissions for his music that is influenced by historic Japanese music and elements from other Asian cultures; and Tokuhide Niimi, who has received international recognition for works that span musical genres from ballet, to choral, to orchestral and chamber music, to music for traditional Japanese instruments.

Performances during the festival will include a broad range of works for different genres (solo instrument, chamber music, choral, traditional instruments) by Yuasa, Ichiyanagi, Nishimura, and Niimi, as well as the winner of a composition competition. They will include the premiere of a new work by Nishimura. The performers for these concerts will include Ruckus (the contemporary music ensemble at UMBC), faculty and students of the UMBC Department of Music, and guest musicians from the Baltimore/ Washington, D.C. area and other international new music centers.

This festival is the fifth in a series of events since 1992 to address Japanese and other Asian musics. Previously held at Hamilton College, the previous events include Asian Music in America: A Confluence of Two Worlds, and Music of Japan Today: Tradition and Innovation I (1992), II (1994), and III (1997).

Music of Japan Today is presented in cooperation with the Embassy of Japan, with additional support from All Nippon Airways (ANA), the Asian Cultural Council, the Freer Gallery of Art of the Smithsonian Institution, the National Cherry Blossom Festival, and the Maryland State Arts Council, an agency funded by the State of Maryland and the National Endowment for the Arts.

About the Contemporary Concert Music of Japan
Western art music has existed for a relatively short time in Japan. It is only since the 1950s, countering Japan's rush to adopt all that is "Western," that some composers, led by Joji Yuasa (b. 1929), Toshiro Mayuzumi (1929-97), Toru Takemitsu (1930-96), and Toshi Ichiyanagi (b. 1933), began to move away from stylistic modeling of nineteenth-century European forms and twentieth-century dodecaphony towards a more individualistic approach. Concerned with reflecting philosophical and musical elements from their own culture, they began to discover and develop their own music. The music of these artists reflects a new global confluence of multiple culturesa powerful cross-fertilization of aesthetics and musical characteristics from both East and West. The music is reflective of a variety of aspects of contemporary Japanese and Western societies, while at the same time deeply rooted in a traditional culture that has evolved over many years.


Major Public Events
Admission as noted
Public information: 410-455-ARTS or www.umbc.edu/arts

Wednesday, April 2
8 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall
Free admission
Concert by the Ruckus ensemble
Akira Nishimura: Madoromi III for clarinet and piano (2003)
Joji Yuasa: Cosmos Haptic II for solo piano (1986)
Joji Yuasa: A Winter Day: Homage to Basho for flute, clarinet, harp, percussion, and piano (1981)

Thursday, April 3
12 p.m. - 2 p.m.
Free admission
National Cherry Blossom Festival, Jefferson Memorial, Washington, D.C.
Concert: program to be announced

Friday, April 4
7:30 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission: $10 general, $5 students/seniors, free with UMBC ID.
Concert by the Ruckus ensemble
Joji Yuasa: Cosmos Haptic II for piano solo (1986)
Tokuhide Niimi: Ohju for solo cello (1987)
Akira Nishimura: Madoromi III for clarinet and piano (2003) (world premiere)
Tokuhide Niimi: The Soul Bird for flute and piano (1996)
Akira Nishimura: From Organums for violin, flute, clarinet, vibraphone and piano (1989): Hemiola, Melismas

Saturday, April 5
8 p.m., Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission: $10 general, $5 students/seniors, free with UMBC ID.
Concert by the Ruckus ensemble
Toshi Ichiyanagi: Cloud Atlas X for piano solo (1999)
Tokuhide Niimi: Lux Originis for violin, clarinet, cello, and piano (2002) (American premiere)
Akira Nishimura: Duologue for Timpani and Piano (1996)
Joji Yuasa: Terms of Temporal Detailing for solo bass flute (1989)
Toshi Ichiyanagi: Cosmic Harmony for cello and piano (1995)
Joji Yuasa: A Winter Day: Homage to Basho for flute, clarinet, harp, percussion, and piano (1981)

Sunday, April 6
4 p.m., Free Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
Admission: free, but reservations through Ticketmaster are required.
Concert by the Ruckus ensemble
Joji Yuasa: Cosmos Haptic II for solo piano (1986)
Toshi Ichiyanagi: Cosmic Harmony for cello and piano (1995)
Joji Yuasa: Terms of Temporal Detailing for solo bass flute (1989)
Tokuhide Niimi: Lux Originis for violin, clarinet, cello and piano (2002)
Akira Nishimura: Madoromi III for clarinet and piano (2003)
Tokuhide Niimi: The Soul Bird for flute and piano (1996)
Akira Nishimura: Duologue for Timpani and Piano (1996)


Other Festival Events
Admission to all events is free unless otherwise noted.

Friday, April 4
9 a.m., UMBC ECS Building
Lecture by Toshi Ichiyanagi (via satellite)

9:40 a.m., UMBC ECS Building
Lecture/Recital and Masterclass with Toshi Ichiyanagi
Marimba Music of Japanese Composers
Greg Giannascoli, marimba (Rutgers University) with Chiu-Tze Lin, piano
Toshi Ichiyanagi: Paginini Personal (1982)
Toshi Ichiyanagi: The Source (1989)
Tokuhide Niimi: For Marimba I (1975)

10:30 a.m., UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall
Music of Toru Takemitsu
Lecture by Ieda Bispo, Joetsu University, Nigata, Japan: A Japanese Garden? Western Confluences in Toru Takemitsus In an Autumn Garden for Gagaku
Lecture/Recital: The Cosmic Metaphor of Toru Takemitsus Rain Tree Sketches
Tomoko Isshiki piano - University of Houston, Houston, Texas
Toru Takemitsu: Rain Tree Sketch (1982)
Toru Takemitsu: Rain Tree Sketch II (1992)
Lecture by Hideaki Onishi, University of Washington, Seattle: Dream, Japanese Garden and Toru Takemitsu: Large-Scale Structure of Dream-Window through Set-Class Analysis

1:00 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts Room 011
Lecture/Recital by Calvert Johnson, harpsichordist (Agnes Scott College, Atlanta, Georgia): Harpsichord Music by Japanese Composers
Makiko Asaoka: Four Pieces for Harpsichord (1994)
Isaac Nagao: Ancient Cities (1986)
Karen Tanaka: Jardin des Herbes (1989)
Asako Hirabayashi: Sonatina for Harpsichord (2002) (world premiere)

1:30 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts Room 011
Composer Masterclasses
Joji Yuasa with Reiko Manabe, flute (University of California, San Diego)
Joji Yuasa: Domain (1978)
Tokuhide Niimi with Greg Giannascoli, marimba (Rutgers University)
Tokuhide Niimi: For Marimba I (1975)
Akira Nishimura with Akiko Fukuda, piano (University of Kansas)
Akira Nishimura: Tritrope (1978)

3:10 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts Studio 508
Performance by Gene Coleman, artistic director of the Transonic festival at the House of World Cultures in Berlin, Germany: Pachinko/Zen A Non-Lecture on Japan

3:40 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts Studio 508
Lecture by Kristian Twombly, Department of Music, UMBC: Oppositional Dialectics in Joji Yuasas The Sea Darkens

4:20 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts Studio 508
Concert
Joji Yuasa: Icon (1967)
Takayuki Rai: Pain for Two Computers (1983)
Joji Yuasa: The Sea Darkens (1987)
Mamoru Fujieda: Patterns of Plants (1997)
Steven Kazuo Takasugi: Iridescent Uncertainty (1999)
Yukiko Ito: two-sides for tape (2002)
Joji Yuasa: Eye on Genesis I for UPIC (1991)

Saturday, April 5
9:00 a.m., UMBC ECS Building and UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall
The Music of Toshi Ichiyanagi
Lecture by Luciana Galliano, Universita Ca Foscari di Venezia, Italy: Ichiyanagi as Japanese Composer, and Fluxus
Lecture/Recital by Yoojin Oh, piano (Manhattan School of Music) with violinist Olivier Fluchaire: The Piano/Violin Duo Works of Toshi Ichiyanagi
Toshi Ichiyanagi: Interrelation (1998)
Lecture by Robert Haskins, Eastman School of Music, Rochester, New York: Cage, Ichiyanagi, Fluxus, Japan: Responses and Resonances
Lecture/Recital by Akiko Fukuda, piano, University of Kansas: A Search for Identity: Postmodern Trends in Japanese Piano Music Since 1985
Takashi Yoshimatsu: Pleiades Dances (1986-2001)
Mamoru Fujieda: Patterns of Plants: The Seventh Collection (1997)
Akira Nishimura: Tritrope (1978)

11:10 a.m., UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall
Lecture by Peter Burt, The Open University, Vienna, Austria: Overtones of Progress, Undertones of Reaction: Toshiro Mayuzumi and the Nirvana Symphony

11:40 a.m., UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall
Presentations of Recent and Forthcoming books on contemporary Japanese music, including Yougaku: Japanese Music in the Twentieth Century (2002, Scarecrow Press) by Luciana Galliano, Universita Ca Foscari di Venezia, Italy; and Locating East Asia in Western Art Music (forthcoming 2003, Wesleyan University Press) by Yayoi Uno Everett, Emory University, Atlanta

1:05 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts 011
Lecture by David Pacun, Ithaca College, New York: Stylistic Counterpoint in the Early Music of Yamada Koscak

1:35 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts 011
Lectures of Guest Composers
Joji Yuasa
Tokuhide Niimi
Akira Nishimura

4:00 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission: $10 general, $5 students/seniors, free with UMBC ID.
Tickets available at the door.
Concert by the UMBC Chamber Players, Ossia (the new music ensemble of the Eastman School of Music, the Maryland Camerata, and Ryan Bridlgand)
Colin Holter: Variations: Go Rin No Sho (2003) (premiere)
Joji Yuasa: Calling Together (1971)
Akira Miyoshi: Reve Colorie for 2 clarinets (1991)
Toshi Ichiyanagi: Music for Electric Metronomes (1968)
Joji Yuasa: Observations on Weather Forecasts (1983)
Tokuhide Niimi: Madrigal II (1981)
Toshi Ichiyanagi: Music For Piano No. 7 (1961)
Toru Takemitsu: Toward the Sea for alto flute and guitar (1981)
Joji Yuasa: Territory (1977)
Joji Yuasa: Mutterings (1988)

Sunday, April 6
9:00 a.m., UMBC Fine Arts 011
Crossovers of Japanese Popular and Art Music
Lecture by Fuyuko Fukunaka, New York University: Globalism, Fetishization, and the "Politics" of Japanese Rap
Lecture by Michael Peluse, Wesleyan University: Tsugaru Shamisen's Latest Boom: Folk Revival or Pop Sensation?
Lecture by Yumi Hara Cawkwell, City University, London, England: Childminder of Takeda

10:40 a.m., UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall
Lecture/Recital by Margaret Lucia, piano (Shippensburg University): Recent Piano Works by Japanese Women Composers
Junko Mori: Imagery (1987)
Nagako Konishi: Fantasy (1995-96)
Keiko Fujiie: Pas de Deux II, Op. 14 (1989)

11:10 a.m., Fine Arts Recital Hall
Jiutamai Dance and Piano, featuring Chie Sato Rodin, piano; Junko Tano, choreographer and dancerTraditional Japanese Dance "Black Hair"
Shigenobu Nakamura: White for solo piano (1983)
Yoichi Togawa: Hi No Chi (The Land of Sorrow) (1991)

11:50 a.m., Fine Arts Recital Hall
Panel Discussion
Joji Yuasa, Tokuhide Niimi, Akira Nishimura, Kazuko Tanosaki, E. Michael Richards


About the Composers
Three Japanese guest composers (Joji Yuasa, Akira Nishimura and Tokuhide Niimi) will be in residence at Music of Japan Today; a fourth (Toshi Ichiyanagi) will participate via satellite.

Toshi Ichiyanagi
Born in 1933 in Kobe, Japan, Toshi Ichiyanagi studied composition with Kishio Hirao and John Cage, piano with Chieko Hara, Barnhard Weiser and Beveridge Webster. After attending the Juilliard School of Music and the New School for Social Research in New York between 1954-60, he returned to Japan in 1961, and introduced many new musical concepts, including Cages idea of indeterminacy, exerting a strong influence on the stream of Japanese contemporary music.

As one of the leading composers in Japan, Ichiyanagi has composed in most genres of music: operas, orchestral, chamber and instrumental works. Among his major works are his violin concerto Circulating Scenery (1983), Piano Concerto No. 2 Winter Portrait (1987) and opera Momo (1995), based on a novel by Michael Ende. While composing these large-scale pieces, he is also known for his compositions using Japanese traditional instruments such as sho and gagaku ensemble. Many of them have been performed throughout the world, especially by Tokyo International Music Ensemble, where he serves as Artistic Director.

Ichiyanagi won the Elizabeth A. Coolidge Prize (1954) and the Serge Koussevitzky Prize (1956) during his studies in New York. He was also a member of Fluxus. Since his return to Japan, he has received numerous awards including the prestigious Nakajima Kenzo Award (1984), the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres of the French Government (1985) and Grand Prix of the Kyoto Music Award (1989). In 1990, he was awarded the Otaka Prize for the fourth time, for his unique symphony Berlin Renshi.

His recent works include Coexistence for ondes martenot and orchestra (1996), Symphony No. 5 Time Perspective (1997), Coexistence for orchestra (1997) and Mirage for shakuhachi and piano (1998).

Joji Yuasa
Born in 1929 in Koriyama, Japan, Yuasa is a self-taught composer. While a premedical student at Keio University in Tokyo, Yuasa made the acquaintance of composer Toru Takemitsu and musicologist Kuniharu Akiyama. He joined them in forming the Jikken-kobo (Experimental Workshop) in 1952, and devoted himself to music. Since then, Yuasa has been actively engaged in a wide range of musical composition, including orchestral, choral and chamber music, music for theatre, and intermedia, electronic and computer music. Yuasa has won numerous commissions for his works from such institutions as the Koussevitzky Music Foundation, Saarland Radio Symphony Orchestra, Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra, Japan Philharmonic Orchestra, NHK Symphony Orchestra, Canada Council, Suntory Music Foundation, IRCAM and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Yuasa has received a number of scholarships at home and abroad, including a Japan Society Fellowship (1968-69), Composer in Residence at the Center for Music Experiment UCSD (1976), Berlin Artist Program by DAAD (1976-77), the New South Wales Conservatorium of Music in Sydney (1980), the University of Toronto (1981) and IRCAM in Paris (1987).

As a guest composer and lecturer, Yuasa has contributed to the Festival of the Arts of This Century in Hawaii (1970), New Music Concerts in Toronto (1980), Asian Composers League in Hong Kong (1981), concert tour for Contemporary Music Network by British Arts Council (1981), Asia Pacific Festival in New Zealand (1984), Composers Workshop in Amsterdam (1984), Darmstadt Summer Course for Contemporary Music (1988), Lerchenborg Music Tage (1986, 1988), and Pacific Music Festival in Sapporo (1990).

From 1981 through 1994, Yuasa was actively engaged in music research and education at the University of California, San Diego, where he is professor emeritus. He has been a guest professor at Tokyo College of Music since 1981 and a professor for the postgraduate course of the College of Arts at Nihon University since 1993.

Akira Nishimura
Born 8 September, 1953, Osaka, Japan, Nishimura studied composition and music theory on a graduate course at Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music from 1973 to 1980. While at the university, he also studied Asiatic traditional music, religion, esthetics, cosmology, and the heterophonic concept, all of which has had a lasting influence on his music to the present day.

He was awarded the Grand Prix for Composition at the Queen Elisabeth International Music Competition in Brussels, the Luigi Dallapiccola Composition Award (Milan), three Otaka Prizes, and four other national prizes in Japan. He has been the Composer in Residence of the Orchestra Ensemble Kanazawa and the Tokyo Symphony Orchestra.

In recent years, Nishimura has been commissioned by many overseas music festivals and organizations such as the ULTIMA Contemporary Music Festival, Oslo; Octobre en Normandie, Rouen; Arditti String Quartet; Kronos String Quartet; ELISION ensemble; and the Hanover Society of Contemporary Music. His new works have been performed at WIEN MODERN, Vienna; Warsaw Autumn, Warsaw; MUSICA, Strasbourg; and the Brisbane Festival of Music, Brisbane.

Nishimura is a Professor at the Tokyo College of Music, and a member of the Board of Directors for the Japan Federation of Composers.

Tokuhide Niimi
Born in 1947, Niimi is a graduate of the Tokyo University of Fine Arts and Music, winner of the Grand Prix at the Geneva International Composition Competition for Opera and Ballet, a Special Prize for Performing Arts from the Japan Agency for Cultural Affairs, and commissions from NHK, the National Theater, Suntory, Min-On, the City of Kyoto, and Salford College (U.K.). His orchestral works have been performed in Japan by the NHK Symphony Orchestra and others, and overseas by the Suisse Romande, Netherlands Radio, BBC Scottish, Radio France, Berlin, and Nurenberg. Niimi is currently a lecturer at the Toho Gakuen School of Music in Tokyo, and a member of the Board of Directors for the Japan Federation of Composers.


Telephone
General Music information: 410-455-2942
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
Music of Japan Today website: http://userpages.umbc.edu/~emrich/mfj2003.html
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Department of Music website: http://www.umbc.edu/music

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

###

Posted by dwinds1

Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents 100 Years of Camera Work

Camera Work, the great quarterly journal dedicated to photography, criticism, and modernist art, is the central focus of the exhibition 100 Years of Camera Work, on display in the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery from March 31st through May 31st, 2003.

Camera Work, the great quarterly journal dedicated to photography, criticism, and modernist art, is the central focus of the exhibition 100 Years of Camera Work, on display in the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery from March 31st through May 31st, 2003.

Published between 1903 and 1917 by Alfred Stieglitz, the journal was one of the stellar achievements of 20th century American culture. It contributed greatly to establishing photography as a high art. 100 Years of Camera Work celebrates the impact that the journal had by exhibiting UMBC's entire holding in a very rare public display of an exceedingly rare publication. In recognition of the powerful influence that Camera Work had upon the development of Modernism in photography, 20th century art photographs made following 1917 have been selected from UMBC's Photography Collections to complement the exhibition of Camera Work.

The pages of Camera Work feature significant photography by such outstanding artists as Gertrude Käsebier, Alfred Stieglitz, Edward Steichen, George Seeley, Eva Watson-Schütze, and Alvin Langdon Coburn. Other modernist artists whose work appears in the journal include Pablo Picasso, Auguste Rodin, and Francis Picabia. Among the famous writers who are published there include Charles H. Caffin, George Bernard Shaw, Sadakichi Hartman, Gertrude Stein, Djuna Barnes, and Mabel Dodge Luhan.

Modernist photographers who came to the medium after the Photo-Secession and the publication of Camera Work owe a great debt to Stieglitz and his groundbreaking journal. Camera Work opened a discourse about photography unlike any previous one. Articles with titles such as "On Art and Originality Again," "Of Verities and Illusions," and "Some Reflections of the Functions and Limitations of Art Criticism--Especially in Relation to Modern Art" helped established the modernist aesthetic consideration of photography. Among the works to be included in the exhibition are many by modernists such as Ralph Gibson, Jaromir Stephany, David Plowden, Minor White, Judy Dater, Olivia Parker, Barbara Crane, Barbara Young, and Lotte Jacobi.

Gallery Information
The Albin O. Kuhn Gallery serves as one of theprincipal art galleries in the Baltimore region. Items from the SpecialCollections Department, as well as art and artifacts from all over theworld, are displayed in challenging and informative exhibitions for theUniversity community and the public. Moreover, traveling exhibitionsare occasionally presented, and the Gallery also sends some of itsexhibits throughout the state and nation. Admission to the Gallery isfree.

The programs of the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery are supported in part by an Arts Program Grant from the Maryland State Arts Council, an agency funded by the State of Maryland and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Hours of Operation
Sunday: Closed
Monday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Tuesday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Wednesday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Thursday: 12 p.m. - 8 p.m.
Friday: 12 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Saturday: 1 p.m. - 5 p.m.

Telephone
General Gallery information: 410-455-2270
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
Gallery website: http://aok.lib.umbc.edu/gallery/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

The images in this release are available at 300 dpi on the above website.

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 toexit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs tothe Albin O. Kuhn Library.

From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mileto the entrance of UMBC at the intersection of Wilkens Avenue andHilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.

From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B.Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Albin O.Kuhn Library.

Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near theAdministration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced onall University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadwaysrequire a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

###

Posted by dwinds1

UMBC Presents Music of Japan Today 2003 Festival

The UMBC Department of Music presents Music of Japan Today 2003, the largest festival and symposium on contemporary Japanese concert music in the United States, from April 2 through April 6, 2003. Featured composers include Joji Yuasa, Toshi Ichiyanagi, Tokuhide Niimi, and Akira Nishimura; performers include Ruckus, the professional contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC.

The UMBC Department of Music presents Music of Japan Today 2003, the largest festival and symposium on contemporary Japanese concert music in the United States, from April 2 through April 6, 2003. Featured composers include Joji Yuasa, Toshi Ichiyanagi, Tokuhide Niimi, and Akira Nishimura; performers include Ruckus, the professional contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC.

The Music of Japan Today 2003 Festival
UMBC will host a five-day festival of performances, lecture-recitals, panel discussions, and paper presentations on topics that concern Japanese music from the widest possible range of disciplines and expertise. Four guest composers of international stature will participate in the festival: Toshi Ichiyanagi, who worked with John Cage in the early 1960s in New York, and has ever since introduced Japan to experimental music; Joji Yuasa, who was a member of the jikken kobo in the 1950s and a Professor of Music at the University of California, San Diego from 1981-94; Akira Nishimura, who has received numerous international awards and commissions for his music that is influenced by historic Japanese music and elements from other Asian cultures; and Tokuhide Niimi, who has received international recognition for works that span musical genres from ballet, to choral, to orchestral and chamber music, to music for traditional Japanese instruments.

Performances during the festival will include a broad range of works for different genres (solo instrument, chamber music, choral, traditional instruments) by Yuasa, Ichiyanagi, Nishimura, and Niimi, including the premiere of a new work by Nishimura. The performers for these concerts will include Ruckus (the contemporary music ensemble at UMBC), faculty and students of the UMBC Department of Music, and guest musicians from the Baltimore/ Washington, D.C. area and other international new music centers.

This festival is the fifth in a series of events since 1992 to address Japanese and other Asian musics. Previously held at Hamilton College, the previous events include Asian Music in America: A Confluence of Two Worlds, and Music of Japan Today: Tradition and Innovation I (1992), II (1994), and III (1997).

Music of Japan Today 2003 is presented in cooperation with the Embassy of Japan, with additional support from All Nippon Airways (ANA), the Asian Cultural Council, the Freer Gallery of Art of the Smithsonian Institution, the National Cherry Blossom Festival, and the Maryland State Arts Council, an agency funded by the State of Maryland and the National Endowment for the Arts.

About the Contemporary Concert Music of Japan
Western art music has existed for a relatively short time in Japan. It is only since the 1950s, countering Japan's rush to adopt all that is "Western," that some composers, led by Joji Yuasa (b. 1929), Toshiro Mayuzumi (1929-97), Toru Takemitsu (1930-96), and Toshi Ichiyanagi (b. 1933), began to move away from stylistic modeling of nineteenth-century European forms and twentieth-century dodecaphony towards a more individualistic approach. Concerned with reflecting philosophical and musical elements from their own culture, they began to discover and develop their own music. The music of these artists reflects a new global confluence of multiple culturesa powerful cross-fertilization of aesthetics and musical characteristics from both East and West. The music is reflective of a variety of aspects of contemporary Japanese and Western societies, while at the same time deeply rooted in a traditional culture that has evolved over many years.


Major Public Events
Admission as noted
Public information: 410-455-ARTS or www.umbc.edu/arts

Wednesday, April 2
8 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall
Free admission
Concert by the Ruckus ensemble
Akira Nishimura: Madoromi III for clarinet and piano (2003)
Joji Yuasa: Cosmos Haptic II for solo piano (1986)
Joji Yuasa: A Winter Day: Homage to Basho for flute, clarinet, harp, percussion, and piano (1981)

Thursday, April 3
12 p.m. - 2 p.m.
Free admission
National Cherry Blossom Festival, Jefferson Memorial, Washington, D.C.
Concert: program to be announced

Friday, April 4
7:30 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission: $10 general, $5 students/seniors, free with UMBC ID.
Concert by the Ruckus ensemble
Joji Yuasa: Cosmos Haptic II for piano solo (1986)
Tokuhide Niimi: Ohju for solo cello (1987)
Akira Nishimura: Madoromi III for clarinet and piano (2003) (world premiere)
Tokuhide Niimi: The Soul Bird for flute and piano (1996)
Akira Nishimura: From Organums for violin, flute, clarinet, vibraphone and piano (1989): Hemiola, Melismas

Saturday, April 5
8 p.m., Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission: $10 general, $5 students/seniors, free with UMBC ID.
Concert by the Ruckus ensemble
Toshi Ichiyanagi: Cloud Atlas X for piano solo (1999)
Tokuhide Niimi: Lux Originis for violin, clarinet, cello, and piano (2002) (American premiere)
Akira Nishimura: Duologue for Timpani and Piano (1996)
Joji Yuasa: Terms of Temporal Detailing for solo bass flute (1989)
Toshi Ichiyanagi: Cosmic Harmony for cello and piano (1995)
Joji Yuasa: A Winter Day: Homage to Basho for flute, clarinet, harp, percussion, and piano (1981)

Sunday, April 6
4 p.m., Free Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
Admission: free, but reservations through Ticketmaster are required.
Concert by the Ruckus ensemble
Joji Yuasa: Cosmos Haptic II for solo piano (1986)
Toshi Ichiyanagi: Cosmic Harmony for cello and piano (1995)
Joji Yuasa: Terms of Temporal Detailing for solo bass flute (1989)
Tokuhide Niimi: Lux Originis for violin, clarinet, cello and piano (2002)
Akira Nishimura: Madoromi III for clarinet and piano (2003)
Tokuhide Niimi: The Soul Bird for flute and piano (1996)
Akira Nishimura: Duologue for Timpani and Piano (1996)


Other Festival Events
Admission to all events is free unless otherwise noted.

Friday, April 4
9 a.m., UMBC ECS Building
Lecture by Toshi Ichiyanagi (via satellite)

9:40 a.m., UMBC ECS Building
Lecture/Recital and Masterclass with Toshi Ichiyanagi
Marimba Music of Japanese Composers
Greg Giannascoli, marimba (Rutgers University) with Chiu-Tze Lin, piano
Toshi Ichiyanagi: Paginini Personal (1982)
Toshi Ichiyanagi: The Source (1989)
Tokuhide Niimi: For Marimba I (1975)

10:30 a.m., UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall
Music of Toru Takemitsu
Lecture by Ieda Bispo, Joetsu University, Nigata, Japan: A Japanese Garden? Western Confluences in Toru Takemitsus In an Autumn Garden for Gagaku
Lecture/Recital: The Cosmic Metaphor of Toru Takemitsus Rain Tree Sketches
Tomoko Isshiki piano - University of Houston, Houston, Texas
Toru Takemitsu: Rain Tree Sketch (1982)
Toru Takemitsu: Rain Tree Sketch II (1992)
Lecture by Hideaki Onishi, University of Washington, Seattle: Dream, Japanese Garden and Toru Takemitsu: Large-Scale Structure of Dream-Window through Set-Class Analysis

1:00 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts Room 011
Lecture/Recital by Calvert Johnson, harpsichordist (Agnes Scott College, Atlanta, Georgia): Harpsichord Music by Japanese Composers
Makiko Asaoka: Four Pieces for Harpsichord (1994)
Isaac Nagao: Ancient Cities (1986)
Karen Tanaka: Jardin des Herbes (1989)
Asako Hirabayashi: Sonatina for Harpsichord (2002) (world premiere)

1:30 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts Room 011
Composer Masterclasses
Joji Yuasa with Reiko Manabe, flute (University of California, San Diego)
Joji Yuasa: Domain (1978)
Tokuhide Niimi with Greg Giannascoli, marimba (Rutgers University)
Tokuhide Niimi: For Marimba I (1975)
Akira Nishimura with Akiko Fukuda, piano (University of Kansas)
Akira Nishimura: Tritrope (1978)

3:10 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts Studio 508
Performance by Gene Coleman, artistic director of the Transonic festival at the House of World Cultures in Berlin, Germany: Pachinko/Zen A Non-Lecture on Japan

3:40 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts Studio 508
Lecture by Kristian Twombly, Department of Music, UMBC: Oppositional Dialectics in Joji Yuasas The Sea Darkens

4:20 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts Studio 508
Concert
Joji Yuasa: Icon (1967)
Takayuki Rai: Pain for Two Computers (1983)
Joji Yuasa: The Sea Darkens (1987)
Mamoru Fujieda: Patterns of Plants (1997)
Steven Kazuo Takasugi: Iridescent Uncertainty (1999)
Yukiko Ito: two-sides for tape (2002)
Joji Yuasa: Eye on Genesis I for UPIC (1991)

Saturday, April 5
9:00 a.m., UMBC ECS Building and UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall
The Music of Toshi Ichiyanagi
Lecture by Luciana Galliano, Universita Ca Foscari di Venezia, Italy: Ichiyanagi as Japanese Composer, and Fluxus
Lecture/Recital by Yoojin Oh, piano (Manhattan School of Music) with violinist Olivier Fluchaire: The Piano/Violin Duo Works of Toshi Ichiyanagi
Toshi Ichiyanagi: Interrelation (1998)
Lecture by Robert Haskins, Eastman School of Music, Rochester, New York: Cage, Ichiyanagi, Fluxus, Japan: Responses and Resonances
Lecture/Recital by Akiko Fukuda, piano, University of Kansas: A Search for Identity: Postmodern Trends in Japanese Piano Music Since 1985
Takashi Yoshimatsu: Pleiades Dances (1986-2001)
Mamoru Fujieda: Patterns of Plants: The Seventh Collection (1997)
Akira Nishimura: Tritrope (1978)

11:10 a.m., UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall
Lecture by Peter Burt, The Open University, Vienna, Austria: Overtones of Progress, Undertones of Reaction: Toshiro Mayuzumi and the Nirvana Symphony

11:40 a.m., UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall
Presentations of Recent and Forthcoming books on contemporary Japanese music, including Yougaku: Japanese Music in the Twentieth Century (2002, Scarecrow Press) by Luciana Galliano, Universita Ca Foscari di Venezia, Italy; and Locating East Asia in Western Art Music (forthcoming 2003, Wesleyan University Press) by Yayoi Uno Everett, Emory University, Atlanta

1:05 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts 011
Lecture by David Pacun, Ithaca College, New York: Stylistic Counterpoint in the Early Music of Yamada Koscak

1:35 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts 011
Lectures of Guest Composers
Joji Yuasa
Tokuhide Niimi
Akira Nishimura

4:00 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission: $10 general, $5 students/seniors, free with UMBC ID.
Tickets available at the door.
Concert by the UMBC Chamber Players, Ossia (the new music ensemble of the Eastman School of Music, the Maryland Camerata, and Ryan Bridlgand)
Colin Holter: Variations: Go Rin No Sho (2003) (premiere)
Joji Yuasa: Calling Together (1971)
Akira Miyoshi: Reve Colorie for 2 clarinets (1991)
Toshi Ichiyanagi: Music for Electric Metronomes (1968)
Joji Yuasa: Observations on Weather Forecasts (1983)
Tokuhide Niimi: Madrigal II (1981)
Toshi Ichiyanagi: Music For Piano No. 7 (1961)
Toru Takemitsu: Toward the Sea for alto flute and guitar (1981)
Joji Yuasa: Territory (1977)
Joji Yuasa: Mutterings (1988)

Sunday, April 6
9:00 a.m., UMBC Fine Arts 011
Crossovers of Japanese Popular and Art Music
Lecture by Fuyuko Fukunaka, New York University: Globalism, Fetishization, and the "Politics" of Japanese Rap
Lecture by Michael Peluse, Wesleyan University: Tsugaru Shamisen's Latest Boom: Folk Revival or Pop Sensation?
Lecture by Yumi Hara Cawkwell, City University, London, England: Childminder of Takeda

10:40 a.m., UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall
Lecture/Recital by Margaret Lucia, piano (Shippensburg University): Recent Piano Works by Japanese Women Composers
Junko Mori: Imagery (1987)
Nagako Konishi: Fantasy (1995-96)
Keiko Fujiie: Pas de Deux II, Op. 14 (1989)

11:10 a.m., Fine Arts Recital Hall
Jiutamai Dance and Piano, featuring Chie Sato Rodin, piano; Junko Tano, choreographer and dancerTraditional Japanese Dance "Black Hair"
Shigenobu Nakamura: White for solo piano (1983)
Yoichi Togawa: Hi No Chi (The Land of Sorrow) (1991)

11:50 a.m., Fine Arts Recital Hall
Panel Discussion
Joji Yuasa, Tokuhide Niimi, Akira Nishimura, Kazuko Tanosaki, E. Michael Richards


About the Composers
Three Japanese guest composers (Joji Yuasa, Akira Nishimura and Tokuhide Niimi) will be in residence at Music of Japan Today; a fourth (Toshi Ichiyanagi) will participate via satellite.

Toshi Ichiyanagi
Born in 1933 in Kobe, Japan, Toshi Ichiyanagi studied composition with Kishio Hirao and John Cage, piano with Chieko Hara, Barnhard Weiser and Beveridge Webster. After attending the Juilliard School of Music and the New School for Social Research in New York between 1954-60, he returned to Japan in 1961, and introduced many new musical concepts, including Cages idea of indeterminacy, exerting a strong influence on the stream of Japanese contemporary music.

As one of the leading composers in Japan, Ichiyanagi has composed in most genres of music: operas, orchestral, chamber and instrumental works. Among his major works are his violin concerto Circulating Scenery (1983), Piano Concerto No. 2 Winter Portrait (1987) and opera Momo (1995), based on a novel by Michael Ende. While composing these large-scale pieces, he is also known for his compositions using Japanese traditional instruments such as sho and gagaku ensemble. Many of them have been performed throughout the world, especially by Tokyo International Music Ensemble, where he serves as Artistic Director.

Ichiyanagi won the Elizabeth A. Coolidge Prize (1954) and the Serge Koussevitzky Prize (1956) during his studies in New York. He was also a member of Fluxus. Since his return to Japan, he has received numerous awards including the prestigious Nakajima Kenzo Award (1984), the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres of the French Government (1985) and Grand Prix of the Kyoto Music Award (1989). In 1990, he was awarded the Otaka Prize for the fourth time, for his unique symphony Berlin Renshi.

His recent works include Coexistence for ondes martenot and orchestra (1996), Symphony No. 5 Time Perspective (1997), Coexistence for orchestra (1997) and Mirage for shakuhachi and piano (1998).

Joji Yuasa
Born in 1929 in Koriyama, Japan, Yuasa is a self-taught composer. While a premedical student at Keio University in Tokyo, Yuasa made the acquaintance of composer Toru Takemitsu and musicologist Kuniharu Akiyama. He joined them in forming the Jikken-kobo (Experimental Workshop) in 1952, and devoted himself to music. Since then, Yuasa has been actively engaged in a wide range of musical composition, including orchestral, choral and chamber music, music for theatre, and intermedia, electronic and computer music. Yuasa has won numerous commissions for his works from such institutions as the Koussevitzky Music Foundation, Saarland Radio Symphony Orchestra, Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra, Japan Philharmonic Orchestra, NHK Symphony Orchestra, Canada Council, Suntory Music Foundation, IRCAM and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Yuasa has received a number of scholarships at home and abroad, including a Japan Society Fellowship (1968-69), Composer in Residence at the Center for Music Experiment UCSD (1976), Berlin Artist Program by DAAD (1976-77), the New South Wales Conservatorium of Music in Sydney (1980), the University of Toronto (1981) and IRCAM in Paris (1987).

As a guest composer and lecturer, Yuasa has contributed to the Festival of the Arts of This Century in Hawaii (1970), New Music Concerts in Toronto (1980), Asian Composers League in Hong Kong (1981), concert tour for Contemporary Music Network by British Arts Council (1981), Asia Pacific Festival in New Zealand (1984), Composers Workshop in Amsterdam (1984), Darmstadt Summer Course for Contemporary Music (1988), Lerchenborg Music Tage (1986, 1988), and Pacific Music Festival in Sapporo (1990).

From 1981 through 1994, Yuasa was actively engaged in music research and education at the University of California, San Diego, where he is professor emeritus. He has been a guest professor at Tokyo College of Music since 1981 and a professor for the postgraduate course of the College of Arts at Nihon University since 1993.

Akira Nishimura
Born 8 September, 1953, Osaka, Japan, Nishimura studied composition and music theory on a graduate course at Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music from 1973 to 1980. While at the university, he also studied Asiatic traditional music, religion, esthetics, cosmology, and the heterophonic concept, all of which has had a lasting influence on his music to the present day.

He was awarded the Grand Prix for Composition at the Queen Elisabeth International Music Competition in Brussels, the Luigi Dallapiccola Composition Award (Milan), three Otaka Prizes, and four other national prizes in Japan. He has been the Composer in Residence of the Orchestra Ensemble Kanazawa and the Tokyo Symphony Orchestra.

In recent years, Nishimura has been commissioned by many overseas music festivals and organizations such as the ULTIMA Contemporary Music Festival, Oslo; Octobre en Normandie, Rouen; Arditti String Quartet; Kronos String Quartet; ELISION ensemble; and the Hanover Society of Contemporary Music. His new works have been performed at WIEN MODERN, Vienna; Warsaw Autumn, Warsaw; MUSICA, Strasbourg; and the Brisbane Festival of Music, Brisbane.

Nishimura is a Professor at the Tokyo College of Music, and a member of the Board of Directors for the Japan Federation of Composers.

Tokuhide Niimi
Born in 1947, Niimi is a graduate of the Tokyo University of Fine Arts and Music, winner of the Grand Prix at the Geneva International Composition Competition for Opera and Ballet, a Special Prize for Performing Arts from the Japan Agency for Cultural Affairs, and commissions from NHK, the National Theater, Suntory, Min-On, the City of Kyoto, and Salford College (U.K.). His orchestral works have been performed in Japan by the NHK Symphony Orchestra and others, and overseas by the Suisse Romande, Netherlands Radio, BBC Scottish, Radio France, Berlin, and Nurenberg. Niimi is currently a lecturer at the Toho Gakuen School of Music in Tokyo, and a member of the Board of Directors for the Japan Federation of Composers.


Telephone
General Music information: 410-455-2942
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
Music of Japan Today 2003 website: http://userpages.umbc.edu/~emrich/mfj2003.html
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Department of Music website: http://www.umbc.edu/music

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

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Posted by dwinds1

UMBC Presents Music of Japan Today Festival

The UMBC Department of Music presents Music of Japan Today, the largest festival and symposium on contemporary Japanese concert music in the United States, from April 2 through April 6, 2003. Featured composers include Joji Yuasa, Toshi Ichiyanagi, Tokuhide Niimi, and Akira Nishimura; performers include Ruckus, the professional contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC.

The UMBC Department of Music presents Music of Japan Today, the largest festival and symposium on contemporary Japanese concert music in the United States, from April 2 through April 6, 2003. Featured composers include Joji Yuasa, Toshi Ichiyanagi, Tokuhide Niimi, and Akira Nishimura; performers include Ruckus, the professional contemporary music ensemble in residence at UMBC.

The Music of Japan Today Festival
UMBC will host a five-day festival of performances, lecture-recitals, panel discussions, and paper presentations on topics that concern Japanese music from the widest possible range of disciplines and expertise. Four guest composers of international stature will participate in the festival: Toshi Ichiyanagi, who worked with John Cage in the early 1960s in New York, and has ever since introduced Japan to experimental music; Joji Yuasa, who was a member of the jikken kobo in the 1950s and a Professor of Music at the University of California, San Diego from 1981-94; Akira Nishimura, who has received numerous international awards and commissions for his music that is influenced by historic Japanese music and elements from other Asian cultures; and Tokuhide Niimi, who has received international recognition for works that span musical genres from ballet, to choral, to orchestral and chamber music, to music for traditional Japanese instruments.

Performances during the festival will include a broad range of works for different genres (solo instrument, chamber music, choral, traditional instruments) by Yuasa, Ichiyanagi, Nishimura, and Niimi, as well as the winner of a composition competition. They will include the premiere of a new work by Nishimura. The performers for these concerts will include Ruckus (the contemporary music ensemble at UMBC), faculty and students of the UMBC Department of Music, and guest musicians from the Baltimore/ Washington, D.C. area and other international new music centers.

This festival is the fifth in a series of events since 1992 to address Japanese and other Asian musics. Previously held at Hamilton College, the previous events include Asian Music in America: A Confluence of Two Worlds, and Music of Japan Today: Tradition and Innovation I (1992), II (1994), and III (1997).

Music of Japan Today is presented in cooperation with the Embassy of Japan, with additional support from All Nippon Airways (ANA), the Asian Cultural Council, the Freer Gallery of Art of the Smithsonian Institution, the National Cherry Blossom Festival, and the Maryland State Arts Council, an agency funded by the State of Maryland and the National Endowment for the Arts.

About the Contemporary Concert Music of Japan
Western art music has existed for a relatively short time in Japan. It is only since the 1950s, countering Japan's rush to adopt all that is "Western," that some composers, led by Joji Yuasa (b. 1929), Toshiro Mayuzumi (1929-97), Toru Takemitsu (1930-96), and Toshi Ichiyanagi (b. 1933), began to move away from stylistic modeling of nineteenth-century European forms and twentieth-century dodecaphony towards a more individualistic approach. Concerned with reflecting philosophical and musical elements from their own culture, they began to discover and develop their own music. The music of these artists reflects a new global confluence of multiple culturesa powerful cross-fertilization of aesthetics and musical characteristics from both East and West. The music is reflective of a variety of aspects of contemporary Japanese and Western societies, while at the same time deeply rooted in a traditional culture that has evolved over many years.


Major Public Events
Admission as noted
Public information: 410-455-ARTS or www.umbc.edu/arts

Wednesday, April 2
8 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall
Free admission
Concert by the Ruckus ensemble
Akira Nishimura: Madoromi III for clarinet and piano (2003)
Joji Yuasa: Cosmos Haptic II for solo piano (1986)
Joji Yuasa: A Winter Day: Homage to Basho for flute, clarinet, harp, percussion, and piano (1981)

Thursday, April 3
12 p.m. - 2 p.m.
Free admission
National Cherry Blossom Festival, Jefferson Memorial, Washington, D.C.
Concert: program to be announced

Friday, April 4
7:30 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission: $10 general, $5 students/seniors, free with UMBC ID.
Concert by the Ruckus ensemble
Joji Yuasa: Cosmos Haptic II for piano solo (1986)
Tokuhide Niimi: Ohju for solo cello (1987)
Akira Nishimura: Madoromi III for clarinet and piano (2003) (world premiere)
Tokuhide Niimi: The Soul Bird for flute and piano (1996)
Akira Nishimura: From Organums for violin, flute, clarinet, vibraphone and piano (1989): Hemiola, Melismas

Saturday, April 5
8 p.m., Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission: $10 general, $5 students/seniors, free with UMBC ID.
Concert by the Ruckus ensemble
Toshi Ichiyanagi: Cloud Atlas X for piano solo (1999)
Tokuhide Niimi: Lux Originis for violin, clarinet, cello, and piano (2002) (American premiere)
Akira Nishimura: Duologue for Timpani and Piano (1996)
Joji Yuasa: Terms of Temporal Detailing for solo bass flute (1989)
Toshi Ichiyanagi: Cosmic Harmony for cello and piano (1995)
Joji Yuasa: A Winter Day: Homage to Basho for flute, clarinet, harp, percussion, and piano (1981)

Sunday, April 6
4 p.m., Free Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.
Admission: free, but reservations through Ticketmaster are required.
Concert by the Ruckus ensemble
Joji Yuasa: Cosmos Haptic II for solo piano (1986)
Toshi Ichiyanagi: Cosmic Harmony for cello and piano (1995)
Joji Yuasa: Terms of Temporal Detailing for solo bass flute (1989)
Tokuhide Niimi: Lux Originis for violin, clarinet, cello and piano (2002)
Akira Nishimura: Madoromi III for clarinet and piano (2003)
Tokuhide Niimi: The Soul Bird for flute and piano (1996)
Akira Nishimura: Duologue for Timpani and Piano (1996)


Other Festival Events
Admission to all events is free unless otherwise noted.

Friday, April 4
9 a.m., UMBC ECS Building
Lecture by Toshi Ichiyanagi (via satellite)

9:40 a.m., UMBC ECS Building
Lecture/Recital and Masterclass with Toshi Ichiyanagi
Marimba Music of Japanese Composers
Greg Giannascoli, marimba (Rutgers University) with Chiu-Tze Lin, piano
Toshi Ichiyanagi: Paginini Personal (1982)
Toshi Ichiyanagi: The Source (1989)
Tokuhide Niimi: For Marimba I (1975)

10:30 a.m., UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall
Music of Toru Takemitsu
Lecture by Ieda Bispo, Joetsu University, Nigata, Japan: A Japanese Garden? Western Confluences in Toru Takemitsus In an Autumn Garden for Gagaku
Lecture/Recital: The Cosmic Metaphor of Toru Takemitsus Rain Tree Sketches
Tomoko Isshiki piano - University of Houston, Houston, Texas
Toru Takemitsu: Rain Tree Sketch (1982)
Toru Takemitsu: Rain Tree Sketch II (1992)
Lecture by Hideaki Onishi, University of Washington, Seattle: Dream, Japanese Garden and Toru Takemitsu: Large-Scale Structure of Dream-Window through Set-Class Analysis

1:00 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts Room 011
Lecture/Recital by Calvert Johnson, harpsichordist (Agnes Scott College, Atlanta, Georgia): Harpsichord Music by Japanese Composers
Makiko Asaoka: Four Pieces for Harpsichord (1994)
Isaac Nagao: Ancient Cities (1986)
Karen Tanaka: Jardin des Herbes (1989)
Asako Hirabayashi: Sonatina for Harpsichord (2002) (world premiere)

1:30 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts Room 011
Composer Masterclasses
Joji Yuasa with Reiko Manabe, flute (University of California, San Diego)
Joji Yuasa: Domain (1978)
Tokuhide Niimi with Greg Giannascoli, marimba (Rutgers University)
Tokuhide Niimi: For Marimba I (1975)
Akira Nishimura with Akiko Fukuda, piano (University of Kansas)
Akira Nishimura: Tritrope (1978)

3:10 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts Studio 508
Performance by Gene Coleman, artistic director of the Transonic festival at the House of World Cultures in Berlin, Germany: Pachinko/Zen A Non-Lecture on Japan

3:40 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts Studio 508
Lecture by Kristian Twombly, Department of Music, UMBC: Oppositional Dialectics in Joji Yuasas The Sea Darkens

4:20 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts Studio 508
Concert
Joji Yuasa: Icon (1967)
Takayuki Rai: Pain for Two Computers (1983)
Joji Yuasa: The Sea Darkens (1987)
Mamoru Fujieda: Patterns of Plants (1997)
Steven Kazuo Takasugi: Iridescent Uncertainty (1999)
Yukiko Ito: two-sides for tape (2002)
Joji Yuasa: Eye on Genesis I for UPIC (1991)

Saturday, April 5
9:00 a.m., UMBC ECS Building and UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall
The Music of Toshi Ichiyanagi
Lecture by Luciana Galliano, Universita Ca Foscari di Venezia, Italy: Ichiyanagi as Japanese Composer, and Fluxus
Lecture/Recital by Yoojin Oh, piano (Manhattan School of Music) with violinist Olivier Fluchaire: The Piano/Violin Duo Works of Toshi Ichiyanagi
Toshi Ichiyanagi: Interrelation (1998)
Lecture by Robert Haskins, Eastman School of Music, Rochester, New York: Cage, Ichiyanagi, Fluxus, Japan: Responses and Resonances
Lecture/Recital by Akiko Fukuda, piano, University of Kansas: A Search for Identity: Postmodern Trends in Japanese Piano Music Since 1985
Takashi Yoshimatsu: Pleiades Dances (1986-2001)
Mamoru Fujieda: Patterns of Plants: The Seventh Collection (1997)
Akira Nishimura: Tritrope (1978)

11:10 a.m., UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall
Lecture by Peter Burt, The Open University, Vienna, Austria: Overtones of Progress, Undertones of Reaction: Toshiro Mayuzumi and the Nirvana Symphony

11:40 a.m., UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall
Presentations of Recent and Forthcoming books on contemporary Japanese music, including Yougaku: Japanese Music in the Twentieth Century (2002, Scarecrow Press) by Luciana Galliano, Universita Ca Foscari di Venezia, Italy; and Locating East Asia in Western Art Music (forthcoming 2003, Wesleyan University Press) by Yayoi Uno Everett, Emory University, Atlanta

1:05 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts 011
Lecture by David Pacun, Ithaca College, New York: Stylistic Counterpoint in the Early Music of Yamada Koscak

1:35 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts 011
Lectures of Guest Composers
Joji Yuasa
Tokuhide Niimi
Akira Nishimura

4:00 p.m., UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall
Admission: $10 general, $5 students/seniors, free with UMBC ID.
Tickets available at the door.
Concert by the UMBC Chamber Players, Ossia (the new music ensemble of the Eastman School of Music, the Maryland Camerata, and Ryan Bridlgand)
Colin Holter: Variations: Go Rin No Sho (2003) (premiere)
Joji Yuasa: Calling Together (1971)
Akira Miyoshi: Reve Colorie for 2 clarinets (1991)
Toshi Ichiyanagi: Music for Electric Metronomes (1968)
Joji Yuasa: Observations on Weather Forecasts (1983)
Tokuhide Niimi: Madrigal II (1981)
Toshi Ichiyanagi: Music For Piano No. 7 (1961)
Toru Takemitsu: Toward the Sea for alto flute and guitar (1981)
Joji Yuasa: Territory (1977)
Joji Yuasa: Mutterings (1988)

Sunday, April 6
9:00 a.m., UMBC Fine Arts 011
Crossovers of Japanese Popular and Art Music
Lecture by Fuyuko Fukunaka, New York University: Globalism, Fetishization, and the "Politics" of Japanese Rap
Lecture by Michael Peluse, Wesleyan University: Tsugaru Shamisen's Latest Boom: Folk Revival or Pop Sensation?
Lecture by Yumi Hara Cawkwell, City University, London, England: Childminder of Takeda

10:40 a.m., UMBC Fine Arts Recital Hall
Lecture/Recital by Margaret Lucia, piano (Shippensburg University): Recent Piano Works by Japanese Women Composers
Junko Mori: Imagery (1987)
Nagako Konishi: Fantasy (1995-96)
Keiko Fujiie: Pas de Deux II, Op. 14 (1989)

11:10 a.m., Fine Arts Recital Hall
Jiutamai Dance and Piano, featuring Chie Sato Rodin, piano; Junko Tano, choreographer and dancerTraditional Japanese Dance "Black Hair"
Shigenobu Nakamura: White for solo piano (1983)
Yoichi Togawa: Hi No Chi (The Land of Sorrow) (1991)

11:50 a.m., Fine Arts Recital Hall
Panel Discussion
Joji Yuasa, Tokuhide Niimi, Akira Nishimura, Kazuko Tanosaki, E. Michael Richards


About the Composers
Three Japanese guest composers (Joji Yuasa, Akira Nishimura and Tokuhide Niimi) will be in residence at Music of Japan Today; a fourth (Toshi Ichiyanagi) will participate via satellite.

Toshi Ichiyanagi
Born in 1933 in Kobe, Japan, Toshi Ichiyanagi studied composition with Kishio Hirao and John Cage, piano with Chieko Hara, Barnhard Weiser and Beveridge Webster. After attending the Juilliard School of Music and the New School for Social Research in New York between 1954-60, he returned to Japan in 1961, and introduced many new musical concepts, including Cages idea of indeterminacy, exerting a strong influence on the stream of Japanese contemporary music.

As one of the leading composers in Japan, Ichiyanagi has composed in most genres of music: operas, orchestral, chamber and instrumental works. Among his major works are his violin concerto Circulating Scenery (1983), Piano Concerto No. 2 Winter Portrait (1987) and opera Momo (1995), based on a novel by Michael Ende. While composing these large-scale pieces, he is also known for his compositions using Japanese traditional instruments such as sho and gagaku ensemble. Many of them have been performed throughout the world, especially by Tokyo International Music Ensemble, where he serves as Artistic Director.

Ichiyanagi won the Elizabeth A. Coolidge Prize (1954) and the Serge Koussevitzky Prize (1956) during his studies in New York. He was also a member of Fluxus. Since his return to Japan, he has received numerous awards including the prestigious Nakajima Kenzo Award (1984), the Ordre des Arts et des Lettres of the French Government (1985) and Grand Prix of the Kyoto Music Award (1989). In 1990, he was awarded the Otaka Prize for the fourth time, for his unique symphony Berlin Renshi.

His recent works include Coexistence for ondes martenot and orchestra (1996), Symphony No. 5 Time Perspective (1997), Coexistence for orchestra (1997) and Mirage for shakuhachi and piano (1998).

Joji Yuasa
Born in 1929 in Koriyama, Japan, Yuasa is a self-taught composer. While a premedical student at Keio University in Tokyo, Yuasa made the acquaintance of composer Toru Takemitsu and musicologist Kuniharu Akiyama. He joined them in forming the Jikken-kobo (Experimental Workshop) in 1952, and devoted himself to music. Since then, Yuasa has been actively engaged in a wide range of musical composition, including orchestral, choral and chamber music, music for theatre, and intermedia, electronic and computer music. Yuasa has won numerous commissions for his works from such institutions as the Koussevitzky Music Foundation, Saarland Radio Symphony Orchestra, Helsinki Philharmonic Orchestra, Japan Philharmonic Orchestra, NHK Symphony Orchestra, Canada Council, Suntory Music Foundation, IRCAM and the National Endowment for the Arts.

Yuasa has received a number of scholarships at home and abroad, including a Japan Society Fellowship (1968-69), Composer in Residence at the Center for Music Experiment UCSD (1976), Berlin Artist Program by DAAD (1976-77), the New South Wales Conservatorium of Music in Sydney (1980), the University of Toronto (1981) and IRCAM in Paris (1987).

As a guest composer and lecturer, Yuasa has contributed to the Festival of the Arts of This Century in Hawaii (1970), New Music Concerts in Toronto (1980), Asian Composers League in Hong Kong (1981), concert tour for Contemporary Music Network by British Arts Council (1981), Asia Pacific Festival in New Zealand (1984), Composers Workshop in Amsterdam (1984), Darmstadt Summer Course for Contemporary Music (1988), Lerchenborg Music Tage (1986, 1988), and Pacific Music Festival in Sapporo (1990).

From 1981 through 1994, Yuasa was actively engaged in music research and education at the University of California, San Diego, where he is professor emeritus. He has been a guest professor at Tokyo College of Music since 1981 and a professor for the postgraduate course of the College of Arts at Nihon University since 1993.

Akira Nishimura
Born 8 September, 1953, Osaka, Japan, Nishimura studied composition and music theory on a graduate course at Tokyo National University of Fine Arts and Music from 1973 to 1980. While at the university, he also studied Asiatic traditional music, religion, esthetics, cosmology, and the heterophonic concept, all of which has had a lasting influence on his music to the present day.

He was awarded the Grand Prix for Composition at the Queen Elisabeth International Music Competition in Brussels, the Luigi Dallapiccola Composition Award (Milan), three Otaka Prizes, and four other national prizes in Japan. He has been the Composer in Residence of the Orchestra Ensemble Kanazawa and the Tokyo Symphony Orchestra.

In recent years, Nishimura has been commissioned by many overseas music festivals and organizations such as the ULTIMA Contemporary Music Festival, Oslo; Octobre en Normandie, Rouen; Arditti String Quartet; Kronos String Quartet; ELISION ensemble; and the Hanover Society of Contemporary Music. His new works have been performed at WIEN MODERN, Vienna; Warsaw Autumn, Warsaw; MUSICA, Strasbourg; and the Brisbane Festival of Music, Brisbane.

Nishimura is a Professor at the Tokyo College of Music, and a member of the Board of Directors for the Japan Federation of Composers.

Tokuhide Niimi
Born in 1947, Niimi is a graduate of the Tokyo University of Fine Arts and Music, winner of the Grand Prix at the Geneva International Composition Competition for Opera and Ballet, a Special Prize for Performing Arts from the Japan Agency for Cultural Affairs, and commissions from NHK, the National Theater, Suntory, Min-On, the City of Kyoto, and Salford College (U.K.). His orchestral works have been performed in Japan by the NHK Symphony Orchestra and others, and overseas by the Suisse Romande, Netherlands Radio, BBC Scottish, Radio France, Berlin, and Nurenberg. Niimi is currently a lecturer at the Toho Gakuen School of Music in Tokyo, and a member of the Board of Directors for the Japan Federation of Composers.


Telephone
General Music information: 410-455-2942
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
Music of Japan Today website: http://userpages.umbc.edu/~emrich/mfj2003.html
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Department of Music website: http://www.umbc.edu/music

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

###

Posted by dwinds1

March 3, 2003

UMBC Department of Music Presents Percussionist Jonas Larsson in Concert

The Department of Music's Contemporary Concerts series presents percussionist Jonas Larsson in a program of contemporary music. Recognized as one of Sweden's most important percussionists, Larsson studied at Gteborg University and is the founder and director of the contemporary music ensemble Gageego!. He tours widely in Europe and the United States as a soloist. Thursday, March 20, 8 p.m., Fine Arts Recital Hall.

Jonas LarssonOn Thursday, March 20th at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall, the UMBC Department of Music's Faculty Recital Series presents percussionst Jonas Larsson in a program of contemporary music. Recognized as one of Sweden's most important percussionists, Larssonstudied at Göteborg University and is the founder and director of thecontemporary music ensemble Gageego!.He tours widely in Europe and the United States as a soloist.

The Program
Jonas Larsson's program will include:

Admission
Admission is free.

Telephone
General Music information: 410-455-2942
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Department of Music website: http://www.umbc.edu/music

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

The image file for this event: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/music/spring03/larsson/larsson.jpg (1.0 Mb jpg file).

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Posted by dwinds1

UMBC Department of Theatre Presents Fanto: A Mysterious Vaudeville

The Department of Theatre presents Fanto: A Mysterious Vaudeville, featuring newborn puppets and misled clowns. March 11-16 in the UMBC Theatre. A curious variety show starring inanimate objects (from dancing tubes to lusty packing tape), Fanto uses theatrical illusion in ten original acts ranging from the spooky to the surreal.

FantoThe Department of Theatre presents Fanto: A Mysterious Vaudeville, featuring newborn puppets and misled clowns. A curious variety show starring inanimate objects (from dancing tubes to lusty packing tape), Fanto uses theatrical illusion in ten original acts ranging from the spooky to the surreal.

Conceived by faculty director Colette Searls, Fanto features commissioned puppets by artist Don Becker, with lighting design by Ryan Griffin, sound design by Terry Cobb and original music by Kristian Twombly.

Click here towatch a brief video clip on Fanto (RealVideo format).

About the Director
A new member of the UMBC faculty, Colette Searls most recently worked in California, where her directing credits include Maria Irene Fornés' musical Promenade, and Shakespeare's A Midsummer Night's Dream at the University of California, Irvine. She has directed several original mixed media puppet plays, including Weight of the Head, which appeared at New York's HERE Theater's 2000 Puppet Parlor. Ms. Searls spent several years running an artist-in-residence program for incarcerated and at-risk youth, which received the Bravo TV Network's national Arts for Change award in 1997. Performance credits include a principal role in Claire Braz-Valentine's Women Behind the Walls, co-created with incarcerated women, and performed inside Soledad state prison. More recently, she toured with the California Commedia Troupe to Spain where she performed and assisted with mask training at Madrid's La Sala Mirador Theater. A member of Phi Beta Kappa, Ms. Searls received her B.A. from the University of California, Berkeley, and her M.F.A. in Directing from UC Irvine.

Showtimes:
Tuesday, March 11, 8 pm (preview)
Wednesday, March 12, 8 pm (opening night)
Thursday, March 13, 4 pm (a free showing for the UMBC campus community, reservations recommended)
Friday, March 14, 8 pm
Saturday, March 15, 8 pm
Sunday, March 16, 4 pm

Note: Fanto is not suitable for infants and toddlers.

Admission
$5 general admission, $3 for the preview.
Ticket proceeds benefit the Department of Theatre Scholarship Fund.
Theatre Box Office: 410-455-2476

Telephone
Theatre Box Office: 410-455-2476
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
General Department of Theatre information: 410-455-2917
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Department of Theatre website: http://www.umbc.edu/theatre

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.

From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Theatre.

From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.

Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.


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Posted by dwinds1

February 25, 2003

Bassist Michael Cameron to Perform at UMBC

On Thursday, March 6th at 8 p.m., the UMBC Department of Music's Contemporary Concerts Series presents bassist Michael Cameron. Free admission, Fine Arts Recital Hall.

The UMBC Department of Music'sContemporary Concerts Series presents contrabassist Michael Cameron, who will present a concert of contemporary classical music.

The Program
Michael Cameron's program will include excepts from the Bach Suite BWV 1010, Giacinto Scelsi's Maknongan, Stuart Saunders Smith's Light, A Dew, Nicholas Maw's The Old King's Lament, Erik Lund's descent, debris, debrief, Stuart Sankey's Haiku, Jelly Roll Morton's Buddy Bolden's Blues, and Hans Werner Henze's Serenade.

About the Artist
Michael Cameron has premiered dozens of solo and chamber works for bass by such composers as Ben Johnston, Violeta Dinescu, Yehuda Yannay, Herbert Brün, Allan Segall, Erik Lund, and many others, and he has also performed many American premieres of works by Sir Peter Maxwell Davies (later broadcast nationwide on NPR's "Performance Today"), Sofia Gubaidulina, and Luciano Berio. He has also worked with composers George Perle and Helmut Lachenmann in adapting their solo cello works for the double bass. Cameron is the author of several articles for The Double Bassist and American String Teacher, has contributed a chapter to the Syllabus of Recommended Chamber Music for Bassists (published by the Yehudi Menuhin School in London), and he is chair of the string division of the University of Illinois School of Music. Cameron was a featured guest artist and lecturer at the 1990, 1995, and 1997 International Society of Bassists conventions, as well as at the Cincinnati Summer Bass School and several Midwest international band and orchestra clinics.

Admission
Admission is free

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Department of Music website: http://www.umbc.edu/music

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

###

Posted by dwinds1

Flutist Lisa Cella to Perform at UMBC

On Sunday, March 2nd, the Department of Music's Faculty Recital Series presents flutist Lisa Cella with pianist Sandra Brown. The program will include music by Sergei Prokofiev, Kaija Saariaho, Anne LaBerge, Paul Koonce and Pierre Boulez. 3 p.m., Fine Arts Recital Hall. Admission is free.

The Department of Music's Faculty Recital Series presents flutist Lisa Cella with pianist Sandra Brown.

The Program
The program will include Sergei Prokofiev's Sonata in D Major, Op. 94, for flute and piano; Kaija Saariaho's NoaNoa for flute and electronics; Anne LaBerge's Rollin' for solo amplified flute; Paul Koonce's Escape Tone for solo flute; and Pierre Boulez's Sonatine for flute and piano.

About the Artist
Lisa Cella holds a DMA in contemporary flute performance from the University of California, San Diego. She has performed with SONOR, the faculty ensemble of UCSD, SIRIUS, and in various concert series and festivals in the San Diego area. She is the executive director of San Diego New Music as well as a founding member of NOISE, the resident ensemble of San Diego New Music. A dedicated performer of contemporary music, she was a member of the Baltimore-based contemporary ensemble Polaris in 1993 and receive her Master of Music degree and a Graduate Performance Diploma from the Peabody Conservatory.

Admission
General admission: $7.00.
Students and seniors: $3.00.
Admission is free to holders of a current UMBC ID.

Telephone
General Music information: 410-455-2942
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Department of Music website: http://www.umbc.edu/music
Lisa Cella page: http://www.umbc.edu/music/site/faculty/cella.html

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
No images are available for this event.

###

Posted by dwinds1

Writer Linda Weintraub to Lead Creative Process Workshop at UMBC

On March 5th, UMBC's InterArts Program presents writer, curator and educator Linda Weintraub, who will conduct a mind-bending hands-on workshop on exploring the creative process. Admission is free. 8 p.m., University Center Ballroom.

UMBC's InterArts Program presents writer, curator and educator LindaWeintraub, who will conduct a mind-bending hands-on workshop onexploring the creative process.

Linda Weintraub served as Henry R. LuceProfessor of Emerging Arts at Oberlin College from 2000-2003. Weintraub isalso a Contributor to the international art journal Tema Celeste and the author ofIn The Making: Creative Options for Contemporary Artists (2003),Art on the Edge and Over: Searching for Art's Meaning in ContemporarySociety (1995, Insights Press). The exhibition Is It Art? wasmounted in conjunction with the book and toured nationally from 1995 and1997. From 1982 to 1993, Weintraub served as the first director of theEdith C. Blum Art Institute located on the Bard College campus where sheoriginated fifty exhibitions and published over twenty catalogues. She iscurator and co-author of Lo and Behold: Visionary Art in thePost-Modern Era, Process and Product: The Making of EightContemporary Masterworks, Landmarks: New Site Proposals by TwentyPioneers of Environmental Art, Art What Thou Eat: Images of Food inAmerican Art, and The Maximal Implications of the Minimal Line.Since leaving Bard College, Weintraub co-curated an internationallytouring exhibition entitled Animal. Anima. Animus with MarkettaSepalla and The Art of Body Crafting. Prior to her appointment atBard College, Ms. Weintraub was the Director of the Muhlenberg College artgallery. She has taught both contemporary art history and studio art andholds a Master of Fine Arts degree from Rutgers University.

Admission
Admission is free.

Telephone
General InterArts information: 410-455-3190
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the University Center.

From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the University Center.

From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the University Center.

Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
No images are available for this event.

###

Posted by dwinds1

February 5, 2003

Phoenix Dance Company Performs at UMBC

Carol Hess and Doug Hamby will premiere new work at Phoenix Dance Company's concert at UMBC February 12 through 15.

Carol Hess and Doug Hamby will premiere new work at Phoenix Dance Company's concert at UMBC February 12 through 15.

Hess' new work involves the intricate manipulation of sounds, as movements by dancers Mandi Brown, Evan Davidson and Pamela Stevens interact with a "wired" setpiece to create layers of random sounds that include rings, buzzes and beeps from telephones and cell phones. Underlying these sounds is a score by UMBC music department chair Linda Dusman entitled Sorry, Your Call Did Not Go Through, a mixture of voice messages from telephone answering machines. Onstage will be an array of speakers, enabling the voice messages to come from various locations in space.

Interplay by Doug Hamby is a quartet which enlivens and intertwines the rich physical, temporal and spatial connections between the performers.

The program also includes Hess' Private Property (1995), a "duet" for dancer and cameraperson to music by UMBC music professor Stuart Saunders Smith. The dancer's movements are captured by the camera, then manipulated and projected onto a large screen onstage. The piece, performed by Pamela Stevens and Nick Prevas, alludes to issues of privacy and surveillance.

Bonds, an excerpt from Four Gestures (2002) by Hess, features three dancers who explore different interactions through inventive partnering. The dancers themselves (Mandi Brown, Evan Davidson, Eileen Mitchell) capture the piece on camera, using a variety of hand-held camera techniques. The images of the live performance are mixed (live) with an unusual combination of images of Ground Zero and nature, with a music score by Dusman.

Artist-in-Residence Jeanine Dunning contributes Part One Parting, a solo performed by Sandra Lacy, with original electronic music by composer Chris Peck. Structured like a short story, Part One Parting follows a woman who recalls an event in her life over and over again. In this episodic solo, the dream-like sequences reflect the ideaof memory and how we remember and re-experience events.

A professional company in residence at UMBC, Phoenix is co-directed by Hess and Hamby. Operating at the intersection between art and technology, the Phoenix Dance Company has explored radical dance collaborations with UMBC videographers, mechanical engineers, computer programmers and visual artists. Founded in 1983, Phoenix Dance Company has played in venues such as the Kennedy Center, Lincoln Center, the Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore Theatre Project, Ohio State University, Judson Church, Goucher College, McDaniel College, Salisbury University and Temple University.

All performances will be held at 8 p.m. in the UMBC Theatre. Admission is $15 general and $7 students/seniors. For more information and reservations call (410) 455-6240.

Posted by dwinds1

February 4, 2003

Interface Ensemble to Perform at UMBC

On Wednesday, February 26th at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall, InterArts and the Department of Music's Contemporary Concerts Series present interface, an electronic performance ensemble consisting of composer Curtis Bahn and Dan Trueman, and dancer Tomie Hahn. They will present an evening of electronic music and multi-media performance.

interfaceOn Wednesday, February 26th at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall, InterArts and the Department ofMusic's Contemporary Concerts Series present interface,an electronic performance ensemble consisting of composers Curtis Bahn and Dan Trueman, and dancerTomie Hahn. They will presentan evening of electronic music and multi-media performance featuring Pikapika, an interactive dance performance by Bahn and Hahn, and BoSSA Nova,a new iteration of Trueman's award winning bowed sphericalspeaker. Bahn is a professor of interactive music performance and directorof the iEAR studios at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute;Trueman is professor of music composition at Princeton University; and Hahn isassistant professor of music at Tufts University.

About interface
The interactive computer music improvisation duo interface creates sonic textures ranging from delicate imperceptible noise to a high energy wall of sound. They have extended, surrounded, and obscured their electric stringed instruments with a variety of technologies, creating an organic, gesturally powerful computer music. Curtis Bahn plays the SBass, a 5-string "vertical bass" (like an acoustic bass with no body) fitted with electrical pickups, motion, touch and pressure sensors which allow him to "drive" his computer during performance. Dan Trueman plays a 6-string electric violin and an electric bow of his own design; the RBow is a normal violin bow covered with motion and pressure sensors that send performance information to Trueman's computer performance system.

Their instruments are dynamic, changing constantly from performance to performance and within performances. Recently, they have begun to integrate spherical speaker arrays, which radiate sound in all directions, into their performance set-up. Interface has a commitment to free-improvisation and electronic music composition. They create real-time sonic environments in performance which combine pre-composed electronic sounds with real-time digital signal processing, synthesis, algorithmic composition, and sampling.

Tomie HahnInterface is often joined by dancer Tomie Hahn (as in this event) performing interactive dance/electronic music compositions Streams and Pikapika done in collaboration with Curtis Bahn. Hahn received her Ph.D. in ethnomusicology from Wesleyan University in 1997. She began studying nihon buyo (Japanese traditional dance) in Tokyo at the age of four and received her natori (professional stage title) Samie Tachibana in 1989. Hahn also teaches and performs the shakuhachi (Japanese bamboo flute). Her current research spans a variety of topics from nihon buyo, Monster Truck rallies, issues of identity and creative expression of multiracial individuals, and gestural controllers as an interactive performance media. Hahn performs regularly, including traditional Japanese dance, contemporary performance art, and shakuhachi.

Other collaborators with interface include Perry Cook on "DigitalDoo," Monica Mugan Wacom Tablet Performer, Nick Fortunato, Erin Seymour, Luke DuBois and Mark McNamara.

Interface has performed throughout the Northeast and abroad, recently appearing at Engine 27, Tonic, the New York Interactive Music Festival at the Kitchen sponsored by Columbia University, the International Computer Music Festival in Thessaloniki, Greece, and the Society for Electroacoustic Music in the U.S. festival (SEAMUS). They have given lectures and concerts at major academic institutions including Princeton, Peabody, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, the MIT Media Lab, and the Computer Music Center of Columbia University and presented their novel approaches to sonic display and gestural musical control at ICMC, CHI2001 and the ASA national conference.

Admission
Admission is free

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Department of Music website: http://www.umbc.edu/music
Department of Dance website: http://www.umbc.edu/dance
interface website: http://www.arts.rpi.edu/crb/interface/interface.htm
Clip of Pikapika (15 Mb): http://www.arts.rpi.edu/crb/interface/examplemedia/pikapika_med.mov

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

###

Posted by dwinds1

February 3, 2003

UMBC's InterArts Program Presents Theatre Artist Ping Chong

On February 19th at 8 p.m. in the Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery, UMBC's InterArts Program presents Ping Chong, one of America's most renowned contemporary theatre artists, who will present a slide-show lecture on his work.

UMBC's InterArts Program presents PingChong, one of America's most renowned contemporary theatreartists, who will present a slide-show lecture on his work. Ping Chong wasborn in 1946 and raised in the Chinatown section of New York City. Hestudied film-making and graphic design at the School of Visual Arts andthe Pratt Institute. Ping Chong began his theatrical career as a member ofMeredith Monk's The HouseFoundation. He collaborated with her on several major works includingThe TravelogueSeries and The Games, forwhich they shared the Outstanding Achievement in Music Theatre Award in1986. In 1972, Ping Chong gathered a group of artists at Meredith Monk'sloft in New York City to create Lazarus, hisfirst independent theatre work. Since then, he has created over fiftymajor works for the stage, including Humboldt'sCurrent (Obie Award, 1977), A.M./A.M. - TheArticulated Man (Villager Award, 1982), Nosferatu(Maharam Design Award, 1985), Angels ofSwedenborg (1985), Kind Ness (USAPlaywrights' Award, 1988), Brightness,which garnered two 1990 Bessie Awards, Deshima, Chinoiserieand AfterSorrow. In 1998 he created Kwaidan, hisfirst full-length puppetry work, in collaboration with Jon Ludwig andMitsuru Ishii. His work has been performed at such major New York venuesas The Brooklyn Academy of Music's Next Wave Festival, The Joyce Theatre,La MaMa E.T.C., St. Clement's Theatre and The Central Park Summerstage, aswell as at major museums, theatres and festivals in North America, Europeand Asia. In recent years he has expanded the range of his explorations toinclude video and visual arts installations.

Admission
Admission is free.

Telephone
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.

From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.

From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Albin O. Kuhn Library.

Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

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Posted by dwinds1

UMBC Department of Music Presents Cellist Franklin Cox

A cellist of international renown, Franklin Cox will present music of J.S. Bach, Elliott Carter, Mark Osborn, Thomas DeLio, Claus-Steffen Mahnkopf and the performer. Saturday, March 1st, 2003, 8 p.m., Fine Arts Recital Hall.

Franklin CoxOn Saturday, March 1st at 8 p.m. in the Fine Arts Recital Hall, the UMBC Department of Music's Faculty Recital Series presents cellist Franklin Cox in a program of contemporary and Baroque music.

Biography
Franklin Cox has performed in numerous festivals and new music ensembles, including the Indiana University New Music Ensemble, the Group for Contemporary Music, and SONOR, as well as at the 1980 and 1982 Spoleto Festivals, the 1983 Banff Summer Chamber Music Festival, the Xenakis Festival and Darmstadt RevisitedFestival at UCSD, and at the DarmstadtFestival since 1988, where he received a special citation for celloperformance in 1990. He received a Bachelor of Music degree in compositionfrom Indiana University, a Master ofArts degree in composition from Columbia University, and a Ph.D. incomposition at the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Cox hasstudied with BrianFerneyhough, RogerReynolds, JojiYuasa, StevenSuber, Fred Fox, HarveySollberger, FredLerdahl, and JackBeeson. He received an Alice M. Ditson Scholarship and DissertationFellowship at Columbia University,Regent's Fellowship and a Dissertation Research Fellowship for OutstandingResearch at UCSD, a full scholarship to the 1990 June in BuffaloFestival, and full scholarships for the 1988 and 1992 Darmstadt Festivals.He was awarded a Stipendium Fellowship at the 1990 Darmstadt Festival, won2nd prize in the Los Angeles Arts Commission competition in the spring of1991, and was co-winner of the Kranichsteiner Musikpreis (highest awardfor composition) in the 1992 Darmstadt Festival.

Franklin Cox is presently co-editor of a book series, New Music and Aesthetics in the 21st Century, published by Wolke Verlag, focusing on current issues in contemporary music. He is also the American representative in yearly international colloquium, The Fundamental Principles of Present-Day Composition, at Schloss Solitude in Stuttgart.

The Program
Franklin Cox's program, dedicated to the memory of composer Mark Osborn, will include:

  • Figment (1994) by Elliott Carter
  • Transparent Wave V by Thomas DeLio
  • Vice (1999) for cello and tape by Mark Osborn
  • Shift (1992-94), for five cellists (version for solo cello and four taped celli) by Franklin Cox
  • Recoil (1994) by Franklin Cox
  • The Courier's Tragedy (world premiere) by Claus-Steffen Mahnkopf
  • Cello Suite in D Minor by J. S. Bach.

Claus-Steffen MahnkopfSpecial Note
The composer Claus-Steffen Mahnkopf, whose work The Courier's Tragedy will be premiered, will be in attendance. He will present a special lecture on his work on March 14 at 1 pm at the Department of Music, Fine Arts Building. Admission to his lecture is free. A native of Mannheim, Mahnkopf teaches at the Staatlichen Hochschule für Musik Freiburg and has served on the faculty of the Darmstädter Ferienkurse. He is co-editor and founder of the Gesellschaft für Musik & Ästehtik. A winner of the Gaudeamus Prize, he is the author of numerous works for chamber ensemble and soloists.

Admission
General admission: $7.00.
Students and seniors: $3.00.
Admission is free to holders of a current UMBC ID.

Telephone
General Music information: 410-455-2942
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Department of Music website: http://www.umbc.edu/music
Franklin Cox page: http://www.umbc.edu/music/site/faculty/cox.html

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.

Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

The image file for this event: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/music/eg/cox.jpg (617 Kb jpg file).

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Posted by dwinds1

January 24, 2003

Phoenix Dance Company Performs at UMBC

UMBC's Department of Dance presents the Phoenix Dance Company in concert on February 12, 13, 14, and 15, 2003. All performances will be held at 8 p.m. in the UMBC Theatre. The venerable Phoenix Dance Company, founded in 1983, has played in venues such as the Kennedy Center, Lincoln Center, the Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore Theatre Project, Ohio State University, Judson Church, Goucher College, Western Maryland College, Salisbury University and Temple University. A professional company in residence at UMBC, Phoenix is co-directed by choreographers Carol Hess and Doug Hamby.

Phoenix Dance CompanyUMBC's Department of Dance presents the Phoenix Dance Company in concert on February 12, 13, 14, and 15, 2003. All performances will be held at 8 p.m. in the UMBC Theatre.

About the Phoenix Dance Company
The venerable Phoenix Dance Company, founded in 1983, has played in venues such as the Kennedy Center, Lincoln Center, the Baltimore Museum of Art, Baltimore Theatre Project, Ohio State University, Judson Church, Goucher College, Western Maryland College, Salisbury University and Temple University. A professional company in residence at UMBC, Phoenix is co-directed by choreographers Carol Hess and Doug Hamby.

Operating at the intersection between art and technology, the Phoenix Dance Company has explored radical dance collaborations with UMBC videographers, mechanical engineers, computer programmers and visual artists, recently including Steve Bradley, an intermedia artist who has generated live computer-enhanced video images and a system for generating sounds based on dancers' movements; Tony Farquhar, a mechanical engineer who developed a spunky six-legged dancing robot (Maurice Tombé); Vin Grabill, an MIT-trained videographer; and composer Linda Dusman.

Phoenix Dance CompanyThe Program
Featured on the program are the following works:

  • Private Property (1995) by Carol Hess, a "duet" for dancer and cameraperson to music by Stuart Saunders Smith. The dancer's movements are captured by the camera, then manipulated and projected onto a large screen onstage. The piece, performed by Pamela Stevens and Nick Prevas, alludes to issues of privacy and surveillance.
  • Bonds, an excerpt from Four Gestures by Carol Hess, which premiered in 2002. In this section, three dancers explore different interactions through inventive partnering. The dancers themselves (Mandi Brown, Evan Davidson, Eileen Mitchell) capture the piece on camera, using a variety of hand-held camera techniques. The images of the live performance are mixed (live) with an unusual combination of images of Ground Zero and nature. The music score is by composer Linda Dusman.
  • A new work by Carol Hess for three dancers (Mandi Brown, Evan Davidson, Pamela Stevens) that involves intricate manipulation of sounds, as the dancers' movements interact with a "wired" setpiece to create layers of random sounds that include rings, buzzes and beeps from telephones and cellphones. Underlying these sounds is a score by Linda Dusman entitled Sorry, Your Call Did Not Go Through, a mixture of voice messages from telephone answering machines. Onstage will be an array of speakers, enabling the voice messages to come from various locations in space.
  • The premiere of a new work by Doug Hamby entitled Interplay. In this quartet, the dance enlivens and intertwines the rich physical, temporal and spatial connections between the performers.
  • Part One Parting, a solo choreographed by Jeanine Durning and performed by Sandra Lacy, with original electronic music by composer Chris Peck. Structured like a short story, Part One Parting follows a woman who recalls an event in her life over and over again. In this episodic solo, the dream-like sequences reflect the idea of memory and how we remember and re-experience events.

Principal Choreographers and Dancer
Choreographer and artistic director Carol Hess received a B.A. from Barnard College and an M.A. from Columbia University. Before coming to Maryland, she danced professionally in New York City, where she performed and taught in hundreds of public schools through the Young Audiences Programs and Residencies in the Schools and the Lincoln Center Touring Program. She has performed with Hannah Kahn and Dancers, the Rondo Dance Theatre, the Janet Soares Company, and as a tap soloist she has appeared on television and in concerts in the United States and Europe. As Artistic Director of the Oregon Dance Theatre, Ms. Hess, in partnership with the Carpenter Foundation, initiated a series of program and workshops in schools, in which nearly fifty schools participated. As associate professor of dance, Ms. Hess has taught at UMBC since 1982 and is currently chair of the Department of Dance, where she also directs Project REACH, an outreach program to Baltimore City and Baltimore County elementary, middle and high schools.

Doug Hamby lives and works in the Baltimore-Washington, D.C. area. He has extensive experience as a dancer, chroeographer, and educator. In addition to his work with the Phoenix Dance Company, he is the artistic director of Doug Hamby Dance, a professional dance company in residence at UMBC. Recent collaborators include artist Timothy Nohe, intermedia artist Steve Bradley, video artist Deborah Gorski, and mechanical engineer Tony Farquhar. Hamby has performed with Martha Graham, May O'Donnell, Rachel Lampert, Elizabeth Keen, Pearl Lang, Norman Walker, the Chicago Moving Company, Phoenix Dance Company, and Hamby and Lacy. His works have been featured at Dance Place, Washington, D.C.; Riverside Dance Festival, Lincoln Center Out-of-Doors, and Celebrate Brooklyn, in New York City; the 1998 New York International Fringe Festival; 1997 Philadelphia Fringe Festival; and 1996 International Fringe Festivals in Edinburgh, Scotland and Vancouver, Canada. He has received choreography awards from the National Endowment for the Arts, Maryland State Arts Council, New York State Council on the Arts, Arts Council of Montgomery County, Maryland, and the Baltimore Mayor's Advisory Committee on Art and Culture. He served as a dance advisory panelist for the Maryland State Arts Council for three years. He is an associate professor of dance at UMBC and holds an MFA in Dance from Temple University and a Biology degree from Michigan State University. He has also appeared on national television as a giant slice of American cheese.

Principal dancer Sandra Lacy has been the recipient of three Maryland State Arts Council Individual Artist Awards in Solo Dance Performance. She holds a B.A. in psychology and is an Associate of the Royal Academy of Dance in London. She has performed with Maryland Ballet, Impetus Dance Company, Path Dance Company, Lacy & Shade, and the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company. Ms. Lacy is on the faculty of UMBC and the Baltimore School for the Arts.

Admission
General admission: $15.00.
Students and seniors: $7.00.
Box Office: 410-455-6240

Telephone
Box Office: 410-455-6240
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
UMBC Department of Dance website: http://www.umbc.edu/dance

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

###

Posted by dwinds1

UMBC Department of Music Presents Its Spring 2003 Concert Season

The UMBC Department of Music presents its spring 2003 concert season, featuring an array of contemporary classical music performances by world renowned artists. Among the major events is Music of Japan Today 2003, the largest festival and symposium of contemporary Japanese music in the United States.

The UMBC Department of Music presents its spring 2003 concert season, featuring an array of contemporary classical music performances by world renowned artists. Among the major events is Music of Japan Today 2003, the largest festival and symposium of contemporary Japanese music in the United States.

Professional Artists Series

February 14
The Department of Music presentscomposer Claus-SteffenMahnkopf, who will lecture on his works. A native of Mannheim,Mahnkopf teaches at the Staatlichen Hochschule für Musik Freiburg andhas served on the faculty of the Darmstädter Ferienkurse. He isco-editor and founder of the Gesellschaft für Musik &Ästehtik. A winner of the Gaudeamus Prize, he is the author ofnumerous works for chamber ensemble and soloists. A new work, TheCourier's Tragedy, will be premiered at UMBC on February 16th byFranklin Cox.
1 pm, location to be announced.
Free admission.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

Franklin CoxFebruary 16
The Department of Music's FacultyRecital Series presents cellist Franklin Cox. His program will includeTransparent Wave V by Thomas DeLio;Vice for cello and tape by MarkOsborn; Shift, for five cellists (version for solo cello andfour taped celli) by Franklin Cox; the world premiere of The Courier'sTragedy by Claus-SteffenMahnkopf; and Time and Motion Study II for cello and liveelectronics by BrianFerneyhough. Franklin Cox has performed in numerous festivals and newmusic ensembles, including the Indiana University New Music Ensemble, theGroup for Contemporary Music,and SONOR,as well as at the 1980 and 1982 Spoleto Festivals, the 1983 Banff SummerChamber Music Festival, the Xenakis Festival and Darmstadt RevisitedFestival at UCSD, and at the DarmstadtFestival since 1988, where he received a special citation for celloperformance in 1990. He received a Bachelor of Music degree in compositionfrom Indiana University, a Master ofArts degree in composition from Columbia University, and a PhD. incomposition at the University of California, San Diego. Dr. Cox hasstudied with BrianFerneyhough, RogerReynolds, JojiYuasa, StevenSuber, Fred Fox, HarveySollberger, FredLerdahl, and JackBeeson. He received an Alice M. Ditson Scholarship and DissertationFellowship at Columbia University,Regent's Fellowship and a Dissertation Research Fellowship for OutstandingResearch at UCSD, a full scholarship to the 1990 June in BuffaloFestival, and full scholarships for the 1988 and 1992 Darmstadt Festivals.He was awarded a Stipendium Fellowship at the 1990 Darmstadt Festival, won2nd prize in the Los Angeles Arts Commission competition in the spring of1991, and was co-winner of the Kranichsteiner Musikpreis (highest awardfor composition) in the 1992 Darmstadt Festival.
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with aUMBC ID.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

February 26
InterArts and the Department ofMusic's Contemporary Concerts Series present interface, an electronic performance ensembleconsisting of composer CurtisBahn and DanTrueman, and dancer TomieHahn. They will present an evening of electronic music and multi-mediaperformance featuring Pikapika,an interactive dance performance by Bahn and Hahn, and BoSSA Nova,a new iteration of Trueman's award winning bowed sphericalspeaker. Bahn and Trueman create sonic textures ranging from delicateimperceptible noise to a high energy wall of sound. They have extended,surrounded, and obscured their electric stringed instruments with avariety of technologies, creating an organic, gesturally powerful computermusic. Bahn is a professor of interactive music performance and directorof the iEAR studios at Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute;Trueman is professor of music composition at Princeton University; and Hahn isprofessor of performance ethnology at Rensselaer. (To view a 15MB clip ofPikapika, click here.)
Free admission.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

March 2
The Department of Music's FacultyRecital Series presents flutist Lisa Cella with pianist Sandra Brown. Theprogram will include SergeiProkofiev's Sonata in D Major, Op. 94, for flute and piano; Kaija Saariaho's NoaNoa forflute and electronics; AnneLaBerge's Rollin' for solo amplified flute; Paul Koonce'sEscape Tone for solo flute; and PierreBoulez's Sonatine for flute and piano. Lisa Cella holds a DMA incontemporary flute performance from the University of California, San Diego. Shehas performed with SONOR,the faculty ensemble of UCSD, SIRIUS, and in various concert series andfestivals in the San Diego area. She is the executive director of SanDiego New Music as well as a founding member of NOISE, the residentensemble of San Diego New Music. A dedicated performer of contemporarymusic, she was a member of the Baltimore-based contemporary ensemblePolaris in 1993 and receive her Master of Music degree and a GraduatePerformance Diploma from the PeabodyConservatory.
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with aUMBC ID.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

March 6
The Department of Music'sContemporary Concerts Series presents bassist Michael Cameron. Cameron has premiered dozensof solo and chamber works for bass by such composers as BenJohnston, VioletaDinescu, YehudaYannay, Herbert Brün,Allan Segall, ErikLund, and many others, and he has also performed many Americanpremieres of works by Sir Peter MaxwellDavies (later broadcast nationwide on NPR's "PerformanceToday"), SofiaGubaidulina, and LucianoBerio. He has also worked with composers GeorgePerle and HelmutLachenmann in adapting their solo cello works for the double bass.Cameron is the author of several articles for The Double Bassist and American StringTeacher, has contributed a chapter to the Syllabus of RecommendedChamber Music for Bassists (published by the Yehudi Menuhin School inLondon), and he is chair of the string division of the University of Illinois School ofMusic. Cameron was a featured guest artist and lecturer at the 1990,1995, and 1997 InternationalSociety of Bassists conventions, as well as at the Cincinnati SummerBass School and several Midwest international band and orchestra clinics.
Free admission.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

March 20
The Department of Music'sContemporary Concerts series presents percussionist Jonas Larsson in a program featuringPrism (1994) by ThomasLiljeholm, Dad's time had come (2001) by Stuart SaundersSmith, Slideshow (2002) by Fredrik Österlin, VibraphoneMusic (No. 1) (2002) by J. Fredric Bergström, andDi-remption (1992) by Franklin Cox.Recognized as one of Sweden's most important percussionists, Larssonstudied at Göteborg University and is the founder and director of thecontemporary music ensemble Gageego!.He tours widely in Europe and the United States as a soloist.
Free admission.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

April 2
The Department of Music presentsRuckus, the professional new musicensemble in residence at UMBC.
Free admission.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.


April 4 - 6
Music of Japan Today 2003 Festival and Symposium

The Department of Music'sContemporary Concerts series presents Music of Japan Today 2003. This weekendfestival and symposium will bring prominent Japanese composers ToshiIchiyanagi, Joji Yuasa,AkiraNishimura, and TokuhideNiimi to the Baltimore-Washington area. Festival activities include acompetition for performers of contemporary Japanese music, a symposium forscholars, and performances by Ruckus,the faculty contemporary ensemble in residence at UMBC (Lisa Cella,flute; E.Michael Richards, clarinet; TomGoldstein, percussion; and Franklin Cox,cello); joined by guest artists).

Major events include:

April 4
An electronic/computer music concert featuring Patterns of Plant (1997) by Mamoru Fujieda, Iridescent Uncertainty (1999) by Steven Kazuo Takasugi, two major works (to be announced) by Joji Yuasa, Funakakushi by Toshi Ichiyanagi, and other works.
4 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.

April 4
Ruckus, the professional music ensemble in residence at UMBC, in concert. The program will include Cosmos Haptic II (1989) by Joji Yuasa, The Soul Bird (1996) and Ohju (1987) by Tokuhide Niimi, Perspective (1986) by Toshi Ichiyanagi, and a new work (2003) and Organums (1989) by Akira Nishimura.
7:30 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.

April 5
A student concert featuring Calling Together (1971), Questions (1978) and Mutterings (1989) by Joji Yuasa; Sapporo (1963), Music for Electric Metronomes (1968) and Stanzas (1961) by Toshi Ichiyanagi; and Melos II (1999) by Tokuhide Niimi.
4 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.

April 5
Ruckus, the professional music ensemble in residence at UMBC, in concert. The program will include Cloud Atlas X (1999) and Cosmic Harmony (1995) by Toshi Ichiyanagi, Duologue for Timpani and Piano (1996) by Akira Nishimura, Terms of Temporal Detailing (1989) and A Winter Day: Homage to Basho (1981) by Joji Yuasa, and Kazane (1989) by Tokuhide Niimi.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.

April 6
Ruckus, the professional music ensemble in residence at UMBC, in concert. Program to be announced.
4 pm, Freer Gallery of Art, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, D.C.

Admission to all events to be announced.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

April 9
InterArts and the Department ofMusic's Contemporary Concerts series present composer PaulKoonce. An internationally recognized composer and softwaredeveloper, Koonce has a reputation for creating short but memorable piecesthat open ears and excite audiences. Koonce will play recent compositions,discuss the ideas behind them, and conclude with a demonstration andperformance of his most recent work with data gloves, virtual instruments,and new performance media. His remarks will focus on the challenge ofworking in a medium in which the performer is often absent. Koonce hasreceived grants and honors from the Guggenheim Foundation, McKnightFoundation, ASCAP, Bourges Institute International Competition ofElectroacoustic Music,1st International Electroacoustic Music Competitionof Sao Paulo, Prix Ars Electronica, Luigi Russolo InternationalCompetition for Composers of Electronic Music, and commissions from theInternational Computer Music Association Commission and the National FluteAssociation Young Artists Competition. Koonce's music has been performedat International Computer Music Conferences (Beijing, Ann Arbor, SanJosé, Delphi, and Thessaloniki), Synthese '99 (Bourges), Santa FeInternational Festival of Electro-Acoustic Music, University of Illinois,BEAST Murmurs Festival of Electroacoustic Music (Birmingham, UK), 5thInternational Acousmatic Festival (Brussels, Belgium), Walker Art Center(Minneapolis, Minnesota), SEAMUS Conference (Dartmouth University;Birmingham, Alabama; Ithaca, NY; and Kansas City), Sonic Circuits IIIFestival of Electronic Music, College Music Society, Darmstadt Festivalfor New Music. He is author of PVC, a phase-vocoder based, signalprocessing software package (UNIX). Koonce is currently on the faculty ofPrinceton University.
Free admission.
8 pm, Fine Arts Studio 508.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

May 4
The Department of Music's FacultyRecital Series presents alto saxophonist Anjan Shah and pianist Rachel Franklin. Their program will include theSonata, Op. 29 by RobertMuczynski; Caprice en forme de valse by Paul Bonneau;Prelude, Cadence et Finale by Alfred Desenclos; Fantasia byRonaldo Miranda;Ludington Woods by DominicDousa; and Divertimento by AkiraYuyama. Anjan Shah is an alto saxophonist who has appeared throughoutthe United States, Canada, and Europe as both a soloist and clinician withthe United States Army Field Band, Washington, D.C. Having earned aBachelor's Degree in Applied Saxophone from Michigan State University anda Master of Music Degree in Saxophone Performance from the University ofIllinois, Mr. Shah currently teaches saxophone at the Baltimore School forthe Arts, Goucher College (Baltimore, MD) and the University of Maryland(Baltimore County). He is a contributing writer for InstrumentalMagazine and frequently conducts master classes throughout themid-Atlantic region. Mr. Shah has performed regularly with the BaltimoreSymphony Orchestra in its SuperPops concert series under the direction ofMarvin Hamlisch. Additionally, Mr. Shah has worked with such musicalluminaries as Natalie Cole, Maureen McGovern, Sandy Duncan, Peter Nero,Jack Jones and the Jimmy Dorsey Orchestra. As a Pro Musicis InternationalAward winner, British pianist Rachel Franklin has given her solo debuts inCarnegie Recital Hall, New York, and Jordan Hall, Boston. The BostonGlobe enthused about her "beautiful differentiations of color,touch and texture" and described a performance on her solo debut CDas "not inferior...to the recorded performances by Cortot andRubinstein." She has also given European Pro Musicis solo debuts inParis and Rome. She has been featured on NPR's Performance Today, with whom she hasgiven frequent spoken broadcasts. She gives courses and lectures for manyorganizations including the Smithsonian Associates Program, the BaltimoreSymphony Orchestra, the Annapolis Symphony Orchestra and the LevineSchool.
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
$7 general admission, $3 seniors, free for students, free with aUMBC ID.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

May 7
InterArts presents the SlantPerformance Group. Described as "Bizarre yetdelightful" by The New York Times, this male trio develops andpresents unique works of theatre. Their initial work, Big Dicks, AsianMen was premiered in 1995 to critical acclaim at New York's La MamaE.T.C. Since then, Slant has performed at venues such as Painted Bride,the Belgrade Experimental Theater Festival, Theater Artaud, and at overfour dozen colleges and universities across the United States. Theirperformance at UMBC will feature A Slanted Musical Kaleidoscope, a60-minute set of audience favorite excerpts from their repertory,including satirical scenes from the live theatrical show Big Dicks,Asian Men, their hit pop romantic song I'm in Love With ConnieChung, operatic puppetry between an all-star cast of dueling liquorbottles, the Accent Elimination theme song, and much morewackiness, comedy and parody.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

Student Recital Series

February 7
The Department of Music presentsthe Jubilee Singers directed by JaniceJackson. In celebration of Black History Month, the ensemble'sperformance will present the history of Spirituals.
12 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

February 21
The Department of Music presentsthe UMBC Jazz Ensemble directed by LafayetteGilchrist in an improv session.
1 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Admission is free.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

March 8
The Department of Music presentsthe UMBC Gospel Choir under the directionof JaniceJackson.
Admission to be announced.
7 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

March 16
The Department of Music presentsthe UMBC Symphony Orchestra under thedirection of WayneCameron. The program features the Symphony No. 3 by Amy Beach, and UMBC student concerto competition winners Ann Lentz, flute, and Daniel Macintyre, clarinet.
Free admission.
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

April 7
The Department of Music presentsthe UMBC Jazz Ensemble in an improvsession under the direction of LafayetteGilchrist.
Free admission.
1 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

April 24
The Department of Music presentsthe UMBC Jazz Ensemble in an big bandsession under the direction of LafayetteGilchrist.
Free admission.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

April 30
The Department of Music presentsthe UMBC Concert Choir under the directionof AyaUeda.
Free admission.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

May 2
The Department of Music presentsthe UMBC Saxophone Quartet.
Free admission.
7 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

May 3
The Department of Music presentsthe Jubilee Singers under the direction ofJaniceJackson.
Free admission.
7 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

May 5
The Department of Music presentsthe UMBC Chamber Players.
Free admission.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
For more information, call 410-455-MUSC.

May 8
The Department of Music presentsthe Maryland Camerata under the directionof AyaUeda.
Free admission.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.


May 11
The Department of Music presentsthe UMBC Symphony under the direction ofWayneCameron.
Free admission.
3 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

May 12
The Department of Music presentsthe Percussion/African Drumming Ensembleunder the direction of Barry Dove.
Free admission.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

May 14
The Department of Music presentsthe UMBC New Music Emsemble.
Free admission.
8 pm, Fine Arts Recital Hall.
Public information: 410-455-MUSC.

Additional Information

Telephone
Public information: (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
General Department of Music information: 410-455-2942
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC Arts News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
Department of Music website: http://www.umbc.edu/music

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building.
Evening parking is available in Lot 16, adjacent to the Fine Arts Building, for 50. Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

###

Posted by dwinds1

January 21, 2003

"Nayland Blake: Some Kind of Love: Performance Video 1989-2002" at the Center for Art and Visual Culture

A retrospective of work by Nayland Blake, whose work addresses issues of race and sexuality, opens at UMBC's Center for Art and Visual Culture with a public lecture by Blake (3:30 p.m.) and reception (5 p.m.) on February 7. "Some Kind of Love: Performance Video 1989-2002," runs through March 22, 2003.

A retrospective of work by Nayland Blake, whose work addresses issues of race and sexuality, opens at UMBC's Center for Art and Visual Culture with a public lecture by Blake (3:30 p.m.) and reception (5 p.m.) on February 7. Some Kind of Love: Performance Video 1989-2002, runs through March 22, 2003.

The exhibition will combine works from the past thirteen years of Blake's performance-based installations and includes several large-scale environments, objects and videos. Historically researched and often literary-inspired, Blake explores complicated and subtly mixed concepts such as identity, race, relationships, and representation. Some of his work incorporates playful and subversive images linked to childhood.

David Deitcher writes in the exhibition catalogue, "[for almost twenty years] Nayland Blake's sculptural installations and performances have revealed a wide range of interests, from popular culture to vanguard subversion; from Camp to the queer body in the age of AIDS; from Sadean and psychoanalytic texts to the toxic legacy of American racism. Like so many American artists whose work has emerged during the 1990s, Blake's projects have often dealt with identity, which they envision as a compound process rather than a fait accompli."

Blake, a native of New York City, received his MFA at the California Institute of the Arts in 1984. He has had solo shows at the Matthew Marks Gallery in New York, the Contemporary Arts Museum of Houston, San Francisco Artspace, and other venues.

"Nayland Blake: Some Kind of Love: Performance Video 1989-2002" was organized by the Tang Teaching Museum and Art Gallery at Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York.

The Center for Art and Visual Culture (formerly the Fine Arts Gallery) is located on the first floor of the Fine Arts Building. CAVC hours are Tuesday through Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. For more information call (410) 455-3188. Click here for a schedule of upcoming visual arts events.

Posted by dwinds1

January 17, 2003

Choreographer Jeanine Durning in Concert

UMBC's InterArts and the Department of Dance present choreographer and dancer Jeanine Durning in a concert of modern dance on February 5, 2003, at 8 p.m. in the UMBC Theatre. Durning and her company will present her newest work, half URGE, for five dancers to an original sound score by New York Dance and Performance Award (Bessie) winner Douglas Henderson.

UMBC's InterArts and the Department of Dance present choreographer and dancer Jeanine Durning in a concert of modern dance on February 5, 2003, at 8 p.m. in the UMBC Theatre.

"One follows Durning trustingly into mysterious worlds without hesitation."
--Jennifer Dunning, The New York Times

The Program
Durning and her company will present her newest work, half URGE, for five dancers to an original sound score by New York Dance and Performance Award (Bessie) winner Douglas Henderson. The dance was inspired by a dream in which Durning was abandoned in an unnamed, desolate city that was crumbling and collapsing. She began by writing a series of narrative passages based on typical anxiety dreams -- for example: flying that turns into falling, swimming that turns into drowning, climbing stairs that suddenly collapse, being abandoned or losing one's way. The writings all referred to structures or constructs that are created to provide a sense of comfort and freedom, a sense of safety and stability that are then shifted against the initial desire. Allowing both the unconscious and conscious realms, the inner and outer worlds to seep into the process of choreographing, Durning created her work for five dancers from these writings.

In half URGE, Durning explores the human dynamic of desire and the attempts to fulfill those desires through relationships and interactions. Durning's interest in the effect that eventual instabilities in our structures of safety (whether psycho-emotional or tangible structures) have on our behavioral choices, on our relationships and the fulfillment of our desires dictated that the work be created using a less controlled choreographic structure. Improvisation was used to develop movement based around simple word ideas such as collapse or incomplete. Then, Durning allowed time for the dancers to investigate the words through movement, physical interaction and behavior. Through this process, she created a dance that amplifies our desire to control that which is inevitably beyond control.

half URGE will be performed by Jean Vitrano, Steffany George, Andrea Johnston, Molly Poerstel and Durning. Costumes are designed by Naoko Nagata.

About Jeanine Durning
Jeanine Durning has been choreographing and performing solo and group work since the early 1990s, and was dubbed by Jennifer Dunning of The New York Times as "a choreographer to watch for." Durning's choreography has been presented in New York at Dance Theater Workshop, at St. Mark's Church, Movement Research at Judson Church, Central Park SummerStage, among other venues, and as part of the Jacob's Pillow Inside/Out series. Her choreography has been recognized with commissions from the Jerome Foundation through Dance Theater Workshop's Bessie Schönberg/First Light Commissioning program and Danspace Project's Commissioning Initiative. She was one of four choreographers invited this past summer to The Yard to begin a new project entitled Houdini is Free.

Durning is dedicated to her ongoing research of movement, which has included over the years, but is not limited to, ballet, Release Technique, Alexander Technique, Pilates, Yoga and Contact Improvisation. She is interested in drawing from and bringing together those movement methodologies, as well as invited modalities in her work as a dancer/performer and in her work as a choreographer. Through her work, it is Durning's artistic mission to offer a multi-layered experience to the viewer in which boundaries of literal and linear interpretation are extended. As a performer, Durning was featured in the short film The Black Boots, written and directed by independent filmmaker Bridgit Murnane. Durning has had the pleasure of working with a number of choreographers whose work and processes have influenced her own, including Lance Gries, Roseanne Spradlin, Zvi Gotheiner, Wendy Perron, Dan Wagoner and David Dorfman (with whom she has participated in the collaborative process since 1993).

Durning has taught dance nationally to dancers and non-dancers alike, of many age ranges, and is often a guest teacher at Movement Research and Dance Space in New York. She is currently Artist-in-Residence at UMBC. Originally from Cornwall, New York, Durning began her dance studies, as a teenager, in tap and jazz at the local dance studio. She attended the Boston Conservatory for two years before continuing her studies at New York University's Tisch School for the Arts, where she received her BFA.

Admission
General admission: $15.00.
Students and seniors: $7.00.
Box Office: 410-455-6240

Telephone
Box Office: 410-455-6240
UMBC Artsline (24 hour recorded message): 410-455-ARTS
Media inquiries only: 410-455-3370

Web
UMBC Arts website: http://www.umbc.edu/arts
UMBC News Releases: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/oci/index.phtml?r=Art
UMBC Department of Dance website: http://www.umbc.edu/dance
This release as a pdf file: http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/releases/03spring/durning.pdf

Images for Media
High resolution images for media are available online:
http://www.umbc.edu/newsevents/arts/hi-res/ or by email or postal mail.

Directions
From Baltimore and points north, proceed south on I-95 to exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Fine Arts Building. From I-695, take Exit 12C (Wilkens Avenue) and continue one-half mile to the entrance of UMBC at the roundabout intersection of Wilkens Avenue and Hilltop Road. Turn left and follow signs to the Theatre.
From Washington and points south, proceed north on I-95 to Exit 47B. Take Route 166 toward Catonsville and then follow signs to the Theatre.
Daytime metered visitor parking is available in Lot 10, near the Administration Building. Visitor parking regulations are enforced on all University calendar days. Hilltop Circle and all campus roadways require a parking permit unless otherwise marked.

Online campus map: http://www.umbc.edu/aboutumbc/campusmap/

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Posted by dwinds1

Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery presents Massin in Continuo: A Dictionary

On view at UMBC's Albin O. Kuhn Library Gallery from January 30 through March 9, 2003, Massin in Continuo: A Dictionary is the first United States exhibition of the French graphic design art